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Mr. Robot is a show built on hacks. The mother of all hacks serves as the big cliffhanger at the end of the show's first season, and nearly every plot development leading up to it was nudged along by some kind of exploit. It’s rare to get through an episode without at least one digital intrusion, often drawn from real life. Each week, we'll be running throughMr. Robot's C Y B E R activities — who got hacked, why, and how much magic would be required to make them actually work. ...

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“Imagine Google Earth with TiVo capability.” That’s how the impressive, and very high-tech, one company's real-time surveillance system is sold to interested parties. In short, Big Brother is here, and as time goes on it’ll get only better at seeing everything you do. DON’T MISS:  iPhone 7: New leak may have just solved the only mystery left Mounted on a Cessna plane that can hover above a city around the clock, an array of wide-angle cameras produce 192-megapixel images of an area that measures roughly 30 square miles, constantly beaming the images down to hard drives that store them indefinitely. Sitting at their desks, analysts can sift through the available images and move backward and forward thorough time to search for clues that might help law enforcement. The system may not be able to identify a person, which measures about a pixel, and can’t magically read license plates numbers by simply magnifying a blurry image like you see in the movies. Instead, it’s able to track objects and identify patterns. Analysts can tell police what a person did after he or she killed or robbed someone, for example. They can track a getaway car to see where it stopped, and they can go back in time to see how it arrived at the crime scene in the first place. Police can then combine that data with street cameras and footage from other locations that offer local surveillance, giving them a better chance of apprehending suspects. This isn’t the plot of an Enemy of the State sequel. It’s actually happening in the US right now, with a privately funded program underway in Baltimore, Maryland. At $2 million per year, the program is cheaper than police helicopters and it could help out with the city’s aim of lowering crime rates. But in the wrong hands, the technology can be devastating, as it’s essentially invading the privacy of every individual in the city. In Bloomberg Businessweek’s massive expose , you’ll learn exactly how this type of surveillance came to be. It all started in Iraq for Persistent Surveillance Systems’ CEO Ross McNutt, where he provided a similar system that the Army could use to investigate bombings. Upon his return, he founded a private company that deals in professional surveillance. His object is to prevent crimes, and he says the system is designed in such a way that analysts looking at images would not be able to track targets for personal reasons, since everything is logged. However, as successful as the Baltimore project might be, it’s still something local police would not acknowledge. And something regular citizens might not appreciate because of the obvious privacy implications. If this type of spying sounds similar, that’s because law enforcement agencies have used similarly sophisticated surveillance systems mounted on planes in the recent past. Called StingRays, fake cell phone towers that can be installed on small plans can also help agencies spy on a community. And yes, before you ask, it appears that StingRays were also used in Baltimore as part of this new program. McNutt’s firm isn’t the only one selling surveillance to cities, and as camera and computer technologies evolve we’ll only see more advanced systems ready to track everything we do from up above. Bloomberg ’s story, complete with video, is available in full at this link . Definitely check it out.

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Want to try virtual reality for yourself but don't have hundreds of dollars to spend on an expensive headset? We have good news for you. According to Bloomberg , Oculus Rift demos ( which started in May ) will be featured in 500 Best Buy stores around the country by the time the holiday season rolls around this year. Best Buy CEO Hubert Joly, who called the technology "mind-boggling," is confident that the demos are going to be well-received by customers and believes VR "has the potential to contribute to our growth." SEE ALSO:  How I get a new iPhone for $125 a year In addition to the Rift, Best Buy will also host 200 PlayStation VR demos, which will rotate between locations throughout the season. The PlayStation VR is likely to be the first headset with mainstream appeal, especially considering the fact that PS VR players don't need a high-end gaming PC to play VR games. All they need is a PlayStation 4 and a PlayStation Camera. Virtual reality has had its fair share of early adopters, but giving the hardware a platform this large could change the way that the average consumer views the technology. After all, it's nearly impossible to explain to someone how far VR has come since over the past several years without letting them get their hands on it. Joly doesn't have any delusions that VR will be a massive hit in 2016. The technology is still being perfected, and the barriers to entry are still too daunting for many gamers. But with thousands of customers finally having the chance to experience VR for the very first time, this holiday could be the first step to virtual reality becoming mainstream in the coming months and years.

