posted 2 days ago on metafilter
What was the period after diagnosis like for you? What did you do differently? What, if anything, did you change? What would you recommend for someone going through it? Did you have any subsequent medical problems?This weekend I had what has been diagnosed as a TIA. I had a short-term, but very scary, loss of language. I couldn't recognize or say or write words. I got seen quickly at the emergency room and the symptoms resolved. I'm feeling fine now, but still a bit freaked out by it and looking for information. YANMD -- I have one and a plethora of follow-up appointments along with prescriptions for statins and aspirin, which I am taking. My questions are less medical than situational. If you've gone through this (or someone close to you has), what was helpful? What was your experience like? I know that I am now statistically at higher risk of a stroke, although I do not have the standard risk factors for stroke (smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.) I'm not generally a very risk-averse person, but I'm not sure how to determine new risks here. I'm a late 40s, generally healthy woman. I work out and eat well. Most of what I read about recommended lifestyle changes are things I already do. I'm also interested in hearing stories where this happened once and never recurred.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
No, the above quote is not the answer to "How many total episodes are there of the various "Law & Order" franchises?". In actuality, those nine words conclude one of the most exciting films of the 1940's (and the direct ancestor of Dick Wolf's prolific franchise). Welcome to "The Naked City". Released in 1948, the film is the story of a murder in New York City and the police detectives who track down the killer. There's nothing original about this premise all by itself, but the execution made it memorable. Much like "Law & Order" does today (but far less typical at the time it was made), "The Naked City" is filmed almost entirely on location in NYC. Producer Mark Hellinger was a native New Yorker and intended the film to be a love letter to the city. Here's a look at a number of the locations then and now. Oh, and a young Stanley Kubrick was working as a photographer for Look magazine at the time and took a number of behind-the-scene shots. Ten years after the movie premiered, the ABC television network debuted a TV series by the same name which ran for five years. It mirrored the film with its police procedural format and the use of location shots. The series would later be sited by critics and even Wolf himself as an inspiration for "Law & Order" Entire film here.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I enjoy SF/F short fiction that takes a wide view of a sub-genre or universe, evoking its possibilities without spending much time on any given situation/episode. I can offer some examples, but I would be glad to read more.A wide scope is probably all that these exemplars definitely have in common, but here's the kind of thing I have in mind: Catherynne M. Valente's "How to Become a Mars Overlord" conjures up the idea of Martian/planetary romances in general and, among other things, rattles off a bunch of different images that could be the heart of a story. K. J. Bishop's "Alsiso" traces a criminal/roguish legend down through time, pointing out many different possibilities for how it could re-emerge and what it could mean. Rachel Swirsky's "The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers beneath the Queen's Window" follows one character through eons of change, and H. P. Lovecraft's "The Shadow Out of Time" is similar. Both follow conventions of realism so closely they're almost too focused in perspective, but they still encompass enough to work for me. Matthew David Surridge's "The Word of Azrael" (abridged version, unfortunately) to me feels almost like an inventory of all the kinds of adventures a sword & sorcery hero would typically have. I love how these stories briefly say so much about other stories that could theoretically be written and then don't go into many details. I'd be grateful if anyone could suggest more like them.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
On the occasion of recently turning 30 and wanting to arrest my weight gain, I'd like to figure out ways to cook things that are healthier than the stereotypical bachelor chow I've been subsisting on for the last year.I'm not really into cooking anything elaborate. Usually by the time I get home from work, I'm pretty well on my way to burnt out, and hungry enough that I don't want to go through any elaborate prep routine. Chopping vegetables is about as far as I want to go most nights. I've been eating a lot of pasta, which is doing horrible things to my waistline. Lately I've been trying to sub that out for veggie stirfry with minimal oil, although I need to figure out something to supplement that so I don't lie awake at night hungry and end up eating later to compensate. I pretty much eat Healthy Choice type meals for lunch at work, which I hope helps, but I can't really see eating more of those as dinners. I'm looking for things that I can either 1) prepare in a big batch on the weekend and eat all week, or 2) throw together quickly, with minimal effort. Any suggestions? I prefer savory over sweet, I'm partial to Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, etc cuisine, and I'm pretty amazingly lazy. Cost is a factor, although I'm open to spending what I need to. Pasta has the benefit of being cheap in the short term, but I imagine the long-term health effects are not at all cheap.