posted about 2 hours ago on the next web
Sex as we know it is about to change. We are already living through a new sexual revolution, thanks to technologies that have transformed the way we relate to each other in our intimate relationships. But we believe a second wave of sexual technologies is now starting to appear, and these are transforming how some people view their very sexual identity. People we refer to as “digisexuals” are turning to advanced technologies, such as robots, virtual reality (VR) environments, and feedback devices known as teledildonics, to take the place of human partners. Defining digisexuality In our research, we use the… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 4 hours ago on the next web
In my research on the platform economy, I’ve seen a trend of trade unions mainly attacking websites like Uber and Deliveroo. However, I’d like to argue that their focus on a hostile approach is a mistake and they need to consider another tactic. Let me explain why. We need to talk about the gig economy The time is ripe for a serious conversation about the gig economy. In recent years, classifieds on the back of a local newspaper and in call centers have widely been replaced by online platforms like Uber (taxi), Helpling (domestic cleaning service), DoorDash (local delivery), and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 16 hours ago on the next web
Do you remember the panic surrounding the Millenium Bug? Computer programs, built when storage space was at a premium, would often represent years as two digits. 1998 would appear as 98, and so on. When the millennium arrived, these two-digit years would roll over to 00, with some programs interpreting this as 1900. While the Millennium Bug was resolved without incurring any real damage or disruption to businesses or users, the causes of the issue are frequently seen in other systems from the same era — GPS, for example. Designed in the 1970’s, the computer systems on the GPS satellites… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 16 hours ago on the next web
A good few months ago, TNW was utterly mesmerized by the Vivo Nex phone. This all-body handset concealed its selfie camera with an unusual pop-out mechanical mechanism. Although it didn’t make its way to the west, it was an interesting glimpse of what a post-notch future looks like. Why do I bring it up? Because MWC is around the corner, and French smartphone brand Archos is unveiling a phone that looks pretty bloody similar. Meet the Archos Diamond, which will retail at €300 when released. The Archos Diamond apes the aesthetic of the Vivo Nex, including that quirky pop-up mechanism,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 19 hours ago on the next web
Last weekend Hard Fork flew Seattle to attend NEO’s second ever developer conference. Besides getting to see and hear from NEO itself, we got to meet a host of developers that are trying to use the NEO platform to bring their dapps to life. While there, I moderated a panel discussion about Security Token Offerings (STOs). Moderating a panel is actually a great way of learning about the topic being discussed. As the chair you get to ask questions, and get input from a range of backgrounds and perspectives. Indeed, this panel was no different. Panel members came from all… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 21 hours ago on the next web
With your Vitagene kit, just swab your cheek, send in your sample, and you’ll get back a complete report explaining your DNA findings and the nutrition path you should follow to lead your healthiest life.

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posted about 22 hours ago on the next web
The short story here below started as a submission to the Dutch Information Law Institute’s science fiction contest but quickly grew into much more once I started to create a timeline to solidify the legal situation. The underlying theme is that everyone expects GDPR enforcement to come from government, but that has been haphazard and that’s unlikely to change. Supervisory authorities only have limited capability and would never enforce against everyone. But the GDPR has a little-known clause that says private organizations may enforce on behalf of the people they represent, including (on paper) the ability to demand financial damages.… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 22 hours ago on the next web
It’s a cold, wet, and windy day in mid-January. You hear the knocking of the shutters against the window pane as you roll over in bed trying to find some warmth. Looking at the clock that’s been handed down four generations in your family you see it’s still not even four in the morning. You realise it’s time to feed the chickens. As you rise from your stupor you think to yourself, “this would be so much easier if I could do this with the blockchain.” Well my friend, now you can! With Pollofeed.com. No more do you have to… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted about 22 hours ago on the next web
Cybercriminals raked in more than $300,000 in Bitcoin payments during a ‘sextortion’ email-based blackmail campaign, which was first spotted in 2017 but saw increased activity mid-last year. According to a report by UK firm Digital Shadows, which tracked a sample of 792,000 emails as part of their analysis, criminals received some $332,000 from more than 3,100 unique sender Bitcoin addresses. The funds were deposited in 92 Bitcoin addresses. Further analysis of Bitcoin wallets associated with these scams found that ‘sextortionists’ could be reaping an average of $540 per victim. Hard Fork first reported on the scam in July last year after Cornell University computer science professor… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Bitcoin

