posted about 2 hours ago on the next web
Jason Zook is the founder of IWearYourShirt and author of Creativity For Sale. This post originally appeared on his blog. I’ve never heard of a highly creative or successful person being too busy. Let me rephrase that: I’ve never heard of a highly creative or successful person that I respect being too busy. The most creative people of our time are doing more things in a day than most people do in a week (or even month). But you know what you rarely hear a highly creative or successful person say? “I’m too busy.” Think about the people who you hear say “I’m… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 4 hours ago on the next web
At last year’s Google I/O developer conference, the company launched its official Gmail API. One year later, it’s adding a small but important feature to this API: Push notification support. The inclusion of push notification support means third party developers no longer have to poll Gmail for new messages, which helps eliminate time and extra network costs. As Google puts it, “Just subscribe to a Gmail mailbox and whenever a change occurs, the Gmail API will instantly notify your server.” Although you can still use IMAP, the official Gmail API will support all the features that come with Gmail, such… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 4 hours ago on the next web
Aaron Orendorff is a contributor at Entrepreneur, Fast Company, Business Insider, Success Magazine, CopyBlogger & MarketingProfs. You can check out how he’s “Saving the World from Bad Content” at iconiContent or on Twitter. J. J. Abrams is a geek. And I mean that in the best way possible. In fact, as one of the most successful geeks in Hollywood today, it’s a title Abrams wears proudly … When I was a kid, it was a huge insult to be a geek. Now it’s a point of pride in a weird way. Intelligence gives us the ability to craft, plan, love, and survive. Matching those… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 5 hours ago on the next web
XPRIZE‘s competitions touch the furthest reaches of human achievement in fields like healthcare, oceanography and even space exploration. The organization is currently designing a competition in the field of cybersecurity. In the second of this three-part series produced by XPRIZE, you’ll hear from some of the giants in the Internet and cyber-security fields as they relate stories of cybercrime becoming a worldwide business and the real possibility of cyber-warfare. Watch next: The end of privacy – ‘If you’ve got nothing to hide, you’ve got nothing to live for’

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posted about 6 hours ago on the next web
Google has confirmed that a prototype of its solar-powered drone designed to bring Internet service by air crashed earlier this month in New Mexico. News of the unmanned Solara 50’s crash, now coming to light, happened on May 1 on a private test site outside of Albuquerque. It was reportedly flying at an altitude of 20,000 feet when it began to fall. No one was injured in the crash, Bloomberg reports. The Solara 50, developed by Titan Aerospace, a company Google bought last year, is Google’s second initiative to provide Internet via sky; the first is Project Loon which peruses high altitude balloons. The drones are expected to… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 9 hours ago on the next web
It’s been a busy month for Android apps, with news from big names – Periscope from Twitter lading on the platform for the first time and notable updates to Flickr’s mobile apps. Then, of course, there’s the black-and-white photography app Lenka, and an overhauled version of QuizUp. All you need to do is peruse the list below and choose your favorites. Snap Me Up Maybe you’re not like me. Maybe you like your morning alarm. Maybe you like selfies. If that is the case, there’s a good chance you’ll also like Snap Me Up, a new Android app that won’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 11 hours ago on the next web
It’s easy to get consumed in our smartphones, tablets and laptops, considering everything they can do. But the side effects are often overlooked. Eye strain, retinal dysfunction and fatigue can all be caused by using electrical devices too much and at the wrong times of day. A recent study by BMJ Open analysed the sleep and device usage of 9,846 people aged between 16 and 19. It found that they only got around five hours of sleep a night, as a result of using tech before clocking off. It’s recommended that adults should get eight hours of sleep a night. Many optometry… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 11 hours ago on the next web
We’ve looked at a lot of new and updated iOS apps this month, with the usual healthy smattering of ones dedicated to messaging and photo organization /optimization. Some big names – like The New York Times and Flickr – also have revamped apps worth revisiting. All you need to do is peruse the list below and pick your own favorites. Kwilt Kwilt isn’t a new app – it first launched in November – but it did undergo a reasonably significant visual overhaul in May to make it easier to use. Alongside a tweaked UI, the multi-platform photo organizer also got a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 18 hours ago on the next web
Sometimes, when we let our imaginations run wild, incongruous visions appear. Artist Pierre Cerveau tried to imagine what an iPhone might have looked like in the era before the cell phone became ubiquitous. Turns out, in Cerveau’s minds eye, it would resemble a classic iPod with a rotary dial featuring a beige Mac Classic-style chassis and monochrome screen. Way less chunky than the cordless phones of the 1980s, Corveau imagines a comparatively slender model whose rotary dial is more reminiscent of the iPod’s click wheel than that era’s push-button phones. ➤ Pierre Cerveau  [via Cult of Mac]