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have a cheap pleather jacket that I wear all the time - the inner lining is stained and I'm worried about washing it. The jacket says "dry clean only" but when I took it to the dry cleaners they said they'd charge $60+ to clean it because it was "leather" (it's not). How should I clean it?The outside of the jacket is fine, it's just the inside lining that is smelly and needs to be cleaned. Will I mess my jacket up by spot-scrubbing the inner lining? What will happen if I soak the whole thing in cold water?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm looking for a daypack that'll carry an SLR camera, an extra lens, a book, and a water bottle. I'd like it to be compact enough that it can't carry much else. I'd like it to offer some mild degree of protection to the camera and the lens. I don't mind if it's a backpack, shoulder bag, or sling. Style-wise, I'd rather it not look like a camera bag. And I'm a male.Previous questions asked for bags that could carry a laptop, or are a bit older, or are targeted toward the other gender. I'm eyeing the Timbuk2 Snoop Camera Messenger Bag, and though it's a little expensive, I may very well go for it. But in the meantime, does anyone have any other suggestions? Thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Is there a way to ignore how you feel and just get things done regardless of whether you feel like doing it or not? I don't understand why I am having such a hard time doing the things that I used to do? I used to be able to get a lot of things done, and now I find myself resisting almost all the time. Is there a way to just stop paying attention to the fact that you don't feel good or that you are scared or a number of other emotions?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In my distaste for brands I tend to remove tags from my clothing, but in one case this has backfired - I found a brand of jeans which fit me perfectly. Sans tag, all I have to go on is the imprint on the buttons. It's a shield with a pointed demon tail (tangential ask: what is that pointy thing called and where does it come from?). Can you ID my jeans? Here is a photo.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Are you in the UK? Have you recently bought spectacles online? Were you happy with them? If your answer to all these questions is YES, please tell me more! Plus any other advice or information about buying glasses online.I'm in London and would like to buy some inexpensive specs (preferably under £125) for my giant noggin. I have a fairly recent prescription tucked away somewhere that I think had the pupillary distance written on it (though I can't now find it, so I may have to go get a new one). I'm only a bit short-sighted, and my prescription's pretty straightforward. Thanks for your help!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"Goddamit, I ain't got no motherf--n' name for it yet, motherf--ker!" (language NSFW)

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"Aint Nothing Shine Brighter Than That Bad Boy": The Inside Story of Hip-Hop's Most Notorious Label

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm questioning my (female) gender identity. I am looking for online resources, maybe a forum or online community that is specifically ftm or has specific ftm threads/conversations. I've combed reddit but the format of reddit feels less like a conversation and I don't feel comfortable posting there. Links I have found to specific resources are surprisingly mostly out of date or MtF specific.Basically, I'd like to talk to ftm guys, and also people who are questioning their female-assigned sex or are living as genderqueer/passing/partially passing, etc. FWIW, I'm in my mid-twenties and have been out as a lesbian for quite some time. I am not your typical "known since consciousness that I'm actually a dude" kind of questioner, so I would also like to know/know of trans* people who don't fit that specific criteria, because honestly it's making me question my authenticity. Also, I would like to try passing as a guy for a few days to see how that would feel, but I don't see how that's even possible (I live with my parents, so even trying it out at home is a problem), so I feel like trying it out online first would give me a general idea. I'm having a really hard time with not knowing what I am. I feel like I can't talk about it with anyone, not even my lgbtq friends, because I'm not even close to the point of opening up about it.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"True, the Nazis were trying to find the Ark of the Covenant so they could destroy the world," Canuto says. "But methodologically and legally they were in the right." Why archeologists hate Indiana Jones. Also, why doctors don't like medical dramas; what is inaccurate about TV portrayals of lawyers and the legal process (PDF); and, finally, the terrific analysis of the portrayal of academics in children's books. When your profession is portrayed on TV, what do they get wrong?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
