posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by flopgd [link] [1 comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by idlestabilizer [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by franticsiev [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by vladmihalcea [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by phpfree [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by ICanCountTo0b1010 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
When i use the gui in network manager and disable one adapter it disables all of them. I have one internal, and one USB wifi adapter. I would like to control them independently. Is this a bug/failure of network manager? I have also noticed this behavior in ubuntu about 2 years ago. submitted by javi404 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by LeoG7 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by grauenwolf [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by scapbi [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by piyushmagarwal [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
What skillset does it take to be a linux developer? submitted by Jncocontrol [link] [2 comments]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by sinemetu1 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by varunkvv [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by RexGrammer [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
I have 14.04 and Ive been wanting to play dwarf fortress to see what all the hype is about but I can't find a straight up tutorial. I only know how to install programs from the software center and it's all just super confusing to me. submitted by kylemon [link] [1 comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by idamarie25 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by davidk01 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
This obvious solution is blitting pixels. It's controversal, and rubs a lot of people the wrong way. There are definitely advantages to that approach, most notably that it's dead simple and everyone should be able to implement it. But there are some definite disadvantages. Probably the biggest problem I can see is inconsistant sub-pixel-font-rendering/antialiasing. Since you're not rendering the fonts locally, you can't take advantage of sub pixel hacks to make pretty fonts. It should work fine of the local display and the remote both use the same pixel orientation, but assuming that could lead to awful results if you guess wrong. Font rendering is important. Well to a lot of people. I'll stick to my monospace. But regardless, we really don't want linux to become a second class citizen typography-wise. Naturally it's also not going to integrate with the clients themes, leading to inconsistant looking displays. If you're using weird settings, be it high-dpi optimized icons or a high-contrast theme, your remote apps should respect that. Ideally anyway. There are definitely some legitimate reasons to complain about just pixel blitting, but most alternative solutions definitely seem worse. We don't want to use a rendering protocol since that's basically reimplementing what went wrong with X. Here's my suggestion. State Synchronization Protocols What is a state synchronization protocol? Simply put, it's a protocol that tries to keep two different data structures in synch, handling all the gritty details like congestion control. A good state synchronization protocol let's you subscribe to data at different priorities, or not subscribe to data at all. An example of a program using this approach is mosh, an ssh helper designed for lower bandwidth connections. I propose that UI toolits (qt/gtk) start using a state synchronization protocol to store a "scene graph", all the data it needs to rebuild that application's UI. Essentially, all UI state gets moved into a state-synchronizable data format. The UI toolkit still handles the rendering at both ends, this approach will only work if the toolkit is installed on both computers. But it should allow the kind of flexability we're looking for. The ability to use different themes on the remote and local enviroment. Automatic caching of resources, prioritizing what's important. What's great is that it shouldn't require a big rewrite. QT already uses a scene graph beneath the hood in QML. Storing that scene graph on a state synchronization server isn't a huge leap. It also has the benifit of allowing you to draw two windows from one remote app. Attach to the same remote app on your tower and your laptop, and have changes in one show up instantly on the other. Personally, the verse2 protocol looks like one of the best options for state synchronization protocols. One approach, but I'm sure there are others. submitted by traverseda [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by filipekberg [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
This is not a regular review of the laptop. I wanted to review how it runs Debian and answer all the questions I had before I took the plunge and bought it myself. This is more of a “how it runs Linux” review. Specs and Settings I decided to go with the 1080 display. People are having issues with scaling, some programs not working at all, and I imagine the 4K display consumes more power, reducing battery life. I also got only 8GB of RAM. My previous laptop had only 8GB and I could never go over 2GB, so I saved some cash there. I removed the 500GB HDD and have the 512GB SSD as the only storage drive on my computer. I couldn't find a cheap 91Whr battery, so I just kept the original 61Whr one on it. The rest is the same as every other M3800. 