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posted about 20 hours ago on the next web
Google may have released a ton of Android news yesterday, but that wasn’t all it had to show. We had the chance to try some of the awesome things the company’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team is working on, including the Projects Soli, Jacquard and Vault detailed earlier. Spoiler alert, they were all awesome. Project Jacquard One of the coolest things demoed at Google’s ATAP session this morning, Project Jacquard is a new kind of fabric created by Google that embeds conductive wire right into the textile. Google says the material can be made in virtually any color and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 21 hours ago on the next web
Controlling a smartphone via the sleeve on your coat isn’t something you can do — yet. If Google’s ATAP division has their way, we’ll all have the ability soon. Announced during a Google I/O session, Project Jacquard swings for the fences; Google even tapped Levi as their lone launch partner for Jacquard. The idea is that by weaving metallic threads into the fabrics we come into contact with during our day will have the ability to control a piece of tech. The thin metal fibers don’t have to be in denim, or even woven into a flat fabric. Project Jacquard’s… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 22 hours ago on the next web
Tempo, the artificial intelligence-powered smart calendar, has been acquired by Salesforce. A note from Tempo’s founders says the app will be discontinued on June 30, and is no longer accepting new users. Until then, the calendar is open to existing users. The app shows you information about your meetings such as location, transportation and parking options, social media posts from participants and other related documents. It also automates connecting into conference calls. “With Tempo, we created a smart calendar, using artificial intelligence to enable the next generation of mobile productivity. We brought context to your events and automated many of your… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 23 hours ago on the next web
I’m really hoping people aren’t trying to make Ross Ulbricht some sort of freedom hero now. He’s not, he’s a business man. #SilkRoad

