posted 1 day ago on metafilter
The special effects wizards behind Manborg are raising funds to create a serious horror film with all-practical effects. Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie are members of the Canadian comedy group Astron-6, but are branching out from that work with The Void, an original horror film project they originally pitched to producers at the Fantasia Film Festival in 2013. They are currently raising funds to create all the film's creatures using practical effects. Astron-6's brand of humor often turns extremely dark, and Kostanski and Gillespie have repeatedly proven to be extraordinarily inventive with effects on tiny budgets, so the idea of them working with more money to make a practical effects-centered film has genre film fans very excited.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I have had a bottle of Aveda Joshua Tree/Spirit Desert Pure-fume in my collection for a while (almost 14 years) and it remains my all-time favourite. It also hasn't been available for purchase in many years, so I have been using it sparely.. but I'm almost out. Help!Despite loving it, I have absolutely no idea how to describe the scent - it's not like any other perfume I've ever had or like anything else I've ever sniffed. It's very distinct. A tiny sniff of the cap is enough to make me feel happy. I love love love it. A quick google tells me that what I'm smelling is mostly likely orange blossom, vanilla, jasmine and bergamot - another source says it's most likely neroli, bergamot, petitgrain, jasmine and vanilla. I have no idea what's most prominent because I have no idea what any of the above smell like (other than vanilla). I just love love love this scent SO MUCH. I can't afford the $350 cost to buy a bottle on ebay. The only "copycat" I've found was on etsy - and the shop is closing AND only shipping in the US. Any suggestions for a replacement? (Ideally one that's available in Canada, but I'll accept shipping from the US if it isn't prohibitively expensive.)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My mother died unexpectedly last week at the age of 64, more than likely of a heart attack, and the whole family has been in shock and upset. She had some serious health issues that she neglected (both to treat and to tell us about) and it basically was the end of her. One of the biggest things she did was being the primary caretaker of our dad who will be 79 next month. So now we're left with trying to figure out what to do...The roller coaster of emotions surrounding her sudden death is very painful and I think the family is basically just trying to take it one day at a time with mixed results. A few days after after her death we received a call from his PCP (who was also her PCP). Aside from his condolences he let us know that dad basically has dementia (not specifically know to us before), that he shouldn't be left to live alone, he needs care much like having a baby and that we should consider things like assisted living and maybe down the line a nursing home. What?? what?!? whaaat??!?!? He had a stroke a couple of years and seemed to have suffered language and oral communication deterioration but dementia was new news to us. He's had hand tremors for years but that was not attributed to any neurological causes. His peripheral vision was affected also. He has had heart surgery in the past, was a cigarette smoker for years before that (not now) and recently with the stroke his medication list has grown. At the risk or rambling on, please forgive me if I do, we don't know what the heck to do! Not even sure what questions to be asking or what resources to be consulting or where to even begin. The facts are that between myself and 1 brother, our SOs who all have full-time jobs and 3 toddlers between us, our physical and mental capacities are stretched thin already. I thought I was stressed out before with 2 kids a mortgage and the horrible snowy winter this year but this takes it to a whole other level. We live about 25-30 minutes (Winchester and Reading) away from dad (Watertown) and work about an hour's or so commute away (Needham and Worcester). So I don't that we could sustain going to see him everyday to make sure he takes his meds correctly for long term. He get confused and take his before/after breakfast meds at once. Or the other day he took the evening medication in the morning. This is in eastern Massachusetts: Watertown is where dad lives in kind of an elderly independent living apartment complex. He has a visiting nurse come maybe once or twice a week (not sure). They had another woman coming in who was supposed to be a home aid from the same agency but my mom befriended her and I think maybe she didn't do all the things she is required to do like laundry or house cleaning etc... but she would take my mom food shopping or go for her if the weather was bad. The visiting nurse and aid have already put in a request for more hours for my dad but we don't know if that will be sufficient. So what do we do about that? He is on Medicare and MassHealth so there is a possibility that some services will be covered but we certainly could not afford a situation like assisted living or nursing home. We're trying to speak to his PCP to figure out what his plan of care is and what appointments he's got coming up. We've spoken to the bank to have one of us be on the checking account to pay bills. He receives a yet unknown amount from SSI monthly. We have an appointment with SSI next month. I don't even know what else there is to deal with, that's one thing we need help with. Another thing that we need help with is figuring out what to do long term. Some of the ideas that