posted about 20 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
The new Nvidia GTX 1080 graphics card represents the pinnacle of graphics performance, and it looks like a mobile variant could find its way inside Asus' upcoming beast of a ROG gaming laptop. Asus didn't identify the GPU inside its 24-inch notebook--it's been playfully redacted--but whatever it is promises spectacular power. As you can see in this purposefully leaked benchmark chart, the mystery laptop beats a GTX Titan X GPU, an AMD Radeon R9 295X2 chip and GTX 990 Ti.

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Rider tech comes to bikes of all levels, for faster and safer trips.

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
I was somewhat surprised to learn that courts use software to predict the likelihood of criminals reoffending. But I was far less surprised to learn that the computer, much like the system it serves, seems to hate black people. ProPublica   has a new report that shines a light on the system used by Broward County, Florida. Those courts use a system made by Northpointe, a for-profit company. Various factors are inputted into an algorithm, which spits out a score that reflects an offender's chance of re-offending within two years. DON'T MISS:  Right now, Lyft is cheaper than the subway in NYC Those scores are then used by judges to help with everything from bond amounts to sentencing. It's kind of like a credit score, only worse-informed, and used to make decisions about people's liberty, rather than car insurance. It's currently used in states including Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. To measure the effectiveness of Northpointe's algorithm in the real world,  ProPublica  obtained the risk scores of 7,000 people arrested in Broward County, and tracked them for the next two years. Surprise result! The computer was "remarkably unreliable" in predicting violent crimes: only 20 percent of people predicted to commit violent crimes actually did so. That figure only rises to 61 percent when considering all crimes. What makes the report -- and yes, there is something worse than computers using flawed methodology to lock people up -- is the racial bias. ProPublica found that it falsely flagged black defendants at twice the rate that it did white defendants. On the flip side, white defendants were mistakenly labelled as "low risk" more often than black defendants. Northpointe disputed the results of ProPublica's findings, and wouldn't release the exact algorithm it uses to compute risk scores. So, in conclusion, a computer is incorrectly classifying individuals as high or low risk, using a formula that it won't disclose, but is objectively racist. And courts are still using the algorithm to influence judge's decisions. Right.

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Conventional passwords might soon be a thing of the past, or at least on devices running Android. Google announced at I/O last week that it's pushing ahead with plans to replace passwords with "trust scores" that incorporate various data points about users to determine whether or not they're legitimate. "Assuming it goes well, this should become available to every Android developer around the world by the end of the year," Dan Kaufman, head of ATAP at Google, said at I/O.

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Facebook is pushing out a few updates to its live video platform today, including a new feature that lets broadcasters maintain continuous streams. Other possibilities include a continuous video of a group of puppies or even entire sports matches and other events, Facebook video head Fidji Simo told TechCrunch. The one downside: you can't save these streams to watch later, as the server strain would be too costly for Facebook to maintain.

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
As if all the new TV shows and movies coming to Netflix in June weren't enough, Netflix is already hyping up its entire summer slate. For June, the service has Jurassic Park and Spotlight , July brings The Big Short and Back to the Future and August's lineup includes The Little Prince and The Fast & The Furious . But the biggest addition comes in September, when Netflix becomes "the exclusive US pay TV home of the latest films from Disney, Marvel, Lucasfilm and Pixar." DON'T MISS:  See tons of new footage in the latest trailer for ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ The deal basically means that all relevant movies will go straight to Netflix after the DVD release -- and it's exclusive, so you won't be able to get the same movies on Amazon Prime or HBO. We originally covered the deal between Netflix and Disney way back in 2012 , but this is the first time we've been given a precise window for when the deal would go into effect. As the original press release notes, this only applies to first-run live-action and animated feature films, but that's still a ton of value. It's also worth reminding everyone that Rogue One: A Star Wars Story will hit theaters in December, so presumably it will be one of the first Disney movies to release on Netflix under this new arrangement. Unfortunately, Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos didn't have many details to share in his blog post on Monday . We'll be keeping an eye out for any more news regarding the Netflix-Disney deal, but in the meantime, here's a sneak peek at the service's summer schedule: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h37iuBD4azI

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posted about 21 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Organizers of trade-only Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) video game extravaganza on Monday announced the addition of a side event open to players. E3 Live will take place in a venue close to the Los Angeles Convention Center where the E3 trade show will be taking place on the same days -- June 14 through June 16.

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
There's a new way to share files, and Jack Wallen thinks it could easily become your must-have file sharing tool. Send Anywhere is simple, fast, and ready to serve.

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Can The Finest Automobile Auctions quietly shake up the online auction establishment with a ground-focused approach?

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Outlook's out-of-the box calendar may not fit your scheduling needs. Here's the easy route to changing the defaults to work for you.

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Uber and Lyft have made taking a car to get around a surprisingly affordable method of transportation. But right now, the rivalry between the two is driving prices to be ludicrously cheap. Starting today , all weekday Lyft rides in Manhattan will be 50 percent off. And before you point out that this will screw over drivers, don't worry -- they're getting to keep 100 percent of the non-discounted fare, with no commission going to Lyft. HUGE LEAK:  This is our first look at a real iPhone 7 The rideshare company won't say how long this promotion will go on for, but it can't be endless -- since Lyft is making up the difference between the discount and the real fare, without collecting commission, it's losing money on every single ride you take. A Lyft spokesperson told the NY Post  only that it would last for a "limited time," possibly stretching to several weeks. But hey, if Lyft wants to burn cash, then there's no harm in joyriding around the city. With the discount in place, any trip shorter than about 25 blocks is cheaper than a one-way subway fare, and four to five times cheaper than a standard yellow cab. It's a possible reaction to Uber's new commuter-friendly option , which allows for $5 rides around lower Manhattan during rush-hour. That requires you to share a cab and walk to the nearest intersection however, while Lyft's promo applies to standard cars. To get the discounts, you don't need a promo code -- just open the app, hail a ride as usual, and be pleasantly surprised by the bill at the end. Lyft is also planning to expand around the NYC area, with Jersey Shore and the Hamptons in the works for the next few weeks.

