posted 3 days ago on metafilter
An A.I. wrote a Christmas song and...yeah.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
In the 1980s I had a book about a little boy in Australia who sneaks out of bed in the middle of the night and goes exploring. He encounters several Australian animals, and makes it back to bed by the end of the book. The illustrations were in pencil and were of the realistic rather than cartoonish persuasion. The boy is completely naked throughout the book, and the whole thing has a quite eerie feeling. It may have been written in rhyme. What was it called?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
My family is getting tired of my bread experiments since our bread machine died. I'm looking for bullet-proof, impatient-busy-idiot-proof bread recipes that satisfy the following conditions: possible ingredients: all-purpose flour, instant dry yeast, fresh yeast, baking powder, oil, butter, water, milk, yogurt, salt, sugar at least 10% but no more than 80% whole-wheat or spelt or corn flour (no deadly bread-bricks please) no eggs no buttermilk, no cream of tartar, no self-rising flour etc. no sourdough if possible, but I'm open to trying it again if you convince me baked on sheet pan or loaf pan (no pot with lids, dutch oven etc.) in an electric, ventilator oven if possible, no food processor/mixer, but kneading by hand is ok (bonus points for toddler-kneading-friendly recipes!) time needed from start to baked product: up to 6 hours (so I can do it in one afternoon), or more than 16 hours (I make the dough in the evening and bake after coming home the next afternoon) family preference is soft crust With the weekend coming up, I'll have plenty of time for experiments, so I'm looking forward to your suggestions! If it comes to worst, there's a bakery about 50m from our home, open 24/7...

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
How the Soviets invented the internet and why it didn't work - "Soviet scientists tried for decades to network their nation. What stalemated them is now fracturing the global internet." The first global computer networks took root in the US thanks to well-regulated state funding and collaborative research environments, while the contemporary (and notably independent) national network efforts in the USSR floundered due to unregulated competition and institutional infighting among Soviet administrators. The first global computer network emerged thanks to capitalists behaving like cooperative socialists, not socialists behaving like competitive capitalists. In the fate of the Soviet internet we can glimpse a clear and present warning to the future of the internet. Today the 'internet' – understood as a single global network of networks for advancing informational liberty, democracy and commerce – is in serious decline... consider how often companies and states are seeking to silo their online experiences: the ubiquitous app is more of a walled garden for rent-seekers than a public commons for browsers. Inward-looking gravity wells (such as Facebook and the Chinese firewall) increasingly gobble up sites that link outwards. also btw... What is the 'splinternet'? - "THE word—and the concept—is not new. An entire book has been written about it. But it is likely to find greater currency in the coming years: 'splinternet', or the idea that the internet, long imagined as a global online commons, is becoming a maze of national or regional and often conflicting rules. Elders of the internet—among them politicians, entrepreneurs and technologists who want the network to remain open—have started to push back." How a Trump Administration Could Shape the Internet - "Under a President Donald Trump, cable and phone companies could gain new power to influence what you do and what you watch online — not to mention how much privacy you have while you're at it."

