posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Silicon Valley is Lying to You via Instapaper http://www.gq.com/news-politics/201506/silicon-valley-is-a-lie

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
HTTPS-crippling attack threatens tens of thousands of Web and mail servers by @dangoodin001

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Approaching Content Strategy for Personalized Websites http://alistapart.com/article/approaching-content-strategy-for-personalized-websites

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
bus bunching explained @humantransit @MarketUrbanism @alon_levy @CityLab @smithsj @yfreemark

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
posted 1 day ago on pinboard
RT @ageis: It's great to see the latest attack on TLS comes with a sysadmin guide to securing your servers and daemons →

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Why It Pays to Be a Jerk via Digg http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/06/why-it-pays-to-be-a-jerk/392066/

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Will Computers Redefine the Roots of Math? via Digg https://www.quantamagazine.org/20150519-will-computers-redefine-the-roots-of-math/

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Nieman Lab: Listicles, aggregation, and viral content: How 1800s newspapers prefigured today’s Internet http://t.co/fInPUdJ0x8 http://t.co/5gVFj3ddYw

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Nice, Iconjar by @daveyheuser is live! If you’re working with icons all the time, you should definitely check it out!

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Using neural nets to upscale ancient Japanese wood prints.

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
"There seems to be an important lesson for educators in Mitra’s experiment. It stirs real emotions in people. Like a lot of what makes it onto the TED stage, it seems to inspire something in the viewer. Mitra’s talk is played and replayed in education courses across the world as an inspiration for… well, it’s not clear for exactly what. Mitra implies that the time for traditional education is over (something that was declared by many people as early as a hundred-and-fifty years ago, when the first “traditional” public school systems were being set up) and that technology can now allow for different, more autonomous and distributed structures of learning. Nevermind that his experiment was conducted in slums where children had no cellphones, no movies, no parties, no alcohol, no swim-lessons in the afternoon, no books, barely a real school, and, yes, no computers; we are to assume that the results there somehow have something to do with European or American public schools as well. Mitra ends the talk with a shameless plug for his project of putting a computer before every child. The lesson of his experiment, the role of play and autonomy in effective education, is in one stroke turned into icing for a project that has very little to do with what got his audience excited about the first few minutes of his talk. This is obfuscation. A nice little experiment is used to give the impression that a large, systemic problem like schooling can be solved easily. That, however, cannot be the real issue with TED—because what I have just described applies to most of what is funded and performed as social research across the world. It is positivist thought with a twist of sleek camera-work. The debate over what this type of thinking means for practice and research stretches back into the 19th century. Whatever TED’s critics have suggested, there is nothing that TED does to ideas or science that has not been done before. The particular problem with TED is elsewhere." … "I will be crass: the most interesting thing about Bratton’s talk is that in the early minutes of the lecture, just as he has delivered his main thesis, he suddenly forgets what he is supposed to say. There is a pause. It would be perfectly natural in another format to wait and gather one’s thoughts, but the pause is strangely disturbing in this context. He loses his place, then his nerve, and for the rest of the talk he struggles under an invisible weight. He has to heave a breath into each sentence, trying to propel himself into a rhythm that he doesn’t regain until the very end. What he is struggling under is the pressure of the TED style." … "But even Adichie’s presentation caters to the format by not acknowledging the shameful absurdity of the situation. The only exception is Sarah Silverman’s talk—which TED refuses to publish on its website. In the unofficial video that somehow made it to YouTube, Silverman is called on to deliver a comedy routine. She is a practiced stand-up and knows her craft—but here she abandons it completely. She pauses inordinately. She drags out her jokes until they are excruciating, then repeats them for good measure. She points her clicker, needlessly and awkwardly, toward the PowerPoint screen behind her which displays nothing but single-sentence TEDisms: ‘Communication is important’ (she talks about discussing a hand-shaped bruise on her ass with her mother); ‘What the world needs now’ (“I am 39 years old,” she says “and I still wake up every morning so thankful that I don’t have to go to school,”); and ‘TED is fancy’ (she discusses how the number 3000 can be seen as a pair of breasts defecating). Finally she picks up her guitar and informs the audience that her next song is dedicated to the porn-stars in the audience, “and you are all stars” she informs them. The moment her song—about how all the cocks in the universe cannot fill the hole in the aforementioned star’s heart—comes to an end, she bails, taking the microphone with her and depriving the audience of the chance to applaud her. On walks one of the largest shit-eating grins in the history of recorded entertainment—a presenter— who repeatedly begs Silverman to come back, until Silverman, who unlike the others in the room does have a sense of shame, obliges. The audience now push to their feet for a standing ovation that is nothing but an attempt to deny their own humiliation. “This can’t be right,” mutters Silverman, bewildered. For various reasons, I find myself forced to sit through a TED-talk now and then. I squirm in my seat—feeling humiliated for myself and the speaker. This is a distinctly un-adult feeling. Adults have lost their capacity for disgust—which is partly why Silverman often jokes about her own unending adolescence. Unwavering critical open-mindedness has, for a very long time, become the correct intellectual posture, and it’s never clear if at any point one can allow oneself to have a visceral reaction against a genre, an industry, or a situation without feeling either childish or curmudgeonly. Teenagers are half-better than adults in this respect: in high doses, tackiness puts them off. They collectively begin to step back from a thing, and they are generally aware that what’s bothering them is not content, but style. So they turn away from Facebook in droves, without having read a single line of cultural criticism on social media. They look back at their own participation in whatever style they dropped with mild horror. That they are then lured in by the next shiny thing is a different story. The point is that the average adult avoids the horror of disgust, which means consciously sticking to what’s most bland and middle-of-the-road: HBO, pants, college, Obama, and, for a few years now, TED. A decent strategy with TED might be to reclaim our teenage capacities and treat these videos as hopelessly passé—ignore them to death. Critiquing them, even as I have done, will do what criticism has done for television: creating an added enjoyment as you go on consuming the crap you despise. I know what I am watching is disgraceful, but aren’t I great at seeing why it’s disgraceful? I only watch it to keep up-to-date with the unwashed masses."

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Before we begin, ask yourself one question. Are you a person who can get your work done with one USB port? You know the answer. If you can’t, then there is likely a better choice for your next computer than the Retina MacBook. Nothing I can say will ease your irritation. via Pocket

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
posted 1 day ago on pinboard
Rust on bare hardware.

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
The Web Developer's SEO Cheat Sheet 3.0

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
⚑ My icon design workflow.

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

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posted 1 day ago on pinboard
As of Chrome 43, we can now (finally) copy to the clipboard programmatically w/o Flash. Demo:

Read More...