During a difficult economic climate, I think it's pretty realistic to suggest that if wanting to make a career change in your mid-thirties or even forties, the decision as to which career to pursue should be chiefly logically and strategically determined. Your passion or love of certain skills you have should not be the main deciding overall factor. We have to be realistic as to how competitive the job market is and which markets are willing to employ career changers in their 30s.......Why? Well, most industries I believe are ageist and they prefer to chose younger applicants (20-27), as they are; free from professional baggage (they haven't developed a strong enough individualist work ethic, and can be molded by their older work colleagues/bosses); are not considered a threat to middle-management's jobs and they generally come without an attitude (meaning, older professionals are independent enough to stand their ground and question authority). This coupled with the economic forces increasing the competitive nature of the job market, makes it much tougher for career changers in their 30s and 40s. I really am stuck between a rock and a hard place at present, and I feel the pressure at 33 to identify and select a career which will make me employable to a new industry. I would eternally appreciate your help and advice in taking the time to read about my situation. To sum up: -I left school at 16 and entered the workplace immediately (did well at school however wasn't interested in further developing my academic record). -I worked as an Agency temp for 3 years, working for over 25 different organisations and accrued fantastic skills in the process; I eventually landed a permanent central government job. -Worked for the government for 9 years – never being promoted. I level transferred to different departments, and my skill-set was predominantly procurement/budget in capacity. I undertook a couple of job shadowing opportunities as an IT Network Floorwalker for a 4 week post-migration server project, and also served as an IT/PD Trainer, designing and creating training guides and training members of staff – both these opportunities I massively enjoyed. -I believe part of the problem of being unable to progress was the 'face doesn't fit' syndrome. It appeared my perceived attitude problem with certain levels of authority massively impinged my ability to apply for promotions. -Despite working really hard, and undertaking various projects for senior management over the years, I was never rewarded; I remained as an Admin Officer for 9 years, frustrated and disillusioned. -I decided after 9 years to do something about my lack of progression and changed to part-time hours, enrolled at college and undertook an Access course to go to University. -I quit my government job when I started uni as to be quite frank, the place was soul destroying and it was a chapter of my life I wanted to leave behind. -Graduated in 2013 with a BA(Hons) degree in Business from a respected UK university with a 2:2 classification (mitigating circumstances – I was dumped 2 weeks before my final exams after 3 years with my partner). -3 months after graduating, I landed a permanent job in real estate, as a Marketing Negotiator in the disposal and letting of commercial property. My initial aim was to seek employment within the Management Consultancy arena as one of my modules highlighted this was a career I would thoroughly thrive and enjoy. However, my 2:2 classification and the sheer competitive nature of the economy with my younger cohorts presented the realisation that my chances were between slim to impossible, so I just looked for any job. -During my 10 months at the commercial agency, I thrived and absolutely loved my job. I worked late most nights, went in the odd weekend to improve the workload, went above and beyond my job role. -The head of the agency and I soley ran the department, and I loved the level of autonomy that was provided to me in my manager's absence. I would negotiate lease terms, analyse legal documents etc, and again, this job made me realise that I excel within areas of research and analysis. I could read literature for hours and annotate, edit and proof read till my brain exploded. I had a good solid, humorous, professional relationship with my manager - I respected him massively and I worked my rear off to prove how much I loved my job. - Because of my