posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Imogene Coca was the hilarious counterpart to Sid Caesar on Your Show of Shows, the ground-breaking 1950s sketch comedy show. (Here they are in the classic Auto Smashup.) She won an Emmy and a Peabody for her work on the show, had a long career in television, and later made an impact as Aunt Edna in National Lampoon's Vacation, as Ms. Dipesto's mother in Moonlighting, and on the stage. With Sid Caesar: Health Food Restaurant | Mata Hari | The Clock | The Sleep Sketch | Classical Musicians | The Cobbler's Daughter | Streetcar named... | Birthday | From Here to Obscurity, Part 1 and Part 2 | Coney Island pantomime | pantomime on the Tonight Show in 1977 See Also: Pictures from her career as a pitch woman | as Mary the Good Fairy on Bewitched | performing Repent from On the Twentieth Century in 1982 (she was nominated for a Tony in 1978 for this role) Her coworkers at Your Show of Shows remember her | Her 2001 Obituary | biography

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
My email is hosted on Outlook.com, using their recently discontinued live.domains.com service. It's fine, but I'm concerned that eventually, MS will stop supporting existing accounts using the service. What's a good hosted IMAP email service that's reliable, supports domains and aliases, and is relatively simple to configure?Fastmail was a pain to work with and the spam filtering was horrible. Office365/hosted Exchange are very tough to configure and feel like overkill. I'm trying to avoid Google services, but I want something simple like Gmail or Outlook, but that I pay for. This is just for a single email account, by the way.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Hi. So a good friend of mine is a happy young woman, about to have her 23rd birthday. She's asked her friends for songs to play. I found a list of songs referring to being 23, here on Metafilter - but they're all generally pretty depressing and negative about being 23. Do people have songs they recommend, for happy young women in general? Her tastes are modern, rock-oriented and eclectic - she's a big fan of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, the Pretty Reckless, MGMT, and dance music, for example. thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Her Noise - The Making Of (2007) - running time ~60 minutes. The video documents the development of Her Noise between 2001 and 2005 and features interviews with artists including Diamanda Galas, Lydia Lunch, Kim Gordon, Jutta Koether, Peaches, Marina Rosenfeld, Kembra Pfhaler, Chicks On Speed, Else Marie Pade, Kaffe Matthews, Emma Hedditch, Christina Kubisch and the show's curators, Lina Dzuverovic and Anne Hilde Neset. The documentary also features excerpts from live performances held during Her Noise by Kim Gordon, Jutta Koether and Jenny Hoyston (Erase Errata), Christina Carter, Heather Leigh Murray, Ana Da Silva (The Raincoats), Spider And The Webs, Partyline, Marina Rosenfeld's 'Emotional Orchestra' at Tate Modern, and footage compiled for the 'Men in Experimental Music' video made during the development of the Her Noise project by the curators and Kim Gordon, featuring Thurston Moore and Jim O'Rourke. Her Noise was an exhibition which took place at South London Gallery in 2005 with satellite events at Tate Modern and Goethe-Institut, London. Her Noise gathered international artists who use sound to investigate social relations, inspire action or uncover hidden soundscapes. The exhibition included newly commissioned works by Kim Gordon & Jutta Koether, Hayley Newman, Kaffe Matthews, Christina Kubisch, Emma Hedditch and Marina Rosenfeld. A parallel ambition of the project was to investigate music and sound histories in relation to gender, and the curators set out to create a lasting resource in this area. Bonus links: Her Noise Liner Notes (.pdf) Archive of projects by Electra Productions

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I was walking in an old cemetery last weekend, and I noticed that many of the tombstones dating from around the late 19th to the early 20th centuries used a period after the surname on the tombstone: "JONES." and not "JONES" by itself. Can anybody point me to any resources for learning about this particular style convention?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm moving to Texas for a new job in a few weeks. I have a health insurance question.Starting a new job in late August/early September. I just found out that my employer won't start contributing to my health insurance until December 1, though I have the option of paying the full premium from my start date through December 1. Since that's expensive (though less than 9.5% of my salary), I would like cheaper short-term options. My question is threefold: (1) given the change in life situation, can I purchase from a ACA marketplace for the 3 month period between my hire date and when the employer pays their part of the premium? (2) Assuming we can use the marketplace, would we qualify for a subsidy? My new salary will be too high for the subsidy, but my old job is well below the subsidy line. So my actual AGI this year will be under the subsidy level. (3) Where can I go for help on this issue? Allegedly there are supposed to be ACA Navigators, but I can't seem to figure out if they're set up or not in Texas at this time. Who is the person I'm supposed to talk to about this? Complications: we're hoping that my wife will be pregnant before December 1 and we have a 3-year old daughter. So we'd like to not use COBRA if at all possible. (Apologies for being unable to Google this, but the politics and FUD around the ACA have made the Internet kinda worthless here.) Thanks.