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
CreditOne of the recent technology trends making waves on the globe right now is the significant use of solar energy systems to generate clean, non-polluting electricity and to also curb other issues that directly affect the environment. Due to different global warming concerns that are depleting the Earth's resources, innovators have found a...

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posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 22 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
There are two reasons we love this new video of an Android fan showing off Android N's hot new animations so much. First, it does a fantastic job of giving users a preview of all of the slick new animations Google baked into Android N. Transition animations might not seem like they would be a pivotal part of the overall Android experience, but we assure you they are. They add a tremendous amount to the user experience and that's why mobile platform makers like Apple and Google  put so much time and effort into their animations. The second reason we love this video so much is because the YouTube user who made it is really excited. Like, really really excited. DON'T MISS:  5 Android N features you won’t find on any iPhone Seriously, just look at him: His name is "GeekCeption" and there is absolutely no question that he's now our favorite YouTuber. The level of enthusiasm he offers in his videos is off the charts, and it's infectious. Is it possible to get this enthused over Android UI animations? You might not think so going into this video, but you'll be a believer when it's done. As for the animations themselves, GeekCeption used the latest Android N developer preview to show them off, and he slowed down the footage so it's all in slow-motion. If you're wondering what kind of attention to detail Google applied when crafting Android N, this video will undoubtedly answer your question. The full video (via Reddit ) is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxbL37IFVRo

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posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Facebook is introducing a new "Engagement graph" for Facebook Live, a simple-to-understand visualization that reveals which parts of a live clip viewers have engaged with the most. According to Facebook, this will allow users to skip all the filler and get "right to what might be the most interesting or exciting points of the video." The engagement graph, rolling out today, appears when you start watching a previously live video — it'd be rather hard to do this on the fly — or any time you skip to a different section of a clip. Why slog through an entire five-minute video when you can just hop from one exciting moment to another, as determined by other Facebook users?

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posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Apple, which last week rejected a mobile game called Liyla and The Shadows of War for its political message, has decided to approve it. The monochrome platformer, which tells the story of a young Palestinian girl living in the Gaza Strip amid the ongoing conflict with Israel, was kicked back during Apple's app review process because it contained content that "is not appropriate in the Games category." The company has a storied history of censoring mobile games that touch on politically or culturally charged subjects, including games highlighting Chinese factory conditions and violence against children. Palestinian developer Rasheed Abueideh, the creator of Liyla, posted a screenshot of text he received from Apple outlining why the company rejected his game.

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posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Streaming leader Spotify said Monday that its losses deepened last year even as the company topped $2 billion in revenue amid the global boom in online music. The Swedish company founded in 2008 has been at the forefront of the music industry's turn to streaming, which offers unlimited music on demand, yet it has never turned a profit itself. Luxembourg-based holding company Spotify Technologies, submitting its annual earnings report, said its revenue jumped 80 percent to 1.945 billion euros ($2.18 billion) in 2015.

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posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
If you haven't seen last night's episode of Game of Thrones yet, I suggest closing this tab and putting all of your devices on airplane mode and avoiding human interaction until you have the opportunity to do so. The lovable, perfect Hodor, who dedicated the last several years of his life to carrying known-brat Bran Stark around on his back and listening to Meera Reed spout off about how much she hates Bran (valid) and just wants some eggs (same), is now deceased. Here is seriously the most simple way I can think to recap what transpired in about two minutes of a very popular cable television program last night: as far as Bran or the audience knew, Hodor has always had some kind of very specific (and presumably rare!) medical condition that renders him incapable of saying any words other than "Hodor" (ostensibly his name), despite being totally able to understand English.

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posted about 23 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Apple's iPhones have long used LCD screen technology, which is great, if you like settling for second-best. OLED panels are lighter, look better, and can be curved into more interesting shapes. The best Android phones have been using them for years, and according to a report, iPhones due out in 2017 will be packing OLED panels. A Bloomberg  article cites a sudden spike in demand for screen-manufacturing technology as an indicator of suppliers preparing for a big increase in demand for OLED displays, and it doesn't take much to connect the dots. HUGE LEAK:  This is our first look at a real iPhone 7 Bloomberg   specifically quotes Applied Materials Inc, a manufacturer of machines used in the production of displays. The equipment is going to Samsung, LG, Foxconn, and Sharp, all of whom are primary suppliers of displays to Apple. As Applied Materials CEO Gary Dickerson told  Bloomberg, " We all know who is the leader in terms of mobile products." The increase in orders isn't a blip: Applied saw orders of $700 million in the space of three months, close to what it would normally see in a year. The timing is right for the new screens to make it into the 2017 iPhones. New machinery being ordered now would be in place early next year, ready for a production run of components to be assembled for a fall 2017 iPhone 7s release. This report also dovetails perfectly with a previous  Nikkei  article , which claimed that Apple reached out to Samsung and LG about OLED displays in December 2015. The timeline sounds perfect: Apple reaches out a few months ago, the suppliers design new supply lines, and now start ordering the heavy machinery that will take months to manufacture and ship. The most compelling part about this rumor isn't the sales data: it's that moving to OLED displays is an obvious move for Apple. Organic light-emitting diode displays have pixels that light themselves, without needing a backlight. That makes for displays that are thinner (no need for a separate light behind the screen), have more contrast, since only the necessary pixels will light up, and better battery life for the same reason.

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