posted 9 days ago on the next web
On Nov. 15, 2021, U.S. officials announced that they had detected a dangerous new debris field in orbit near Earth. Later in the day, it was confirmed that Russia had destroyed one of its old satellites in a test of an anti-satellite weapon. Wendy Whitman Cobb is a space security researcher. She explains what these weapons are and why the debris they create is a problem now – and in the future. What do we know? Anti-satellite weapons, commonly referred to as ASATs, are any weapon that can temporarily impair or permanently destroy an orbiting satellite. The one that Russia…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 9 days ago on the next web
It’s one thing to know how you’re doing against your metrics. But even if you’re knocking it out of the park, if you don’t know why you’re doing well, you won’t be able to replicate your success. That’s why, at Zapier, we use attribution to understand how customer actions result in certain business outcomes. Attribution is a way for us to see how much each of our activities — across marketing, product, support, and more — is influencing the customer journey. It gives us a holistic view of how each touchpoint — from a blog post to an email to…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
Most of the ebikes we’ve tested at TNW have futuristic designs, ample smart features, or minimalist aesthetics. But sometimes you just want something a little more classic, and for that, the Electric Bike Company’s Model Y exactly fits the bill. Made in the USA Electric Bike Company is a relatively rare breed of an ebike brand in that its bikes are actually designed and built in the USA. Pretty much all of the company’s bikes are some variety of beach cruiser, and though some components are sourced from outside the US, the company builds frames to order in California. This…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
Google News holds a special place in the world of journalism. When multiple media outlets report on the same topic in a short amount of time, the articles that make it to the main News page are seen by the most people. It’s no different than any other media industry. If you’re a musician, you want your song to show up on Spotify’s main page. If you’re in a comedy movie, you want it to be listed first in the “comedy” section on Netflix. That’s why one of my crowning achievements as a journalist was convincing the Google News algorithm…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Google

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
On a crisp autumn morning in London town, I awoke to an email from someone whom I hate but just can’t quit: Amazon. The company was writing to notify me of some important news: it will soon stop accepting Visa credit cards for UK payments. Customers will still be able to use Visa’s debit cards, but the firm’s credit cards are getting dumped on January 19. The coverup story notification email from Amazon. Amazon blamed the move on Visa’s high processing fees, but conspiracy theorists suspect something bigger is afoot. Were Jeff Bezos and his Sun Valley buddies plotting a…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Amazon

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
China’s dominance in manufacturing has made it the factory of the world. The subsequent economic growth enriched an ever-expanding middle class, and the country’s retail industry has quickly adapted to supply a growing appetite for consumption. Some of these developments in the way people spend their money, powered by the latest technology, will soon be appearing on a device near you. Indeed, at the start of this year, The Economist suggested that retailers everywhere should look to China, and some are already doing so. So what will China’s “retail revolution” bring to the rest of the world? Here are five…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
The Covid-19 pandemic has transformed how and where people work. Although it’s difficult to predict the long-term trends that will evolve as a result, it’s clear that many tech workers are considering moving away from expensive city centres. Back in February, Spotify announced that its 6,550 employees can choose where they want to work in the future. Whether that’s in an office, a coworking space, or a beach in Bali. It doesn’t matter! In 2020, Dropbox also announced they were going to have a ‘virtual first’ workplace. While employees will primarily work from home (or wherever they choose), they can…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
TLDR: With nearly 2,000 courses between them, the Stone River eLearning and StackSkills Unlimited Lifetime Membership Bundle offer all the training you need to learn virtually anything. 2021 is rapidly counting down to its final days, with 2022 just a few short weeks away. When you step back and think about everything you accomplished this year, are you happy with those results? Ask most people about their annual resolutions and for those who didn’t accomplish their goals, more than half say lack of self control is what did them in. So for 2022…no excuses. With the training in the Stone…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
TLDR: This award-winning app can help you complete any PDF project, from editing to filling out forms to even creating PDFs of your own. PDFs pulled away as the primary web document format of the digital age in the early 90s because they offered high quality versions of those documents in a comparatively small file size. But while they looked great and didn’t take up much space, the downside of PDFs have always been just as forward-facing. Even with many editors and across all operating systems, PDFs can still be a bear to hassle with. Of course, it doesn’t always…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
On Monday, I received the draft of a new marketing campaign for a company I follow. It looked professional, but not in a good way. It was easy to imagine what kind of conversation preceded this campaign. Someone probably said, “I want it to look professional,” and so the marketers went with that. The campaign reflected a mature and professional organization. But it also looked like it could fit any organization. It was polished, clean, and corporate. But not original, emotional and personal. As you can tell, I’m not a big fan of professionalism. I’m much more into amateurs, and…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
Facebook has rebranded itself to Meta, and is fully committed to building a metaverse. To achieve its grand vision, it’ll need to launch multiple groundbreaking devices, controllers, and supporting hardware. The company has already shown off some concepts and research projects in this area, and some of them are fascinating. Here’s a list of what we’ve seen so far: Haptic gloves In its series of prototype devices, gloves with haptic feedback for VR. These gloves are meant to make you ‘feel’ grabbing an object or running your hand along a surface in the virtual world. To achieve this, Meta’s engineers…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
Another day, another Snapchat feature lands up on Instagram. The Meta-owned app has now implemented a ‘rage shake’ feature that lets you shake your phone to report a bug. Last night, Instagram‘s chief, Adam Mosseri, announced this feature alongside another one that will let you delete a specific photo from a carousel. Pretty neat. You can watch the feature in action in the video below from the 55-second mark. You can also turn the toggle off so you don’t accidentally land on the bug reporting page. Covering ✌️ this week: – Carousel Deletion (finally!)– Rage Shake Did you know about…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Instagram

