posted less than an hour ago on reddit
submitted by nghialv [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 1 hour ago on reddit
submitted by psignosis [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 1 hour ago on reddit
submitted by AlexeyBrin [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 2 hours ago on reddit
submitted by sreenu9552008 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 2 hours ago on reddit
submitted by 3G6A5W338E [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 2 hours ago on reddit
submitted by karbarcca [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 3 hours ago on reddit
submitted by elgillespie [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 4 hours ago on reddit
submitted by yogthos [link] [2 comments]

Read More...
posted about 4 hours ago on reddit
As someone who has generally always been interested in trying out new setups (its rare that i go for more then 6 months without reinstalling my computer and trying something new) I naturally eventually moved from windows into the world of Linux. Everyone kept talking about year of the Linux desktop (which apparently is every year) However after around 5 months of being on Linux full time here are the reason i think it still has one hell of a long way to go. *Disclaimer all my time was spent on LMDE Graphics Drivers - Oh my dear sweet fucking god this was so much more work then it should of been, i tried the drivers offered up by my distro but the open source was slow as fuck and the non free was old as hell. So naturally i looked at getting the latest from nvidia. I figured this cant be all that much harder to install then windows probably just a .deb or something i can just run. Oh how wrong i was, after around 20 min of googling i finally figured out i had to logout go to TTY ,kill mdm, set init to 3, run the script, let it disable the build in driver, update inframs, restart, run again and then FINALLY it was installed. This is not something 90% of people would be able to figure out Linux has a looooooooooong way to go on this front or at the very least Debian. Software - There is a decent amount of software that is easily installable via apt or the GUI software manager. Thats good and makes things simpler most things you could need are available. However the second you want something not available via apt things can get messy quick. If you are lucky a .deb is offered and you can install just by 2click or dpkg in the cli. If not however it becomes a insane monsterish nightmare of trying to figure out how to compile something. If you are lucky it has at least partial documentation of the requirements of things to install before you can compile and you are even more lucky if atp offers the correct versions (more often then not you need a super specific version and you have to also compile that which starts the whole thing over again) Then comes the fucn 2 hour journey of trying to figure out wtf you need to install to meet the dependency its bitching about that wasn't documented. There are some programs with really nice full documentation and instructions that make this simple but not all. Stability - I have used Linux on servers for a long time now and i cant honestly say i have ever had any issue with them. they are stable and rock solid never have i been forced to reboot. My personal desktop experience has been different with random issues and things suddenly not working. However i will not attempt to make any broad statements on this as like i said i was using LMDE and whats more i used Cinnamon which i know is currently outdated on the LMDE so i am sure most of my issues are related to this. I did look at just plain mint with cinnamon in a VM and didn't notice any issues. Alright so there was the bad but don't worry this is not 100% bitching i have things i really like about Linux as well. Speed - Linux is fast like supar fast. Even on an older spinning rust disk things fly after i setup prelink and E4rat. This alone makes me generally enjoy the system. Memory use - Sometimes i look at HTOP and think oh i must be sshed into one of my servers, wait nope that is my desktop taking only 800MB ram even with FF Skype music and teamspeak all open. Huh. HTML5 - Having such shitty flash support made me finally ditch flash entirely and i found ways to force HTML5 on the sites i use. Couldn't be happier no more insane cpu use, no more crashing, no more memory leaks. Just happy smooth videos. Mounting - Holy shit being able to mount drives to folders is the coolest and most useful fucking thing in the world. This makes organization of my media and downloads stupidly easy because now instead of just making shortcuts and such my movies folder actually just links to a drive. 11/10 Power use - I often see a lot of threads about Linux using more power, this has not been the case with me. I have noticed the idle power draw from my desktop (thanks to a UPS that measures watts being pulled) is actually lower than when i was using windows. Windows would usually pull around 95watts idle in high performance. I could move that down to 70watts if i went to power saver but then games would be laggy shit would be slow. Basically just unusable. LMDE with the on demand cpu gov idles at around 60 - 72 watts and also has no issues with lag. After some digging around i found one of the larger reasons for this was my GPU. Its a 550TI and it has 3 power states high med low, or 900Mhz, 405Mhz, and 50Mhz respectively. In windows if you have 2 screens the card will NEVER go below 405 and tends to mostly stay in the 900. On Linux if the desktop is idle or i am only on irc/skype it will go to the 50Mhz so lots of power saved there. General feeling of being cool - Something just feels right about using Linux, the installers are cool learning how to use CLI feels fun although tedious at times. Knowing you can transition your desktop into a full on web-server with a few commands is a nice feeling and knowing that any and all upgrades will always be free. Hopefully the main glaring issues will get sorted out in Various distros and Linux can really start to enter the playing field as a true competitor in the General desktop use area. P.S forgive any large grammar/spelling mistakes i have a small disability that affects my spelling, grammar, and punctuation. I try to proof read and make corrections but some things just don't click in my head. submitted by lordkitsuna [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 5 hours ago on reddit
submitted by regreddit [link] [1 comment]