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
Ok, it could also be a children's novel. All I know is I keep thinking about it off-and-on but the actual title eludes me. I believe I read in the late 1990s or early 2000s, although the book may have been published before that time. It was dystopian, coming of age theme. The basic plot that I can remember is that a virus killed off all adults leaving the children behind.Details I do remember: 1. The protagonist was a girl on the verge of puberty. 2. She was taking care of her younger brother and the book focused on her journey to survive. 3. She learned how to drive a car (I think her parent's car). 4. With her newfound ability to slowly drive, she found a warehouse where she would replenish supplies, 5. She and her brother did befriend/band up with other children. 6, The ending focused on the question of her incoming puberty and if the virus was still around/would kill her too once she became an adult. Hopefully these are enough details to produce an answer! Thank you in advance.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
Cat Hulbert: How I got rich beating men at their own game In her own words, Cat Hulbert describes how she got rich beating male opponents - and the casinos - and explains why in her view women are innately better at poker than men.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
The World Of Tomorrow: A Tribute to the Post-Apocalyptic Cinema (SLVimeo)

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
100 Notable Books of 2016 [The New York Times] The year's notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. This list represents books reviewed since Dec. 6, 2015, when we published our previous Notables list. - The 10 Best Books of 2016 [The New York Times] The year's best books, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. - The Best Book Covers of 2016 [The New York Times] However ornamental book jackets may be, they are also entry points to both the good and bad ideas that illuminate our possible futures. Conventional wisdom holds that an uninteresting book cover should never stop a worthy idea within from taking hold. And yet, so many conventions and so much wisdom were proved wrong this year that during my more histrionic moments, I wonder how many instances exist throughout the course of history in which book covers have worked against the potential human value of the books they're wrapped around. Here then are 12 reasons to be less fatalistic and more optimistic. These covers are challenging without being impenetrable and playful without being precious — none of which is an easy task for a designer. - Temples for the Literary Pilgrim [The New York Times] From Mexico City to Hangzhou, bookstores that are destinations in and of themselves. - 7 Writers on Their Favorite Bookstores [The New York Times] Geraldine Brooks, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Pamela Paul and others in the literary world reveal their favorite bookstores. - Ann Patchett's Guide for Bookstore Pilgrims [The New York Times] If bookstores are a must on your travel itinerary, Ann Patchett has a road map for you. - A Bookworm's Travel Plan [The New York Times] For the writer, a good bookstore in a faraway place is as basic a need as a decent hotel, a hot shower and enough underwear. - NPR's Book Concierge [NPR.org] Our Guide To 2016's Great Reads: Use the filters below to explore more than 300 titles NPR staff and critics loved this year. (You can also combine filters!) Want even more recommendations? Check out our favorite books from 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 - Best Books of 2016 [Good Reads] Announcing the winners of the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards, the only major book awards decided by readers. Congratulations to the best books of the year! - Best Books of 2016 [Amazon.com's Editors Picks] All year, Amazon.com's editorial team reads with an eye for the Best Books of the Month, plus the best books in popular categories like Cooking, Food & Wine, Literature & Fiction, Children's books, Mystery & Thrillers, Comics & Graphic Novels, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, the best books for teens, and more. We scour reviews and book news for tips on what the earliest readers have loved, share our own copies and tear through as many books as possible. - The 10 Best Books of 2016 [Vulture] There were many literary surprises in 2016 — we were forced to learn of Elena Ferrante's true identity before we wanted to; in an Oprah-coordinated marketing assault we were treated to Colson Whitehead's new novel a month before we expected it; and in accord with the year's backwards logic, the runaway best-seller about ethnic identity was by a white guy from Ohio: Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance. We won't forget these shocks, but what really mattered in 2016 transpired quietly. A changing of the guard is under way, and most of the year's best books were debuts or sophomore efforts. I was disappointed by many of the year's marquee releases (Whitehead's was a glorious exception), but for every high-profile bomb there were several outstanding books from singular authors emerging on the fringes. These aren't writers you can group into a movement, they aren't bound by a narrow, parochial set of themes, but in their variousness they've shown that whatever else is wrong with the country, the American novel, story, and essay remain fertile forms. - Holiday Books 2016 Gift Guide [CBC.ca]Want to be the best secret Santa on the block this year? Give great books! We've combed through our favourite recent titles and created customized