posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Banking tips

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
So I configured slackbot to clean up flipped tables and I'm convinced my team now hate me:

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Why news 'libertarian' billionaire Peter Thiel secretly bankrolled Hulk Hogans suit agst Gawker is a big big deal.

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Building a Visual Language – Behind the scenes of our new design system. via @smashingmag

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Very cool! Terrapattern — browse satellite images by similarity

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Sticky Footer ❶ ❷ ❸ ❹ ❺ Ways!

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
✎ Stylelint, the style sheet linter we’ve always wanted, by @xwoody.

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
What Thiel has done is downright evil, and the consequences will be grim for free speech. @felixsalmon explains:

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Hard to think of someone more awesome. He’s great! Wired gets it: How Can We Make You Happy Today, Peter Thiel?

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Dropbox developed their own .kext to run in your OS X kernel. But end-to-end crypto is too hard? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
WebGazer.js is an eye tracking library that uses common webcams to infer the eye-gaze locations of web visitors on a page in real time. The eye tracking model it contains self-calibrates by watching web visitors interact with the web page and trains a mapping between the features of the eye and positions on the screen. WebGazer.js was built It is written entirely in JavaScript and with only a few lines of code can be integrated in any website that wishes to better understand their visitors and transform their user experience. WebGazer.js runs entirely in the client browser, so no video data needs to be sent to a server.

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
wrote a thing about visiting Chelsea Manning in prison at Fort Leavenworth:

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
apps application - see?

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Mathematicians Bridge Finite-Infinite Divide

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
2016 is no different from WALL·E

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Open sourcing Twitter Heron, our real-time stream processing engine

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
We just open-sourced TrailDB, a core library powering AdRoll. It makes handling event data fast and fun: #traildb

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
via The Atlantic http://ift.tt/g0swmq

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Here’s the blog post of the tweet of the “It’s ok” poster. Includes a link to a downloadable PDF.

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11771697

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posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
posted about 12 hours ago on pinboard
Jason Willick, writing for The American Interest in defense of Peter Thiel: It’s also not clear what policy response Gawker’s outraged defenders would recommend. Put caps on the amount of money people can contribute to legal efforts they sympathize with? That would put the ACLU and any number of advocacy groups out of business. It would also represent a far greater threat to free expression than a court-imposed legal liability for the non-consensual publication of what is essentially revenge porn. If Marshall and others are worried about the superrich harassing critics with genuinely frivolous lawsuits — as, yes, authoritarian characters like Donald Trump have attempted to do — they would have more success backing tort reform measures to limit litigiousness overall than attacking Thiel for contributing to a legitimate cause he has good reason to support. Willick’s argument is that Thiel’s bankrolling of Hogan’s case against Gawker is within the bounds of free speech. I don’t disagree. My counter to Willick, though, is that it’s possible to be outraged and/or alarmed by Thiel’s behavior without proposing any sort of new legislative barrier to prevent this sort of thing. Willick: Fortunately, this debate does not needs to be resolved, because our First Amendment protects the speech rights of everyone, regardless of where they reside on the left-wing privilege totem poll. And that means Peter Thiel’s right to back Hogan’s cause is not and should not be in dispute, no matter how much Gawker-sympathizers hand-wave about how the wealthy contrarian is ushering in a totalitarian oligarchy. It’s free speech on both sides. Thiel was free to secretly back (and apparently strategically steer) Hogan’s case against Gawker. But Gawker founder Nick Denton was free to air his suspicion that Hogan had a billionaire Silicon Valley backer, and Forbes was free to out Thiel as said backer. And now commentators who are appalled are free to express their outrage at Thiel, perhaps embarrassing him and making it less likely that he or others of similar super-wealth will do this in the future. Willick’s defense of Thiel strikes me as being of a piece with the view that the super rich are an aggrieved, rather than privileged, class. I, for one, don’t dispute Peter Thiel’s right to back Hogan’s case. I simply think he’s an asshole for doing it, and a coward for having attempted to do it in secret.

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