1080p display 8GB RAM Plextor M6M PX-512M6M 512 GB mSATA 6-cell, 61Whr battery Debian Testing (Jessie) Cinnamon DE Debian installation I created a bootable flash drive with dd, disabled legacy support (BIOS), enabled UEFI and disabled secure boot. The laptop picked up my flash drive right away and I installed everything from it with no issues. The USB ethernet adaptor worked perfectly, but it got painfully hot just for being used for about 20 minutes. Other than that, the installation was super fast and trouble-free. Also, from the moment I push the power button, my computer takes two seconds to show the GRUB screen. Yes, two seconds. Wifi All it took to get Wifi running on the M3800 was to install “firmware-iwlwifi” and restart the computer. It worked right away after the reboot with zero problems. No loss signal or instability whatsoever. Screen It looks absolutely gorgeous. I did notice a big difference between my previous HP ENVY dv7-7212nr and the M3800. The HP Envy is more saturated. The default Jessie wallpaper looks nearly grey with a little bit of blue on the M3800 and completely blue on the HP Envy. And as I said before, I picked the 1080p display because I don't want to fight to get everything to look barely readable on my screen. I believe it also uses less power, giving me more battery life. Coming from a 1080 17” laptop that was already good, I concluded that this resolution would be satisfactory for me on a 15” screen. I believe the color difference is because of the Quadro GPU as opposed to the GeForce on the HP laptop. Using touch on the screen isn't really spectacular, but it works. I couldn't do a double tap at all, but regular taps work just as you'd expect. If there's dust or something stuck to the screen, you'll have to turn the computer off to clean it because it'll catch your touches. It may be annoying to some of us who like to keep the screen clean and clear. I don't really care for touch on my laptop, so I only tried it for this review. Battery The 61Whr battery is not the longest-lasting battery you can get. I can get about 3.5 to 4 hours of light usage out of it. I'm not using any battery-enhancing programs like Powertop. HDD/SSD I am using just the mSATA 512GB SSD I bought off eBay and got rid of the 500GB HDD to make the M3800 lighter, faster, and have a longer battery life. Everything is lightning fast, programs open almost instantly, copying/moving is really fast as well. If I ever decide to get the 91Whr battery, I won't be able to have the HDD installed anyway because the bigger battery uses the space where the HDD would go. Heat I haven't done any heavy-lifting with the M3800, but just by comparing my light usage of surfing the net and using some spreadsheets, it is significantly cooler than my HP Envy. It's like night and day. I can rest it on my legs and use it for a long time with no problems. I could never do that with the HP because its battery sticks out like a heel on a shoe, making it awkward to sit on anything and it got uncomfortably hot very quickly. The M3800 bottom is flat, which allows you to sit it on your lap and have a cooling pad if you desire. I use one sometimes just to keep the internals cool enough and avoid damage. Sound The position of the speakers is really crappy. If you set the computer on a flat surface, it'll muffle the sound to the point of losing comprehension. I can't even understand voices sometimes and have to put the computer on the cooling pad, which lifts it just enough off the table to allow the sound to flow clearly. Keyboard/lights/travel The keyboard is not the best one I've used. The keys feel a little too soft and fragile. I am extremely careful with my stuff and my old laptops look like new, but I'm afraid I'll have to replace this keyboard eventually. It's not bad, but people who are less careful than I am are guaranteed to destroy it. The travel on the keys is decent. Not too much, not too little. The backlight is alright. It's not as bright as I wish it was and it turns off by itself if you don't type for a while. That forces you to hit some key before actually typing to bring the lights back on just so you can see the keys in the dark. I'm not a big fan of that. Touchpad You might want to get a wireless mouse to avoid this touchpad. It's too sensitive and I often touch it when I'm typing, moving the focus to another window. The buttons are good. I don't see any problems with them. The problem I did find is that the touchpad does not move the mouse if you are resting a finger on top of one of the buttons. That forces you to lift your thumb from the button, move the mouse, find the button again, and click it. That sucks. I always have my wireless mouse to use the computer. Performance Everything flies. There's barely any waiting happening on this beast. Since I'm using just the SSD as my storage, everything pops up fast. Programs open almost instantly and run like a charm. I haven't had one single problem with Debian on this thing. I was afraid one piece of hardware wouldn't work with it, but Debian took care of everything. Weight/size The M3800 is so thin and light I just couldn't believe it. I don't know how Dell was able to fit this amazing hardware into suck a tiny body. I feel like I'm holding nothing when I have it on my lap. Other issues Some people reported a humming sound when the computer is connected to a power source. I don't have that problem. I never tested this on Windows, so I don't know if that's a Windows-only problem. Also, since I don't have an HDD installed, the machine is not noisy as some people reported. It's very quiet all the time. submitted by contra_nap [link] [1 comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by yoqudos [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by cym13 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by omegaender [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by based2 [link] [1 comment]

Read More...