posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Ryan Fox attached a camera to his hubcap. (seizure warning)

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
What happens if you get hit by the main beam of a particle accelerator like the LHC?. "Well, fortunately (unfortunately?) we don't have to guess, as this exact scenario actually happened to Anatoli Bugorski, a Russian scientist, way back in 1978."

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am working to become an adoption counselor with a local no-kill animal shelter. What are some innocuous yet revealing questions that may have worked for you in a similar type of situation? Obviously they have their own set of practices to which I am striving to adhere. The role is not a sales job, rather one of a filter. I am trying to obtain as much honest (or sniff out as much dishonest) information as possible from potential adopters, so that those in charge can have a clear picture to place the animal in a responsible home. I personally feel my strength in this kind of work is the ability to listen at length and sympathetically to just about anything. Do you have a suggestion to get folks chatting in this type of scenario? I know it is an art, but I would appreciate some perspective.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I've been tasked (by my wife) with coming up with a corporate, work-safe joke with a specific punchline. That punchline is 'change'. Help? I've got nothing.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have an older house in Chicago. 1890s. Not sure that is relevant to the age of the doors but regardless, there are three doors (bathroom, two bedrooms) where the hinge pins are inserted from the bottom up. Occasionally this means they fall out when the tension fails to keep them in. Surprisingly this if not that often, maybe twice a year. However it is startling, prob bad for the door, hinge and floor. Anyone know a reason why a hinge may be positioned like this? Or should I just get to work flipping/replacing them?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Where cats are more popular than dogs in the U.S.—and all over the world. We all know there are only two types of people in the world: cat people and dog people. But data from market research firm Euromonitor suggest that these differences extend beyond individual preferences and to the realm of geopolitics: it turns out there are cat countries and dog countries, too.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Will Self and Robert Macfarlane Walk Wild Britain We met on the sea wall beneath the lowering weirdness of Bawdsey Manor and bonded over the bizarre extent of its rock garden: how had it come to be there? Xenoliths – Robert said – that was the technical term for rocks brought from another place. He was indeed handsome, fit and disarmingly charming; and as we loped on along the shingle crunching and chatting it became abundantly clear that our problem that day was not going to be an awkward silence. There are two main types of walk so far as I'm concerned – and I expect Robert would agree: the determining factor is not a walk's length, whether up hill or down dale, if it is sleeting or shining, but only accompanied/unaccompanied. Will and I are both walkers. We leg it. In fact, we long-leg it (I'm 6' 2" and Will is taller still). We walk a lot, we walk to talk, we walk to write and we walk for thought, but we walk very differently. We were both brought up in walking families. Will made epic traverses of Dartmoor with his father. I spent my childhood holidays in the wilder parts of Britain, stomping up mountains, learning how to navigate by map and compass, how to scramble, how to eat Mr Kipling's Cherry Bakewells in a freezing gale at 3,000ft. What started for both of us as frogmarches or forced pastimes became, later, not just a pleasure but a necessity. A need to walk: a longing for lactic, for the burning leg. Walking as a way of making sense of the landscape, and of ourselves. Robert Macfarlane's book The Old Ways chronicles, among other things, the ancient tracks and walkways, those dark moments on the heath, his inspirations Edward Thomas and John Muir, the footsteps of Laurie Lee, the pilgrimage or sacred act, the most dangerous path in Britain, the Cairngorns, and has 'made him an unlikely star,' as he travels The World Beneath Our Feet Macfarlane is a writer-naturalist whose reputation rests on a remarkable ability to conjure nature in full quintaphonic sensual detail, with a beguiling pulse of the spiritual (or perhaps animist) that places him firmly in the Romantic line. If Keats were alive today, he would be lamenting the loss of nightingales, and it is clear where Macfarlane's sympathies lie. But he also has something writers are thought to lack: physical endurance and courage, inherited from his diplomat grandfather, Edward Peck, who "covered vast distances . . . his six-foot wooden skis taking him to summits in the Himalayas, the Alps, up Kilimanjaro and Kinabulu". The grandson, while not speaking twelve languages, is equally hearty. He scales peaks, hikes in dangerous places, camps out in polar weather, dives into freezing waters. One of the sixteen "journeys on foot" recorded in The Old Ways takes him out on the Broomway, a faint causeway curving out over the silt of the Essex coast, a precarious path which the tide can swallow in minutes. Despite all the warnings about finishing in quicksand or in the sea, he and his friend set out in a white mist with only a brief demur: "We walked on . . .". Macfarlane also writes about the woods and wild places, peregrine falcons, and heading underground

