posted about 9 hours ago on OSNews
Over the weekend someone released hundreds of revealing photos of celebrities that appear to have been stolen from private storage. In response to this, a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet copied them and posted them all over the town square, because the internet is written in ink and if you are ever a victim once in your life the internet will remind you of it forever. These men are the detritus of human society for whom the internet provides a warm blanket, so let's remove the warm blanket for a minute. If the NSA spies on us, it's a massive violation of privacy and omg government and #impeachobama. When some (hopefully not for much longer) anonymous hacker breaks into the personal, private accounts of dozens of famous women, steals their most private photographs, and posts them online, these same men shouting from the rooftops about the NSA retreat to their bunkers, share the photos as much as they can, and do much more I'd rather not imagine right now. Props to The Verge for this article.

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posted about 9 hours ago on OSNews
Version 8.1.0 of FreeRTOS was released a few days ago. Probably the most important feature is support for non contiguous heap space (heap_5.c), needed for allocation of memory (for creation of tasks, queues, semaphores, etc. and also user applications).

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posted about 18 hours ago on OSNews
Anand Lal Shimpi, the editor and publisher of the well-regarded AnandTech site, is going to work at Apple. An Apple rep confirmed that the company was hiring Shimpi, but wouldn't provide any other details. Last night, via a post on the site he founded in 1997, Shimpi said he was "officially retiring from the tech publishing world," but didn't say what he was doing next. "I won't stay idle forever. There are a bunch of challenges out there :)", he wrote. This is great news for him, and after 17 years of some of the best technology journalism in the world, he certainly deserves a change of pace. Still, the rest of us lose a great voice, one of the best technology journalists of all time. Inside Apple, nobody hears you scream.

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posted 3 days ago on OSNews
Apple's public relations (PR) department is probably the best in the world - certainly more impressive at shaping and controlling the discussion of its products than any other technology company. Before customers get their first chance to see or touch a new Apple product, the company has carefully orchestrated almost every one of its public appearances: controlled leaks and advance briefings for favored writers, an invite-only media debut, and a special early review process for a group of pre-screened, known-positive writers. Nothing is left to chance, and in the rare case where Apple doesn't control the initial message, it remedies that by using proxies to deliver carefully crafted, off-the-record responses. A well-written article by Mark Gurman, detailing Apple's PR practices. Especially the parts about how Apple carefully manipulates journalists, bloggers, and newspapers is very interesting. We all know that they do this, of course, but it's great to see it all penned down like this. It's a long read, but definitely worth it.

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posted 3 days ago on OSNews
Things were looking up in early 2013 for the team behind webOS, a pioneering but star-crossed mobile operating system. After surviving the implosion of Palm and a rocky acquisition by HP, LG stepped in to buy the team. The consumer electronics giant seemed like a white knight with a plan: To make webOS the core of LG's next-generation smart TV platform, and use the brains behind webOS to create a much-needed engine of innovation at LG. To create a unit that was meant to help the company to beat competitors like Samsung with Silicon Valley smarts. A disruptive force. Eighteen months later, the acquisition looks a lot like a failure. I wondered why it got so awfully quiet after that CES showing.

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posted 4 days ago on OSNews
Microsoft has explained that they have removed more than 1500 apps from the store. Every app store finds its own balance between app quality and choice, which in turn opens the door to people trying to game the system with misleading titles or descriptions. Our approach has long been to create and enforce strong but transparent policies to govern our certification and store experience. Earlier this year we heard loud and clear that people were finding it more difficult to find the apps they were searching for; often having to sort through lists of apps with confusing or misleading titles. [...] This process is continuing as we work to be as thorough and transparent as possible in our review. Most of the developers behind apps that are found to violate our policies have good intentions and agree to make the necessary changes when notified. Others have been less receptive, causing us to remove more than 1,500 apps as part of this review so far (as always we will gladly refund the cost of an app that is downloaded as a result of an erroneous title or description). The upside is that the store becomes a better, less cluttered and misleading place; the downside is that the walled garden is stronger. Is a top down approach really what we want, or is there a a better, community driven, approach that could be taken?