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posted 10 days ago on the next web
I’m calling it. 2021 was the year of the electric vehicle. I predict, 2022 is the year of circular design.  We recently saw batteries makers Northvolt produce its first lithium-ion battery cell featuring a nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) cathode produced with metals recovered through battery waste recycling. This is a big deal.  While this is a huge leap in battery innovation, we’re not entirely there yet. The company aims to produce cells with 50% recycled material by 2030 — that’s a long way off.  What interests me just as much is that other materials from battery recycling — recovered copper, aluminum, and…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
Here’s a sentence I never thought I’d write, let alone in 2021: Apple today announced Self Service Repair, a program that will allow everyday customers to buy genuine Apple repair parts and tools to fix their own broken devices, starting with the iPhone 12 and 13. In related news, the domestic pig, Sus domesticus, has recently been spotted flying south for the winter. Seriously though, my mouth was agape as I read Apple’s press release. I can still hardly believe it as I type this. Apple notes that the program, which begins in early 2022, will initially focus “on the…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Apple

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
A renowned theoretical computer science expert recently released an astonishing physics pre-print paper that tosses fuel on the fiery debate over… whether humans could use wormholes to traverse the universe or not. Don’t worry, I’ll explain what this has to do with self-aware robots in due course. Fun with physics First, however, let’s lay the foundation for our speculation with a quick glance at this all-new wormhole theory. The pre-print paper comes courtesy of French researcher Pascal Koiran. According to them, if you apply a different theoretical math metric to our understanding of gravity at the edge of a black…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
Think back to when you were a kid, and people asked what job you wanted to do when you grew up. Did you say a truck driver? Well, now, once you turn 18, you can become one. But why would you want to?  The Developing Responsible Individuals for a Vibrant Economy (DRIVE-Safe) is changing to allow 18-year-olds to drive trucks across states. While  48 out of 50 US states currently allow 18-year-olds to obtain a Commercial Driving License until federal law is changed, they cannot drive a truck across state lines until they are 21.   As a result, transportation secretary Pete…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
Contrary to what many skeptics preach, there’s not enough data yet to confirm that EVs are more likely to catch fire than internal combustion engine cars. But there’s un irrefutable fact: when electric vehicles do catch fire, they burn fiercely and require a new skillset for emergency respondents to fight the flames. Austrian firefighting equipment manufacturer Rosenbauer has developed a special EV fire extinguisher, specifically designed to tackle the complexities of EV fires, Rideapart reports.  But first, things first. What makes electric car fires unique? Yes, lithium-ion batteries are flammable The issue is the lithium-ion batteries that power EVs up.…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
TLDR: The Lamp Depot Minimalist LED Corner Floor Lamp casts up to 16 million colors and over 300 different lighting patterns to remake a room strictly through lighting. For their hundreds of different possible styles and configurations, lamps don’t always get loads of attention as central room decor. But it’s tough not to earn some attention when you’re not even sure that a lamp IS a lamp. That’s part of what makes the Lamp Depot Minimalist LED Corner Floor Lamp ($89.99, 40 percent off, from TNW Deals) such a cool addition to virtually any room. Sliding unobtrusively into a corner…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
Twitter may be a cesspit, but sometimes it’s worth trudging through toxic waste in search of buried treasure. If you find a pithy wisecrack or a memorable meme, dysentery doesn’t feel so awful. Unless, of course, Twitter’s auto-refresh vaporizes the tweet before you’ve pulled it out of the pigshit. After tormenting users with this issue for years, the bird app has finally shown some mercy. Twitter announced on Tuesday that it will no longer automatically refresh your feed. Instead, you can now choose when you want to load new tweets by clicking on the tweet counter bar at the top…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Twitter

