posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Articles like this talk about links between the Nazi regime and the Rockefellers, Warburgs, and others. Is there any validation for this line of thought?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Where can I find these beautiful double-spike fake gauge earrings? I'm looking for exactly what ASOS is offering: small, gold or black, metal, and symmetrical earrings in this style.I tried looking on Etsy, but found only very long spikes or tribal jewelry. (I hope this style isn't appropriative—if it is, let me know, and I'll drop it.) I also looked on eBay, and found these two somewhat sketchy listings (one, two). Alternatively, I could commission someone to make them. I'm open to that if you have recommendations. My price limit is about $40 and I live on the East Coast in the US.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I've got a 480 square foot studio. The layout's fine, and I've got a desk and kitchen table to use, but I never want to do that, actually I don't feel like working at all when I'm home. How can I set things up so I will?(I don't want to work from my couch or bed, either -- I seem to just sink into non-work activities on those.) I thought about getting a half-screen, maybe, by the desk, but I hate the idea of cutting up the space -- I think it just wouldn't feel or look good, and I'm sorry to say that this matters to me. Coffee shops are distracting, and I hate libraries, though, so I've got to find a way to just sit and GTD in here. What's worked for you? Open to ideas around design or just mental tricks or anything, really, that's helped you.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My 2000 chevy malibu has an ignition recall. In looking up the other recalls this vehicle has had (but not vin specific), I see there is one that pertains directly to a problem I have been experiencing. Help me make sure this gets fixed!I have already called GM. They said they would have the dealer look at it but if the dealer doesn't think it aligns with the recall then I am on the hook for charges of their having looked at it. Any pointers on making sure this gets remedied on GM's dime? The recall pertains to the blinkers/ hazards going on and off whenever they feel like it and sometimes not even working at all. Definitely a safety concern.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm looking for a great, homey-but-mathematically sophisticated introduction to Functional Programming book / doc / etc. Don't mind much what language. (Swift is my primary interest, but realize this is unlikely.)I've got a pretty reasonable general math background. (5 years of grad school in a non-CS but mathy field.) Mainly an iOS / Objective-C dev these days. Mostly this interest is due to Swift, but frankly like everyone+dog I've been chafing a bit at OO in general. (Annoyed by conflation of type and capability in traditional OO inheritance, too much mutability, too much state, not enough reasoning about data flows, etc.) That said, not really trying to learn Category Theory / Type Theory from the ground up. (Am familiar with the book the objc.io folks are writing. Looking I guess for something a bit deeper.)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Thinking about having bariatric surgery. Have you done it? What was it like for you? Do you regret it or love it? What's life like now?My rheumatologist just wrote me a referral to the bariatric surgery center at UH (Cleveland). If I were to get it done, it would be down at Case on the main campus. I watched their informational video (yay for them putting it online) and while I'm scared to death, I'm interested as well. I've tried all the medical ways (diet/exercise) and it does nothing. My thyroid has been checked and is fine and I've finally gotten a CPAP for apnea. Feel free to MeMail or email at the email in my profile. Thanks in advance.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Hi, not sure where to go to ask for an id on an old coin I found, thanks to anyone that might know what Im looking at here. http://imgur.com/l93tRpQ http://imgur.com/lhgR5oF

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I don't have cable. Just wifi. What television should I buy?I want to buy a flatscreen TV that is large (40-45'' or so, erring on the size of larger rather than smaller) for up to $500. I don't have cable TV (but have a fairly good internet connection with broadband cable internet to wifi throughout the apartment), but I do have Netflix and in addition want to be able to stream whatever is on my Windows laptop onto the TV (for example, playing iTunes through the TV speakers or playing a random streaming video from a website on the TV -- is this as simple as USB to HDMI cable?). What TV do I want to buy?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Swedish fly fisherman and filmmaker Rolf Nylinder takes a trip to Slovenia with Kristian Matsson (Tallest Man on Earth) and friends. Nylinder produces wonderfully artistic, humorous and uniquely philosophical films about his obsession with dry fly fishing through Frontsidefly. Music is an important element throughout. Recently, on his blog, he announced that the building he was living in burned down, along with his work and everything he owned. The Norwegian website vakmag.com has organized a fundraising campaign to buy new equipment for him.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
How do you suggest I approach fixing this drainage issue at the side of our garage?Whenever it rains heavily here, maybe 2-6 times a year, water runs off the roof, falls to the base of the wall on the side of our garage, and then into the garage where it covers about half the floor. I can continue squeegeeing it out when this happens but (1) I'd rather not, and (2) I'm concerned about possible structural damage that the water may be causing. I've considered having a gutter installed but our other gutters overflow during big rains which means it may not carry all the water away. I've also thought maybe some flashing could be added that would throw the water away from the house and into the dry creek bed which seems to drain well. Would sealing the base of the wall be a better approach? What kind of business would do something like this? Thanks for any and all suggestions!