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The Note 7 is the first phone made with Gorilla Glass 5, but does this make it a tougher to break that the S7 Edge?

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SINGAPORE (AP) — The world's first self-driving taxis will be picking up passengers in Singapore starting Thursday.

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When Siri was originally released on the iPhone 4S back in 2011, the reviews were somewhat lukewarm. On the positive side, having an intelligent assistant baked into a massively popular smartphone was a huge leap forward. On the other hand, Siri didn’t always perform as advertised. Even more problematic was that Siri's feature set was purposefully stunted by Apple. In fact, the Siri Apple released in 2011 wasn’t even as capable as the Siri app that Siri’s original developers had previously released on the App Store. What’s more, it eventually became apparent that rival AI systems from the likes of Google were far superior than what Apple was bringing to the table. DON'T MISS:  Case maker claims the most intriguing new iPhone 7 feature is actually fake As time marched on, Siri began to slowly but surely improve. Not only did the scope of its functionality expand, but its speech recognition and processing capabilities also got markedly better. A fascinating in-depth piece from Steven Levy, writing for Medium’s Backchannel , details how Apple’s ongoing research into machine learning made all of these improvements possible. What’s more, Apple’s machine learning techniques can now be found across many parts of Apple’s software. With access to top-level Apple executives like Eddy Cue and Craig Federighi, not to mention some time spent with two Siri scientists, Levy provides us with an unprecedented glimpse into some of the fascinating work Apple is currently doing with deep learning. If you’re an iPhone user, you’ve come across Apple’s AI, and not just in Siri’s improved acumen in figuring out what you ask of her. You see it when the phone identifies a caller who isn’t in your contact list (but did email you recently). Or when you swipe on your screen to get a shortlist of the apps that you are most likely to open next. Or when you get a reminder of an appointment that you never got around to putting into your calendar. Or when a map location pops up for the hotel you’ve reserved, before you type it in. Or when the phone points you to where you parked your car, even though you never asked it to. These are all techniques either made possible or greatly enhanced by Apple’s adoption of deep learning and neural nets. Indeed, Apple emphasized to Levy that machine learning now permeates all aspects of the iPhone user experience, often in surprising ways. For instance, Apple leverages machine learning to improve face detection in the Camera app and even when deciding if connectivity is stronger on a Wi-Fi network or on cellular, One particularly interesting tidbit from the piece details how Apple leveraged its machine learning expertise when developing the Apple Pencil that debuted with the iPad Pro. When the iPad Pro first came out, reviewers lauded the Apple Pencil and specifically noted that inadvertent touches via the palm were thankfully unregistered. As it turns out, this was made possible by machine learning. Using a machine learning model for “palm rejection” enabled the screen sensor to detect the difference between a swipe, a touch, and a pencil input with a very high degree of accuracy. “If this doesn’t work rock solid, this is not a good piece of paper for me to write on anymore — and Pencil is not a good product,” says Federighi. If you love your Pencil, thank machine learning. Apple famously likes to keep everything under wraps, a fact which makes Levy’s write-up all the more enthralling and worth checking out in its entirety. For the full scoop on how Apple has used machine learning to improve Siri and why Apple believes that controlling both the hardware and software helps improve overall AI, make sure to hit the source link below. Apple doesn’t make its executives and top-level scientists available too often, but when they do, it’s always worth exploring.

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The owner of a San Francisco company gets a big-league shout-out from the NBA star on social media.

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Technically Incorrect: No one seems to know why Jamie Keeton's body is the way it is. But it's seemingly magnetic. So much so that he makes money out of it.

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Apple has been quite opinionated regarding emoji standards of late, and today its latest recommendations have been approved by the Unicode Consortium. The iPhone maker suggested earlier this month that Unicode adopt new job-related emoji for firefighters, pilots, painters, astronauts, and judges, with options for both male and female versions of each profession. For those unaware, the Unicode Consortium is the tech industry non-profit responsible for standardizing emoji across operating systems and hardware.

