posted about 11 hours ago on the next web
Freelance developers have a good gig going on these days. They get the opportunity to work on many different projects and build new skills in the process. Many of the best can pick and choose projects, once they have gained enough years of experience and a solid reputation to attract repeat clients. They often make great money, and generally have more control over their hours. For software organizations, indie developers can be a lifesaver when workload increases unexpectedly or it’s not economically viable to hire full-time developers. When there’s a talent shortage, it’s usually much easier and faster to find… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 12 hours ago on the next web
Google has launched Crowdsource, a new Android app designed to seek the help of users to improve the company’s services through microtasks. If you’ve got a few moments to spare, you can assist Google with image transcription, handwriting recognition and – if you’re fluent in more than one language – translation. Each task only takes a couple of seconds and ranges from assessing the accuracy of translations for text and Google Maps labels to typing out words captured in photographs (just like captchas). So what do you get for your hard work? Nothing – for now. Google tracks your contributions,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 15 hours ago on the next web
Amazon is tired of sellers hawking counterfeit goods on its ecommerce platform, and it’s now taking action to keep them off the site entirely. CNBC reports that the company has begun implementing stringent conditions for merchants who want to sell popular brands, such as one-time non-refundable fees of about $1,000-$1,500 per label and invoices from manufacturers or distributors that show the purchase of 30 items within the last 90 days. A spokesman told CNBC: We want customers to be able to shop with confidence on Amazon. For certain products and categories, Amazon requires additional performance checks, other qualification requirements, and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 17 hours ago on the next web
Nearly two months ago, Google included a ‘Cast’ option in a beta build of Chrome, which allowed users to beam content from their browser to Chromecast-equipped TVs and speakers, over a local wireless network. The company has now baked the Cast feature into the latest publicly available version of Chrome, so you can use it without an extension. You can find it in Chrome’s menu, with options to choose which device you want to stream to and adjust the volume. If you don’t see it yet, open the menu > Help > About Google Chrome and update to the latest version… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 18 hours ago on the next web
Kim Dotcom, the brazen founder of file hosting service Megaupload, has been granted permission by a New Zealand judge to livestream his appeal against his extradition to the US. That’s a big win for Dotcom, who is wanted in the US on charges of copyright infringement, racketeering and money laundering. His request to stream the court proceedings was opposed by the US; the prosecution raised concerns about the stream contaminating the potential jury pool being contaminated. Breaking News: Judge has granted live streaming! Success! — Kim Dotcom (@KimDotcom) August 29, 2016 In a chat with the BBC, Dotcom explained that… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 23 hours ago on the next web
Three days after Facebook fired all its human curators, Saira Khan, a former Facebook curator, took to Twitter to share her experience with the company. Khan, now the social media editor at The New Yorker, detailed “the most absurd” things she saw in her time as a Facebook news curator. Some are heart-warming, others are gut-wrenching, but it’s an interesting peek into the lives of the people that formerly decided what was important enough to be a trending topic. According to Khan, the most accurate and in-depth explanation of life as a news curator is found in a Guardian post titled:… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 23 hours ago on the next web
Windows 10 can use a lot data in the background. That’s a problem if you’re on the go a lot, and frequently need to tether your laptop to your phone’s network often. Or maybe you just don’t want Windows 10 constantly downloading huge updates in the background, even if Microsoft says it tries to only do so at times of low activity. Though we recommend downloading updates as they come – they often include important security and hardware updates – sometimes you want to control when and where that happens. Thankfully there’s a way to keep the rein in the amount… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
According to a new report from Bloomberg, Apple is set to announce much more hardware after it drops the iPhone 7 next week. New iMacs, a MacBook Pro and a 5K display are on their way, which is not surprising. What might make you scratch your head is the Air, which is also receiving an update. With the MacBook arriving last year, many wondered if Apple was simply going to replace the Air with that model in its lineup, effectively creating an iPhone-esque MacBook lineup with a base model and a Pro. But now that we have an iPhone SE,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