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Lizzie Miles (1895-1963) was a blues singer from New Orleans. (Her music was recently featured during the closing credits of Blue Jasmine.) Less well-known are her two half-siblings, blues singer Edna Hicks (1895-1925), and jazz trumpeter and vocalist Herb Morand (1905-1952). Lizzie Miles: Eh La Bas My Man O'War I Hate A Man Like You Some Of These Days Edna Hicks: Sad 'n' Lonely Blues I'm Goin' Away (Just To Wear You Off My Mind) - with brief bio introduction; record starts around 1:10 You've Got Everything A Sweet Mamma Needs But Me I Don't Love Nobody So I Don't Have No Blues Herb Morand: Root Hog Or Die - with the Harlem Hamfats (on vocal and trumpet) Oh! Red - with the Harlem Hamfats I Ain't Gonna Give You None Of My Jelly Roll - with the George Lewis Jazz Band (on vocal and trumpet) If You're A Viper - with the George Lewis Jazz Band

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm wondering why I had a much easier time making friends in the last area where I lived than I have had in this area. I think it has to do with the way social media has changed, but I'm not sure that's the whole story. I've asked myself what gives. Snowflakes inside.Throughout my adult life, I've lived in a number of different places -- largely due to job changes -- and mostly in New England. It took about four or five years before I had a good network of friends and before New England felt like home to me. Now, I've been living in Maryland for about five years. The fact that I still really don't have any friends here bothers me, largely because I remember that it was at about the five year mark up in New England that I started to feel at home and that I have a social circle. I still keep in touch with my friends up there, but it's now exclusively online contact due to the long distance. (My college friends are all over the country and always were, so I'm used to online-only contact there and don't expect a change.) I'm very often homesick for New England, even though I did not grow up there. I used to think there was something special about the area, though now I'm not so sure. I've come to realize that my current lack of a local social circle is not due to something that Maryland lacks or due to something that New England uniquely has. It's just that for some reason, the process of making friends for me here seems much, much slower. In general, I like most people, but I'm definitely an introvert, and thus I have a lot of difficulty with small talk and other useless conversations. I meet someone in person for the first time, and after we introduce ourselves to each other, you can almost hear the crickets chirping. The odd exception to this was when I was in college, I seemed to have little trouble making friends in person - I can only attribute this to the college environment, though I'm not sure exactly what made it conducive to me making friends in person. For some reason I haven't yet figured out, I do a lot better with making friends if I meet people online first before meeting them in person. LiveJournal was great for this when I lived up in New England, but LJ has died a slow and painful death, and meeting local friends through that venue is no longer viable. Facebook is absolutely terrible for this, as it's kind of limited to people you know already. Heck, I lock my profile down and use a fake last name to avoid people finding me who I don't want to have contact with (mainly people from high school). There are a few people I know from LJ days who live nearby that, though I have never met them in person, I feel like we'd be good friends if we ever did. Unfortunately, "nearby," in this case, means "at least an hour's drive away." I had hobbies up in NH/MA, and I met some great people through those hobbies. I do volunteer work for a specific organization through which I made a lot of friends up in New England; here, the specific organization exists, but the volunteer opportunities are far less plentiful, so I end up volunteering less often, and thus the people I meet are not people I see quite as often. I was also in a community band in MA, but the bands I've found here don't seem to interest me, and I haven't picked up my instrument in at least six years, so I'm probably not as good at it anymore. Finally, I'm part of a collector organization -- but I never really made "friends" so much as trading partners through that organization -- whether up in New England or here in MD. I know my co-workers. We go out to lunch occasionally. I see one co-worker of mine at volunteer events for the organization I mentioned. Aside from that, once 5:00 rolls around, everyone goes home. Now, I had a similar issue at my job in MA, but after a few years, those acquaintances slowly became friends. Here, it doesn't seem to be happening. I like my