posted 2 days ago on pinboard
FYI the Gore campaign was given the Bush campaign's debate prep book in 2000. They called the FBI.

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posted 2 days ago on pinboard
RT @GetCasetab: @Pinboard We looked into this a while ago and this was the best easy-find estimate we tracked down:

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posted 2 days ago on pinboard
Android killed Windows Phone, not Apple via Digg https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/14/15970082/google-killed-windows-phone-not-iphone?utm_source=ifttt In the chaotic years after the iPhone's release, there was a massive opportunity to be the alternative that would ultimately dominate marketshare. It was Microsoft’s for the taking, but Google got there first.

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posted 2 days ago on pinboard
posted 2 days ago on pinboard
posted 3 days ago on pinboard
posted 3 days ago on pinboard
A website devoted to recipes.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
The API can convert any marked-up recipe web page into easily consumable JSON data.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Although some think blockchain is a solution waiting for problems, there’s no doubt that this novel technology is a marvel of computing. But, what exactly is a blockchain?

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Rene Ritchie, “iPhones of Future Past: Understanding iPhone 8”: iPhone 8 will simply let Apple impress in a different way — by including technologies that don’t yet reach iPhone scale. In other words, by bringing tomorrow’s iPhone to market today. In terms of the business, it’s really no different than getting an iPhone onto Verizon, onto China Mobile, with bigger and bigger displays, or with smaller displays again — it’s about annexing adjacent markets and maximizing the revenue potential for iPhone. As it becomes harder to sell more iPhones — the population of earth is now a limiting factor — selling more of an iPhone becomes beneficial. It’s the same benefit Apple gets from selling services revenue on top of iPhone, but in atoms, not bits. Ritchie is using the name “iPhone 8” to refer to what I’ve called the “iPhone Pro” — the high-end OLED-display model that I think might start at over $1000. Name aside, I think he’s got exactly the right idea on how Apple can position this: a future iPhone today. Honda used to sell a car in the U.S. called the Prelude. Edmunds’s description: Honda established itself in America with the Civic and Accord — both good, solid but basic cars. But big profits in the automotive world don’t come from basic cars that sell for commodity prices. Those profits come from cars that get consumers so excited that they’ll pay a premium price just to have one. The Prelude was Honda’s first attempt at an exciting car. The Prelude was Honda’s technological leading edge. Features that are now expected from Honda, like the double-wishbone suspension under the Accord, fuel injection, and VTEC electronic variable valve timing system showed up first on the Prelude before migrating across the Honda line (though VTEC first showed up on the 1990 Acura NSX). The Prelude was also a test bed for some technologies that went nowhere, like four-wheel steering. In a broad sense, that’s my idea for the iPhone Pro — a premium-priced product that offers us early access to technologies and components that will be (or even just might be) in all iPhones in another year or two.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
When science fiction writers first imagined robot invasions, the idea was that bots would become smart and powerful enough to take over the world by force, whether on their own or as directed by some evildoer. In reality, something only slightly less scary is happening.

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Jonathan Chait: In truth, it was never possible to reconcile public standards for a humane health-care system with conservative ideology. In a pure market system, access to medical care will be unaffordable for a huge share of the public. Giving them access to quality care means mobilizing government power to redistribute resources, either through direct tax and transfers or through regulations that raise costs for the healthy and lower them for the sick. Obamacare uses both methods, and both are utterly repugnant and unacceptable to movement conservatives. That commitment to abstract anti-government dogma, without any concern for the practical impact, is the quality that makes the Republican Party unlike right-of-center governing parties in any other democracy. In no other country would a conservative party develop a plan for health care that every major industry stakeholder calls completely unworkable. The Republicans control the House, Senate, and White House, and cannot pass health insurance legislation. One can argue about why this is so, but I think Chait nails it: they can’t square their anti-government dogma with the need for the government to play a role in any humane health care system.  ★ 

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posted 3 days ago on pinboard
Interview with Google Fellow Amin Vahdat on Espresso, the latest in-house network design used for interfacing with the public internet.

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