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posted 1 day ago on reddit
I'm volunteering for an organization with a very spotty internet connection. They have five or so computers that all use Dropbox for file sync. Do you think they would benefit from a Raspberry Pi hooked up via Ethernet that's also syncing the Dropbox client, to increase the chance of the LAN Sync feature having a local copy of files? SD flash storage might help out sync speeds, but I don't want to add to inter-network traffic too much... Thanks for your thoughts! submitted by /u/xd1936 [link] [comments]

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So I just realized, I installed the wrong debian version. I forgot on the machine I have a AMD cpu, but i usually use intel cpus so I installed the i3 version of Debian. It works okay, slow at times but it works. How is this possible? I do screenfetch and it says my kernel is i686 but my CPU is AMD a6-7000 submitted by /u/Retr0Capez [link] [comments]

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posted 1 day ago on reddit
Recently someone posted a neat question in ELI5 about how a computer restarts itself. /u/capn_hector gave a thorough response which took this interesting tangent: "one interesting aspect of modern OSs is they never really "shut down". It used to be that when you shut your computer down all the operating system internal code (the kernel) would have to be re-initialized from scratch. This takes a really long time, several seconds even on a fast computer. So modern OSs (Windows 8 and up) will actually write the kernel's state to disk before they shut down. Then they will just load the kernel state from disk rather than set everything up from scratch. This is the "Fast Boot" mode, officially called Hybrid Boot because it's a hybrid of a shutdown and a hibernate." Is this a feature used by any (all?) linux distros? submitted by /u/kb2005 [link] [comments]

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