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I accidentally ran up my phone bill to $1100. I want to know what I can say, if anything, to try to lower my bill.I ran up my phone bill like never before. I have been with Verizon for two years on a family plan. I've been talking to someone (long distance relationship) for two months and my last bill was over, but not by an astronomical amount. I did it again, and this time I can't afford it. I'm willing to buy LDR a phone and put them on my plan (we have unlimited family minutes) which would be quite a bit cheaper. They have unlimited minutes on their phone, but they're on a different network and I am being charged insane amounts of money. Skype is not an option as I am on the road a lot and data is not available in some of the areas I travel, although we do that occasionally. Anyway, I received some warning text notifications about going over my minute limit, but nothing specific about how bad it was. I understand that per my service contract, I'm responsible for monitoring my phone usage. I know that this was irresponsible. What I want to know is: how much am I really on the hook for? Is there anything I can say (short of being dishonest) that will give me a one-time reduction? What's reasonable to ask for? Should I ask for a manager, then ask for their manager? Should I go into the store and throw myself on the mercy of the clerks? Thank you for your answers.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am looking for non-fictional literary examples of a place or a specific event described by two or more writers. A dinner party, a famous travel attraction, etc. I am curious about how the exact same thing, filtered through different minds and colored by the unique experiences and personalities of the writer, can be interpreted in very different ways. A hypothetical example would be two people attend the same dinner party and write two different accounts of it, each informed by their idiosyncrasies.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"If you lose sight of your keys for the better part of 20 seconds, you should consider them lost," says Jos Weyers, a Dutch lockpicking guru and security consultant. "If you find them later, consider them a souvenir." The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor's Home

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am looking for decent, yet cheap, running shoes for the short term. Suggestions? More inside of course.So I've been running off and on for about a decade now. Currently off :( My standby shoes have been addidas supernova/glide/current model. However I am once again getting back into running after a good amount of time off so won't be doing super-serious running for some months and, frankly, don't want to pay $120+ for shoes just to break me back into running. Any ideas for cheap running shoes for the next 6 mos that are respectably decent - at least in terms of not killing my knees and ankles? By cheap I am talking $40-50. Thanks for any thoughts and suggestions.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
A friend of mine just had a baby in a somewhat isolated area. She's feeling alone and in need of support. Does anyone have suggestions for online communities that are respectful, articulate, and not full of woo? She says the ones she's found have been too judgmental (posts mocking/disparaging other parents), or filled with anti-vax, co-sleeping, and breastfeeding dogma. Bonus points if it has a large number women who are the main breadwinner in the family.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Christine Love prankishly included an achievement in her visual novel Hate Plus that could not possibly be achieved. But gamers have refused to take no for an answer.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I really liked OpenOffice, but apparently it's defunct. According to this, my choices are now ApacheOpenOffice or LibreOffice. Of course, there's also Google Docs. I need something for occasional use on my home PC. What should I do?Pertinent considerations: - My home PC is running windows 7 - I'm used to MS Office because that's what I've used at work. - I won't be using it enough to justify buying MS Office. Free is what I'm shooting for. - I need word processing and spreadsheet functions, and would like an Access clone - Document access via the internet would be nice, but I can just save to Google Drive, right? Which should I go with, ApacheOpenOffice or LibreOffice? Is there any appreciable difference?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Chocolate chip cookies. No-knead bread. Even crepes! All of these benefit from rest time (and usually 12+ hours). Are there other foods that also taste better the longer you take to make them?One probably-not-so-secret technique to better tasting chocolate chip cookies is to chill the dough before baking (if you can manage) for 12-36 hours (as discussed, among other places, in this NYTimes article) Similarly, there's no-knead bread, where a 24-hour rise is the secret. When I researched tips for making crepes, the overnight rest came up again. What are other foods that taste better the longer you take to make them? Is there a way you can tell if a recipe can be made slower? (It seems like any time you want to work with gluten, then rest time will help.)

