posted 1 day ago on reddit
I've just found out that my samsung 840 evo supports aes hardware encryption. From what I've read it's activated by setting the password in uefi. I already have linux installed, let's say I set a password now, does that mean that the ssd still encrypts all the data on it? Even that data that's already there? Or would I have to wipe everything, set a password and then reinstall linux? My cpu also support aes-ni, does that have anything to do with the hardware encryption the ssd does? Or would that only help me when it comes to software encryption? Is there any difference when it comes to security between just using the hardware encryption and dm-crypt? submitted by FuckingCockbroaches [link] [1 comment]

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submitted by ohet [link] [2 comments]

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posted 2 days ago on reddit
Recently, I've been studying many different linux distros. Most importantly gentoo, arch, and fedora. Even though gentoo might say its different, Its very similar to the other two. The only difference is its package manager. So I've come up with my own operating system. Unlike gentoo, arch, fedora, debian, and many more, this one plans to be changing the file structure instead of the package manager. The idea is that you choose your own package manager that has been customized for the file structure, like you would install a custom version of pacman that would be customized for the file structure, or a custom version of portage, or APT. So what is this file structure? The idea is instead of applications data being stored in a complication of folders (usr, etc, lib, etc.) its instead stored in its own personal folder. In this case lets say you want to copy the vim config file. Instead of doing this: ~ cp /etc/vim/vimrc ~/.vimrc You would do: ~ cp /app/vim/vim/etc/vim/vimrc ~/.vimrc This would seem complicated, but makes since in a user perspective. In this case it hurts the problem, but in this case it improves it: Without the new file structure: ~ ls /etc xdg 2 ufw updatedb.conf update-manager update-motd.d update-notifier UPower upstart-xsessions upstream-release usb_modeswitch.conf usb_modeswitch.d vim vtrgb wgetrc wildmidi wpa_supplicant X11 xdg xml zsh_command_not_found ml With it: ~ ls /app/vim/vim/etc vim So its much simpler to edit config files. Noticed how I put the name of the app twice? This is because your folder with the app plans to have dependency apps, like this: ~ ls /app/portage portage python etc. This way you can do things like this: ~ cp /app/portage /mnt So its very easy to move applications from one point to another. Although, the idea is there is no extra dependencies. I plan to do this by using bind chroots to make a folder act like its in two places at once, while only really being in one place. This is how bedrock linux makes the home folder accessible to multiple clients, and that's how I plan to treat dependencies. So that's my operating system idea. Or file structure idea. Never the less I don't want any operating system I make to be bound by a specific package manager, and this seems like a good idea. So I want to know what you think. submitted by butlerccreltub [link] [3 comments]

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posted 2 days ago on reddit
Just set up my free year of AWS and am looking for some ideas. I set up an email server on an EC2 instance but am looking for some interesting ideas on what else can be accomplished on the free tier. submitted by igotthelastone [link] [2 comments]

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posted 2 days ago on reddit
My Acer Aspire v5 (i7) running Arch died today. Looks like the GPU crapped itself. So I'm looking for a new laptop. Going to put Arch on it again but not sure what to get. My previous laptop was an HP that I would have kept longer if I didn't have to keep replacing the power sister board because the dc jack kept breaking. I wasn't a huge fan of the Acer. The chasis was very weak. I would routinely click the touchpad by resting my hands on the wrist wrests and inadvertently bending the laptop enough to "click" the pad. As for requirements, I'm not a gamer but I do use computers heavily. Tons of browser tabs (usually >40), a lot of open terminals to vim sessions, compiling code, Eclipse, Netflix and what not. So obviously I don't need anything too flashy but a healthy amount of RAM and many cores makes my experience pleasant. Right now I'm looking for something in the $700 range and fairly durable. So, what laptops and/or manufacturers do you like? submitted by HokieGeek [link] [4 comments]

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posted 2 days ago on reddit
submitted by coppolaemilio [link] [comment]

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