are being considered are technological like a medication dispensing device that will simplify that process, I know there are some that will send out an alert if a dosage is missed etc...Another thing is maybe putting a webcam so we can keep an eye on him for whatever good that would do. There are motion sensors and things that we could install that would allow us to monitor him but I don't know how useful they are and a cursory glance at some options I've found online has shown that some of this is costly. Non-tech things: Do we need an attorney for anything? Is it a good idea for one of us to have power of attorney? health proxy? Are there any social services we can/need to/should pursue? What else? or instead? The life insurance policy we had for mom was practically useless when it came time to use it for the funeral expenses. Guaranteed life but only pays out the premiums +10% if you've had it under less than 3 years. So probably another thing we need to review. These are all things that mom would have been good at figuring out :( She would complain to us to a mild degree about dad and what she had to deal with but never led us to believe that it was this bad. And we didn't know about any serious cardiac issues until we started going through her documents and saw letters from her doc urging her to seek treatment. Had we only known. This has been my worse nightmare for a long while, to have mom go before dad, and now it's happened. I know this is a lot to ask from strangers on the internet but...damn if this isn't anxiety/panic attack inducing stuff! Thanks in advance for any and all contributions. I can check in and answer any questions if needed periodically.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Combination of genes and lack of fluoridated water when I was growing up made my oral health a perpetual issue. My attempts to get a handle on the situation, resulted in dental bills I have been unable to afford. Now that I am covered by insurance (both Cigna and Delta Dental plans) I am wondering if anyone can recommend low cost options for dental work (I will need a lot of it). I am looking at dental schools, and other subsidized opportunities to get this started. Thus, I would appreciate any specific recommendations for NYC area (all boroughs). Thanks in advance.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended avoiding feeding peanut products to very young children to minimize the risks of developing a severe peanut allergy. Turns out that might not have been good advice. A study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests early exposure to peanuts is a better strategy. And while you're at it, don't worry about sanitizing everything in the dishwasher; hand-washing dishes is also associated with fewer allergies.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
The Urban Institute has released (PDF) the first study to focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth; young men who have sex with men (YMSM); and young women who have sex with women (YWSW) who get involved in the commercial sex market in order to meet basic survival needs, such as food or shelter.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm looking for a part-time course (in or around London UK) , online course, or book(s) that will help me understand business.Hello, I work for a Organisational/Talent Development consultancy in London in the UK. Although I really love it, I sort of ended up here by accident (after a humanities degree, followed by a postgrad and then a career in the arts), and I am looking to increase my business acumen, credibility and long term career prospects. The trouble is, I'm finding it really difficult to know where to start. I know there are courses, books, podcasts etc, but there are so many out there I feel totally overwhelmed. My colleagues have mostly completed masters in Occupational Psychology, and I considered going down that road, but it's a long path and I actually think I'd rather do something with broader application- my long term goal is to consult businesses/ coach individuals on innovation and strategy. I'm creative and think conceptually, but a strategist needs to have an understanding of business and market context, and I'm not entirely sure what that means, or where to find it. I've done a lot of Googling but I'm a bit overwhelmed by everything out there, and as an 'outsider' I don't have a clue how to assess what would be valuable and which brands are credible. I learn best in a classroom setting so my ideal would be a part-time evening weekend, or short course (I wouldn't mind taking off around 5 days for something brilliant). As I said, I've googled, I'm aware of what's out there, but I could really do with an expert view on what would be a good investment of my time. In an ideal world, I'd do this course: Innovation, Creativity and Leadership MSc / MA / MInnov But I don't know if it's business focused enough, and although I know City is the best journalism school in London, I don't know anything about its reputation in the business world. Any guidance on this would be wonderful. I am considering doing an MBA, but would be some way off because of the huge cost. My budget would be an absolute max of £10k per year. I will ask for help from my company, but have no idea if this will be available. Otherwise, I'm looking for credible resources that are easy for a layman to understand- books, podcasts, publications etc. I don't want a university reading list- more like: if you could recommend just one book what would it be? Or, if you picked up your business savy by reading financial publications, which ones? How often? Cover to cover, or certain topics only? How did you apply what you learnt. I'm know I sound very remedial, but coming from an arts background, this stuff is totally alien! Thanks your your time.