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I start graduate school in a few weeks. Yay! Problem? I don't know what school and/or office supplies will be most helpful to me. Can you help me out? Do I need anything besides paper, pens, highlighters, and post its? What am I not thinking of here that may save my scholarly life later? If it helps any, I am in a non-STEM related field. Thanks so much!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am a Verizon FIOS customer using Verizon's modem/router combo. I am having some problems getting a strong signal in one room of my house. I am torn between two options, and I would love your input.So here they are: Option 1 is to run my network signal through my electrical lines using something like this. Option 2 is to connect an Apple Airport router to my existing modem/router to see if I can get a better signal on my Macbook that way. Option 3 is whatever you suggest that I have not yet thought of. As always, thank you for your help.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am an older student (in my 50s), graduating with my first B.A. in December, in anthropology. I'm very sad to leave school, as I have really enjoyed my time there (well, in this iteration--not so much when I was much younger). I absolutely LOVE going to classes and learning new stuff. I love the idea of continuing to be a student, but I'm not sure if grad school makes sense. But, mostly, I really don't understand how grad school works:1) I know grad school is crazy expensive, but I have some idea that many schools actually pay students to go there and pay them stipends as well? Is this true? 2) I have depended 100% on federal school loans for undergrad; can you get them for grad as well? I am unemployed and have no money at all for school. 3) What does grad school consist of? Classes or just researching and writing? I'm good at writing but I detest it. It's so HARD! I also do way better collaborating with others, but does grad school demand more independent work? 4) Will my age be a problem? I would be on the far side of mid-50s by the time I would finish a program, with not much working time left (not that I can afford to retire; I imagine working for a long, long time). Will schools hesitate to accept me because of this? 5) Does a masters have any value in liberal arts, especially anthro? Or must I get a Ph.D? And how much longer would that take? I have not really been considering grad school, because I assume that it would be REALLY hard to work a full-time job while earning a graduate degree, and I really need to be working. Is this true? I am currently unemployed and will begin looking for a "real" job in earnest within the next few weeks, in anticipation of my graduation. But I know a B.A. doesn't get you much. I've been planning to look for a job in non-profit management. I have no illusions about getting a job even remotely related to my love of anthropology (most particularly, primatology), and I'm just sucking that up. But the fantasy of really working in anthropology is fueling my fantasy of getting a graduate degree.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm not referring to saving a page or website to view offline, but viewing/saving the coding of an entire website without manually clicking the view source on every single page. Is this possible? Is there a program?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Creepy texts get even creepier when they're read out loud. Creepy Text Theater [NSFW SLYT]

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Multiple websites are out there to help you dine like an anime character. Typically, they consist of anime screencaps plus either adapted or invented recipes that attempt to replicate the dishes. Okonomiyaki, dainty strawberry cakes, gyoza, Ponyo's ramen, coffee jelly, you name it! There's the earnest Real Anime Food. Then there's the sillier Recipes for Weebs, which has functional indices. Anime Recipes hasn't updated in a year, but it has a long list of recipes, including the fish pie from Kiki's Delivery Service. More? Itadakimasu Anime seems to focus on general dishes that show up in many anime, like purin and omurice (with copious screencaps). Culinary Adventures and More: Real Life Anime Food. Otaku Recipes. Anime B&B: Food (not a ton of recipes, but very detailed). Foodie Fanart has a wider range of influences beyond anime. And if you can read Japanese, Animeshi. Anime recipes show up on YouTube, too (warning for autoplay): Feast of Fiction has a wide range of source material, including a few anime. Miki's Pantry will teach you how to make sootball and Dragonball cookies. Finally, Anime Foods is FULL OF GIFS. Something missing? You might be able to find it at en.cookpad.com, the English version of Japan's popular and charming user-submitted recipe database (previously).