newly discovered enthusiasm for commercial real estate, I looked into becoming a Surveyor. I worked with Surveyors on a daily basis and there was a 2 year part time Masters conversion course available at my local University. This would require day release every week and I would raise this as a request nearer the time (had only been in my job 5 months). -It became clear after a few months that the office politics and culture of the organisation had caused real HR problems in the past. It was a small company comprising circa 150 employees across several branches. Through the grapevine I would hear how certain people got sacked without warning, or there were grievances taken with the owners of the company. They didn't have a HR department, which says it all. -1 particular employee, female, very opinionated, bossy, manipulative, two faced etc – had a lot of control over company decisions, despite not being a company owner, or branch manager (she was business development director). She had a very close working relationship, scrupulously you could say, with the two owners of the company, and it looked as though they would allow her certain departmental/company privileges in making some big decisions. -10 months after being in my job, I was called in to the office shortly after lunch on a Friday by my manager, with the aforementioned woman present, and was told I no longer had a job. Apparently the department wasn't making enough money and couldn't justify paying my wage (£20k), and wanted to bring someone in with more business development experience on less money. I knew the decision was politically motivated – by this woman. -My understanding is that this was a woman, despite her abundance of money, clothes and holidays she loved to talk about in the office to everyone, was jealous of younger, perhaps pretty (don't wish to seem arrogant) and ambitious women. -To say I sobbed in the office was an understatement. I could have got angry but I didn't. I could tell she revelled in witnessing my vulnerability. I was asked to leave the office some 20 mins later after I had said my brief goodbyes. -5 days later, I was served my months notice from my landlady whom I lived with. For the last few months since I was made redundant, I have remained unemployed, living with friends of the family. I had a plan when I worked in my last job, I felt I had real identity and a path, then the rug was pulled away from under my feet when I lost my job. I suppose a positive thing out of all this happening is that it gave me lots of time to introspect and re-evaluate what I want out of my career. I find it pressurizing and quite sad really that I see so many of my friends doing well, on good wages (from £25k to £40k), or either doing a Masters degree, and I will inevitably be back on the minimum wage pay scale. I don't regret doing my degree and it has opened the door to do a Masters in the near future if I wish. I have lived in houseshares pretty much most of my life when I left home at 16, aside from a 5 year period where I lived with an ex-partner. My credit history is dire because of how financially irresponsible I was when I was 19/20, my parents are divorced and are not financially secure themselves, so I don't have that luxury of loaning money from parents, or living with them (fell out with my mum a few years ago, and my dad and I speak every 3-5 years. During my 10 months at my agency job, I managed to save £1000 which I still have in a savings account. For some stupid reason, I have applied for MSc Building Surveying on a part time basis, paying £400 x 4 instalments in Y1, followed by £600 x 4 instalments in Y2. Why? I am genuinely scared I will miss the boat on forging a career which offers a technical skill with a recognised qualification (RICS). I now have to move out of where I am, and and relocate back home; I have to also look for a job. What I am trying to say is that maybe this is a time, at 33, being a woman (yes it has to be taken into account depending what industry I wish to pursue), where I have to apply logic, rather than following a pathway determined by what my passion is and what skills I thrive utilising. This is not a time to be following my heart in this current economic climate - I did that with my undergrad degree. What I need is to be aiming towards a recognised profession – something I can be Iqualified in – with real vocational/technical skill, that will pay well (not interested in earning thousands and thousands of pounds – anything over £25k I'd be thrilled with given I haven't earned over £20k all my life), and will provide greater security than most service sector non-vocational jobs. Yes – a Chartered something. A chartered surveyor sounds perfect – they are in demand, that's what I want. I want to be in demand professionally. However, I read 'What colour is your parachute?', which was brilliant to say the least, and having undertaken the tests etc, it turns out – -I like working in a young (22-30), sociable, environment – not too busy – but with the opportunity to work on