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Looking for a diet tracker app or website with the following functionality:[REQUIRED] 1) entering target macros, for example: 145g protein, 45g carb, 38g fat. This should also be able to adjust to the day because I have different targets for training and non training days. The app should tell me how many grams left I have for each category (carb, protein, fat) after adding a food I've eaten. [REQUIRED] 2) food log including barcode scanning though I don't mind if I need to enter in all the barcode data myself. [NICE TO HAVE] 3) a meal/intake generator. I'd be able to enter foods and the app could generate meals that would reach my targets for the day. I'm currently using lifesum but I can't figure out how to adjust my target macros manually. I do like the barcode scan that they have. Thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
You are a good man, and a good father, but all this good cannot continue to make up for the race we cannot touch. I am so tired of slipping into black and out of daughter whenever race is evoked. I need for you to meet me as your daughter, as your daughter of color, all at once. We cannot keep evacuating our bodies to love each other. We cannot simply ignore the way our bodies are policed and politicized as antithetical, irreconcilably raced when we stand side by side. "An Open Letter to the White Fathers of Black Daughters, from Kelsey Henry in Bluestockings Magazine.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
A Few Silent Men. The courtroom scene from A Few Good Men, but without dialogue.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Hey math/fitness nerds. I'm working on a pet project. I'm trying to quantify general fitness levels across a population based on a few different scores. I have the tests, but need help setting up the values of each score.This question is not about the validity of these tests, it's about numbers. I'm open to discussion about the tests, but not here. (Please mail me if you have strong opinions about the tests.) This is strictly a math question. I'm trying to give each score a value out of 100 so the scores can be displayed in a radar-style graph. The tests are as follows: Overhead squat mobility test. Score from 1-5 points. (5 = 100%) 1.5 mile run test time. 10 min 30s = 100% (630 seconds.) 500 meter ergometer row test time. 1 min 37 s = 100% (97 seconds) 1 Rep Max Deadlift. A weight of 1.75 bodyweight = 100%. So here's an imaginary test subject: Male 185 lbs Squat evaluation = 4/5 1.5 mile run time = 12 minutes or 720 seconds. 500 meter row time = 2 min or 120 seconds. 1RM Deadlift = 225 lbs. At 185 lbs he'd need to pull 323.75 lbs. So I'd like to know the best way to put each of the scores at a 100 point value. This is slightly tricky for me as obviously higher times would be worse than lower times. Could someone help me with the formula in excel so I could just drop the scores into a spread sheet and get some answers? This is a basic math question not really an excel question. I know it's the sort of thing that's dead easy for some people but fairly mystifying for me. To use the above examples: Goal time for 1.5 miles is 10 minutes and 30 seconds. (630 seconds.) The subject ran 1.5 miles in 720 seconds. How can I set up the formula so that 720 seconds is scored out of 100 on a scale that uses 630 as a perfect score of 100 with anything larger being a worse score? Thanks.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
It's 2015—when we feel sick, fear disease, or have questions about our health, we turn first to the internet. According to the Pew Internet Project, 72 percent of US internet users look up health-related information online. But an astonishing number of the pages we visit to learn about private health concerns—confidentially, we assume—are tracking our queries, sending the sensitive data to third party corporations, even shipping the information directly to the same brokers who monitor our credit scores.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
‘Gresham College has provided free public talks within the City of London for over 400 years.’ ‘Since 2001, the college has been recording its lectures and releasing them online in what is now an archive of over 1,000’ of them. Some examples: Snails in Art and the Art of Snails; The History of the Bowler Hat; “Speaking Scars” - The Tattoo; Mother Green Tree Frog and her Children: How Folktales Contributed to the Confucianisation of Korea; The Psychology of Doing Nothing; Möbius and his Band; Harmony in the Lowest Home: The Guitar and the Labouring Poor. Lectures can be browsed by category . Note that there are video and audio recordings of some lectures, while for others there are just transcripts. Gresham College previously: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
When your father is the BTK serial killer, forgiveness is not tidy

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
PES Film makes amazing stop-motion film shorts in which everyday objects take on unexpected utility. Western Spaghetti (YT 1½m) - Fresh Guacamole (YT 1½m, Oscar-nominated "Best Short Film" 2013) - Game Over (YT 1½m) - The Deep (YT 1½m) - Submarine Sandwich (YT 2m previously) - Fireworks (YT 32s) - Moth (YT 20s) These may be slightly NSFW depending on workplace: Roof Sex (YT 1m) - Black Gold (YT 1m) - Pee-Nut (YT 1m) A few bits made for advertisements after the break. These are some of the more interesting ads or promos PES made for various people: Coinstar Shoe (YT 1m) - Washington State Lottery (YT 1m) - Human Skateboard (for Sneaku) (YT 31s) - Bacardi Submarine (YT 38s) - Sprint "Comforts of Home" (YT 40s) - citizenM Swan Song (YT 47s surprise!) - Orange Telecom "Hide & Seek" (YT 47s surprise!) Thanks to Dr. Julia Griffin for the initial lead.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