job; I have job security, and I like my house -- so I'm pretty sure I'll be sticking around in MD for the foreseeable future. (Then again, I thought I'd be a lifer in MA, too.) My wife is much more outgoing than I, and she's slowly been able to meet friends in our area by doing whatever it is that extroverts do. I feel very awkward, though, getting to know these friends, and I often feel as if I'm "stealing" her friends from her. That feeling is going away, thankfully, but I still feel like these people know me whereas I don't know them. Recently (within the last month), we were invited to and attended a party hosted by one of these friends. I was very much looking forward to said party as an opportunity to meet more people in our area. I was disappointed. Yes, there were plenty of local people there, but they all seemed to be in their own little cliques, and everyone seemed to have known each other from the time they were about five years old. I ended up sitting most of the time with the two people I already knew -- which was fine, but I was just disappointed. Maybe I expected too much of the event. I live in a somewhat rural area. MeFi meetups "near me" that come to my e-mailbox seem to mostly be in DC, which is usually (at least) a two hours' drive away. Whenever I check it, meetup.com doesn't turn up anything I'm interested in nearby. Our neighbors are wonderful, but that's just one family. People I've talked to about this say that in your 30s, you start making friends when you have kids. I understand that; you want to know the parents of the kids that your kids are hanging out with. But I figure there's an absolute minimum of nine months, plus about five years until the kid gets to be of school age, before I'm in a situation where I'd be able to meet people in this manner. I need something for in the mean time. Any advice? Am I expecting a social circle to materialize too quickly? Is there anything else I can be doing to speed up the process?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
My employer and I just agreed that I am not a good fit for the job. What should I do? I'm in Ontario, Canada. I realize that similar questions have asked, but am specifically looking for answers that take Canadian law into account. Thanks!What can I do/not do/sign/not sign that will help me be eligible for EI and anything else I may not have thought of yet?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I Accidentally Started a Wikipedia Hoax: A stoned college prank involving the history of the children's book series Amelia Bedelia takes on a life of its own.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I've got a lot of B-Roll and the file sizes are too much for us to maintain them in a usable way. 300 gb for a 30 min .avi? What are decent formats/compressions that are acceptable but that also give manageable file sizes?The b-roll is all scenic and ski footage. The total amount isn't too bad, about a terabyte, but many of the files are too big to even share with Dropbox so they just sit on hard drives that don't get used. I can't help but feel some of the older giant files are of lower quality than something 1/100th the size that was generated by my iPad.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Should I disclose my frequent medical marijuana use in an online dating profile?As an (OKCupid) A-list-er, I can search individual questions and the number of women around my age and location who answer "What's your relationship with marijuana?" with "I smoke regularly" is tiny. Some "I smoke occasionally", but many of those are explained with things like "very occasionally." In San Francisco/East Bay and among younger women there are more "regularly". I've had no success trying to date women 40+ miles away. I suffer from typing-related chronic pain. I also like pot. I'm 46 and a parent, divorced 3 years and I don't work, drive or parent stoned. Currently, I've answered the question honestly, but I've made all of my answers private. I'm fine dating someone who doesn't indulge, but not someone who's going to want me to stop even when we aren't together. Related profile falsification: I live in a town with high incomes and property values, for the school and by accident. I'm a renter and progressive-minded. Is changing my location to Campbell or San Jose enough of a fib to be a dealbreaker when disclosed? I've tried a form of "radically honest dating" and the reply rate was so low that I guess I want to try being slightly less honest but also more open minded about accepting partners and about making changes to be acceptable. I'd go vegan or try to make more guy friends, but I'm not giving up my only relief.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