my own as this is when I am at my most productive. Young because I like the fact I can make friends from this environment and engage in social events outside of work. Most people over the age of 30 have commitments and tend not to participate in such social events. -Research & analysis, proof reading, annotating, writing, reading, design and problem solving are the top skills I love to utilize. ( * during university, my fellow cohorts would ask me to proof read their essays – without risk of plagiarism – to improve their grammar, vocab, diction etc – and I loved doing it) -Design- as in I have always been artistic – at school I achieved top grades in art, won competitions etc. During my career I have loved designing material from training guides to posters etc. Dabbling in design software such as Illustrator is what I would like to begin doing - even just as a hobby for the time being. -Writing – ever since I can remember, I always seem to be writing something. Whether it was a diary as a child, a poem as a grown teenager, a newspaper when I was at junior school (which I still have believe it or not), or even very short stories. Writing a novel was always a hidden fantasy of mine since I was younger, generating different titles of books, starting them, but not having the time/will power/motivation to take it seriously. At University, I achieved first class grades working independently and as a group – 8,000 word essays weren't a problem for me. -Computing – from pursing a Networking qualification at college, to dabbling with Adobe illustrator, I've always had a connection with computers. Whenever there was a computing problem at my previous places of work, I would offer to resolve the problem first before calling the helpdesk (obviously I wasn't an expert, but I was certainly a lot more computer savvy than over 95% of my colleagues). I recently thought about starting my own business, producing infographic CV's. I hear infographics/data visualisation is an emerging, growing field in analytics/marketing. I have re-engineered so many people's CV's over the years. I seem to have a natural aptitude in being able to successfully market a person using key buzzwords etc, whilst also improving the vocab/grammar/diction content, in addition to the layout in which I'd introduce a few non-imposing, professional graphics. Feedback was great – my assistance increased their marketability and subsequent invitation to interviews. However, I backed out from the idea as it's not realistic to earn a decent salary for the long term. I've seen some incredible infographic's on the internet, and that would be a great job really using research/analysis/data, and convert into illustrations. However when I was at university, I really wanted to pursue a Management Consultancy career, and deep down I still want this, but if this is going to be unrealistic, then a career involving aforementioned skills would be equally as amazing. I feel under so much pressure in the idea of becoming qualified as a professional using a vocational skill-set, that my real passion, you could say, seems logically unrealistic and completely unfeasible because it will not make me qualified in anything. To be chartered, or qualified in a profession means I can also narrow down the job search to an 'occupation', rather than 'admin/sales/customer service'. I know that Quantity and Building Surveyors are in demand, and what is also very appealing is that Surveyors are on the occupation shortage list in Australia, so such an occupation means I would also be in demand internationally. So I have signed myself up for this Master's degree to start next week, having no idea how I am going to fund the first year's fees, but I feel if I don't pursue this, time will pass by (including my age), and I will make it much harder for myself to enter an industry where age poses a significant barrier to entry. If I wanted to be a teacher or occupational therapist, age would not be a problem - these are not within ageist industries – but deep down I don't' want to be either of them. If truth be known, im having doubts about the MSc in Building Surveying because its not my ideal career, but it certainly offers me the opportunity to obtain a profession with Chartered status..... So whilst 'What color is your parachute?' is invaluable in helping those such as myself, identify what skills they love to utilize, what environments they like to submerge within, in helping you pursue a career, I worry the book is failing to take into account that logic, rationality and realism is essential if wanting to pursue a new career, in the current climate, at a typical career-changing age (33-45). I would love to work in a design environment, being able to research and analyse literature, edit work, etc and achieve some recognized masters qualification, but the reality is, most industries are heavily leaned towards recruiting younger job seekers. The colour of my parachute is uncertain – because it's struggling between logic and emotion. I would genuinely and gratefully appreciate any advice you have – your thoughts/opinions could well prove a significant turning point at the moment.