posted about 13 hours ago on reddit
submitted by Rotaway [link] [comment]

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posted about 13 hours ago on reddit
submitted by harold_finch [link] [1 comment]

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posted about 13 hours ago on reddit
So I got a school issued chromebook a while back (rules are you can do anything with it as long as its default by the end of the year and not broken) and I found Crouton recently. Have any of you used it before, and if so, does it work well? Crouton GitHub page Actual Crouton submitted by ze_OZone [link] [comment]

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posted about 13 hours ago on reddit
submitted by crozyguy [link] [1 comment]

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posted about 14 hours ago on reddit
submitted by towardsthesun [link] [1 comment]

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posted about 14 hours ago on reddit
submitted by royosherove [link] [comment]

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posted about 15 hours ago on reddit
submitted by RenegadeUK [link] [2 comments]

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posted about 15 hours ago on reddit
I upgraded to 14.04 a while ago, But it was a weird and very manual upgrade, I've been slowly discovering things that weren't installed or that were removed, And, Apparently, Not upgraded at all. I was using 3.11 this whole time, And to think I was considering getting 3.16. submitted by MissValeska [link] [comment]

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posted about 15 hours ago on reddit
submitted by AmericanXer0 [link] [comment]

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posted about 15 hours ago on reddit
submitted by skillcode [link] [comment]

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posted about 16 hours ago on reddit
I really have problems with Android Communities like xda-dev, they use their infrastructure wrong. On Thread for a ROM often is release page, manual, bug tracker and general discussion. There is no wiki page with documentation and manual, or release page. There is no bug tracker for bugs, no discussion linked to the wiki article etc. pp. It is a mess. Similar for communities around ereader hacking. I always think that might be because the communities are so young and a few months back a forum was all they needed but then the community grows so rapidly that they hadn't had time to introduce the infrastructure that would organise their community. How bad organized was the/were the Linux Community/ies in the early days? And when came the different services that helped staying organized (wiki, bug tracker, VCS, forums, mailing lists, etc.). If someone could provide a time line that would be great. submitted by valgrid [link] [comment]

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posted about 16 hours ago on reddit
submitted by VSChawathe [link] [comment]

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posted about 16 hours ago on reddit
submitted by men_cant_be_raped [link] [5 comments]

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posted about 17 hours ago on reddit
submitted by yogthos [link] [comment]

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posted about 17 hours ago on reddit
submitted by onedaycanada [link] [comment]

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posted about 17 hours ago on reddit
I think I understand why some software companies (e.g. microsoft) create closed-source software. But I don't understand why some hardware companies (e.g. Nvidia and Broadcom) have closed-source drivers. If they make their money selling hardware (rather than software), why would they care if people are permitted to understand how the drivers work? What would Nvidia fear by having a full performance open-source driver? submitted by MadPhatFishKiller [link] [5 comments]

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posted about 18 hours ago on reddit
submitted by electronics-engineer [link] [1 comment]

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posted about 18 hours ago on reddit
submitted by bilog78 [link] [2 comments]

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posted about 19 hours ago on reddit
submitted by david_222 [link] [comment]

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posted about 19 hours ago on reddit
submitted by k-h [link] [3 comments]

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posted about 20 hours ago on reddit
submitted by rdcll [link] [comment]

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posted about 20 hours ago on reddit
submitted by henk53 [link] [comment]

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