posted 2 days ago on the next web
When developer Stavros Korokithakis was refused a landline in his new office by the phone company, he took that anger and put it to good (and ridiculous) use – turning an old rotary phone into a mobile handset. He says the whole project, which uses open-source code, an Arduino, a GSM shield and, of course, that orange rotary phone, took about two days to complete and cost a grand total of $150. You can find extensive instructions on how to build your own frustrating handheld at the link below. ➤ The iRotary Saga [Stavros.io] Read next: Build your own Raspberry Pi-powered handheld… This story continues at The Next Web

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A little over a month ago, Google began suggesting users install Android apps right from its search results. Today, iOS users are getting a similar treatment. The App Indexing feature allows the search engine to pull content from Android apps directly into its results, and open up the link right in the relevant Android app. Should the user not have the app installed, they would be prompted to download it from the Play Store. Today’s update will allow iOS app makers to do the same in Chrome for iOS and the main Google App. Google’s launching the feature with a… This story continues at The Next Web

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Every year, Mary Meeker, partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, releases her internet trends report full of insight about everything from mobile device usage to internet usage breakdowns. Meeker unveiled the 2015 report at Recode’s Code conference today. Here’s the full report: Highlights include: Internet users grew by 8 percent in 2015, down from 10 percent in 2013 and 11 percent in 2012 Mobile subscriptions grew to 7 billion, with 2.1 billion smartphone subscriptions New internet users are “likely to onboard” for the first time via a messaging app 64 percent of people are online in the US using a… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google Maps got its first public API 10 years ago and the team behind it is setting off on a massive US road trip to celebrate the milestone. They’re making the journey in a customized vintage 1959 GM tour bus and will be holding meet ups with developers, bikers, athletes and, apparently, Elmo, along the way. The whole thing is concluding with an event at Disney World. The bus will begin its trip tomorrow in San Francisco, where it will be stationed outside Google I/O on the corner of  4th Street and Howard Street. Unlike the actual conference, it’s open to anyone,… This story continues at The Next Web

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Ever wanted to turn something on your computer into a playable game of Super Mario Brothers?  Well, of course you do. Dream no more. Aaron Randall just made all of our big kid dreams come true with Screentendo. Screentendo is a Mac app that runs through Xcode, allowing you to drag a semi-transparent window over any part of your screen. Whatever is inside of that window will be analyzed and turned into Super Mario Brothers world, complete with a little Mario that you can move around. This concept came about when Randall, who was wanting to learn Cocoa and Sprite Kit… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google introduced its e-book typeface Literata last week, giving Google Play Books a well-needed spruce up. Now Amazon has dropped a similar gift on users of its Kindle iOS app. The company quietly introduced Bookerly, “a new Kindle exclusive font designed for reading on digital screens,” on Kindle Fire devices late last year and has been rolling it out across its hardware ever since. Bookerly replaces Caecilia as the Kindle app’s new default font. It’s a custom made serif typeface, which definitely looks better at first glance than its predecessor, a slab serif that’s more suited to headlines than serving as body text. Caecilia Bookerly… This story continues at The Next Web

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Whether it is gaming on your iPad, taking photos with your iPhone, or listening to your iPod, Apple’s “toys” really are fun to play with. So we are giving you the chance to win any of them up to the value of $750. Along with the devices mentioned above, the winner of this giveaway could choose a gleaming Apple Watch, or maybe the convenience of an Apple TV. It’s like being a kid at Christmas again. For your chance to win, click through, create an account to claim your entry. Then, share your entry on social media for more chances to… This story continues at The Next Web

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Any.do, a note-taking and list-making app for mobile devices, has partnered with Ginger Keyboard to enable users of the latter to quickly make lists using the former. Announced today, the integration brings Any.do functionality directly within Ginger Keyboard’s Smart Bar, which lets you switch apps without closing the keyboard. As well as allowing users to take notes directly to Any.do, the integration also introduces the option to access your schedule (the daily planning feature) directly from the keyboard too. It’s not a revolutionary move, but anything that cuts down on the number of times users need to jump between different… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google’s instant search suggestions are about to get a better. An update, which is rolling out now, shows answers to short questions directly in the autocomplete options as you type them. A query like “when did Hawaii become a state?” shows the answer in the suggestions dropdown. The change only appears to work with queries that have short answers, mainly related to dates. It’s a subtle tweak but it save you from having to wait for the results page to load – perfect for your next pub quiz. The change appears to be rolling out slowly, with some people seeing… This story continues at The Next Web