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"It irritates me because it seems such a self-conscious way to live. But, to be fair, it's almost always completely unselfconsciously done. It's people like me, carping at the camcordsters, who are overthinking how life should be experienced. We're the ones who are trying to impose our opinion of how things should be enjoyed. 'Why can't you just look at a view!?' we fume, but we never ask ourselves: 'Why can't you just let people enjoy the view in the way they want!?' Exasperated by people staring at their phones instead of the world around them, we end up staring at people staring at their phones, miss the sunset, fireworks display or penguin feeding time, and don't even walk away with a video to watch later." (SLGuardian)

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
The colorful street art and murals of L.A.-based artist Septerhed.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In the 1960s, the city of Sheffield redeveloped their neglected market square into a Hole in the Road. "A small early forerunner to Meadowhall-type malls; but with more drunks and dodgy smells," the Hole was filled in and paved over in the 90s. I've never been to Sheffield, but somehow this story activated my second-hand nostalgia. Here's some photos: Under construction Buskers, bums, and others In the hole, day and night From above and below And be sure to check out that animated lego music video in the first link!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
It's today. I know I should have started planning earlier - I was thinking I'd just get her some flowers and a card and take her to brunch, but now I want to make it special. I still have not gotten into the habit of thinking "This may be the last time ..." but it's true. I want her to go back to her independent living facility feeling well fed, well feted, happy to be 96 and loved.Places I am considering: The Brown Palace afternoon tea. We've been before and she loved it, but I don't know that they do anything special (like a cupcake with candle?) for birthdays. White Fence Farm, lunch or dinner. Less elegant, but they definitely cater to her age group, and I've heard birthdays are celebrated with a dessert with sparkler. Denver Botanical Gardens, lunch at the garden bistro by the waterlily pond; the weather is going to be perfect to eat outdoors. Difficulties: She has a rolling walker (rollator) that we will take with us. If a lot of walking is involved, we'd have to switch to a wheelchair, which would have to be provided by the venue (Botanical Gardens is in this category). I have her handicap placard to hang in my car. If I can't park close enough I have to drop her off, park, and come back for her. She has dementia and her memory is not great. She does best in the mornings and afternoons; by evening she is tired and sometimes sundowns, so dinner, unless it is an early dinner, is not optimal. She has good days and bad days - I want this to be a GOOD day. Minimal frustration, much tender care, good food, moderate fuss over how awesome it is that she is 96! And I want her to get back in time to tell her friends what a good day she had, which is at least half the enjoyment for her. Ideas?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm trying to find a piece of classical music from a few barely-remembered details. It had a number of short-ish solos (in a row?) of parallel structure. I'm sure that there were harp and oboe solos but I think that there were others as well. I think that part the name was some reference to Spain or Spanish (Espanola?). Any ideas?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I want to buy a drum kit (as a gift) and have no idea where to start (this is in Melbourne if you happen to have some location-specific information).I'm buying a drum kit. Why, doesn't matter. The person (who is an adult) to be using the kit doesn't know it's coming and cannot yet play the drums, but will be practising or getting lessons I'm sure. Rock music. So I want to get a good value (of course) kit that will last until either a passion is ignited and better gear can be bought, or a whim is vanished. I know absolutely nothing about drums. I would buy second hand for value, but I wouldn't know where to start (except on gumtree) and would sound an utter naif. I will be going to a major music store (any advice as to which store in Melbourne greatly appreciated, city or south-eastern suburbs preferred) and will be looking for a friendly and supportive salesperson, and will put myself in his or her hands. But, to start with, I wouldn't mind knowing a little bit... e.g. how many drums would you start with (Wikipedia suggests bass, snare, two toms, two hi-hats)? My budget is $500 - $800, this is realistic? Are there extras I should remember (sticks, I bet they're useful). Fire away with whatever advice you can give on buying a first beginners drum kit...