At long last, after a year jobhunting, I've seemingly finally landed a job! It's not 100% set in stone yet, and I'm a bit uncertain of how to proceed. Help me navigate this whole process.Last week, I had two interviews with a small company (>15 people at the local office, with other offices of similar sizes): one via the phone, another in person, for a data entry/website support position. The in-person interview went well, and surprisingly enough, I received an email yesterday with them saying they were pleased to hire me and that they wanted me to start as soon as possible, and that they'd send an offer letter with more specifics within the next few days. Of course, I leapt at the opportunity. However, there's a few things bothering me. I'd like to ask for help navigating through this process. I haven't had much experience with job interviews/negotiating a salary, and I'm decidedly wet behind the ears. 1) I'm deaf. We did the initial interview via relay. At the end of the call, I explained that I would need an interpreter for the in-person interview, and was told that they did not provide interpreters and asked if I could bring my own. I explained that in most cases, it was the law to provide reasonable accommodations, but after talking with my VR (Department of Rehabilitation), they said they would provide interpreters for interviews/trainings. I spoke with the hiring manager again and clarified upon that, and all went well. It still kind of came across as a small red flag, but I chalked it up to them not having had experience working with Deaf people. However, to be truthful, it came across as a bit penny-pinching, which can be another red flag. 2) During the phone interview, they asked me how much I wanted to be paid. I explained that my previous job (with a retail company) was $16/hour, I would be happy with that base salary. I was told $12 was the most they were offering for this position, which seemed low to me, especially for the job description and for being in a major city (DC). I foolishly said that would be fine. However, it's unlikely, but possible that the operator misunderstood or misspelled the number. When I get the offer letter (either via email or in person), how do I successfully negotiate and go higher? $12 a hour really smacks of being way too low, especially for DC, but I'm afraid I had talked myself into a corner by saying (on the phone) that $12 would be okay by me. However, it's possible the manager forgot/will assume the phone interview was a bit wonky (which it was; the operator made several mistakes). Would negotiating for paid metro (DC's version of a subway) also be ideal? I'm just concerned that if they pay such a low rate (lower than retail!), does that say something negative about their way of doing business? It's a full-time position and does include medical/vacation/sick days, though. I'm not clear if it's actually salaried, or paid hourly. 3) Another (very minor) red flag is the fact that glassdoors.com doesn't have any information on this company. Very minor, but a bit odd, I would guess, especially given that many companies are on that website. What should I expect, working in such a small setting? 4) When/if I get the offer letter (possibly tomorrow, or next Monday, when I start), how long should I wait to respond? This whole process is completely new to me, and as you can see, I'm completely wet behind the ears. I only had experience working at my university with various odd jobs, an internship, and a retail setting. I also have to deal with closing SSI, discontinuing food stamps, and arranging for an interpreter for the first few days with VR. Oy. Many thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Andy Rehfeldt (previously) is at it again -- here's his latest, the death metal version of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious". It works the other way, too... for example, the Radio Disney version of Slayer's "Angel of Death". Andy specializes in these types of musical reboots.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Essentially two-hand-touch taken to bloodsport level, with two 25-minute halves, a mostly running clock, and referees to nominally control the mayhem, it's the closest these weekend warriors will come to professional sport, though many are high-caliber athletes.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
John Richard Boyd was a U.S. Air Force F-86 and F-100 pilot. Indeed, at the elite Fighter Weapons School he was arguably the best pilot and instructor in the world during his tenure. Boyd could make jet fighters do "impossible" things and simultaneously out-think adversaries. As a result Boyd gained the moniker "40 Second Boyd" because he quickly defeated all challengers in simulated aerial combat. from a review of "Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War" by Robert Coram. Robert Coram on the Art of Manliness podcast. Forty Second Boyd And The Big Picture (previously) About a hundred miles north of Las Vegas there is a clump of wild grass and cottonwood trees called "The Green Spot." Not much to look at from the ground, but from thirty thousand feet above the brown Nevada desert it stands out for a hundred miles. In the mid to late fifties, a fighter pilot could earn himself a quick forty bucks and perhaps a nice steak dinner in Vegas – not to mention everlasting