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The UK’s freshly-minted Tory government – the first majority Conservative administration to be elected since 1992 – has used its first Queen’s Speech to introduce plans for super-charged surveillance powers. In her address – which is written by the government and civil servants – the Queen said: Measures will also be brought forward to promote social cohesion and protect people by tackling extremism. New legislation will modernize the law on communications data, improve the law on policing and criminal justice. A previous attempt to push through similar powers was stymied by the Conservatives’ Lib Dem coalition partners in 2012. No obvious roadblock… This story continues at The Next Web

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There is no greater adventure than founding your own business. But before you embark on the journey, check out these business-related deals — they provide invaluable knowledge and resources, all at great low prices. 96% off the Skillsology ‘Start Your Own Business’ bundle If you are a new entrepreneur, or fancy becoming one, this bundle of seven courses is a good place to start. It concentrates on all the skills required to run a business successfully, taught by instructors with years of experience. Along with the all-round Start Your Own Business course, there are tracks on the math of business,… This story continues at The Next Web

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We’ve been having a bit of a debate about ad blockers around here recently – Martin Bryant for the prosecution, Owen Williams speaking up for the defence – but here’s one I think we can all agree on: The Ad Filter, a browser extension for Firefox and Chrome created by advertising organization D&AD, is the most hypocritical ad blocker ever. Once you’ve installed it, the extension replaces the ads you’re served on YouTube with ones that have received awards. Or to be more precise, ones that have received D&AD Awards. The organization claims “it works like magic – the more great ads you see, the… This story continues at The Next Web

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A major bug found in the latest version of iOS causes phones to crash when they receive a special/malicious text message. If someone sends you the below string of Arabic characters via SMS or iMessage, it can cause the Messages app to stop working and can take down the entire phone if it appears in a lock screen notification. لُلُصّبُلُلصّبُررً ॣ ॣh ॣ ॣ 冗 The bug appears to be related to how iOS processes Unicode text for banner notifications using the CoreText API. It affects iOS 7 and iOS 8 right now and the only fix is to send a photo or piece of text to the… This story continues at The Next Web

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First there was Meerkat, then Periscope and now we have Streaming Unicorns. Launching today, the project started off as an internal hack for the folks at Swedish startup Lookback. Unicorns, as it is affectionately known, is a Mac app that connects to your iPhone or iPad to let you stream your homescreen as you use it, or anything you want really. Similar to other streaming apps, you can share a link to your stream on Twitter or Facebook, but you are also given the URL to share privately if you prefer. Anyone watching your stream can communicate with you using text… This story continues at The Next Web

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You’re no doubt aware that Facebook shares your location with friends, but what you probably didn’t realize is how precise that data is or how easy it is to extract from the service. Aran Khanna, a student developer in Cambridge, MA, has created a Chrome extension that grabs location data from Facebook Messenger and rapidly plots your friends’ locations on a map. Named ‘Marauder’s Map’, in a cheeky nod to Harry Potter, the extension loads the map in Messenger’s Web interface. The data is retrieved from messages sent with location sharing enabled. That usually means from mobile devices, as it’s… This story continues at The Next Web

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Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis has announced a collaboration with US-based biotech startup Rani Therapeutics to create a “robotic pill” that can deliver complex drugs which would usually be given with injections. The capsule is taken like a conventional pill, but contains tiny needles made of sugar that deliver drugs into the wall of the intestine. The approach could make the dream of delivering large-molecule biologic drugs in pill form possible. Most previous attempts have been stymied as the compounds are broken down in the stomach. The startup says it will be running feasibility studies over the next 18 to 24 months, evaluating which… This story continues at The Next Web

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Google Chrome is both my productivity hub and the bane of my existence. I’d gladly switch to something else, but its support for useful extensions makes it an essential part of my workflow. Even in 2015, I fire up Winamp when I need some music to keep me going at work — I’m old-school like that. For new tracks, I usually head to YouTube or SoundCloud, but thanks to a new Chrome extension, I can tune in without launching a new tab. SoundCloudify lets you stream music from both those sources in a neat and clean interface. You can search YouTube… This story continues at The Next Web