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posted 4 days ago on OSNews
The new Genode version 14.08 extends the graphical abilities of the framework to the level of flexibility expected from a general-purpose OS. In contrast to contemporary GUI stacks, Genode approaches the problem from the angle of maximizing security. This premise led to a fairly unique design. Further highlights of the new version are a new port of OpenVPN, an upgraded DDE Linux, vast performance improvements of the base-hw kernel, and networking for VirtualBox on top of the NOVA microhypervisor. It goes without saying that a flexible and dynamic GUI stack is needed for a general-purpose operating system. Since Genode strives to become such a system, this problem had to be covered at some point. The starting point was the existing nitpicker GUI server, which is a secure multiplexer for the physical display and input devices. Regarding widget sets, the framework already featured a few custom graphical applications talking directly to nitpicker, and came with support for Qt and libSDL. However, there was a missing link between the low-level nitpicker GUI server and the applications, namely a window manager and desktop environment. The open question was how to maintain the rigid security provided by nitpicker while also supporting sophisticated window management, visually appealing window decorations, and customizability. The solution took the Genode team more than a year to fall into place. At its core, it is a clever combination of small components that use existing Genode interfaces and facilitate two features unique to Genode: the virtualization of arbitrary OS services and the sandboxing of each individual process. The solution that comes with the new release adds merely 3000 lines of code to the trusted computing base of graphical applications while enabling advanced dynamic GUIs. The complex parts of the GUI such as the rendering and behavior of window decorations and window-layout management are stuffed away in sandboxes so that those complex (and potentially bug-prone) parts cannot compromise the privacy of the user. In fact, the security of the GUI stack does not even depend on a correctly working C runtime. So its attack surface is orders of magnitude smaller compared with commodity OSes. Of course, the current version is just a step on the road towards an integrated desktop environment but now, in contrast to one year ago, the path to walk on is clear. Besides addressing the GUI stack, the new release comes with an updated execution environment for device drivers of the Linux 3.14.5 kernel. Thanks to DDE Linux, Linux subsystems such as the TCP/IP stack and the USB stack can be executed directly on the microkernels supported by Genode. The primary motivation behind the update was ongoing work on bringing the Intel wireless stack to Genode. Functionality-wise, the highlights of the new release are a new port of the OpenVPN client that can now be used as Genode component, added networking support for guest OSes running in VirtualBox on top of NOVA, the use of multiple processors by the Seoul virtual-machine monitor, and the addition of pluggable file systems. Those and many more topics are covered in the detailed release documentation.

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posted 4 days ago on OSNews
What an awful week for the culture that surrounds and influences video games. That's putting it very mildly. The people responsible for all of this - like the people who threatened a critic of the portrayal of women in games with physical/sexual violence - should be sent to jail. Especially the 'Kevin Dobson' character should probably be locked up in a mental institution for life. Especially the treatment of women in the gaming industry - whether on-screen or off-screen - is absolutely horrible. As an n=1 social experiment, I often pretend to be female in my League of Legends matches, and the kind of shit you get thrown at you when you do so is disgusting. I can shake it off because I'm actually not female - but I shudder at the thought of not being able to do so.

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posted 5 days ago on OSNews
Via CrackBerry: It would seem as though the floodgates have REALLY opened up on the BlackBerry Passport and the device is popping up all over the place. This time around, to go along with the typical photos of the device, mobilenet.cz has given the BlackBerry Passport a look in a 28 minute long video, along with putting its camera and video camera to the test. Almost 28 minutes of Passport goodness - in Czech, which you may not understand. However, even without knowledge of the Czech language, that's still 28 minutes of Passport goodness. I really, really want this device.