shopping guides for everyone on your list. - The Globe 100 Best Books of the Year 2016 [The Globe and Mail] These are the best books of 2016 - The 10 Best Books of 2016 [The Washington Post] In our annual survey of the best books, you'll find 10 that we think are exceptionally rewarding and 100 notable titles that you shouldn't miss. Also, look for our special recommendations for lovers of mysteries, graphic novels, audiobooks, romance, poetry, memoirs, and science fiction and fantasy. - My Favorite Books of 2016 by Bill Gates [Gates Notes] Never before have I felt so empowered to learn as I do today. When I was young, there were few options to learn on my own. My parents had a set of World Book Encyclopedias, which I read through in alphabetical order. But there were no online courses, video lectures, or podcasts to introduce me to new ideas and thinkers as we have today. Still, reading books is my favorite way to learn about a new topic. I've been reading about a book a week on average since I was a kid. Even when my schedule is out of control, I carve out a lot of time for reading. If you're looking for a book to enjoy over the holidays, here are some of my favorites from this year. They cover an eclectic mix of topics—from tennis to tennis shoes, genomics to great leadership. They're all very well written, and they all dropped me down a rabbit hole of unexpected insights and pleasures. - Best books of 2016 [The Guardian] [Part 1] [Part 2] From Zadie Smith's Swing Time to horror in the Highlands and a brief history of tomorrow, Paula Hawkins reflects on guilt, Jackie Kay seeks hope post-Brexit, and David Nicholls is lured into the lonely city...writers choose their best reads of 2016. - Tor.com Reviewers' Choice: The Best Books of 2016 [Tor.com] Other than action figures, mugs of tea (Earl Grey, hot), and glorious unicorn lamps, the sight most prevalent in our offices rocket ship here at Tor.com are heaps and heaps of books! Between our rereads of everything from Dune to the The Wheel of Time, and our regular bookish columns—Five Books About..., That Was Awesome!, Sleeps with Monsters, our comics Pull List, and Genre in the Mainstream, to name a few—we're reading books and reviewing books around the clock! So with 2016 coming to a close, we invited some of our regular contributors to choose their three favorite books from the last year, and we're sharing their responses and recommendations below. Please enjoy this eclectic overview of some of our favorite books from the past year, and be sure to let us know about your own favorites in the comments! - The Best Books About Science of 2016 [Smithsonian Magazine] The best writing makes you see the world anew, and science writing is no different. Whether it's shedding light on worlds beyond us (Hidden Figures) or delving into microbial worlds within (I Contain Multitudes), these standout science books of the year illuminate the phenomena, people and microscopic organisms that shape our existence each day. Here are 10 books that will jettison you to the forefront of human knowledge and make you see your world differently—whether it's a blade of grass, a forest, or the night sky. - These Are the Books We're Giving Our Friends This Year [Mother Jones]Every year, Mother Jones receives hundreds of worthy books, but there are always a handful that truly stand out, the ones we end up foisting on friends and family. Well, friends and family, here you go, in no particular order. Also, be sure and check out the Best Cookbooks post by food and ag writer Tom Philpott, and stay tuned for photo book picks from photo editor Mark Murrmann and the year's best music from critic Jon Young (on Sunday). - Our Favourite Books of 2016 [Newsweek]As 2016 comes to a close, Newsweek staff members from New York; Washington, D.C.; London and the Bay Area are sharing some of our favorite books published this year. We loved titles that reimagined stories about the Manson family murders, dragged us on an obstacle-ridden path of escape from a slave plantation and whisked us to a house in the mountains where a controversial cartoonist lives. And we loved nonfiction volumes that revealed new things about familiar topics like the American AIDS crisis, Abraham Lincoln, the Attica prison uprising and the shooting at Columbine High School. - The Top 50 Books of the Year [The Telegraph] 2016 has been a fantastic year for literature, from tales of post-punk rebellion and fish-out-of-water detectives to politically incorrect satire and secrets from the Hollywood studio system. Here our top critics count down the year's best, from 50 to 1. - Holiday Books Gift Guide [Los Angeles Times] Welcome, readers! This year our Holiday Books Gift Guide has more titles than ever before — more than 170 in all, with books for everyone on your list. - Books of the Year: Authors on Their Favourite Books of 2016 [New Statesman] From Eimear McBride to Stuart Maconie, The Argonauts to Transit, writers share their picks of the year. - The Best Fiction Books of 2016 [Chicago Review of Books] 2016 will be remembered for many reasons, one of which—I hope—will be its sheer volume of era-defining fiction. This year, novelists and short story writers confronted climate change, LGBTQ rights, US immigration, the legacy of slavery, and the populist backlash to globalization, among other pressing concerns. These authors aren't interested in escapism—in the war against complacency, they are the tip of the spear. Here are our favorite fiction books of 2016, including 10 published by independent presses. - A Year in Reading: 2016 [The Millions] Stephen Dodson, co-author of Uglier Than a Monkey's Armpit, proprietor of