posted 5 days ago on the next web
Google’s Search Console (formerly Webmaster Tools) has been updated with new reports to show developers how their mobile app content is performing in search results. The Search Analytics report lists top queries, top app pages and traffic by country for each indexed app. You can also use filters to drill down to specific query types or regions, or sort by clicks, impressions and click-through rate. There’s also a Crawl Errors report to help you find issues encountered by Google’s indexing engine when going through your content. This makes it easy to locate app pages that aren’t showing up in search… This story continues at The Next Web

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Who knew when Pac-Man was released on 22 May 1980, that it would end up becoming such an iconic arcade game? Celebrating thirty five years since its arrival in Japan, Bandai Namco has updated the app on iOS with some new features and a revamped interface.   The updated version introduces a multi-player option for the first time on iOS, as well as new mazes and challenges to explore. Pro-tips are now available in-game too. While the game costs $4.99 to download, there is also a free version –Pac-Man Lite – on iOS. ➤ Pac-Man [iOS]

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posted 5 days ago on the next web
Emoji are incredibly popular. Our traffic stats show that unequivocally. Stories about new emoji, how we use them and just about every other aspect of the culture around them do incredibly well. Source: Google Search Trends They’re fun. It’s undeniable. Even I, with an inclination that leans more to towards the Eeyore end of the spectrum rather than the over-caffeinated Tiggerish space occupied by my colleague Owen, have to admit it. Image credit: Disney Owen loves emoji. He picks through the pronouncements of the Unicode Consortium, the arbiters of emoji accuracy, as if they are messages carried down from Mount Sinai – a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 5 days ago on the next web
Google’s given the Hangouts Chrome app a new lick of paint – implementing its Material Design aesthetic and bringing all your contacts together in a single window, with chats on the right. It’s a big improvement. The new simplified version will be particularly pleasing to people using Mac OS X, but as Google’s Hangouts product manager Mayur Kamat says, it’s also pretty hand for folk on Chrome OS, Linux and Windows. If you’re not on OS X though, make sure to heed Kamat’s advice to switch off ‘transparent mode’ before using the app. ➤ Google Hangouts [Chrome Store via Engadget] Read… This story continues at The Next Web

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The rules of engagement are changing. Picture this scene: The whole family is sitting on their couch and everyone is watching the same TV show. One person is controlling the remote control, so the other people cannot really choose what to watch. The world has changed a lot since then. In today’s families, everyone has their own screen and decides what content they want to consume. We’ve just added Daniel Alegre’s talk from the TNW USA Conference 2014 to our TNW Video site and you can watch it right now for free. Alegre, the president of global partnerships at Google,… This story continues at The Next Web

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When a new prospective customer calls your startup for the first time, who answers the phone? Many companies have put their process on autopilot for responding to inbound sales inquiries – they might have an administrative assistant who answers the phones, or they might have a simple e-mail capture form on a website. But when a prospective customer contacts you for the first time, that’s a powerful chance to make a good first impression. It’s your first opportunity to either start to build a long-lasting business relationship, or (if not handled properly), lose out on thousands of dollars worth of… This story continues at The Next Web

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The Intercept and CBC News report that back in 2012, the US National Security Agency (NSA) along with allies from the so-called ‘Five Eyes’ alliance (which also includes Canada, the UK, New Zealand and Australia) developed a plan to hijack data links in the Google Play and Samsung app stores: As part of a pilot project codenamed IRRITANT HORN, the agencies were developing a method to hack and hijack phone users’ connections to app stores so that they would be able to send malicious “implants” to targeted devices. The implants could then be used to collect data from the phones without their users… This story continues at The Next Web

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PayPal announced a bunch of new rollouts and services at an event in San Francisco today, including Easy Payments and a simpler One Touch checkout experience. The company trialed its Easy Payments monthly installment program with Apple in January and is now launching the service with more partners like Shop.com. It’s also extending its One Touch checkout service to all 90,000 merchants on Bigcommerce’s online store platform. In addition, mobile users can now pay for their purchases in a range of shopping apps with just a tap, if they’ve signed into PayPal at least once on their device. If you’re… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 5 days ago on the next web
After introducing native video on for its mobile apps in January, Twitter has updated its REST API with support for video uploads. With this new API access, developers can allow users of their Twitter apps to add a single 30-second video or GIF up to 15MB in size to their tweets. The update also brings support for chunked uploads to combat challenges faced while transmitting large files over fluctuating mobile data connections. You can find more information, including revised guidelines on the API’s media upload documentation page. ➤ REST API now supports native video upload [Twitter Developer Blog] Image credit:… This story continues at The Next Web

