posted 8 days ago on the next web
We’ve all seen enough spam ads promising a quick & easy way to “make money online!” But as companies increasingly establish their Web presence and outreach, social media is a tried-and-true tactic for engaging users and increasing revenue. With the training provided in the Silicon Valley Social Media Marketing Course & Certification, you’ll master top-level strategy for social media marketing and get on track to make your mark in a lucrative and rapidly expanding field. At just $29 from TNW Deals, this is a tiny investment for a serious resume upgrade. Through 12 comprehensive modules included in the Silicon Valley Social Media… This story continues at The Next Web

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Building an efficient and effective business structure in today’s marketplace requires mastery of both Six Sigma and Lean principles. With 40 hours of learning in the Six Sigma Green & Black Belt Certification Training, now 93% off on TNW Deals, you’ll master the processes for maximizing efficiency and limiting the eight significant channels of waste. Six Sigma has three tiers of certification: Yellow Belt, Green Belt, and Black Belt. You’ll begin this course bundle with Green Belt training, using an assortment of lectures, simulated exams, flashcards and tool kits to prepare for the Six Sigma Green Belt Certification Exam. You’ll… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 8 days ago on the next web
We’ve heard a lot about Uber’s plans to create its own self-driving vehicle, but we’ve always been curious to see what it would look like. Today, Uber gave us a glimpse of its current self-driving car. Announced in a blog post, the car is essentially a Ford Fusion equipped with laser scanners, radar, and high resolution cameras to photograph all the places it’ll go.The sensors are all aligned almost like speakers (or missiles) – unlike Google’s street view car with a 360-degree globe-like camera up top. Uber says it will be driving in Pittsburgh to collect mapping data and test its self-driving mode.… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 8 days ago on the next web
Today, Adobe is introducing Spark for mobile and the Web, which it hopes will help small businesses and nonprofits create great images, websites and media for their campaigns. There are three main components to Spark: Page, Post and Video. Those tools were formerly the standalone Slate, Post and Voice; Adobe is basically branding them under Spark and giving them a bit more power under the hood. With Page, you can create slick “magazine style” landing pages, which are hosted by Adobe. In use, it’s a bit like a pared-down Squarespace or Weebly, which is likely a better option for Adobe’s target… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 8 days ago on the next web
In February, Facebook began rolling out live video streaming capabilities to users worldwide – meaning that there’s bound to be someone streaming video of themselves somewhere on the planet at any given point in time. At its F8 developer conference, the company unveiled a number of new features for Facebook Live, including reactions, comment replay and filters. But the most useful of them all is this interactive map that shows you streams that you can tune into in real-time. It certainly beats waiting around for people to begin streaming stuff in your news feed, and gives you a chance to… This story continues at The Next Web

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For a long time, almost as long as I’ve been a member of the exclusive “Women in Tech” club, I’ve avoided talking about diversity. I modeled myself after Marissa Mayer, who when asked what it was like being the only female engineer at Google (back in the day) said,  “I didn’t notice.” I completely believe this. It’s often very useful not to notice. Perhaps her blindness came naturally. For me, I trained myself not to notice being the only woman in the Slack channel because noticing hurt me. It literally made me worse at my job. How stereotype threat hurts… This story continues at The Next Web

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Machine learning, which helps computers do things like understand complex voice commands and improve image search capabilities, can be taxing on traditional hardware. Google should know – over 100 of its products and features use this technology to run and improve themselves constantly. The company has revealed that over the past few years, it quietly developed its own custom processor for such tasks. The Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) is built expressly for running TensorFlow, Google’s in-house machine learning system that it open-sourced last year. Google says it’s used TPUs in its data centers for more than a year now, and… This story continues at The Next Web

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Known for its radical product reinvention, Apple has changed the way the world uses their mobile phones. So what’s next for the tech giant? After Apple‘s recent milestone, I posed the following question to a panel of business owners from Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC): What do you see Apple reinventing next, and how will this change the markets in which they operate? 1. The Search Engine Apple has already launched their own search engine called “Spotlight,” which allows you to search for things like apps, documents, images and other files on your Mac. Since search ads are Google’s main source… This story continues at The Next Web

