posted about 3 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
BEIJING (AP) — China issued new regulations on Saturday demanding search engines clearly identify paid search results, months after a terminally-ill cancer patient complained that he was misled by the giant search engine Baidu.

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posted about 4 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
BEIJING (AP) — China has issued new regulations demanding search engines clearly identify paid search results, months after a terminally-ill cancer patient complained that he was misled by the giant search engine Baidu.

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posted about 5 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 5 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 6 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
China's internet regulator said on Saturday that search engines should tighten management of paid-for ads in search results, making clear which results are paid-for and limiting their numbers. Chinese regulators last month imposed limits on the number of lucrative healthcare adverts carried by Baidu Inc following the death of a student who underwent an experimental cancer treatment which he found using China's biggest internet search engine. Wei Zexi, 21, died in April of a rare form of cancer, and the case sparked widespread public anger.

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posted about 6 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 6 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Elon Musk keeps warning us that artificial intelligence is a real threat , but he’s also contributing to the evolution of machines. Sure, he might not be doing the real coding, but the smart Tesla cars that will be able to drive themselves around town in the following years will have to be programmed to handle a particular type of emergency: hitting a pedestrian or saving the lives of the passengers inside the vehicle. DON’T MISS: Galaxy Note 7 shaping up to be Samsung’s most powerful smartphone yet Tesla and other carmakers are already working on self-driving cars, but autopilot features are yet to be finalized – or completely safe. Even if driverless cars would be readily available to buyers, the legal framework that would allow such machines to operate on public roads isn’t there yet. That means self-driving vehicles aren’t legal as long as they’re not regulated. Overall, self-driving cars are supposed to increase the safety of everyone on the road, and minimize the risk of accident. But even so, accidents may happen, and a car would have to be programmed to react in a worst-case type of scenario where it should choose who to save, either the people in the car, or a passenger. Sure, the car may be smart enough to find a way to save everyone – or at least not kill anyone, even though some people may sustain injuries. But no matter how unlikely such a scenario sounds, carmakers and lawmakers will have to take it into account. A new research study reveals that prospective owners of self-driving cars responded in online studies that driverless cars should make decisions for the greater good. But by presenting respondents with “a series of quizzes that present unpalatable options that amount to saving or sacrificing yourself,” as The New York Times puts it , the researchers were able to discern that people would rather stay alive. The study, published in Science magazine , details the findings of a group of computer scientists and psychologists after performing six online surveys of United States residents between June and November last year. Teaching ethics to a car, and therefore, to a powerful computer that may have AI features, might be one of the hardest things that programmers working for Tesla, Google, and Apple will have to do. By forcing machines to abide to a certain set of yet-to-be-determined laws, tech companies including Musk’s Tesla will teach them the types of situations where it’s okay to jeopardize the life of a human. The Times ’ full article on the matter, complete with a video explaining this particular moral dilemma, is available at the source link below.

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posted about 6 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Discover how medical professionals and MIT researchers are using data-enabled systems to help doctors around the world make the best healthcare decisions.

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posted about 6 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 7 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Nissan earlier today unveiled the GT-R Drone, an incredibly advanced drone that Nissan categorizes as "one of the fastest accelerating FPV (First Person View) racing drones in the world. So just how fast is it? Well, the GT-R Drone was designed to keep up with the Nissan's new GT-R car on a race track. Specifically, the GT-R Drone can accelerate from 0-62 MPH in just 1.3 seconds and can reach a top speed of 115 MPH. Of course, piloting a drone at such high speeds requires an individual with top-notch skills, which is why Nissan called in British National Drone Racing champion James Bowles to a racetrack recently. DON'T MISS:  Mountain biker crashes into a black bear in crazy Instagram video The end result is an exciting and admittedly absurd video featuring the GT-R Drone chasing Nissan's 2016 GT-R around a 1.2 mile track. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARHjF3T7MKI Sure, we know that this is nothing more than a brilliant piece of marketing dressed up as a viral video, but come on, it's still pretty darn cool. The video description reads in part: Custom designed by World Drone Prix Champions, Tornado XBlades Racing, the GT-R Drone uses a special race tuned configuration and low-drag canopy to reach 100 km/h from a standstill in just 1.3 seconds. Both machines use incredible technology and engineering to extract the maximum performance, both in a straight line and through corners. The GT-R car transfers power from its twin-turbocharged 3.8-litre 24-valve V6 to all four wheels; the GT-R Drone delivers incredible acceleration via four propellers mated with 2000kV XNova motors and race specification Sky-Hero quadcopter frame. Undoubtedly, the web certainly doesn't have a clip shortage of downright absurd race videos to choose from. Just two months ago, for instance, we saw footage of a Tesla Model S P90D in Ludicrous Mode go head to head with a Boeing 737 , of all things.