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Wi-Fi Assistant is a feature that Google has been offering to Project Fi users for a year. The optional setting will connect your device to over a million public Wi-Fi hotspots that Google has verified as being fast and reliable, giving you more seamless connections in places where the cell service is lacking. Starting today, the option is rolling out to anyone using a Nexus device in the United States, Canada, Mexico, UK and Nordic countries. For anyone eligible, this is an upgrade well worth taking. DON'T MISS:  How I get a new iPhone for $125 a year There's obvious privacy concerns about auto-connecting to public Wi-Fi, however. Previous studies by researchers have shown that people will connect to basically any Wi-Fi network, and if Google is programmed to trust a network with a specific name, hackers could build a similar-looking network that your device would connect to automatically. But Google does have one trick up its sleeve: when you connect to a public Wi-Fi hotspot, Google will establish a VPN connection with its own servers, which should protect your data. It's likely not foolproof, as there's other attacks that can be done on public Wi-Fi other than sniffing packets, but it's far more secure that most public Wi-Fi, which mostly involves praying no-one can be bothered to hack you. So, if you regularly do online banking or send nuclear launch codes from your mobile device, you'll want to use a VPN, or disable Wi-Fi Assistant outright. But for anyone who struggles for cell signal, Wi-Fi Assistant is a decent way to save a little time every day.

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The singer whose 1980s video is at the heart of a recurring internet joke says he knows it's not personal.

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The developer of the world's largest aircraft says the blimp-shaped airship sustained damage after it made a bumpy landing Wednesday on its second test flight in eastern England. Hybrid Air Vehicles said it is trying to figure out what caused the rough landing of the 302-foot (92-meter) Airlander 10 during its 100 minute flight Wednesday in Bedfordshire, north of London. "The Airlander experienced a heavy landing and the front of the flight deck has sustained some damage, which is currently being assessed," the company said. "Both pilots and the ground crew are safe and well and the aircraft is secured and stable at its normal mooring location." A hybrid of blimp, helicopter and airplane, the Airlander is able to stay aloft for days at a time. It is designed to use less fuel than a plane, but carry heavier loads than conventional airships. The aircraft was initially developed for the U.S. military for use in surveillance in Afghanistan. Related:  Was Cincinnati Zoo right to delete Twitter account? FBI investigating possible cyberbreach of New York Times reporters' email accounts World's largest pyramid is hidden in a mountain in Mexico

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Residents are invited to check whether their address is served by 1-gigabit service, which costs $70 per month.

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Nextdoor became a magnet for racial profiling. An update aims to reduce such incidents, but what responsibility does the community message board have to do so?

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Facebook, Twitter and Google are not doing enough to prevent their social networks from being used by extremists for a recruitment drive, a panel of British MPs said Thursday. Failure to act would lead to the sites becoming "the 'Wild West' of the internet," the Home Affairs Committee warned. The report was published after the number of counter-terrorism arrests in Britain increased 35 percent between 2010 and 2015, although the country has not seen a mass casualty extremist attack since 2005's London bombings.

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One of the reasons why Facebook is so beloved by advertisers is because the social networking giant has access to all sorts of granular data about your background and interests. All the more interesting is that Facebook even has a good idea as to your political leanings, even if you rarely, if ever, “like” or express an interest in a particular candidate or political cause. Interestingly enough, there’s an extremely simple way to see what side of the political spectrum Facebook thinks you fall on. It all goes back to advertising dollars, after all, so you better believe that Facebook has a good inclination as to whether or not you’re on the Trump bandwagon or if your heart still beats proudly for Bernie Sanders. Even if you think you’ve done a good job when it comes to keeping your political views hidden from public view, it’s hard to escape the all-knowing Facebook algorithm. DON'T MISS:  iPhone 7: New leak may have just solved the only mystery left Per The New York Times , figuring out “how Facebook has categorized you — as very liberal or very conservative, or somewhere in between” is a relatively straight forward affair. All you have to do is log-in to Facebook and then hop on over to facebook.com/ads/preferences . Next, go to the “Interests” section where you’ll see a number of sub-categories. From there, click on the “Lifestyle and culture” option and keep an eye out for a box called US Politics . Once you find that, you’ll see your political designation (according to Facebook) located in parentheses. Expectedly, the possible designations include, liberal, very liberal, moderate, conservative and very conservative. How does Facebook figure this out when it comes to who those prefer to keep their politics to themselves? Facebook obviously isn’t divulging any details, but it stands to reason that the company makes educated guesses based on a user’s interests, drawing correlations between items that can reasonably be associated with a specific political orientation.