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posted 5 days ago on OSNews
Getting outflanked by tech upstarts, hacked in two by a fearsome corporate raider, and finally taken over in part by a Chinese company that exists largely because of the world Motorola made for it: Such a fate would have been unthinkable 20 years ago. Motorola was then one of America's greatest companies, having racked up a stunning record of innovation that continually spawned new businesses, which in turn created enormous wealth. Motorola had the vision to invest in China long before most multinational companies. It even developed Six Sigma, a rigorous process for improving quality that would be embraced by management gurus and change the way companies nearly everywhere operate. However, as the history of many giant corporations (Lehman Brothers, General Motors) shows, great success can lead to great trouble. Interviews with key players in and around Motorola and its spinoffs indicate that the problems began when management jettisoned a powerful corporate culture that had been inculcated over decades. When healthy internal competition degenerated into damaging infighting. "I loved most of my time there," says Mike DiNanno, a former controller of several Motorola divisions, who worked at the company from 1984 to 2003. "But I hated the last few years." Very detailed in-depth look at the rise and fall of Motorola.

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posted 6 days ago on OSNews
Apple is developing a larger iPad with a 12.9-inch display that it plans to begin manufacturing early next year, according to Bloomberg. It's not stated when the larger iPad will actually be released, but reports have swirled around the development of an iPad at this size for about a year now, so it's quite possible that it's finally headed toward a launch. Apple's existing iPads, the Air and the mini, have 9.7- and 7.9-inch displays. At 12.9 inches, this purported iPad would be closer in size to a laptop, like the MacBook Air. A little birdie has provided us with an exclusive photo of the device.

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posted 6 days ago on OSNews
How do you determine what makes a good OS? What makes iOS vs. Android or Windows Phone vs. BB10, or any other such comparison not just about the fanboyism? Is it even possible to arrive at a scientific conclusion to this question? If we look at entire ecosystems, Android and iOS are obvious choices for buyers because of the sheer amount of apps they have available. However, what's that got to do with an answer to the question, "What's the best designed OS out of the box?" Not going to spoil it for you.

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posted 6 days ago on OSNews
A new version of MenuetOS has been released. Updates and improvements (httpc, ehci, picview, memcheck, menu, wallpaper, ohci, uhci, maps/streetview, icons, dhcp, freeform window, smp threads, smp init, onscreen keyboard, utf8 support, tcp/ip, keyboard layouts: western, cyrillic, hebrew, greek) MenuetOS is open source (MIT) and written entirely in 32/64 bit assembly. It's important to note that development is focused entirely on the 64bit version.

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posted 7 days ago on OSNews
If your monthly cellphone bill seems high, that may be because American cellphone service is among the most costly in the world. A comparison of two similar plans, one in the United States and one in Britain, reveals a marked difference. Both plans include a new iPhone 5S with 16 gigabytes of memory. Both require a two-year commitment and allow unlimited voice minutes and unlimited texting. The plan offered by the British provider, Three UK, offers unlimited data and requires no upfront payment. With Britain's 20 percent tax included, the plan costs 41 pounds a month, or $67.97 at current exchange rates. The plan provided by the American carrier, Verizon Wireless, has an upfront cost of $99.99 and then $90 a month, not including taxes. Spreading the upfront cost over 24 months and adding 17 percent tax - typical for the United States - comes to $109.47 a month. But while the British plan includes unlimited data, the American plan does not. It includes two gigabytes a month, with an additional gigabyte free during an introductory period. This should not surprise anyone. Companies like Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, et al., are state-owned monopolies in all but name. They are not state-owned, but the way the US government - both local and federal - protects them essentially makes them the equivalent of being state-owned. They have no competition, and they know it. There is no incentive for them to lower prices, improve service, or expand coverage to less important areas. Meanwhile, here in The Netherlands (I can't speak for other countries), our government mandated that the owners of the physical cables provide access to other players, ensuring competition across the board, which has benefited all of us. Don't quote me on this, but I'm pretty sure something like 95%-99% of Dutch households can get broadband internet via several different media and through several different ISPs. All because our government was smart enough to realise that it would take government intervention to ensure competition. Of course, it's unfair to compare one of the smallest and most densely populated western countries to the United States, which is crazy large and has large stretches of impoverished areas that probably do not have access to the financial means to create a proper network infrastructure. Still, the US is supposed to be the richest country on earth, and if it really wanted to, it could definitely provide good broadband access to every American citizen at low prices. It's just that the monopoly companies don't want to.