Languagehat. • Chigozie Obioma, contributing editor at The Millions and author of The Fishermen. • Sofia Samatar, author of A Stranger in Olondria and The Winged Histories. • Claire-Louise Bennett, author of Pond. • Tony Tulathimutte, author of Private Citizens. • Caille Millner, author of The Golden Road: Notes on My Gentrification. • Edan Lepucki, contributing editor at The Millions and author of California. • Matt Seidel, staff writer at The Millions. • Sonya Chung, contributing editor at The Millions and author of The Loved Ones. • Nick Moran, special projects editor at The Millions. • Jacob Lambert, staff writer at The Millions. • Michael Bourne, staff writer at The Millions. • Tess Malone, associate editor at The Millions. • Tana French, author of The Trespasser. • Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, author of The Crown Ain't Worth Much. • Esmé Weijun Wang, author of The Border of Paradise. • Nicole Dennis-Benn, author of Here Comes the Sun. • Richard Russo, author of Empire Falls. • Annie Proulx, author of Barkskins. • Teddy Wayne, author of Loner. • Brandon Shimoda, author of Evening Oracle. • Basma Abdel Aziz, author of The Queue. • Imbolo Mbue, author of Behold the Dreamers.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
We recently got a portable dishwasher for our apartment. (We love it!) The thing that we don't love is that on our kitchen faucet the water comes out at an angle, and when combined with the quick connect aerator that came with the dishwasher it tends to spray water over our countertops instead of down into the sink. Is there anything we can do to fix this?If there's not a different aerator compatible with our dishwasher (Kenmore 14652) we can get, is there something that we can connect to the quick connect when the dishwasher isn't hooked up that would let us redirect the flow downward (I'm envisioning some sort of pivoting nozzle)? There's a picture of the angled faucet with the quick connect here. I believe the old aerator was lower flow and had a wider opening so it didn't have this problem, but with the new one the water comes out in a much narrower stream at higher speed and the shape seems to lend itself to some spray coming out of the main stream and hitting the countertop (the main stream itself hits most of the way up the side of the sink basin). I've turned the water pressure to the faucet down quite a bit using the knobs under the sink which has helped somewhat. We can of course ask our landlord about replacing the faucet but wanted to ask here first in case there was an easier solution. Thanks!

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
DJ Kutski is keeping the rave alive via podcast mixes, "representing 360 degrees of the harder styles of dance music," an hour at a time. He's up to 244 episodes, and if you check out a few, you'll quickly notice a pattern in the shows. They generally feature a mix of old and new tracks, a cheeky check to see "does it sound good at 170 BPM", a bit of sample mania, and a guest mini-mix from such names as Dune and Charlie Lownoise & Mental Theo from the living history of the scenes, with folks like Sound Rush and AniMe representing the new generation. PLUR! If you prefer, you can browse KTRA directly on Mixcloud, and he has a separate account for older mixes. He has also posted a mix of live videos and KTRA episodes on YouTube. And you can find more Kutski on Soundcloud, where he has a selection of his own production.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I recently plopped down some cash and joined the e-chapter of a niche psychology-related society and have really enjoyed the webinars and opportunities to network with like-minded people. What are some other clubs or societies in which I might be interested? Reasonable membership fees are OK; details inside.I'm looking for the following membership benefits: - Webinars or online presentations by members or outside-professionals - Online discussion areas or email lists - Networking with those who know what they are talking about I'm looking for something that's a bit more structured than e.g. a subreddit or an internet forum, with regular presentations by members, that sort of thing. My interests are: - Psychology [personality being a big one] - Space science - Science in general - Subjective thinking or inquires into nature and being, e.g. pet theories or speculation into unifying theories - Global security and intelligence, like Bellingcat, How to Make War, etc. - Military hardware - Japan - Neography - Shorthand - Retro computing - Linux - The 17th - 19th centuries Thanks for any ideas! I live in rural northern California without the ability to easily drive to a big city, so the online-r the better.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
"Yellowbrick was founded a decade ago specifically to treat 'emerging adult' brains. It helps its patients navigate the extended period between childhood and adulthood." At a cost of $27,500 per month and a minimum commitment of 10 weeks, parents of prospective patients are paying dearly - and some would say being sucked dry - in the name of launching their failed-to-launch 20 or 30-something child.