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A couple of months ago, DJIT, the company behind the DJ app Edjing, announced that it was bringing a wireless crossfader to market. This excited quite a lot of people, and so, looking to capitalize on that support, DJIT decided to bring the product to eager buyers via Kickstarter, so that it can garner last minute ideas before setting the final design. For example, one of the changes in the interim since we first looked at it is the switch from using a plastic shell to a metal one, which should help make it more robust and give it a slightly classier air.… This story continues at The Next Web

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For most us, waking up to an alarm clock is no fun — even if it is carefully calibrated with a favorite musical selection. Something about the sudden combination of sound and light can be inherently jarring — a real downer. Teenage developer Guillaume Rolland, a French engineering student, has come up with a way to ease that frustration with an olfactory “alarm” clock called SensorWake. At the appointed time, instead of sound or light, SensorWake softly emits a scent that promises to awaken you in two minutes or less. Launched today as a $50,000 Kickstarter campaign, this patented alarm clock awakens you with a… This story continues at The Next Web

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Wunderlist announced today that it’s integrating team communication app Slack into its task management service, allowing users to create tasks while chatting with their colleagues. You’ll need to follow a few simple steps outlined on the Wunderlist blog to connect the two apps and choose a list for Slack to keep an eye on. Once you’ve done that, you can type /wunderlist add [task here] to add a new task. When you comment on or complete tasks, it’ll let everyone in your channel know. If you forget your Wunderlist commands, you can always look them up by typing /wunderlist help at… This story continues at The Next Web

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Search giants Google and Yahoo are interested in buying Flipboard, a newsreader app, according to the Wall Street Journal. The news comes just a day after Twitter was reported to be in talks to acquire the company for about $1 billion. Negotiations have been stalled since April, though. Flipboard says its news aggregator had 65 million monthly active users this May. It’s raised $160 million from investors by December 2013. Why is everyone interested in Flipboard? The recent trend among internet companies engaging users with content could be the reason. Facebook recently launched Instant Articles for faster access to publishers’… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 3 days ago on the next web
At Recode’s Code Conference, Snapchat’s Evan Spiegel announced something dedicated Snapchat users are probably going to like. Instead of pressing and holding the screen to watch video, Snapchat is working on a way to get video playing straight away. It’s not known if users will need to tap the screen (or a ‘play’ button) or if videos will just start playing as you view them. One of the reasons Snapchat employs a press-and-hold scheme for video playback is that it ensures engagement. Changing that model is risky as Snapchat wouldn’t actually know you’re viewing video. Spiegel may be confident Snapchat’s size means… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 3 days ago on the next web
A fix for the ongoing WiFi and connectivity issues many Mac users are experiencing may be on the horizon. In the latest build of OS X, Apple has dropped the discoveryd networking process, which many point to as reason for their headaches. In a surprising twist, Apple is going with mDNSResponder — the process discoveryd replaced. Apple hasn’t addressed the change, and we should all keep in mind this is a beta build of the operating system. 9to5Mac is reporting issues with services like Handoff and AirDrop (any Bonjour features, really) may have brought on the regression to mDNSResponder. Reverting to mDNSResponder was also a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 3 days ago on the next web
Vox media has agreed to purchase technology and business website Recode. Terms were not disclosed, but it’s reportedly an all-stock deal. Recode was founded by Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, who split from The Wall Street Journal and All Things D nearly two years ago. Recode now shares a parent with sites including The Verge and Vox.com. Though similar in scope, The Verge’s Editor-in-Chief, Nilay Patel, notes that Recode is more business-focused, while his title focuses on tech and culture. You will see some immediate changes, though. Recode’s reviews team of  Lauren Goode, Katie Boehret, and Bonnie Cha will be joining The… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 3 days ago on the next web
Another day, another hack. The Associated Press is reporting that hackers stole tax information from over 100,000 taxpayers. The says the thieves were able to access the system with a “Get Transcript API”. They accessed the information by clearing security screens requiring the person’s Social Security Number, date of birth, tax filing status, and street address. The IRS told the AP that about 200,000 attempts were made from “questionable email domains,” and 100,000 . The agency says 23 million transcripts were legitimately downloaded, but a 50% success rate for the thieves is not very encouraging. On the other hand, the… This story continues at The Next Web

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