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posted 7 days ago on OSNews
Everybody thought it would be Google, but it's actually Amazon. Today, I'm pleased to announce we've been acquired by Amazon. We chose Amazon because they believe in our community, they share our values and long-term vision, and they want to help us get there faster. We're keeping most everything the same: our office, our employees, our brand, and most importantly our independence. But with Amazon's support we'll have the resources to bring you an even better Twitch. Most of the times some hot startup gets acquired it's some vague nonsense I don't care about, but Twitch - Twitch I care about. I use it almost every day, and seeing it in the hands of a company with zero presence in my home country and no history with video, streaming (like I said, Amazon has no presence here), or gaming makes me uneasy. Twitch is one of the very rare cases where I would have actually preferred Google - or better put, YouTube - buy it. Google+ is by no universally accepted as a mistake, Google is backtracking from it, so that most likely would not have been an issue. The combination Twitch+YouTube looked great on paper - much better than Amazon+Twitch. This acquisition has me worried for the future of Twitch.

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posted 7 days ago on OSNews
Fans of mobile operating systems not called "Android" or 'iOS" might be sad to hear what Huawei's head honcho just told the Wall Street Journal. In an interview, Richard Yu spoke about the company's plans regarding Tizen, Windows Phone and a long-rumored homegrown OS, and basically said they were all doomed. He's not wrong.

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posted 8 days ago on OSNews
A very interesting discussion is taking place in the Haiku mailing list right now. A developer has created a working prototype implementation of the BeOS API layer on top of the Linux kernel, and he is wondering if the project is worth pursuing. He's got the App, Interface and Networking Kits in good shape within a few months' work. While there are some minor downsides to having the kits on top of Linux (or one of the BSDs), the upsides include all the drivers in the world (well, the gpu driver situation could be a tad better), a rock solid kernel that works on all kinds of devices (who says BeOS can't run on a phone, mine can), and a working BeOS clone with comparatively little effort (as a musical engineer, my biggest worry was sound system latencies, but it turns out many Linux schedulers can easily be tuned to handle the loads I expect in a BeOS system.) I think the Haiku project made a monumental mistake in not using an existing kernel - it's simply no longer practical for a small project to keep up with the hardware evolution, handling security requirements and so on. Sad but true, and it was sad but true back in 2001. A very interesting and in-depth discussion follows. Both 'sides' make a lot of compelling arguments, and it gives a lot of insight into decisions that went into the Haiku project, both past and present. For once, I have no clear opinion on this matter; both sides have merit, and it in the end comes down to what the actual developers want to work on (hint: it's not Linux). Still, the developer in question will be putting up a repository of his Linux work, so we'll get to see what it's like.

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posted 11 days ago on OSNews
Mobile apps have skyrocketed in popularity and utility since Apple introduced the iPhone App Store in the summer of 2008. Apps now represent 52% of time spent with digital media in the US, according to comScore, up from 40% in early 2013. Apple boasted 75 billion all-time App Store downloads at its developers conference in June, and followed up by declaring July the best month ever for App Store revenue, with a record number of people downloading apps. Yet most US smartphone owners download zero apps in a typical month, according to comScore's new mobile app report. Companies like Apple like to boast about the 'app economy', but in reality, the situation is a whole lot less rosy and idealistic than they make it out to be. I think most smartphone buyers download the bare essentials like Facebook, Twitter, Candy Crush, and their local banking application, and call it quits. Together with the problematic state of application stores, the 'app economy' isn't as sustainable as once thought.