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Fitbit has had a busy 2016 so far, having launched two new fitness trackers: the $200 watch-like Blaze and the slimmer $130 Alta. It’s also found time to acquire payments hardware firm Coin. The company hasn’t revealed terms of the deal that closed on May 12, but said that “the acquisition accelerates Fitbit’s ability to develop an active NFC payment solution that could be embedded into future Fitbit devices, broadening its smart capabilities.” Coin made a splash in 2014 when it announced its smart card-like gadget, which allows you to digitally store and use all your actual credit cards to… This story continues at The Next Web

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It looks like 2016 is the year that Apple learns to show India some love. It’s already working on plans to open its first official retail stores in the country and announced yesterday that it would set up a support facility for iOS developers in Bangalore early next year. Today, the company revealed that it’s opened a new office in Hyderabad, another major IT hub in the country. The new facility, located on the Waverock SEZ campus, will house 4,000 developers who will work on Apple’s Maps product and features. CEO Tim Cook, who is currently touring India after a… This story continues at The Next Web

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Although it’s well known across Asia for its excellent smartphones, Xiaomi’s presence in the US has been minimal, with only accessories like headphones available for sale since it opened its online store there last May. But at Google I/O 2016, the Chinese hardware maker had a surprise for the American market: a 4K-ready Android TV-based set-top box for all your video streaming and gaming needs. The company says that, unlike all its other products, it will first launch in the US. Xiaomi says its Mi Box will be capable of running 4K UHD video at 60fps and supporting HDR10, a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 8 days ago on the next web
After making a big splash in 2014 by acquiring Nokia, Microsoft has effectively sold it off to Apple supply chain partner Foxconn for $350 million. The actual buyer is listed as FIH Mobile Ltd., which is a subsidiary of Foxconn. In the deal, FIH will also get Microsoft’s phone manufacturing facility in Vietnam. Microsoft is also relenquishing the Nokia brand, software, services, care network, supply agreements and customer contracts. This doesn’t mean Microsoft is moving away from phones in any way — it will just stop producing Nokia devices. In announcing the sale, Microsoft says it “will continue to develop Windows… This story continues at The Next Web

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The keynote was great, the demos are cool and there’s free food and drink for everyone there — but don’t kid yourself, Google IO 2016 is the conference version of hell. Lines that span 90+ minutes, attendees being turned away at the door after waiting in said lines, and 93 degree heat with no discernible way of cooling off aside from grabbing an Uber and bailing are the talking points (at least amongst attendees) of IO, not tech. Having to skip every other session so I can stand in line for an hour to be sure of getting in. @google didn't… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 8 days ago on the next web
Google is taking a page from Apple’s book and letting families share apps. Discovered in some developer documentation by Android Police, the program — called Family Library — will allow groups of up to six people share access to apps. Developers have been given a date of July 2 to decide if they want older apps to be eligible for the program. Apps that have been purchased after July 2 will automatically be listed as Family Library apps. Here’s the full documentation: When Family Library becomes available to users, up to six family members will be able to share purchased… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google has conventionally named its Android versions after desserts, but earlier today, the company announced it would let users choose what the ‘N’ in Android N stands for. For a brief moment, it seemed like a fun idea to make users to feel involved in Android N’s release. Then the Internet happened: people complained. Leaving Android N’s name to a free-for-all is a recipe for disaster. From ‘Nipple’ to ‘Nazi’ – let’s not get into the variety of racial slurs – people started submitting all sorts of inappropriate things. How could Google ever assure its well-mannered users that the masses of immature internet denizens wouldn’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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Android apps are coming to Chrome OS. First spotted by 9to5Google in the session ‘Bring your Android App to Chrome’ officially discuss the merger of mobile and desktop: Today we announced that we’re adding the best mobile app experiences in the world, Android apps and the Google Play store, to the best browser in the world, Chrome! Come to this session and test your Android apps for Chrome OS. You will get hands on help from our friendly engineers on how to optimize your Android app for Chromebooks. Oh, and we will also be giving the first 50 developers to show up… This story continues at The Next Web

