posted 2 days ago on pinboard
Given the expansive growth in the field, it's become challenging to discern what belongs in a modern computer science degree. My own faculty is engaging in this debate, so I've coalesced my thoughts as an answer to the question, "What should every computer science major know?" I've tried to answer this question as the conjunction of four concerns: What should every student know to get a good job? What should every student know to maintain lifelong employment? What should every student know to enter graduate school? What should every student know to benefit society? My thoughts below factor into both general principles and specific recommendations relevant to the modern computing landscape. Computer science majors: feel free to use this as a self-study guide. Please email me with suggestions for addition and deletion. Click here to read the rest of the article

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Show HN: OctoSQL – Query and Join multiple databases and files, written in Go https://t.co/4XaGJ8KFZx — Richard Laksana (@RichardLaksana) July 16, 2019

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Trump believes that only white people can truly be American citizens. Like his Birtherism, it is not a statement of fact, but a statement of values, one his…

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Alan Turing, World War Two codebreaker and mathematician, will be the face of new Bank of England £50 note

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
RT @keithjgrant: @smashingmag Indieauth

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Intro to Speculative Fiction by People of Color via @TheFantasyInn

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Mike Schmitz’s Screencast and Podcasting Setup

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Am I micromanaging my team?

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
We all do it. The question is how. Mr. Willingham is a psychologist at the University of Virginia.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
A new study in mice points to how cell biology, not willpower, might be the root of yo-yo dieting. The American conventional wisdom about weight loss is simple: A calorie deficit is all that’s required to drop excess pounds, and moderating future calorie consumption is all that’s required to maintain it. To the idea’s adherents, the infinite complexity of human biology acts as one big nutritional piggy bank. Anyone who gains too much weight or loses weight and gains it back has simply failed to balance the caloric checkbook, which can be corrected by forswearing fatty food or carbs. Endocrinologists have known for decades that the science of weight is far more complicated than calorie deficits and energy expenditures. And in 2016, the fickle complexity of weight came to broad national attention. In a study of former contestants on a season of the weight-loss reality show The Biggest Loser, scientists found that years later, the contestants not only had gained back much or all of the weight they’d lost on the show, but also had far weaker metabolisms than most people their size. The contestants’ bodies had fought for years to regain the weight, contrary to the contestants’ efforts and wishes. No one was sure why. Along with a team of researchers, Ann Marie Schmidt, an endocrinologist at the New York University School of Medicine, has been unraveling the mystery. In a new study published today, Schmidt and her team have unlocked a molecular mechanism controlling weight gain and loss in mice: a protein that shuts down the animals’ ability to burn fat in times of bodily stress, including when dieting or overeating. This discovery might hold the key to understanding why it’s so hard for humans to lose weight, and even harder to keep it off.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
via Articles on Smashing Magazine — For Web Designers And Developers https://ift.tt/2ibDzra

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
The Apollo guidance computer—the first digital general-purpose, multitasking, interactive portable computer—laid the foundations of much of the digital world we know today, from the fly-by-wire cockpits of commercial jetliners to the multitasking smartphones we carry in our pockets.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
The new £50 note will be Turing complete.

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