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Microsoft announced today that it’s integrating its flexible multimedia content publishing tool, Sway, into its Office 365 productivity suite. The app has also been updated with support for six more languages: Dutch, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. In addition, Sway’s media search results now include Wikipedia snippets — containing an image, the article’s first paragraph and a citation — that you can add to your project. You can also insert images from Flickr, whether they’re from your personal account or the pool of Creative Commons-licensed photos shared by the community. Rounding off the update is a new grid card… This story continues at The Next Web

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In a notable juxtaposition — one timed to send a distinct message — Adobe communicated some critical intelligence on a topic dear to creative hearts. Earlier today, Bryan O’Neil Hughes, Adobe’s product manager for digital imaging, announced that the company was discontinuing development of Photoshop Touch, the mobile version of Photoshop for iOS and Android. Adobe has many mobile image editing apps — mostly on the iOS platform — but Touch was the one designed as the cross mobile platform analog to its desktop image editing flagship. For the record, you can still use Touch — and for the next week — you can still buy it,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Sling TV has expanded its reach, and is now available on Android TV. The service — which brings scheduled TV broadcasts to your streaming device — is already available on Apple TV, Fire TV, Roku and Xbox One consoles, as well as iOS and Android devices. If you don’t have an Android TV device, Sling is offering a Nexus Player for 50 percent off with three months of prepaid Sling TV service. Those who already have a Nexus Player can try Sling TV for seven days before purchasing a plan. Sling TV will work on any Android TV device, but… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Everyone likes a sneak peek, and today Adobe obliged with a look at some new features it is working on for upcoming versions of its flagship image editor, Photoshop CC. These demos tend to generate a lot of buzz, and what better venue than the 3D Printshow in London to show off new capabilities that will eventually let Photoshop CC users, 3D printer manufactures and 3D print service providers use the 3D PDF and the SVX file formats for their workflows. Adobe also plans to offer 3D Hubs support built into Photoshop CC and a new printer profile for the Tinkerine… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Earlier this week, there was some controversy over some less-than-ideal results on Google Maps. Basically, entering a certain n-word into Google Maps with could lead you the White House. Ouch. Google today apologized for the incident on its blog for Maps, and then noted it was making changes to prevent it from happening again. Apparently, the association with the search queries and locations were caused after people had used the term in online discussions. Google linked these discussions to the White House. The company says its team has been working to fix the problem, updating its ranking algorithm to prevent… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Last week we learned that some European mobile networks plan to block advertising across their services beginning later in 2015. In response, Editor-in-Chief of The Next Web, Martin Bryant, wrote that ad blocking is “immoral” and that “ad-blocking folk out there are happily starving sites.” While I agree that blanket ad-blocking is perhaps unfair, I believe some level of ad blocking is a necessity with the internet that exists today. Before I became a writer I worked in desktop support and later as an infrastructure engineer and could have been described as an ad blocking zealot. The IT nerd in me wanted… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
When it comes to DIY projects, there are two very different types of people. There are those who assemble patio furniture, lay mulch in their flower beds, and lay tile in their bathroom. And then there are those who build a ridiculously impressive propane-powered golf ball cannon. While you’re not going to be laying down the law with your new creation, it does allow you to shoot golf balls out of an RPG-looking launcher using the basic design principles from another amazing DIY project – the Sci-fi pop gun. The build requires PVC pipe, a self-igniting torch, and some tubing found… This story continues at The Next Web

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While the Title II classification of ISPs as common carriers was a victory for all, there is growing concern that ISPs could go on with business as usual with clever tricks designed to skirt the rules of the classification. While knowingly stepping outside the boundaries of the Title II classification carries the possibility of hefty fines and additional regulation by the FCC – for the most part – the average consumer would never even realize throttling or degradation was even taking place. The ‘Internet Health Test‘ by Battle for the Net is an attempt to install a sense of checks and balances… This story continues at The Next Web