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posted about 23 hours ago on the next web
A spacecraft launched by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in 2014 successfully touched down on a speeding near-Earth asteroid, and has collected samples to bring back for scientists to study. Everyone, we did it!!! #haya2_TD Thank you so much for your support from all over the world! pic.twitter.com/cHkeTCBgcs — [email protected] (@haya2e_jaxa) February 22, 2019 For the space aficionado in me, this is a goosebumps-raising achievement because the asteroid Ryugu is a tiny rock, floating in space about 300 million km (186 million miles) away from our planet. It took the Hayabusa2 spacecraft almost four years to reach the asteroid,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
In 2017, Apple introduced gesture-based navigation for iOS on the iPhone X, and kick-started the trend of phones offering this functionality in place of software buttons. One and a half years later, the option to use gestures to get around your phone‘s interface instead of buttons is available on the majority of handsets today. Now, given how diverse the Android ecosystem is, you’ll find a range of different methods for implementing these navigation gestures among various phone brands. And that’s alright, because you might prefer one system over another. Having tested several phones’ gesture controls over the past few months,… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: iPhone

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Competition between apps can be fierce. It’s no longer just about selling a great product and doing some light advertising — there’s so much more to it now, especially if you want to steal customers from your competitors. To find out how to encourage customers to download one app over another, I asked a panel of entrepreneurs from Young Entrepreneur Council the following question: What’s one way to encourage customers to download your new mobile app instead of a competitor’s? Their best answers are below: 1. Add an ongoing incentive Marketing your app should be about finding incentives, not just for the… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Israel is a nation full of booming tech startups. In fact, according to the 2018 Global Startup Ecosystem Report, Tel Aviv has more startups per capita than anywhere else in the world, earning it the reputation of being the Silicon Valley of the Middle East, or better known as Silicon Wadi. At the same time, cities like Jerusalem are also producing their own tech unicorns. In 2017 Intel acquired Jerusalem based autonomous-driving company Mobileye for $15.3 billion. The combination of world-class technological educational institutes and large investments into the research and development of cybersecurity, deep technology, and infrastructure have made… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
AI still needs some time to figure out how cats work. That is the idea one gets when visiting thiscatdoesnotexist.com. Just like its human counterpart that we covered last week, the algorithm behind the site generates an image of a cat based on how it ‘learned’ a cat looks from other images. Apparently the site was made by the same researchers behind thispersondoesnotexist.com, and it performs, uhm, slightly worse. If you want to read more about how an algorithm like this works, read my smarter colleague Tristan’s piece on the human version. If you just want to be horrified and entertained,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Google showed off Digital Wellbeing several months ago as one of the most compelling new features in Android 9.0. The tool, which is designed to help you monitor and limit your app usage, so you spend less time glued to your phone. Sadly, it’s taking forever to become available on non-Pixel handsets. If you’re like me and can’t wait to kick your screen addiction to the curb, you’ll want to check out ActionDash. It’s developed by Chris Lacy – who’s behind other solid apps like Action Launcher and Link Bubble – and arrived in the Play store last month with… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Android