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have severe social anxiety and depression, but I've been trying to work part-time with the support of my state's vocational rehab program. I have a natural exit point from this job coming up on August 27th, and I intend to take it. I don't know, though, if I can make it that long.I work with children with special needs-- I've been doing it for a decade and I like to think I'm pretty good at it. The student I currently work with through a local preschool is leaving for kindergarten soon. I have been talking about leaving this job, and the working world in general, for months now. I discussed it with my boss, told her I would like to leave to focus on my computer programming (that's partly true), and the plan is for me to stay as long as my student does, then drop to 0 hours and be available for subbing. I constantly worry about work and barely get anything outside of it done. I left my previous job for this one, also for reasons related to my mental health, but I managed to stick in there long enough to give the 30 days' notice they required and end on an okay note. I want to do something similar here, but I'm not sure if I'm going to make it without having a meltdown. I blow money on a taxi to work 2 or 3 days a week because I want so badly not to go I sit there paralyzed instead of getting ready on time, but hate being late. I cried after work today, and often have thoughts (that I have lots of practice not acting on) like "the only honorable way to get out of this job would be to kill myself". YANMP, and I have talked to actual mental health professionals about this. I only include it because it conveys the extent of my distress. This employment contract is at-will. I intend for this to be my last job working with children. My mother has offered to pay my rent if I leave and I have a disability hearing in the fall. My partners have pointed out, and I have to admit, that the only things keeping me in the game at this point are my sense of obligation to my student and coworkers, my fear of being disliked, and pure unfiltered stubbornness. They've pointed out that this is one of those times where the only thing keeping me from what I want is me. But I feel like my stubbornness is my friend-- it got me through all my other jobs, and it's kept me alive through years of suicidal ideation. I know that if I quit this job, I am going to feel deeply ashamed of myself, and that, too, could bring me to meltdown. Though it feels far away, I'm so, so close to the finish line. So should I stay or should I go?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"Welcome to The Unbelievable Truth, the panel game show about incredible truths and barely credible lies. I am your host, David Mitchell. The rules are as follows: each panelist will present a short lecture that should be entirely false save for five pieces of true information which they should attempt to smuggle past their opponents – cunningly concealed amongst the lies. Points are scored by truths that go unnoticed while other panelists can win a point if they spot a truth or lose points if they mistake a lie for a truth."Having recently concluded its 13th series, the show has amassed 81 episodes. For your listening pleasure: Pilot: 19 October 2006 Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton, Neil Mullarkey, and Graeme Garden on Hair, Football, Cats, and Bees. episode Series 1 (2007) Episode One: Marcus Brigstocke on coffee, Tony Hawks on cats, Frankie Boyle on Michael Jackson and Neil Mullarkey on beards. one two three Episode Two: Alan Davies on Coca-Cola, Clive Anderson on carrots, Jo Brand on Morris dancing and Jeremy Hardy on the human body. one two three Episode Three: Alan Davies on the London Underground, Clive Anderson on the Ancient Egyptians, Jo Brand on Queen Elizabeth I and Jeremy Hardy on chickens. one two three Episode Four: Sandi Toksvig on George W. Bush, Dara O'Briain on women, Jo Caulfield on ants and Graeme Garden on the Olympic Games. one two three Episode Five: Marcus Brigstocke on the Queen, Tony Hawks on bras, Frankie Boyle on hemp and Neil Mullarkey on barcodes. one two three Episode Six: Sandi Toksvig on her native Denmark, Dara O'Briain on rats, Jo Caulfield on Prince Philip and Graeme Garden on trousers. one two three Series 2 (2008) Episode One: Phill Jupitus on bears, Tony Hawks on tennis, Alan Davies on bears and Simon Evans on Queen Victoria. episode Episode Two: Michael McIntyre on toilets, Fred MacAulay on