renown, which is to fighter pilots what oxygen is to us lesser beings – by meeting over the Green Spot at thirty thousand feet and taking position just 500 feet behind an arrogant and unpleasant man with precisely zero air-to-air victories to his credit. From that perfect kill position, you would yell "Fight's on!" and if that sitting duck in front of you was not on your tail with you in his gunsight in forty seconds flat then you would win the money, the dinner and best of all, the fame. Tank commanders may be charging cavalrymen at heart; sub skippers may be deer hunters using patience and stealth. But fighter pilots are Musketeers. They are swordsmen whose survival depends on remaining on the offensive... that is to say, they are men who survive because they can (and have) initiated 16-to-1 fights because they possess the confidence – actually, the untrammeled ego – to know they will win. To be challenged in such a manner is an irresistible red flag to men like this, and certainly no less of one because the challenger was a rude, loud, irreverent braggart who had never been victorious in actual air-to-air combat. And yet that forty dollars went uncollected, uncollected for many years against scores of the best fighter pilots in the world. That is more than luck. That is more than skill. That is more than tactics. That level of supremacy is the result of the ability to see things in an entirely new way. It is the difference between escaping from a maze you are embedded in, versus finding the way out from one that you look down upon from above. Having your ass handed to you in such a spectacular and repeated fashion causes some men to curse and mutter about 'one trick ponies' and so on. But for others, for those who are more invested in victory than in ego, it reveals a level of skill that instantly removes all swagger and competition and puts one in the place of a willing supplicant, eager for knowledge. Taking a few moments to understand what this odd man learned about airplanes and aerial combat will pay rich dividends later. Because John Boyd – Pope John, The High Priest of the Fighter Mafia, the Mad Major, the Ghetto Colonel – Forty Second Boyd not only wrote the revolutionary tactics manuals that gave American pilots the keys to air-to-air victory... and with it the essential and undisputed control of the battlespace. Nor was his achievement limited to the design of the phenomenally successful F-15 and F-16 fighters. Nor was it merely the codifying of physics and thermodynamics to make a science out of an art form. That John Boyd saw all of these things for the first time would have made him a legend. But this was quite the lesser of his two great achievements. For Boyd not only saw how to perfect the sword. He saw too how to perfect the swordsman. And for that, Forty Second Boyd may turn out to be one of the most important men of the Twenty-First Century. And he has lain at rest in Arlington National Cemetery since 1997. you can read Boyd's work at Defense and the National Interest: Aerial Attack Study[PDF], 1964 New Conception For Air-to-Air Combat[PDF], with the famous E-M diagrams A Discourse on Winning And Losing[PDF] Destruction And Creation[PDF] - 1976 Patterns Of Conflict[PDF, and powerpoint as PDF, and videos of John Boyd presenting] - 1986, his most famous work: Idea of fast transients suggests that, in order to win, we should operate as a faster tempo or rhythm than our adversaries -- or, better yet, get inside adversary's Observation-Orientation-Decision-Action time cycle or loop The Strategic Game Of ? And ?[PDF] - 1987 We will use this scheme of pulling things apart (analysis) and putting them back together (synthesis) in new combinations to find how apparently unrelated ideas and actions can be related to one another. this leads us to our revelation[PDF] Organic Design For Command And Control[PDF] - 1987 Conceptual Spiral[PDF] - 1992 The Essence Of Winning And Losing[PDF] - "If you have read any of the biographies of John Boyd, you may remember this briefing as "the big crunch." If you develop a deep understanding of this work, you'll have the essence of Boyd." Boyd's OODA Loop (It's Not What You Think)[PDF] A Non-school of Strategy: The late USAF Colonel John R. Boyd (1927 – 1997) was hard on ideologues: "Don't be a member of Clausewitz's school because a lot has happened since 1832," he would warn his audiences, "and don't be a member of Sun Tzu's school because an awful lot has happened since 400 BC." We should not be members of Boyd's school, either: "If you're going to regard this stuff as dogma," he would say at some point in his briefings, "you'd be better served to take it out and burn it." Why, then, spend time studying his works today? Boyd's (1987a) answer was not to memorize the specific principles of any strategy— including his—but to follow his larger example, to achieve what he called "intuitive competence" in creating, employing and dealing with the novelty that permeates human life (Boyd, 1992). On The Making Of History: John Boyd and American Security[PDF] even businesses[PDF] have adapted The Strategy Of The Fighter Pilot. So have security professionals some more reading: Slightly East of New What Does A Broken OODA Loop Look Like? Introduction To The Theories Of Colonel John Boyd

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