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
There’s a certain kind of computer game everyone plays, the kind that have been around for so long most people don’t even know a time when they weren’t always available to play. No, I’m not talking about Fortnite. I mean the really ubiquitous games: Minesweeper, FreeCell, or Mahjong. How have these games lasted so long, and how’d they make it did they make it onto our computers? It’s actually thanks to the efforts of game developers like Arkadium that these games are now so freely available. You may not have heard of Arkadium, but you’ve almost certainly played one of… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
It’s difficult to tell whether wide-spread use of predictive policing AI is the result of capitalism or ignorance. Perhaps it’s both. AI cannot predict crime; it’s ridiculous to think it could. What it can do is provide a mathematical smoke-screen for unlawful police practices. And it does this very well, according to AI experts. A team of researchers from the AI Now Institute recently investigated thirteen police jurisdictions in the US that were utilizing predictive policing technology. At least nine of them “appear to have used police data generated during periods when the department was found to have engaged in… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
There is no longer a delineation between digital and traditional customers. Anyone with a smartphone traverses between online and offline activities without a second thought. As they do, they gain a penchant for modern conveniences, such as speed, utility and real-time assistance. Along the way, they also become more and more impatient and demanding. To engage today’s customer takes a modern approach to marketing where advanced technologies and customer optimization set the stage for what I call “adviser brands.” And, they’re changing the game for everyone. Adviser brands represent a shift away from a traditional focus on top-of-the-funnel campaigns and… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 1 day ago on the next web
Yesterday, Samsung unveiled its most ambitious phone to date — the ultra-flexible Samsung Galaxy Fold. This 5G-enabled tablet-smartphone hybrid will retail at roughly $2,000, and is expected to hit shelves in April this year. Even to those who cover the smartphone industry professionally, the announcement was a genuine surprise — which, believe me, is a rarity these days. Although most people knew a foldable phone was on the near-horizon, it didn’t seem quite this close. Most expected Samsung to announce it during the manic hubbub of Mobile World Congress, which takes place in Barcelona next week. If I was a… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
After months of seemingly endless rumors and speculation, the Galaxy S10 is here, and we had the chance to play with it – or rather, several versions of it. The 10th in Samsung’s Galaxy line, the S10 is the company’s chance to get back in the limelight after lackluster sales of the Galaxy S9. Samsung is releasing not two or three, but four versions of the device, each designed to appeal to different types of consumer. There are the standard Galaxy S10 and S10+ everyone expected, and then the smaller and more affordable ‘S10e’ we’ve been hearing about for a long… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Samsung

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
Over the past 10 years cryptocurrency, blockchain, and art have become the most surprising and unlikely of bed fellows. Street art, graffitti, and memes are quite common, but the words cryptocurrency and fine art rarely appear in the same sentence. But that’s changing as one artist is making these worlds collide to produce something as individually unique as a Bitcoin wallet private key. Toronto-based fine artist – Nelly Baksht – is one of a growing community creating works specifically for the cryptocurrency and blockchain industry. But she hasn’t always been interested in the decentralized technology. For Nelly her love of… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
It’d be foolish to undermine the role of white papers in the cryptocurrency and blockchain ecosystem, given these industries – estimated to be worth billions in years to come – spawned from a nine-page document put together by Satoshi Nakamoto, Bitcoin‘s mysterious creator (or creators). First published in 2009, Nakamoto’s white paper set the scene for an innovative and decentralized peer-to-peer payment network, its underlying blockchain technology, and the some 1,600-plus altcoins that have emerged since. Throughout cryptocurrency and blockchain’s relatively short history, white papers have been considered to be an effective marketing tool. They explain a project’s raison d’être,… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
Ilise Benun is one of the world’s most vocal advocates for not only dreaming about life on your own terms, but actually doing it. With her course Command the Fees You Deserve with Ilise Benun ($19.99, 79 percent off, from TNW Deals), you’ll get her battle-tested road map for striking out on your own and succeeding by doing things your way.

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
Our annual technology conference is fast approaching. On May 9 and 10, we’ll bring together the brightest minds in the industry to discuss the future of tech, through inspiring keynotes, in-depth roundtable discussions, hands-on workshops, and more. We’re very excited to announce our TNW2019 partnership with the Financial Times, the world’s leading global business publication. Their expertise will help shape the conversation surrounding the future of technology and business. TNW and the FT share a similar vision but different audiences – with this partnership we’re bringing them all together in Amsterdam at TNW2019. We’re really excited about the key features… This story continues at The Next Web

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posted 2 days ago on the next web
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is exploring the possibility of leveraging blockchain technology for the company’s third-party login services. In an interview with Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said a move from the existing centralized Facebook Connect to a distributed system could empower users and app developers alike. Multiple reports have been floating since last year on Facebook’s possible plans with blockchain technology, but this marks the first time a company representative has shared any tangible details. According to Zuckerberg, the users would be able to store their information on a decentralized system and have the choice of logging… This story continues at The Next Web

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