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posted about 23 hours ago on the next web
Ross Ulbricht, convicted founder of the Silk Road online drug marketplace, was sentenced by a US federal judge to two life prison terms without parole. He also received several other sentences for convictions on lesser charges and was ordered to forfeit $184 million of the $187 million his site made before it was shut down two years ago. Ulbricht was convicted of trafficking drugs on the internet, and conspiracy for narcotics-trafficking, computer-hacking, money-laundering and running a criminal enterprise which generated some $1.2 billion in illegal bitcoin-based drug transactions. The sentence exceeds the 20-year mandatory minimum for the crimes, despite the defendant’s… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 24 hours ago on the next web
It was five years ago and it ended in failure. But the details are trickling out now about how the US tried to infect North Korea’s nuclear weapons program with a version of the Stuxnet computer virus. A Reuters report has it that the operation took place around the same time as a more successful attack on the Iranian nuclear program that demolished some 1000 uranium enriching centrifuges. A related virus targeted North Korean computers, but was thwarted by that government’s secrecy and the extreme isolation surrounding its communication networks. Whereas in North Korea you need police permission to even… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
With Facebook finally rolling out support for GIFs, now’s the perfect time for you to up your GIF game. Thankfully, a new app that’s ideal for creating DIY animated snaps has arrived. That app is GifLab, and it claims to be the “easiest way to create GIFs on your iOS device”. Created by Museworks, GifLab lets you snap new footage or use existing video and quickly turn it into a shareable GIF. You can also apply a range of filters, impose text and place emoji over your creations. The apps super easy user interface also lets you tweak both the speed and quality of the resulting file… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
I have a confession: unlike my fellow tech reporters, I’ve never been totally convinced virtual reality was much more than a fad. Not that I don’t want it to succeed. I’ve lusted over the Oculus Rift, marveled at Microsoft’s HoloLens from afar, and had fun with the original Cardboard, but content has seemed too scarce, inconvenient, or uninteresting outside of solo gaming. Google’s VR push at this year’s I/O has started to convince me otherwise – the new Jump and Expeditions experiences in particular. The New Cardboard Before we get to that, there’s that new Cardboard device. The hardware isn’t… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
One of the more popular announcements of yesterday’s Google I/O keynote was the immediate launch of Google Photos. This online photo service, which the company severed from its Google+ social network, was rolled out as a brand new photo app for Android, iOS and the Web. It is designed to provide a place for all your photos and videos to reside, help you organize and get creative with your photos and share and save the ones that are meaningful to you. An auto backup and syncing option is also available. With Google Photos, you can back up and store an unlimited number of high-quality photos and videos for… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Robots are becoming more and more sophisticated, and now can mimic the movements of animals. Researchers and developers at MIT have developed a robot that acts like a cheetah. Not only does it look somewhat like a cheetah and run like a cheetah, it can also now jump over obstacles in its path like a cheetah. This means they have successfully developed the first four-legged robot that can do this autonomously. Their robotic cheetah can currently run an average of 5 mph and jump obstacles up to 18 inches tall. The researchers have developed and use three different algorithms to allow the robot… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
If you’ve been using the new Google Photos app announced yesterday at Google I/O, you may be impressed with how smooth the interface is, or how easily the service indexes your photos. There’s a lot happening behind the scenes to make the magic happen; things you’re never supposed to see, but will nonetheless make you a happy Photos user. After the keynote address, Google went into more detail about what makes Photos special to a small group of media folk. While our review will give you some insight on Photos’ forward-facing performance, we now know what makes the app so uniquely… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
The appeal of using robots resides firmly in the fact they’re far more efficient at most tasks than a human. On the other side of the coin, what keeps them from becoming more of a fixture in our modern lives is their lack of adaptability and the need for constant maintenance. When a robot breaks, it is no longer capable of doing its job and to keep it from breaking, it requires regular maintenance from a human. Efficiency gains are then minimized, which is exactly why there isn’t a robot serving your frappuccino at the local Starbucks. This could soon change. Researchers at… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
“Passwords suck”. Google’s Regina Duggan said as much on-stage this morning at an ATAP session at Google I/O. We’ve got plenty of ways to manage passwords, but ATAP wants to turn your device use into the password with Project Vault. ATAP wants to trade “human cycles for machine cycles”. Sounds confusing, but your password is more personal than you think. You often choose one based on something you find clever or easy to type. To make the password personal again, ATAP is attempting to find a way to know you’re the one using a device, which will authenticate you even… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Google’s pulled the covers off App Invites, a new way for developers to encourage users to recommend their apps. The set of tools allows devs to easily incorporate SMS and email invitations, highlight recommended contacts, create personalized onboarding and measure the success of app invites with custom reports. It’s a timely development and giving users the ability to invite friends in a way that feels less sterile than a lot of the current approaches will definitely appeal to a lot of developers. App Invites doesn’t just give users a simple list of contacts to choose from. It will recommend specific… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
GoogletToday it also unveiled a partnership with Levis to create smart clothing that can control your devices. Google also unveiled a radar-based wearable that lets you control devices with just your fingers.

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Leading into Google I/O, one session caught everyone’s attention. Google ATAP — the company’s skunkworks division tasked with creating cool new things we’ll all actually use — teased their session with talk of a new wearable that would “literally” blow our socks off. Project Soli is that wearable, but it’s not the wearable you might think it is. It’s not a watch; it’s you. Google ATAP knows your hand is the best method you have for interaction with devices, but not everything is a device. Project Soli wants to make your hands and fingers the only user interface you’ll ever… This story continues at The Next Web

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