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
Light is fast. In fact, it is the fastest thing that exists, and a law of the universe is that nothing can move faster than light. Light travels at 186,000 miles per second (300,000 kilometers per second) and can go from the Earth to the Moon in just over a second. Light can streak from Los Angeles to New York in less than the blink of an eye. While 1% of anything doesn’t sound like much, with light, that’s still really fast – close to 7 million miles per hour! At 1% the speed of light, it would take a…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
I love reading books and that’s why I have a membership card for my city’s public library. Do I visit it often? No, I don’t. I’m normally too busy or lazy to leave the house just for that. For the same reasons, I have a stash of books that I did manage to borrow from the library, which I return long after the due date and end up paying some pretty big fines. But what if I could have access to books while strolling around the city to get a coffee or something? That’d definitely make it easier. So it’s…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
I don’t want this to be my Jerry Maguire moment but to be honest, I’m sick of hearing the words ‘digital transformation.’ What does it even mean anymore? It’s such a hyped-up term, overused by a market saturated with evangelists spouting conceptual nonsense, amplifying its enigma-like existence (and profiting handsomely from it). It normally starts with the C-Suite coming back from a strategy week, a Silicon Valley trip, or a CMO change — in tow is a strategic imperative on doing something better ‘digitally.’ This enthusiasm trickles down and results in a bunch of smart people sitting in a room…This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 11 days ago on the next web
When’s the last time you used Windows Media Player? What about Microsoft’s Groove Music app? If you’re anything like me, it was probably right after getting a new computer or completing a fresh install, when you tried to play some music or videos only to remember you haven’t installed foobar2000 or VLC yet. Needless to say, the antiquated Windows Media Player looks completely outdated with Windows 11‘s modern UI, and Groove has been lackluster since Microsoft gave up on its streaming service, so it’s about time they got a replacement. The company today began to roll out the new simply…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Microsoft

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posted 12 days ago on the next web
IBM and David Clarke Cause just announced Saaf Water as this year’s 2021 grand prize winner! Saaf Water is the first team from India to take the grand prize and their amazing story represents everything that’s good and necessary about the Call for Code challenge. Per an IBM press release: Saaf Water will receive $200,000 and support to incubate, test, and deploy their solution from the IBM Service Corpsand expert partners in the Call for Code ecosystem. The India-based team will also receive assistance from The Linux Foundation to open source their application so developers around the world can improve,…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: IBM

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posted 12 days ago on the next web
I don’t usually pass along Twitter gossip like it’s news, but it isn’t everyday the world’s most famous whistle-blower gets into a tissy with the underground rulers of all things search. Let me rewind: Edward Snowden, everybody’s favorite fugitive-turned-technology-critic, shot out a seemingly off-the-cuff post on Twitter today professing his disdain for the current state of internet search: Is it just me, or have search results become absolute garbage for basically every site? It's nearly impossible to discover useful information these days (outside the ArchWiki). — Edward Snowden (@Snowden) November 16, 2021 In what, to this reporter, appears to be…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Twitter

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