In the past, Snapchat has seen platform-specific releases of films and television shows, but this marks the first time the service has ventured into the video game market. It’s a forgettable move and one that’s more marketing than gaming, but it does give us at least a glimpse into what the future of the platform could look like. The game, ‘Serena Match Point’ lets you play as Serena Williams through 22 levels of timing-based monotony. Each of the 22 levels signifies one of the 22 major events she’s won over the course of her career. Each event takes you through a historic… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
As part of Mark Zuckerberg’s trip to Italy, the Facebook CEO and his wife, Priscilla Chan, sat down with Pope Francis. Following the devastating earthquake that hit Italy last week, Zuckerberg discussed the importance of connecting people around the world without internet access. He spoke on his admiration of The Pope’s mercy, tenderness and progressive views on technology, especially as they pertain to communicating with people of every faith around the globe. Zuckerberg then offered him a replica of its solar-powered drone, Aquila, designed to facilitate this sort of communication for unconnected — or under-connected — areas. Sadly, this one is affixed to… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Instagram, which unabashedly stole Snapchat’s Stories feature, is now iterating on it by suggesting who to follow based on their own Stories. It’s a feature many Snapchat users long for in a roundabout sort of way, too. Though many still prefer Snapchat’s Stories feature, it’s still a walled garden limited to who you’ve already followed (unless it’s brands). Under the Explore tab, users will now see Stories from accounts Instagram thinks they should follow. Like the app’s main page, Stories will appear as a bar across the top of the Explore tab. Instagram also says over 100 million users now… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Apple finally sent out an invite for an event happening September 7, almost certainly to launch the iPhone 7. Though the invite is very sparse there’s a big clue as to what you might be able to expect from the new cameras. And no, we’re not just jokingly overanalyzing it: Apple's invite is unusually obvious this time: its just one circle for every headphone jack, slowly disappearing pic.twitter.com/lIda3jYuED — David Pierce (@pierce) August 29, 2016 Yes, the bubbles do seem to suggest something "camera" related. iPhone 7 Plus camera differentiation. — Neil Cybart (@neilcybart) August 29, 2016 Decoding Apple’s blurry… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
A California legal firm filed the necessary paperwork to start a class action lawsuit over Apple’s so-called ‘touch disease’ problem. As we reported last week, iPhone 6 and 6 Plus owners are complaining of a gray flickering bar at the top of the screen that renders the phone unresponsive — or less responsive — to touch. After restarting the phone, the issue normally disappears temporarily, only to come back at a later time. Repair facilities, like iFixit, report that it’s one of the most common problems it sees with the iPhone 6. Apple, on the other hand, is basically pretending it doesn’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Philips is making another investment in smart home lighting. Hue owners can now buy a motion detector that will turn on connected lights around their home. Simply named the Hue motion sensor, the $40 add-on uses two AAA batteries, which Philips says last about two years(!). It affixes to surfaces using double-sided tape, so you can stick it just about anywhere. The sensor is also highly configurable. It work with the Hue app to control scenes, so you can have the sensor turn on living room lights when it senses you on the front porch. Lights can also be dimmed… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
No Man’s Sky (NMS) is a truly remarkable game with untold potential. Sadly, it only gives you the warm and fuzzies for the first few hours. Soon after, the excitement wears off. What replaces it is a feeling of repetition as you explore a different-looking planet and ultimately find the same things. It’s easily the biggest gaming disappointment in 2016. Steam recognizes this, and it has altered its return policy ever-so-slightly to accommodate a mob of slighted gamers. Typically, Steam only issues refunds if you’ve played no more than two hours and purchased the game no longer than 48 hours ago.  Steam wasn’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
I like to think of myself as an inherently trusting person. Take this story, for example. Two weeks ago, I was in Liverpool city center with my fiancee. It was 1am and we were walking to the hotel. This is typically the time when most pubs and bars close, sending their patrons off into the night in search of ATMs, fast food, and other places to drink. As we were trundling up the aptly-named Hardman Street, a young man no more than nineteen years old approached us. “Excuse me” he said, as my fiancee tugged my arm, silently imploring me to… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
As we get ready for Apple’s September 7 event — and probably a new iPhone 7 and 7 Plus — a spec sheet for the two new devices has leaked. From techtastic, we learn the following about the Phone 7: Screen: 4.7-inch, 750×1334 resolution Processors: A10 and M10 RAM: 2GB LPDDR4 Battery: 1960 mAh Camera: 12 megapixel, 1/2.6-inch sensor, F/1.9, 1:3 microns pixels And the iPhone 7 Plus: Screen: 5.5-inch, 1080×1920 resolution Processors: A10 and M10 RAM: 3GB LPDDR4 Battery: 2910 mAh Camera: Two 12 megapixel, 1/3-inch sensor, F/1.9 If you’re wondering how they stack up to the 6S and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