Read More...
posted about 5 hours ago on reddit
submitted by porkchop_d_clown [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 6 hours ago on reddit
submitted by spartanatreyu [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 6 hours ago on reddit
Where do you guys keep downloaded programs? The ones that need to be extracted and are (sometimes) ready to work from their directory? Most of the time you also add the directory or a subdirectory (e.g. bin/) to the path variable as well. I personally put them in my home folder, but I was wondering what is the common practice about such things. Example of such programs: gradle, eclipse submitted by _____R_____ [link] [4 comments]

Read More...
posted about 6 hours ago on reddit
So, do you guys think that there would be any interest in a linux blog about a total linux laymen learning the ropes? This would not be a "10 things to install after installing" whatever or a distro review site. It would be a site to prove that linux and OpenSource cannot only be installed and operated by a laymen, but also provide a throughly enjoyable desktop experience. Your thoughts? submitted by BobsYourUnc [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 6 hours ago on reddit
submitted by huydx [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 7 hours ago on reddit
URL: https://github.com/stoneage7/etile Demo: http://gfycat.com/GorgeousUnderstatedImpala Configures in console with "-k" switch, hotkeys default to Win+Numpad, layout defaults to 2x2 or 3x2, supports multiple screens. submitted by stoneage7 [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 7 hours ago on reddit
submitted by cpaasch [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 7 hours ago on reddit
submitted by indraniel [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 7 hours ago on reddit
I'm not gonna talk about the pure technical side, because from the recent debates here I concluded that globally systemd solves much more technical problems than it creates, also the adoption by distros tends to confirm that. But I noted that there are many criticizes over 1 the "fuck portability" decision and 2 other key projects in the ecosystem that now depends on systemd. Why refuse external contributions to make systemd more portable? What sense does it make in our ecosystem to limit interoperability and extend the gap with BSD for example? Is that really a good choice for other key projects to force the move to one init system because it brings many good things now? Won't it be harder in the future to respond to new needs? Those choices for me seems really ecosystem unfriendly (if you disagree, please explain me). Are the technical benefits worth the cost over the long term for our ecosystem? (I.e. making a strong dependency between our distros and key other projects with a project whose governance seems quite controversial) I am really exited about the features of systemd but I still have concerns about the two issues mentioned above. Please enlighten me, I'm really in love with the FOSS ecosystem because of its diversity and I need to be reassured that this move is worthwhile on the long run. submitted by tuxayo [link] [2 comments]

Read More...
posted about 9 hours ago on reddit
submitted by retardo [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 9 hours ago on reddit
submitted by mepcotterell [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 9 hours ago on reddit
submitted by andrei_ [link] [1 comment]

Read More...
posted about 10 hours ago on reddit
submitted by yogthos [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 10 hours ago on reddit
submitted by poutteringfanboi [link] [comment]

Read More...
posted about 10 hours ago on reddit
submitted by ForgotMyPassword17 [link] [comment]

Read More...