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The much-awaited Amazon Echo competitor from Google is finally here – while we heard a lot about its features and its rumored name, we were all pretty clueless on what the device would look like. And well, it seems the internet is still confused. Anyone else think @google Home looks like an @glade air freshener device? pic.twitter.com/TmFsSyU7BR — Evan Spielberg (@EvanSpielberg) May 18, 2016 Google Home looks like it should diffuse Essential Oils. — Trent Nix (@trentnix) May 18, 2016 Air fresheners seem to be the first thing people are picking up on, but perhaps for a good reason. After all, home fragrance… This story continues at The Next Web

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Android Instant Apps is a game-changer for the mobile Web. Announced at Google I/O today, Instant Apps lets developers take advantage of modules that allow mobile Web users to use an application without actually installing it. When clicking a link, Google Play runs the app instantly by only fetching the pieces of the app you need at that moment. The first example showed the user clicking a Buzzfeed Video link to view a recipe and being transported to the appropriate part of the application — all in a span of about two seconds. In another example, the presenter used B&H’s Android… This story continues at The Next Web

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At Google I/O, the company announced some major changes to Firebase, which now has analytics for developers that it says is “like Google analytics for apps.” Google says Firebase will now be able to do crash reporting by finding bugs and issues in apps. It looks at user behavior and session information to diagnose problems and point developers to the right way to solve the problem. Developers can also test configurations at scale using Firebase Remote Config, which lets you toggle features on and off as needed. Engagement is also important, so Google is leveraging Google Cloud Messaging to help… This story continues at The Next Web

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At its IO conference today, Google announced Android Wear 2.0, the biggest update to its wearables platform yet. First up, any watchface will now be able to show information “from any app.” Basically, it’s Google’s take on the Apple Watch’s complications. Google is also including two keyboards; you can use either handwriting or a full-fledged QWERTY keyboard. It also implements Smart Reply to provide contextual answers to messages without requiring you to type anything. Finally, Google is untethering your watch from your phone with standalone apps. That means LTE-enabled watches will let you run apps without having your phone nearby… This story continues at The Next Web

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VR is coming to Android N. Bouncing off of Cardboard, which has 50 million app installs, Google is accelerating its VR initiatives. Noting that cardboard is a bit limited, Google is releasing a new platform named Daydream that is focussed on a better VR experience for Android. Daydream has a series of specs for devices that want to run VR on Android. While any device can run VR, Google will have an official ‘Daydream-ready’ tag for those devices that meet its specifications. Samsung, HTC and LG will all have phones ready this Fall. There’s also a VR mode in Android… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google always names its newest version of Android after a dessert, in alphabetical order. This year will be the first time Google will let users choose the name. You can head on over to android.com/n to submit your vote. While it seems it doesn’t have to be dessert this time around, my vote still definitely goes to Nutella (because it’s Nutella, duh). That said, don’t think you can campaign for a raunchy name. Google is still reserving the right to choose the final title. Developing…

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Today at I/O, Google debuted its new chat app, ‘Allo’ as well as a companion app (for video) ‘Duo.’ Duo is lightening-quick, encrypted and works on both iOS and Android. The team worked with WebRTC to create a new protocol that allows for instant creation of an encrypted connection, a feature that keeps you from answering the call only to be faced with a blank screen while you wait on both ends’ video feeds to catch up. It uses the same technology — as well as hand-tuned and optimized codecs, bandwidth probing and other quality measures — to ensure that not… This story continues at The Next Web

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Today at Google I/O, CEO Sundar Pichai announced some new tweaks for Google Photos, which he says now has over 200 million users. You’ll now be able to communicate via Photos with two new apps — yes, really. A new messaging app named Allo is a “smart messaging app” that learns over time to be more expressive and productive. It’s based on your phone number, so there’s no fussy sign-up process to worry about. It also has the new Google Assistant built in, so you can both chat with friends and Google Search. In Google’s example, a feature in Allo… This story continues at The Next Web

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At Google I/O today, Google CEO Sundar Pichai detailed a future that featured a whole lot of talking to your devices. 20 percent of queries on Google are performed via voice search. Because voice assistant’s, such as Google Now, are making up progressively larger percentages of our searches, Google wants to ensure its “industry leading” voice processing natural language processing platform is up to the task. Google Assistant, Google’s own natural language processing platform has high aspirations that exceed mobile devices. It’s designed to work with Google Home, an Alexa-like always-on listening device that helps you manage everything from search,… This story continues at The Next Web

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