All current reports to indicate that the flagship 2017 iPhone will include a curved OLED panel. But new rumors indicate that Apple isn’t planning on staying with the technology for long. Instead, it’s likely to move on to a fancier technology called microLED. Wang Jyh-chau, CEO of LCD maker Innolux, notes that “OLED cannot replace LCD in terms of performance-cost ratio and reliability,” and that while OLED makes sense for the 2017 iPhone, Apple likely won’t want to hold on to the technology for long – especially given Samsung might have difficulty manufacturing OLED screens for both Apple and its own… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Fitbit may have released two new fitness trackers today, but it didn’t solve one of its core problems: software. The Fitbit app still doesn’t work with Apple’s HealthKit, which returns data to an accompanying Health app for iPhone users. It also doesn’t work with Google Fit. And its recent app update has been met with a cool reception from users. Basically, Fitbit doesn’t seem to understand software, or how its users want to gather data. It’s philosophical, too. Fitbit is trying to create a walled garden to compete with Apple and Google rather than work with them. But perhaps even… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Madden, it’s one of my must-purchase games each year and yet each iteration is slightly more disappointing than the last. The only people that get joy out of this game anymore are the hardcore football fans and the racist teenagers that like to make me cry while playing online. Seriously, it’s a shit storm of epic proportions and I’m a glutton for punishment that forgot my umbrella. To be fair, the dozen-or-so hours I’ve put into Madden 17 this year have shown real potential. It’s also shown a few glitches that make me believe that Madden developers are cruel, cruel people… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
It’s official: Apple is holding an event on September 7 at the Bill Graham Civic Center in San Francisco. As you might imagine, we’re expecting new iPhones — two, to be precise. An iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, which should have a few tricks up it sleeve. September 7, iPhone 7 — get it? Many think the newest iPhones will ditch the audio jack in favor of a Lightning connection for wired sound, and add a second speaker grill. Elsewhere, the larger iPhone 7 Plus is widely believed to have two cameras, while the iPhone 7 could see optical image… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
T-Mobile’s new ONE plan was met with much criticism when it was announced a couple of weeks ago, for good reason. But the company is now backtracking slightly on some of the biggest pain points on its new plan. The plan originally included unlimited tethering, which sounded great until you realized it was capped at 2G speeds (or 128 kbps) often with lower speeds in the real world. In other words, it was barely a step up from dial-up, and pretty much unusable for anything you’d want to do on the Web, especially on a full-fledged computer. It was a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
You read that right. You can now buy a fully functioning Mac for only $329. Well, until Apple sends out a cease and desist letter. The HacBook Elite is a so-called Hackintosh laptop that’s capable to run macOS and is quick enough to boot in only 15 seconds. It comes inside a HP laptop case and is fully upgradable after purchase, just like any Windows PC. All other specifications are roughly as good as an entry-level MacBook Pro, except for notable parts like the Retina display. I really want to like the HacBook, if only for its extremely low price point — something rarely… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
It’s safe to say that most of us in the West don’t know much about Iran beyond its supposed nuclear weapons program. This is a shame, because despite its many problems, Iran boasts an old and beautiful culture, and has one of the youngest and most educated populations in the Middle East. Most of us don’t recognize Iran as a technological heavyweight, but since 2005 it has been quietly working on its own national intranet. The first stage in this ambitious project has been recently completed. President Hassan Rouhani said that the development of a “reliable, stable, and safe” network will… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
After Svpply’s closing two years ago there hasn’t been a shortage of alternatives for the popular shopping website. With Repick it’s easy to find great looking, well-designed products. Within minutes of browsing their website I got dangerously close to buying this hazy clock, a cute kitty LED light and a NASA logo t-shirt. That doesn’t mean it has no competition. There’s Very Goods, there’s Canopy and Amazon has its own Interesting Finds. However, Repick tries to be different in a few ways. For example, instead of being based on the choices of the community, Repick has a team of experts working to select products… This story continues at The Next Web

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