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posted about 7 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 7 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
By Heather Somerville SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - As valuations flounder for Silicon Valley startups once worth billions of dollars, investor interest is on the rise in startups with both financial and social benefits, such as healthcare software for poor communities or low cost solar panels for homes. The change reflects investor concern with current valuations of more mainstream technology startups, a desire to help by some investors and a broadening definition of social-good startups. There is also growing sentiment that the rise of mobile technology will allow for profitable upstarts in parts of the world relatively untouched by Silicon Valley.

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posted about 7 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 8 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Basically, with Tend.ai you buy a regular robot arm, and attach a regular webcam to it, and then you let Tend.ai supply the smarts. You can "train" your robot arm on a task by simply moving the robot arm around and demonstrating the task you want performed — just like how Baxter works.

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posted about 8 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
By Joseph Menn and Dustin Volz SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Some of the web’s biggest destinations for watching videos have quietly started using automation to remove extremist content from their sites, according to two people familiar with the process. The move is a major step forward for internet companies that are eager to eradicate violent propaganda from their sites and are under pressure to do so from governments around the world as attacks by extremists proliferate, from Syria to Belgium and the United States. YouTube and Facebook are among the sites deploying systems to block or rapidly take down Islamic State videos and other similar material, the sources said.

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posted about 8 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 8 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
(Reuters) - Citigroup Inc said on Friday it resolved a technical issue that had left customers unable to access their accounts remotely. Customers had taken to social media to complain about the major outage. "We experienced a brief technical issue that is now resolved," Citigroup's customer service Twitter account said in response. Bloomberg reported the news of the outage first. A Bloomberg reporter spoke with four people at a bank branch on Manhattan's Upper East Side who said debit cards did not work at the ATM there. (http://bloom. ...

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posted about 9 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Exclusivity is a complex issue for the gaming industry, and has been for quite some time. Although platform exclusivity of first- and third-party titles creates competition between the console makers, it also fragments the user base and forces gamers to either put up with the fact that they're going to miss out on major triple-A titles, or spend money on yet another video game console. All of that said, you can see why Oculus's aggressive stance toward acquiring VR games exclusively for its platform has been met with some derision. Now Oculus wants to explain itself. DON'T MISS:  All the best deals from Steam’s summer sale This week, Oculus Head of Content Jason Rubin sat down with GamesIndustry to discuss the company's approach to acquiring exclusive rights to VR games, and how it might help the industry in the long run. "As a developer looks at a multi-million dollar production in VR right now, they say there's no way that will earn its money back in any reasonable amount of time, so instead I'll go make a non-VR PC game of that scale if I want to because that's a better bet," posits Rubin. " We don't like that ," he adds. Basically, Oculus wants to jump-start the industry by funding big-budget games today, rather than hoping that developers find success with smaller projects and slowly build up to working on titles that would fit in among the Grand Theft Autos , Call of Duties and Uncharted 4s of the world. "So what Oculus has said is, 'Why don't we throw more money into the ecosystem than is justified by the consumer base,' which will lead to a consumer base that's larger, which will leave that second generation of developers to say, 'Hey, let's go build these games because now the consumers are there, and kick start that decade long process in a much shorter length of time.' And, to do that, we have put huge amounts of money into the ecosystem, more than any of our competitors," explains Rubin. But vital to this entire conversation is the fact that "in no case [is Oculus] asking to have control of the intellectual property in the long-term." He gave a specific example of that last point with Crytek's  The Climb : "In the case of The Climb , there was no game The Climb . We went to Crytek, I looked at some demos they had put together, one of them was a climbing demo, and I said, 'We should build a game entirely around that.' We co-designed it. They, obviously, did all the hard work and they're the developer, but that game was fully funded and fully conceptualized from the beginning with us. We consider those first-party titles... Having said that, they own The Climb IP. The Climb 2 can come out on any console, any PC, any anything, anywhere. We don't own that." It's hard to poke many holes in Rubin's reasoning. Sony, HTC, Oculus — they're all in on VR, and they all want to see the medium flourish. If Oculus genuinely believes that funneling millions into the industry for timed exclusives is going to benefit everyone in the long term, the company might as well give it a shot. In the meantime, Oculus is doing what it can to get back in the good graces of gamers. On Friday, it was discovered that the company had quietly reversed its DRM which barred Vive users from playing Rift exclusive games on their headsets . "We believe protecting developer content is critical to the long-term success of the VR industry, and we’ll continue taking steps in the future to ensure that VR developers can keep investing in ground-breaking new VR content," Oculus told Ars Technica , but confirmed that it "will not use hardware checks as part of DRM on PC in the future." A win for VR gamers everywhere.