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I've had a tough semester, partly due to current events, partly due to personal issues, and some of those personal issues could sound like "bad choices," especially to a conservative-leaning person. There's a ton of obnoxious thinkpieces making fun of students who needed counseling or safe spaces after the election, so naturally I think my reasons are invalid. I'm debating asking for incompletes. Sob story inside.About me: I'm an AMAB transwoman and 28. I lost about 9 years of my life to major depression, and I'm thankful I've had the privilege and resources to recover. I'm on my senior year of my Bachelor's degree, and I really wanted to finish strong. If I can get registration worked out perfectly, I want to finish next semester. So, this semester, I proposed to my fiancee. As she is my fiancee, you may infer she said yes. When that successful proposal to a woman I'm very close to left me feeling numb and empty, as I always felt, I got worried. I thought it through and worried my emotions were all an act, and realized one of the few things I had strong feelings about was my gender identity. I thought of the strong sense of envy I had for trans people I followed on Twitter and Tumblr, and how hopeless I felt thinking I'd age and die as a man. I'd had a history of joking about hating male gender roles, wanting to castrate myself, and so on, which I thought was typical cis male things. But after the proposal, the jokes got more frequent and darker, to the point my fiancee straight up asked if I thought I was cis. And I realized, I couldn't answer yes. I was kind of reminded of the quote about Bob Arctor hurting himself getting popcorn. I didn't hate my life, but I knew it was mentally unsustainable. I felt I was watching myself from afar, so dissociated that I was living, but not experiencing anything. So, I discussed it with my psychiatrist, and counselors at the university, and decided starting HRT would be the right choice for me. I got my script from an informed consent clinic, and with the approval of my psychiatrist, who himself does not specialize in LGBT issues. I started a little over a month ago. I felt a lot better on spiro, less tense. And I felt more emotionally "awake," and prone to socialize more. I didn't feel worthless and gross. I felt like a real person, and for the first time started feeling comfortable with myself. Maybe part of it was the feeling of taking a big step to fix myself. However, the election sideswiped me at the worst time. I had taken it for granted that Hillary would win. I was vulnerable, and so was my fiancee. She's been very supportive, but she's used to being the sensitive one who turns to me for support. My callousness felt like stoic strength, and that was fading away. It was harder for me to be there for her while I myself was hurting, and afraid in ways I didn't expect. I found myself alternating between consoling her and distracting myself for a few weeks. I admit this wasn't the healthiest way to be a college student, but it was stress I didn't expect, and both the way I felt it and the ways to deal with it felt unfamiliar. I was used to a rather privileged, polyanna sort of approach to mental health and self talk, where I'd assume things could only get so bad, and with the right attitude I could work my way through anything. While this probably isn't 100% true for everyone, it's easier if you are in a financially stable and safe situation. Suddenly, I was feeling the most fear I'd ever felt as an adult, in a situation that was uncertain and looking worse every day. So escapism into online distractions and video games felt like the right option. I've worked through this a bit, and I'm doing work again, but it might be too little, too late. My mindset is still kind of polyanna, since I'm just assuming I'll be safe from major problems because I live in a blue state. But that should keep me going through the rest of the semester. So, from my perspective, I feel like I'm going through unexpected problems at a bad time in my academic career. I'm considering requesting medical incompletes. My psychiatrist offered to write me a letter a few weeks ago, and I stupidly declined. But I could ask him for it. The impostor-syndrome/imaginary-outsider/devil's-advocate part of my brain sees this as a series of bad choices. I could have put off my transition, even though it felt healthy and important to me. I could have called my professors the second my problems became apparent. I could have cancelled my phone and internet and spent all my time studying to keep my mind off my worries. But I didn't. Those of you who are professors or understand when an incomplete is an option, do you think I have any right to ask for an incomplete?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I have a very non standard furnace (photos) that is broken and would like to repair a broken valve instead of replacing the system. Furnace repair companies alway are scared away from fixing this furnace.It is an HS TARM of unknown model number - it burns oil, wood, and coal. The broken valve regulates the circulation of hot water up to the radiators and is controlled by the thermostat. The tech removed it and explained that they do not make the part anymore and it cannot be replaced. It was stuck open and no longer functions. The heating system still functions, but must be turned on and off manually. The tech said that a new system would be required if I wanted to regulate the heat by thermostat. Does anyone know of a source to buy this part, or a company that deals with these older but expensive units in Western New Jersey?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
Aimless wandering is one of my preferred pastimes, and finding things locally blends well with this; I have a strong collecting impulse and it's a good way to know an area. But many recreational spins on this - geocaching, Ingress - are too internet-based for my tastes lately, and feel somewhat artificial. So what other things do you find it interesting/useful to go hunting for? All I can think of offhand is edible weeds/plant stands.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