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Come May 28, Photoshop Touch will no longer be available for download. Instead, Adobe is focussing on building its suite of mobile apps to better mimic Photoshop’s powerful desktop tools. Photoshop Touch recreates much of the core tools found in the desktop version of Photoshop, but falls short of being as powerful. Adobe is instead fleshing out their Creative Cloud apps like Shape CC, Color CC, Brush CC, Comp CC and Photoshop Mix. A subscription service is offered for users who want to tap into Adobe’s Creative Cloud, which syncs edits to a cloud server for easier use between apps or from… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Rockstar Games owner Take-Two Interactive today filed a lawsuit against the BBC, taking issue with the British broadcaster’s plans for a TV show based on the development of the popular Grand Theft Auto series. Titled Game Changer, the BBC revealed plans for the new show earlier in the year. The unauthorized TV drama is said to portray Rockstar Games’ rise to success and the subsequent controversy that surrounded the developer due to the typically violent gameplay found within their releases. The show’s main focus would be around that of Rockstar co-founder Sam Houser, said to be played by Daniel Radcliffe, and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Getting messages from random people you don’t know is the worst. Facebook wants to help clear things up by providing details on messages from strangers. According to TechCrunch, Messenger will now display publicly shared information atop message threads when someone you haven’t previously contacted messages you. It’s not just for complete strangers either — the information might show up for Facebook friends you haven’t spoken to online before. The feature won’t help you if the person doesn’t have any information set to “public” however. The update is rolling out for iOS and Android today in the US, UK, France and India.… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Mat Carpenter has a knack for creating devious ideas that get the Web excited. The 23-year-old Australian was the original brains behind ShipYourEnemiesGlitter, the site that Product Hunt’s Ryan Hoover called “the ultimate troll product”, and just this week launched Abusive Elmo on Demand. I dropped Carpenter a line at his lair – Sofa Moolah, the SEO and marketing firm he co-founded in 2011 – to find out what his plans for the foul-mouthed furry one are. After all, he managed to sell the glitter bombing site for $85,000 without mailing a single order. New blog post: The Entire Ship Your Enemies… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Google’s interest in software for low-spec devices might take it through the emerging market and straight to the Internet of Things. According to The Information, Google is preparing to release an Android build capable of running on devices with as little as 32 megabytes of RAM, codenamed “Brillo”. The previous threshold for Android was 512 megabytes, but that’s meant for smartphones and wearables. Brillo is reportedly aimed at the myriad of sensors and dongles that comprise your connected life. Based on Android, Brillo is said to have the same purpose: bringing together disparate hardware onto a single software platform. Currently, Brillo… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
Ever wanted to take a picture, but never actually see it? How about seeing a stranger’s picture in return? Mistaken allows you to take a picture, submit it, and never see it again. In exchange, you will get to see a stranger’s picture that they, in turn, will never see again. You will download this app You will take photos You will never see those photos again You will see other people’s photos. Maybe You don’t need an account to use the app. Simply download the app to your Android device and start taking pictures. Each picture you take will show… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
We’ve known that Mozilla’s Firefox browser is coming to iOS devices for some time now, but it’s been a while since we’ve heard any updates until today. Spotted by TechCrunch, there’s now an invite request page asking for a few details if you want a chance at testing it out, like which device you use, and how proficient an iOS app user you consider yourself to be. To be in with a shot of beta testing, you’ll need an iPhone or iPad running iOS 8 or newer. This still doesn’t mean a full release is any nearer, but a public beta probably isn’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 6 days ago on the next web
We first wrote about Kwilt last November when it debuted as an online aggregator offering photo editing and collage capabilities. The concept is to take control of a plethora of digital photos scattered across the internet to create a giant camera roll — bringing all your photos together in one place from devices, cloud-based platforms and social networks. The app does not store images, but accesses them from wherever they reside. A new version of Kwilt, launching today, features an overhaul of the user interface aimed at making the app easier to use, with an updated collage creator. The app had already let you stream photos from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Photobucket, Flickr, OneDrive,… This story continues at The Next Web

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