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posted about 9 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
The Rock is obviously not going to be one of those vloggers. Dwayne Johnson launched his YouTube account today with nothing less than a movie trailer about how epic (or not so epic) his channel is going to be. The channel will include videos from Johnson himself, as well as an action series, collaborations with other figures who "inspire" and "motivate," and looks at projects from his production company, according to Variety. Johnson's channel is actually the latest project out of his production company, Seven Bucks Productions, so it's not surprising that part of the goal here is to leverage YouTube to promote The Rock's other projects.

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posted about 9 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
posted about 9 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Google is getting closer and closer to the moment diehard Android fans are waiting for, the official release of Android N to supported Nexus devices. Google already explained at I/O 2016 the new features of this new Android release, but it didn’t reveal everything there is to it. While Android N will still be baked using Google’s tried and tested Material Design, a report details a change we didn’t see coming: new navigation buttons. Yes, you're probably going to hate it, at least until you get used to it. DON’T MISS: Galaxy Note 7 shaping up to be Samsung’s most powerful smartphone yet According to Android Police , which often provides accurate details about unreleased Android features and devices, Google is redesigning the home and navigation buttons. For some inexplicable reason, Google seems to think a redesign is in order, even though the current design is only a couple of years old. The site says that it remains unclear whether all Android N devices will get the new navbar buttons (old Nexus hardware included), or whether the design change is restricted to this year’s Nexus devices. “According to our source, the new multi-colored home button does animate in some fashion when long-pressed, with the various colors expanding in their corresponding directions until they all file out horizontally,” the site says. “I know - it's not exactly easy to visualize, but stuff happens. As you can see, all they keys are also now opaque - an interesting change.” Google’s Sundar Pichai said recently that Nexus devices will no longer run pure Android versions , and this sort of tiny but immediately noticeable changes might help Google give an identity to the Nexus line. Even so, updating the home and navigation buttons in this manner is probably going to enrage some people, at least until they get used to the new design.

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posted about 10 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Secure and protect your path across the Internet

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posted about 10 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Microsoft plans to stop manufacturing its entry-level Surface 3 tablet by year's end, the company announced today. Quite a few sites dedicated to Microsoft and Windows news noticed of late that stock for the device has been running low, and ZDNet confirmed the company would be winding down production over the next six months. "Since launching Surface 3 over a year ago, we have seen strong demand and satisfaction amongst our customers," Microsoft said in a statement.

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posted about 10 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
When classic toys get covered in molten copper, the results are anything but playful.

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posted about 10 hours ago on yahoo! technology news
Everything points to the next big upgrade coming in 2017 for the 10th anniversary of the iPhone. The Apple Watch is looking at new display tech, and say goodbye to the Thunderbolt Display.

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