An American in Syria: The young United States florist headed to Raqqa, Syria, as a volunteer with the People's Defense Units, or YPG, is known to most of Weird Twitter as PissPigGranddad.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I've been doing a lot of the "big 4" time complexity/algorithm heavy-style software dev interviews lately, but will soon start interviewing with smaller companies. What should I expect/prepare for?As I mentioned above the fold, I've done interviews with big companies (Facebook, etc.) where algorithms and time/space complexity analysis are very important, and database questions and implementation questions are usually fairly marginal or more general than detail-oriented. However, I'm interviewing with some smaller software dev shops now while waiting to hear results from my first batch of interviews, and I get the impression that these interviews are usually quite different. (e.g., one I had recently required some database design questions, then some HTTP header questions, and asked for real implementation code, or as close as someone can get it on a whiteboard.) I realize this will vary a lot based on the shop and their area of focus. I'm mostly interviewing for sort of "general" dev or full stack positions. One specializes in building business intelligence platforms, once is an IT consulting position, etc. But are there any general tips or areas that would be worthwhile to brush up on? And is it ever kosher to ask your contact what to prepare for in advance? Important Note: I am a new grad so they won't be asking me in depth questions about my 15 years of experience in sys admin or anything like that.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
The other day on the bus , my kiddo was being teased about her dark brown skin. it wasn't the first time and it won't be the last. this morning we did a little self-love exercise. i wrote some positive things on sticky notes and had her stick them to her mirror. BuzzFeed interview with Alexandra Elle.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
The star-crossed life of Sara Seager, an astrophysicist obsessed with discovering distant planets. A long read NYTMag article about a scientist that touches on exoplanets, starshades, daily commutes, love, loss, widowhood, and aliens. (As an aside: the WFIRST mission, and the proposed starshade.)

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
The Bones Brigade's The Search for Animal Chin — the most successful skateboarding video of all time — turns 30 next year. YouTube. Previously. Under the guidance of Tim Payne, the original Animal Chin ramp builder, a new Chin Ramp has been erected at Woodward West Skatepark in Tehachapi, California. The outcome was a near-identical ramp complete with extensions, channels, mini ramp on top of the deck and a full vert spine – a feature that hasn't been attempted again since its original creation. Building the Chin Ramp The Full Story: Tony Hawk, Steve Caballero, Mike McGill & Lance Mountain Recreating the Invert Photo The Chin Sessions Chin ramp sessions Vol 1 - Bucky Lasek & PLG

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
What is the argument style where Person A (PA) takes Person B's (PB) constructed argument, and, in a matter of seconds, breaks down their logic into a single statement (or question) where 1.) PB's entire argument is invalidated and 2.) The statement/question is one which takes PB's logic out of context. Both of PA's tactics have the (intended or unintended) effect of making PB look as if they are acting unreasonable or making an unreasonable demand.Sometimes PA takes PB's statement and exaggerates it to its extreme. It isn't bullying, because PB is not threatened or in danger in any way. This is a game of intellectual chess. Great for debates, impossible for intimate/emotionally charged discussions. The collateral damage of this argument style is emotional intimacy, understanding and empathy. It's kind of like stonewalling, but with an added layer of semantics. What is this argument style called? Does this sound familiar? Bonus points: How have you responded (or how would you respond) in this situation?

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
I seem to recall an article some years ago (Possibly about a previous US election?) from a US based news organization where they wrote in the tone and style that's normally used for foreign countries. Does that ring a bell with anyone? I think it was linked on Metafilter but haven't been able to find it.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
When people called in to ask for help or inquire about services, internal documents and interviews show, UHS tracked what a former hospital administrator called each facility's "conversion rate": the percentage of callers who actually came in for psychiatric assessments, then the percentage of those people who became inpatients. "They keep track of our numbers as if we were car salesmen," said Karen Ellis, a former counselor at Salt Lake Behavioral. How treating psychiatric care as a profit-driven business has led to predictably horrifying results.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
Choir singing cat tunes.

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posted 3 days ago on metafilter
Investigating Environmental Racism is the essence of The ENRICH Project, a unique and innovative project established in 2012 to address the health and socio-economic effects of NIMBYism on Mi'kmaw and African Nova Scotian communities. Their work is the subject of the documentary In Whose Backyard?

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