A man has died in Lagos of Ebola virus. What's worrying is how he got there - by plane, with 100 other people. "Since it claimed its first victims in Guinea last March, the Ebola virus epidemic has killed 660 people in three countries and infected nearly 1,100—more lethal than any other outbreak in the virus's nearly 40-year history. ​ But last week's developments could transform this outbreak from an unusually nasty regional epidemic to something much bigger. On Jul. 24, Nigerian authorities confirmed that a Liberian man, Patrick Sawyer, had collapsed in Lagos after flying there from the Liberian capital, Monrovia, and tested positive for Ebola; Sawyer died on the night of July 24-25." Perhaps the most worrying quote from the article? "The 35 Nigerian co-passengers took flight once word got out that the health ministry was supposed to have quarantined them" Previously: Is Ebola so scary? Mapping the spread of Ebola.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am shopping for a new bike which I will use for a daily commute in Iowa City, and I am looking for suggestions.I'm basically starting from scratch, and don't know a ton about bikes. Previously living in Portland I'd gotten away with whatever decent road bikes I found on Craigslist and just sort of got by. I'd like to step it up a bit. My biggest concern is that I need a bike that will be able to handle commuting in the winter, which could mean icy or snowy roads. So I'm thinking your standard road bike may not be ideal for this, and am wondering if a mountain or hybrid might be a better option. I'd like to limit myself to just one bike, so I'm hoping to not purchase a summer bike and a snow bike. Speed is not a huge deal - I'm more looking for comfort and reliability. My daily commute will only be a couple miles each way, but I will need to do longer trips as well. The bike must be able to support a rack that I can attach some panniers to and be available in an 18-19" frame (mountain) or 22" (road). Obviously I'd like to keep the price reasonable but am willing to pay for something that is worth the price. I'd like to not spend more than $1,000 though if possible. I've been kind of looking at a Jamis Commuter, but like I said, I don't know a ton and the information out there is overwhelming. I'm looking for specific bike suggestions or general advice about what I should look for when choosing a bike that will fit my specific needs. Thanks everyone!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm putting together a list of recipes that only master cooks take on once they're at the highest levels. Dishes where the sauce alone can take two days. I need recipes that aren't new (aka it requires a magnetic cooktop) or too non-western. And I'd love if there was anything that had some history (though in general if it's a dish over 30 years old, it's going to). As in "It was prepared once for President McKinley...who fired the chef." Ideas?Too non-western: For instance Buddha Jumps the Wall, a soup that takes two days with a lot of different kinds of meat is good. But the blowfish that if improperly prepared kills you...not so much.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
If we're talking about vinyl in 2014, we have to talk about Jack White. In April, rock'n'roll's self-appointed analog evangelist celebrated Record Store Day by teaming up with United Record Pressing in Nashville to put out the "World's Fastest Released Record." At 10 a.m., White and his band recorded a live version of his new album Lazaretto's title track at his own Third Man studios, then drove the masters to United, where it went immediately onto a 7" press, before ending up in fans' hands at the Third Man store. From start to finish, the process took 3 hours, 55 minutes, and 21 seconds.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I'm an inexperienced driver in LA who is starting researching how to buy a car (I'm considering both new and used at this point but probably the latter is more likely; I'll definitely be going to some dealer showrooms) for the first time. I don't know much about cars and I am feeling a bit lost.It's all new to me and any tips would be much appreciated. I am a nervous driver and want something that is very safe and easy to use; it should also be very economical (and ideally eco-friendly) . I'm a single guy, so a compact car would be fine, probably preferable. I'm more interested in functionality than style (though naturally that would be a plus too). Especially with the LA area in mind - What steps should I take in my research process? Which information resources/ articles etc. should I read? Are there any hacks and specials secrets I should know about the buying and financing process? Are there any car brands/models people especially suggest? Thanks very much for any help!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In the news: Journalists subpoenaed in a pending law suit from the makers of Pink Slime™. In other recent news: Family kicked off flight for complaining about poor service on Twitter. Blogger in Europe fined for blogging a bad review of a restaurant. Free speech rights curtailed for fracking. Viewing all these stories on the heels of the Hobby Lobby ruling (which even Satanists are now using to advance their cause), it might be fair to ask (with apologies to Betteridge): Are the corporate people now using the law to try to keep the flesh and blood people from criticizing them?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Writer Jules Bentley writes about being (and staying) sober in New Orleans.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I seem to recall a MeFi post a while back, but cannot find it (perhaps it was from an NPR story) that referenced a study claiming that the achievement level for urban Black boys placed in suburban schools was much lower than their female counterparts.I believe the author of the study opined that perhaps the difficulty for boys to integrate well was that they were treated differently, and seen as a threat by individuals in the new environment. Any help finding this study (or the OP) would be appreciated. As a contrast, it's easy to find articles that say the exact opposite: claiming that integration for the boys are easier due to their perceived coolness. (I suspect that only holds true for boys with specific personality profiles) Are there any other studies related to gender, achievement and school integration out there?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