cows, Graeme Garden on sandwiches and Lucy Porter on giraffes. episode Episode Three: Tim Vine on hedgehogs, Adam Buxton on hair, Ed Byrne on kissing and Lee Mack on potatoes. episode Episode Four: Phill Jupitus on bears, Tony Hawks on skateboards, Alan Davies on frogs and Simon Evans on William Shakespeare. episode Episode Five: Michael McIntyre on pigs, Fred MacAulay on beds, Graeme Garden on Sweden and Lucy Porter on Leonardo da Vinci. episode Episode Six: Tim Vine on Napoleon Bonaparte, Adam Buxton on marriage, Ed Byrne on left-handedness and Lee Mack on fleas. episode The Unbelievable Truth Christmas Special: In this special Christmas edition Graeme Garden on Christmas tree, Jack Dee on Charles Dickens, Armando Iannucci on Father Christmas and Sean Lock on turkeys. episode Series 3 (2009) Episode One: Graeme Garden on bicycles, Chris Addison on Albert Einstein, Clive Anderson on money and Lucy Porter on penguins. episode Episode Two: Tony Hawks on dogs, Simon Evans on Iceland, Johnny Vaughan on football and Milton Jones on Prince Charles. episode Episode Three: Graeme Garden on China, Chris Addison on the postal service, Clive Anderson on the Moon and Lucy Porter on moustaches. episode Episode Four: Jack Dee on smiling, Fred MacAulay on Charles Darwin, Will Smith on cucumbers and Jeremy Hardy on dolphins. episode Episode Five: Sue Perkins on Henry VIII, Arthur Smith on cockroaches, Sean Lock on dancing and Miranda Hart on cricket. one two three Episode Six: Jack Dee on umbrellas, Fred MacAulay on the brain, Will Smith on alcohol and Jeremy Hardy on cheese. one two three Series 4 (2009) Episode One (Recorded at the 2009 Edinburgh Fringe Festival): Reginald D. Hunter on cats, Shappi Khorsandi on tea, Adam Hills on Adolf Hitler and Rhod Gilbert on golf. one two three Episode Two: Clive Anderson on baldness, Henning Wehn on Winston Churchill, Fi Glover on urine and Dom Joly on dwarves. one two three Episode Three: Tony Hawks on teeth, Arthur Smith on underpants, Phill Jupitus on the Vikings and Graeme Garden on Birmingham. one two three Episode Four (recorded at the 2009 Edinburgh Fringe Festival): Reginald D. Hunter on Julius Caesar, Shappi Khorsandi on kissing, Adam Hills on kangaroos and Rhod Gilbert on milk. one two three Episode Five: Clive Anderson on tobacco, Henning Wehn on sausages, Fi Glover on frogs and Dom Joly on Elvis Presley. one two three Episode Six: Tony Hawks on Ludwig van Beethoven, Arthur Smith on wigs, Phill Jupitus on honey and Graeme Garden on telephones. one two three New Year's Special: Rob Brydon on snow, John Lloyd on tax, Stephen Fry on champagne and Alan Davies on tigers. [apparently not available online] Series 5 (2010) Episode One: Lucy Porter, Henning Wehn, Marcus Brigstocke and Graeme Garden discuss Sleep, Beer, Childbirth and Sir Isaac Newton. one two Episode Two: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Phill Jupitus and Catherine Tate talk about Hats, Pigeons, Hairdressers and Admiral Lord Nelson. one two Episode Three: Susan Calman, Liza Tarbuck, Fred MacAulay and Charlie Brooker talk about Skiing, Elephants, Chocolate and Cleopatra. episode Episode Four: Lucy Porter, Henning Wehn, Marcus Brigstocke and Graeme Garden about Soap, Pudding, Rabbits and the Taxi Cab. one two Episode Five: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Phill Jupitus and Catherine Tate talk about ostriches, toast, spectacles and the colour red. one two Episode Six: Fred MacAulay on ducks; Liza Tarbuck lectures on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; Susan Calman has researched make-up; and Charlie Brooker has the topic of Thomas Edison. one two Series 6 (2010) Episode One: Chris Addison, Susan Calman, Rufus Hound and Armando Iannucci about Henry Ford, biscuits, rain and squirrels. episode Episode Two: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Henning Wehn and Graeme Garden on cake, shoes, nudity and Walt Disney. episode Episode Three (Recorded at the 2010 Edinburgh Fringe): Rhod Gilbert, Kevin Bridges, Tom Wrigglesworth and Lucy Porter on spiders, mushrooms, eggs and Edinburgh. episode Episode Four: Chris Addison, Susan Calman, Rufus Hound and Armando Iannucci on clocks, funerals, goldfish and Joseph Stalin. episode Episode Five: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Henning Wehn and Graeme Garden on noses, apples, fishing and Lord Byron. episode Episode Six (Recorded at the 2010 Edinburgh Fringe): Rhod Gilbert, Kevin Bridges, Tom Wrigglesworth and Lucy Porter discuss bells, donkeys, the