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posted 11 days ago on OSNews
Microsoft is planning to unveil its Windows 8 successor next month at a special press event. Sources familiar with Microsoft’s plans tell The Verge that the software maker is tentatively planning its press event for September 30th to detail upcoming changes to Windows as part of a release codenamed "Threshold." This date may change, but the Threshold version of Windows is currently in development and Microsoft plans to release a preview version of what will likely be named Windows 9 to developers on September 30th or shortly afterwards. The date follows recent reports from ZDNet that suggested Microsoft is planning to release a preview version of Windows 9 in late September or early October. Microsoft is really stepping up its release schedule. Good.

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posted 11 days ago on OSNews
Two related stories. Microsoft's Windows Store is a mess. It's full of apps that exist only to scam people and take their money. Why doesn't Microsoft care that their flagship app store is such a cesspool? It's now been more than two years since Windows 8 was released, and this has been a problem the entire time, and it is getting worse. If Microsoft was trying to offer a safe app store to Windows users, they've failed. And: Flappy Bird wasn't the first game to spawn an entire ecosystem of me-too clones, nor will it be the last. And now that the developer of the insanely difficult but addicting game has released the even more insanely difficult and even more addicting (is that even possible?) Swing Copters, well, we're seeing it again. This applies to all application stores. They are filled to the brim with crapware nobody wants, making the experience of using them pretty unappealing. Since Apple, Google, and Microsoft care about quantity instead of quality, I don't think this will change any time soon.

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posted 11 days ago on OSNews
China should end smartphone subsidies to overseas vendors and give more support to local brands, industry insiders said on Tuesday, as telecom carriers pledged to cut operating expenses and Apple Inc gets ready to debut its next-generation iPhone. Xiang Ligang, a telecom researcher in Beijing, said cutting carriers' subsidies to foreign-made handsets will not only reduce carriers' operating expense but also leave local players with more market demand. "It will be a one-stone-two-birds move for the Chinese smartphone industry," he said. I'm all for doing the same here in Europe and overseas in the US - but, of course, only if it applies to all smartphones, regardless of origin. Let people see what they're really paying for their Galaxy S5 and iPhone 5s. Can you imagine if smartphone vendors and carriers can no longer mislead consumers?

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posted 12 days ago on OSNews
For every Android update, Google's release of code to OEMs starts an industry-wide race to get the new enhancements out to customers. So how did everyone do this year? Who was the first with KitKat, and who was the last? What effect does your carrier have on updates? How has the speed of Android updates changed compared to earlier years? Nice overview that may help during your next purchasing decision, and which neatly illustrates Android's biggest weakness. Interestingly enough, it doesn't include non-stock ROMs.

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posted 13 days ago on OSNews
Modern microcontrollers are becoming quite beefy. The Microchip PIC32 line is actually an implementation of the MIPS32 4K architecture - and with 512K of flash and 128K of RAM you can even run Unix! RetroBSD is a port of BSD 2.11 for the PIC32. You might not be able to run X11, but it is still very useful and a great reminder of how small Unix used to be - and how far it has come.

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posted 13 days ago on OSNews
As expected, HTC has just announced a new smartphone with Windows Phone called the HTC One M8 for Windows. The new device is the same as the HTC One M8 with Android, albeit it comes with Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1 preinstalled. Sounds great, especially since it may be possible to dual boot or switch operating systems once the XDA crowd gets its hands on this thing. But then... The HTC One M8 for Windows is an exclusive device for U.S. carrier Verizon. Yeah. Good luck, with that.

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posted 14 days ago on OSNews
Via TechCrunch: You want to play Adventure, but don't know how to turn on the PDP-11? These instructions are for booting our dual rack machine from its RL01 drives, although booting the single cabinet machine from the RK05 is very similar. How to boot a PDP-11. Yes.

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