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I want to design a simple wedding ring for my fiancee. She loves Iceland more than me. Is there any unique material or gem that could be used in a ring? Or a referent to the area?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I have just had a total hip replacement (one week ago) and am recovering beautifully. I am female. I am supposed to use a toilet with a raised seat and have installed one in my primary toilet at home. I am theoretically allowed to go to a restaurant, but if they don't have a "handicapped" toilet (with a raised seat), what should I do? Can I only go to a restaurant that has this?I have an extra raised toilet seat (similar to this) that I haven't even opened yet (for my second bathroom, which I use rarely but might have to sometimes) that is called "portable," but would it be insane to walk into a restaurant carrying my own toilet seat?? (in a large bag, but still). I would like to know if anyone else has had experience with this sort of thing. I'm supposed to need the raised toilet seat for the next 5 weeks or so, but have a couple of occasions coming up that I'd like not to have to miss. Thank you. (oh also please don't suggest those cone things that you put up against your body. I don't trust them! (or, rather, myself with them)

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
At a dinner party at our home a few years ago one of our guests brought up issues of life insurance and their concerns about adequate coverage for their family. They asked my husband and I how we manage our policies. My husband announced to the group that he refuses to get life insurance because he feels such a policy would prompt me to actively seek ways to end his life. He was serious. This has caused no small amount of angst on my part, and I need some advice.My husband's comment at our dinner party prompted the room to fall silent. Although we had all had a few drinks my husband was clearly speaking his mind. Although our relationship is less than perfect, I would never imagine doing anything to hurt another human being, let alone the man I married and have had a child with. It was a shock, and was tremendously upsetting to me to know that he trusts me so little and that he thinks that I could conceive of such action. I attempted to discuss this the following day and to explain to my husband how hurt I was by his perceptions of me, but he refused to discuss it saying that is simply how he sees things. Fast forward to today, when life insurance came up again. Our daughter was talking about how Harry Houdini died from a sucker punch. My husband, whom she sometimes punches in the belly while playing, said "that's why you should never sucker punch me." I commented (jokingly, but unthinkingly) "and you don't want Daddy to die - he doesn't have life insurance!" My husband immediately bristled, announcing to our 10 year old daughter that he does not have life insurance because he thinks I will try to kill him off if he does. My daughter sat in shock as I asked my husband if he truly thinks of me as so unloving, heartless and immoral. He said it was clear that I am such a person, as evidenced by my comment. Just a bit more background: The topic of life insurance first came up very early in our relationship as we were creating living wills, at which point I broached the subject of securing policies for both of us. My husband refused to get a policy, and furthermore said that he would not support my getting a policy either because he thought it an unnecessary household expense. I pursued the topic only one other time after our daughter was born, but to no avail. My husband and I do have a very strained relationship, but I have never for a second wished any ill on this man. Several questions for metafilter: Are these concerns typical? Does it seem like excessive paranoia on my husband's part? How can I apologize to my husband for the bad joke I made today, but make clear to him that it WAS a bad joke - not that I want him dead to get life insurance money? Am I wrong to be heartsick and deeply hurt that the man I married views me in such a horrible light? Am I wrong to be upset that he should talk like this about me with our daughter. How should I try to engage him on this? Should I just drop it? And am I wrong to be concerned that we don't have life insurance?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
'I place the blame for gaming history at the feet of the medium itself, or rather the industry that runs it. You can turn on the radio and hear the entire post-Beatles spectrum of popular music history represented as you run down the dial; flip through cable channels on a Sunday afternoon and you're as likely to see yet another repeat airing of an '80s release like Die Hard or Back to the Future as you are something that hit theaters in the past five years. For games, though, you practically have to go digging to find the classics. And chances are you won't even find them.' Jeremy Parish on the preservation and availability of classic video games. And what happens when a company simply goes out of business? On occasion, its catalog is snatched up in its entirety by another publisher. More often, however, its games are auctioned off individually to the highest bidder. We may learn where high-profile or high-selling brands end up, but more niche or obscure titles are just as likely to vanish into the vaults of someone who buys the rights speculatively only to never use them again. Scroll down for a list of which company owns what franchises.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
They have a very sexy cow in Murky Waters, the tiny, rural village you find yourself in for the duration of Chapter 4. The peasants are devoted to their cow, and dedicate themselves to her every need, guarding her jealously and evangelising about her voluptuous udder. They seem to take less care of their daughters, who keep wandering off and getting killed. Quick, better screw some of them first! Kate Simpson is collecting all the ladycards in The Witcher: part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. (The Witcher, for those who don't know, gave the player collectable trading cards for each character they ahem "romanced".)

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