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YORBA LINDA, Calif. (AP) — The U.S. is still probing the extent of a recent cyber leak of what purports to be hacking tools used by the National Security Agency.

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Players who don't regularly clean their instruments could end up suffering from "Bagpipe lung," according to a new case study.

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Many of the updates Niantic has released for Pokemon Go  over the past month have been to address bugs and server issues, but this week, the developer surprised players with a brand new feature that hadn't been previously announced . The new feature, "Appraise," allows players to ask their respective team leaders about the power level of any Pokemon in their possession. MUST SEE:  The holy grail: Hack Pokemon Go so you can walk anywhere, no jailbreak required It's a neat addition, but unfortunately (like every other feature in the game), it's poorly explained and nearly impossible to find if you don't know where to look. We're going to do our best to walk you through the process. How to appraise your Pokemon Once you've updated your Pokemon Go app to 1.5.0 (iOS)/0.35.0 (Android), you can open the Pokemon menu where all your captured Pokemon can be found. Tap on the Pokemon you want to have appraised, then tap on the circular menu button at the bottom of the screen. You should see three separate options: Favorite , Appraise and Transfer . Click on Appraise . At this point, your team leader—Blanche, Candela or Spark—will pop up at the bottom of the screen and analyze your Pokemon. Tap on the screen a few times to read everything your team leader has to say, but be sure to take note of what the leader says in the second dialog box, because you'll need that information later. Understanding your appraisal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYVeirP7v6M So, you've appraised your Pokemon, but you have no idea how to actually utilize the information you've been given. Here's where the internet comes in handy. Shortly after the update began rolling out, some clever Pokemon Go players decoded the messages from the team leaders and determined that you can actually gauge the Individual Value (IV) of your Pokemon based on what they say. Here's a helpful image from Reddit user ygorwr with every possible answer: If you want a more precise reading, you can check out the detailed explainer over on Gamepress . But this chart should give you a basic understanding of what your team leader means when they tell you that your Pokemon is "really strong."

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — The personal website of Leslie Jones has been taken offline after it appeared hackers posted personal photos in the latest online attack on the black "Saturday Night Live" and "Ghostbusters" actress-comedienne.

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Apple's upcoming Macbooks need to be a major refresh to the lineup, since the laptop selection is looking a little old lately. We're expecting Touch ID and a new OLED button panel to come to the 2016 Macbook Pro, but code hidden in the latest version of macOS Sierra hints at one additional feature. According to code uncovered by  9to5Mac , macOS Sierra will support USB 3.1 Gen 2, better known as the upgraded version of USB-C. Apple introduced USB-C ports into its lineup with the 2015 Retina Macbook, and it's a safer bet than ever that those ports will be coming to the new Macbook Pro. DON'T MISS: The code  9to5Mac   found shows that Apple is planning to support the upgraded USB-C from a software side. Given that the Retina Macbook isn't due for an update for a good six months, and a Macbook Pro refresh has been overdue for some time, it's a safe bet that this code is aimed at the upcoming Macbook Pros. I'll be disappointed if the new Macbook Pros ditch conventional USB ports entirely, but adding USB-C connectivity could be a major boost. The ports should have the capability for 10Gb/s transfer speeds, which means that one port could potentially handle a high-resolution external display, talk to an external graphics card, and provide power all in one. If that doesn't sound like a laptop you want in your life, there's something wrong.

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The Ring was excellent for a number of reasons, but I’d start with director Gore Verbinski, who, at his best, is not just a good horror director, but a talented storyteller regardless of genre. In The Ring, Verbinski's talents turn a silly story about a deadly video into something natural, immediate, and believable. Bit by bit the stakes are raised, with more innocent people being sucked into The Ring’s increasingly powerful blackhole.

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Some malware is really good at hiding itself. You can thwart those malicious plans by running Windows Defender in offline mode.

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LG's V20 is set to debut on September 6th, but mobile leaker Evan Blass has already got his hands on a high-resolution image of the Android flagship and posted it to Twitter. The image shows off a rather bland-looking smartphone with an uncluttered home screen devoid of any duplicate apps and unnecessary bloatware. What we can see from this image is LG's commitment to the second screen concept it debuted with last year's V10.

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No joke! A new video makes a convincing argument as to why the Clown Prince of Crime makes the perfect antagonist for the Dark Knight.

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