police and Mrs Beeton. episode Series 7 (2011) Episode One: Alan Davies, Jack Dee, Marcus Brigstocke and Lucy Porter on Enid Blyton, curry, flies and breasts. episode Episode Two: Clive Anderson, Sue Perkins, Henning Wehn and Graeme Garden on dogs, lobsters, Lewis Carroll and the Sun. episode Episode Three: Arthur Smith, Tony Hawks, Charlie Brooker and Rhod Gilbert on mice, soup, television and Sir Walter Raleigh. episode Episode Four: Alan Davies, Jack Dee, Marcus Brigstocke and Lucy Porter on eyes, snakes, cutlery and dieting. episode Episode Five: Clive Anderson, Sue Perkins, Henning Wehn and Graeme Garden on sheep, furniture, the ancient Greeks and Arthur Conan Doyle. episode Episode Six: Arthur Smith, Tony Hawks, Charlie Brooker and Rhod Gilbert on ears, divorce, badgers and ice cream. episode Series 8 (2011) Episode One (Special Christmas edition): Lee Mack, Jack Dee, Rufus Hound and Graeme Garden on reindeer, decorations, boxes and pantomime. episode Episode Two (Recorded at the 2011 Edinburgh Fringe): Mark Watson, Phill Jupitus, Ed Byrne and Henning Wehn on the Olympics, butter, bees and blood. episode Episode Three: Tom Wrigglesworth, Tony Hawks, Alan Davies and John Finnemore on hamburgers, snoring, pens and crocodiles. episode Episode Four: Lee Mack, Jack Dee, Rufus Hound and Graeme Garden on nuts, boy scouts, the circus and Florence Nightingale. episode Episode Five (recorded at the 2011 Edinburgh Fringe): Mark Watson, Roisin Conaty, Alex Horne and Henning Wehn on competitions, chickens, sweets and the Romans. episode Episode Six: Tom Wrigglesworth, Tony Hawks, Alan Davies and John Finnemore talk on subjects such as wool, flowers, the radio and pasta.[apparently not available online] Series 9 (2012) Episode One: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Lucy Porter and Graeme Garden on parrots, breakfast, insurance and Oliver Cromwell. episode Episode Two: John Finnemore, Henning Wehn, Danielle Ward and Tom Wrigglesworth on pandas, football, China and smoking. episode Episode Three: Marcus Brigstocke, Miles Jupp, Susan Calman and Alan Davies on swimming, bread, hotels and foxes. episode Episode Four: Tony Hawks, Arthur Smith, Lucy Porter and Graeme Garden on restaurants, Barbie dolls, feet and garlic. episode Episode Five: John Finnemore, Henning Wehn, Danielle Ward and Tom Wrigglesworth on bats, cars, oranges and Dr. Johnson. episode Episode Six: Marcus Brigstocke, Miles Jupp, Susan Calman and Alan Davies on goats, singing, glue and painting. episode Series 10 (2012) Episode One: Tony Hawks, Lucy Porter, Ed Byrne and Charlie Higson lie about pies, worms, dancing and James Bond. episode Episode Two (Recorded at the 2012 Fringe Festival): Henning Wehn, Lloyd Langford, Celia Pacquola and Rhod Gilbert lie about wine, the Queen, baths and wind. episode Episode Three: Henning Wehn, Arthur Smith, Holly Walsh and John Finnemore on wasps, computers, Oscar Wilde and Boris Johnson. episode Episode Four: Tony Hawks, Lucy Porter, Ed Byrne and Charlie Higson lie about gambling, turtles, teeth and lemons. episode Episode Five (Recorded at the 2012 Edinburgh Fringe): Lloyd Langford, Celia Pacquola, Phill Jupitus and Marcus Brigstocke on Tomatoes, Koalas, Boats and Cheese. episode Episode Six: John Finnemore, Henning Wehn, Holly Walsh and Arthur Smith on Germany, Beards, Camels and Simon Cowell. episode Series 11 (2013) Episode One: Lloyd Langford, Henning Wehn, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden on sharks, photography, sugar and Jeremy Clarkson. episode Episode Two: Rhod Gilbert, Richard Osman, Lucy Beaumont and John Finnemore on moles, cabbages, trains and the BBC. episode Episode Three: Ed Byrne, Mark Watson, Tony Hawks and Lucy Porter on monkeys, fingers, windows and horns. episode Episode Four: Lloyd Langford, Henning Wehn, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden on geese, horses, advertising and Madonna. episode Episode Five: Rhod Gilbert, Richard Osman, Lucy Beaumont and John Finnemore on octopuses, planes, armadillos and socks. episode Episode Six: Ed Byrne, Mark Watson, Tony Hawks and Lucy Porter on lions, pianos, grass and the French. episode Series 12 (2013) Episode One (Recorded from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe): Arthur Smith, Henning Wehn, Bridget Christie and Ed Byrne on poison, etiquette, jelly and... David Mitchell. episode Episode Two: Marcus Brigstocke, Holly Walsh, John Finnemore and Rufus Hound lie about Eton, babies, Russia and hats. episode Episode Three: Henning Wehn, Graeme Garden, Jeremy Hardy and Victoria Coren Mitchell lie on the subjects of trees, doctors, newspapers and Spain. episode Episode Four: Lloyd Langford, Lucy Porter, Tom Wrigglesworth and Fred MacAulay lie on the subjects of women, Japan, owls and potatoes. episode Episode Five: Marcus Brigstocke, Holly Walsh, John Finnemore and Rufus Hound lie on the subjects of board games, salt, guinea pigs and actors. episode Episode Six: Henning Wehn, Graeme Garden, Jeremy Hardy and Victoria Coren Mitchell talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as the British, beetles, the clergy and novels. episode Series 13 Episode One: Alex Horne, Lucy Beaumont, John Finnemore and Jack Dee lie on subjects as varied as birds, witches, birds, pubs, birds, shoes and birds. episode Episode Two: Lloyd Langford, Jon Richardson, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden lie on the subjects of whales, pigs, Canada and buses. episode Episode Three: Alex Horne, Lucy Beaumont, John Finnemore and Jack Dee talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as legs, the Internet, dogs and the Middle Ages. episode Episode Four: Lloyd Langford, Jon Richardson, Katherine Ryan and Graeme Garden lie on the subjects of Wales, fish, mouths and perfume. episode Episode Five: Tony Hawks, Susan Calman, Phill Jupitus and Miles Jupp lie on the subjects of the brain, the Victorians, toads and cooking. episode Episode Six: Tony Hawks, Susan Calman, Phill Jupitus and Miles Jupp lie on the subjects of school, bears, underwear and bottles. episode

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
tl;dr: If you were looking for a place in the U.S. where you could own some land, in beautiful, lonesome country (utilities entirely optional) -- ideally in the mountains or the high desert -- on which to live intermittently throughout the year, where would you look?I live and work in New York City. I will never ever be able to afford to buy my own place here, and I have a job which I can't really do anywhere else and which is intermittent -- months on, months off. My finances are solid enough to begin budgeting and planning this property idea as a multi-year project. I love the city but I'd really like to get away sometimes. I had an unusual childhood and adolescence which included periods living with family in extremely rural environments, without electricity or running water, and they were very happy times for me. (This also means I have a pretty solid grasp on the various indignities and difficulties involved in living this way -- storing food, outhouse maintenance, and so on. The kind of house this might involve will depend on vehicle access, climate, etc, of course.) I miss the quiet, the concentration, the solitude/camaraderie, stargazing and so on. I have a very soft spot for the mountains and the high desert and places with a lot of sky. There's large parts of the U.S. I don't know well at all. So, if you were giving this some thought, where would you go looking around? Where have you traveled through and thought "I could live a way out over there"?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Good maintenance/car history/reliability/price versus everything elseSo I am on the hunt for a new (used) car and am working within a limited budget. I have $4000-$7,500 to spend and am looking for: - single owner if possible, maintenance records and a history that checks out - manual transmission - Japanese make or something else with that won't break down/cost me a lot in repairs One option that came up in my search is a Scion XA 2006 with 170,000 miles. I had been generally limiting my search to 130,000 or less, but I like that model car because the reliability, good value and gas mileage. Anyway, the car meets a lot of my criteria. It has a spotless history in terms of no accidents, one owner, all maintenance records with regular oil changes, etc. It was used as a commuter car. If I were to get it checked out by a mechanic and I got the green light, would this worth consideration? Basically I'm looking for a "good enough" car that won't break and the idea of paying 3,000something for a XA instead of 6,000 for a Corolla or whatever is sort of appealing. The seller indicated that price was negotiable. For what price would this be a good deal or should I just look at other options? My heart isn't set on the car, just looking for some advice about buying high mileage if the car is a reputable make.

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