This question came to me as a result of seeing staplers with antibacterial tops at an office retailer. What's next - anti microbial doorknobs? As I thought about the number of touch screens I use during the day - ATMs, debit card machines, etc, - and the fact I've never seen anyone cleaning them, it occurred to me they are probably far germier than office equipment.Does anyone keep track of the number of people in the US who catch communicable infections such as colds, flu and gastrointestinal upsets from touch screens? What are the numbers? If not, why not, since this has all the makings of a story that I can envision sweeping daytime TV, news aggregators on the Web and what used to be called housewives' magazines like an epidemic?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I can't find this info.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm super excited to have booked a holiday in Fiji in May, however I need to sort out my camera options - do I buy a cheapo body and case for my existing m/43 lenses, or just spend the same money on a compact point and shoot?I'm a fairly keen and knowledgeable hobbyist photographer, however have not done any underwater photography. I'm also a good swimmer and am looking forward to the snorkeling off the beach as we're staying on a coral cay, and possibily getting scuba certification. When looking at options, I can snag a decent case for M43 (micro four thirds) and an old GF3 body to use with my rarely-used kit lens for about 200 bucks. I can also buy a new "tough" camera like the pentax wg4 or panasonic ts-25 for roughly the same price and I'm quite torn. Pros for dslr: High resolution images, can go quite deep if I do the scuba, housing definitely won't leak, and if it does won't really care cause it's kit lens and crappy body. Cons for DSLR: Large compared to point and shoot, possibly unwieldy. May make taking good photos harder, and there's more to lug around. Pros for P and S: Small and easy to handle; not lugging a trillion pieces around with me and can shoot in one hand no worries. F.2 lens on Pentax good for low light, in fact better than dslr with kit. Cons for PS: Resolution, sharpness, colour, basically all of the attributes that make an image will be indisputably shitter. Also due to sensor size, the f2 may not make much a difference for lower light. No real use for camera outside of snorkeling etc. Any experienced underwater photogs have an opinion/experience that could help me make my mind up? Whenever I think I'm leaning towards one option, the other makes a comeback!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have been with the same company/educational institution for 10 years. What should I do with my resume? Is it necessary to put jobs that I had over 10 years ago relevant? I have placed accomplishment statements under the current job. I have also included the job i had previous to that. I kept some community service work on their that I feel is relevant because it shows skills that I am capable of. What do I do? I have thought a lot about it. This is the best solution I have come to. Anyone care to weigh in? A few additional details... I am an archivist, which is a librarian of rare documents, or a records manager for old documents. I am also a librarian. I would like to step outside of higher education, but am willing to stay in higher ed. too. I'm not sure what the right move is right now. I am just trying to get the resume up to snuff first. Should I have a separate resume for corporate jobs, and other positions outside the realm of higher education? I think the answer is "yes." I enjoy writing and blog for a New England-based sports blog. I love to write and would like to do so for a living. It is a bit of pipe dream at this point because I will never make much money at it. Thanks for reading. I look forward to your suggestions.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"Bracket bolts the book open to the page 'LIFE, WITHOUT BIRTH AND WITHOUT END, EMITTING LIGHT!'" A collection of tampered-with books for sale.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In the years since the financial crisis, central banks across the world have struggled to stimulate adequate aggregate demand. Most mainstream economists agree that this is due to inherent impotence of monetary policy at the zero lower bound, although some, including some central banks, now say that the effective lower bound, though finite, is below zero. The Swiss and Danish central banks are currently testing that idea. However, a growing number of writers are advancing the idea that this impotence is no theoretical requirement, but an artifact of the current monetary policy tool kit, and particularly inflation targeting. Scott Sumner and Nick Rowe are two of the more prominent advocates of this claim. They suggest that rather than targeting an annualized measure of inflation (whether or not the actual target is the stated one), central banks should have a Nominal GDP Level target (NGDPLT). Nominal, meaning that prices are not attempted to be adjusted for inflation. Level, meaning that errors carry forward, so if the target is missed by 1% this year, next year's target growth will increase by that same 1%. While no central banks have explicitly adopted such targeting yet (although some suggest one already implicitly did), at least one European finance minister is talking about related ideas in the form of NGDP linked bonds, and Japan's Abenomics are certainly in the same vein. And if you want to play along at home, there is now, thanks to Sumner and funded by Gabe Newell, a quarterly US NGDP growth rate prediction market. Janet Yellen has, as of yet, failed to mention it. Sumner, not one to rest on his laurels, is offering yet more radical targets. Meanwhile in the US, Fed Chair Yellen pushed back on a bill sponsored by Senator Rand Paul to "audit the Fed", which some see as fundamentally a means of reducing the Fed's operational independence.

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