As North Vietnamese forces marched towards Saigon in 1975, Citibank employee John Riordan (Warning: Autoplaying video) was ordered by Citibank to burn everything important and evacuate. In Hong Kong, he and his manager discussed the situation of their Vietnamese coworkers, who were in grave danger because they had worked for an American company. Despite being threatened that he would be fired if he tried to do anything, Riordan flew back to Vietnam, where he was told that evacuation was only available for Americans and their dependents. Over the course of ten trips back to Saigon, he claimed his coworkers and their family members as his own wives and children, eventually safely evacuating all 105 of them.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I traveled to DC, SF, NYC, and a few other cities taking photos with a film camera... and I can't tell where this photo's from. City-identifiers with good memories, help me!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Drinking a mug of fair trade coffee? Give thanks to the memory of Edna Ruth Byler, mother of the fair trade movement in the U.S. In 1946, Byler traveled to Puerto Rico as part of a mission run by the Mennonite Central Committee. There she visited a sewing class for women living in poverty. She bought their needlework, brought it home to Pennsylvania, and began what would become a decades-long campaign: Byler believed that she could provide sustainable economic opportunities for artisans in developing countries by creating a viable marketplace for their products in North America. She began a grassroots campaign among her family and friends in the United States by selling handcrafted products out of the trunk of her car. Byler made a concerted effort to educate her community about the lives of artisans around the world. For the next 30 years, Byler worked tirelessly to connect individual entrepreneurs in developing countries with market opportunities in North America. Byler's project grew into Ten Thousand Villages, whose stores promote both artisans' crafts and the ideal of fair trade. So raise your coffee mug in salute to the woman whose vision has evolved to encompass the world. Have one of Byler's Potato Dough Cinnamon Rolls to go with your java!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
As part of their State of Sex issue, Dazed and Confused magazine presents an oral history of the trans magazine Original Plumbing [previously]. Amos Mac, co-founder and editor, asks five people in NYC who identify on the trans spectrum what being "trans in America" at this moment in time means to them. Dating columnist Arisce Wanzer discusses the challenges of dating as a transwoman of color (nsfw). Legendary NYC drag den mother Flawless Sabrina talks the ethics of identity politics and her mentorship of gay and transgender youth. Trans 101.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am in the US. My brother is in Europe on business, his first time out of the US, and will be there for about another six months. Right now he's in Germany, but the list of additional countries he'll go to later doesn't seem to be finalized. His birthday is coming up, and I want to send him a gift that won't generate logistical problems for him.Any physical object he'd have to lug around Europe for 6 months probably isn't a good idea unless it's something so incredibly useful, well, I can't even imagine how useful it would have to be or why he wouldn't already own it. He is not the least bit homesick. He is totally loving it there, although he's posting photos of places and things he doesn't know how to label, because language barrier. I'd get him a guidebook or dictionary or something, except he won't be where he is much longer, and it's unclear which country he's going to next. I'd love to not pay for shipping, so if I could send something electronically, that would be perfect. I probably don't want it to be food-and-beverage-related since he has a generous per diem to cover that. My go-to gift in the past has been A Book I Have Read And Thought You Might Like, but I don't want to send a physical book because I don't want him having to schlep a physical anything, and he is vehemently anti-e-book. I just don't think he'll read from a Kindle app or similar. Can you gift apps? Is there a guidebook app or multi-language translation app that's worth it? I'm Apple; he's Android. So how would that work? Ideally, I'd like to get him something thoughtful that will enhance his trip. I'm hoping the hivemind can help with that. Thanks!

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