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm a software developer at a small startup. I'm giving a technical interview next week. My CTO will be doing the interview with me, and wants me to ask several algorithms/data structures whiteboard questions. I have very little experience either giving or receiving technical interviews, no traditional CS background, and am stressed out by whiteboard coding (also just socially anxious in general). What questions should I ask?The only other technical interview I've given went poorly - I didn't have time to prepare in advance, then blurted out a question I hadn't thought through fully, then froze with anxiety when the candidate started asking me follow-up questions which made me feel like the interview-ee rather than the interviewer. My goals are: Come up with a couple solid whiteboard-ey questions I can recycle in future interviews. Not too easy, not too hard...something that will give useful insight into the candidate's thought processes even if they don't know the answer, and has good follow-ups I can ask if they know the answer immediately. Prepare for likely related questions/alternate approaches/common mistakes the candidate may make in response, and how to handle them. I understand that I can't anticipate everything and it's OK not to know everything, but I want to project confidence and be able to mostly stay one step ahead in our discussion. I've tried to google for ideas about questions to ask, but got overwhelmed because there are so many out there and I don't know which will work well in practice. I'm also interested in reading about alternate interview techniques that don't involve CS101/whiteboards, since I'm not convinced they're all that useful...but that's a secondary concern. For right now it's more important for me to get comfortable doing things the traditional way. The person I'm interviewing this week is junior to me, but is a web dev (whereas I do desktop/embedded stuff). Later on, though, I'll also be interviewing people who are senior to me.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
what it's like to fly the $23,000 Singapore Airlines Suites Class (includes lots of photos) In 2008, Singapore Airlines introduced their Suites Class, the most luxurious class of flying that is commercially available. The Suites were exclusive to their flagship Airbus A380, and they go beyond flat beds by offering enclosed private cabins with sliding doors that cocoon you in your own little lap of luxury. The interior was designed by French luxury yacht designer Jean-Jacques Coste and comes along with a plush soft leather armchair hand-stitched by the Italian master craftsmen Poltrona Frau. Perhaps most well-known of all, Singapore Airlines became the first and only commercial airline with a double bed in the sky. However, the experience came with a hefty price tag. With round-trip tickets costing up to S$23,000 (or US$18,400), it was completely unattainable for most people. Formerly, the only way for an average person to fly in the Suites was to take out a bank loan. And then I remembered that most of my personal net worth exists in frequent flier miles rather than cash. So in September 2014, after splurging an colossal amount of miles... I was booked on Suites Class to NYC! This is my trip in photos. Flightfox - The 24 Best First-Class Cabins (includes photos, prices, breakdown of amenities offered, and a "rockstar factor" rating) New Yorker - Game of Thrones: How airlines woo the one per cent Condé Nast Traveler - All That Money Can Buy: "...how—and where—the top 0.01 percent travel, and... what it's like to vacation like a billionaire" The American Prospect - Et Tu, Jet Blue? The Airlines' War on the 99% "Yes, air travel is getting even worse for regular people. That's because the wealthy are taking up all the space." Crain's Chicago Business - Another place wealth gap is at its widest: in the air "...some of the most cherished new international first-class perks have nothing to do with meals, drinks or seats. Global airlines are increasingly rewarding wealthy fliers with something more intangible: physical distance between them and everyone else. The idea is to provide an exclusive experience — inaccessible, even invisible, to the masses in coach. It's one way that a gap between the world's wealthiest 1 percent and everyone else has widened."

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I salvaged a bicycle and, not knowing a whole lot about bikes and bike parts, I'm wondering if it's worth it to repair, or just scrap it and buy a new one?Long story short, I need a bike. I salvaged one with a perfect frame, not even a chip in the paint, but it's missing the rear wheel and needs new brakes. The words on it are "Huffy", "Shimano", "Rock Creek" and "Kolo". It's red, looks to have 24" sized tires (or tire, as it is). Is this something worth repairing? I was pricing new rims and they seem pretty expensive. If the bike is less than $200 I'm not sure it's worth doing. What do you guys think?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Can you think of acclaimed musicians who didn't put out their first album until 35 or later?I've buried my dreams of being a singer-songwriter for a few years now. However, it still feels like an important part of me and I find it inspiring to hear about musicians who didn't take their craft seriously until they were older. E.g. I listened to an interview with Mary Gauthier on Fresh Air recently and was so releived to hear about a songwriter who didn't start writing songs until she was 35. Debbie Harry, Patti Smith, Leonard Cohen and other "late-starters" who I used to look to, well, I've surpassed the age when they started recording. Can you think of other acclaimed (if niche) musicians who didn't put out their first album until 35 or later?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
This dog wishes to continue playing in the water. (SLYT)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
We trashpicked a couple of vintage wood doors - they looked like varnished wood, but it turns out they were painted and faux-finished to look like wood. Mr Jane has spent the better part of his weekends over the last month stripping them; he applied the stain last Sunday and there's still paint in the grain...We are not novice wood refinishers, we've refinished most of the painted oak trim in our 100 year old house. The doors are pine. They had a base layer of white paint on the raw wood, then the decorative (and convincing!) faux finish on top of that. He's used citri-strip no less than 5 times, he's sanded them, he's used TSP and a brass brush and when he applied the stain, there's a lot of streaky light grainy patches, that are really unattractive - it looks like the door has been clawed by an animal (yet it's quite smooth, due to the sanding). Needless to say, Mr. Jane is quite annoyed at this outcome. I'm pretty handy with a paintbrush - I offered to paint the offending areas, prior to the polyurethane coat. My questions are: 1) If I were to attempt painting, should I use an oil base paint, since we've got oil based (Minwax) stain on the door? 2) How long do I let the oil paint dry before polyurethaning? 3) Should we even bother trying to fix them, or just cut our losses (time only, since they were trashpicked), polyurethane them and just give them a coat of paint?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
This Is What's the Matter With Kansas: Sam Brownback tried to create a conservative utopia. He created a conservative hell instead. In 2012, advised by supply-side economist Arthur Laffer, Kansas Governor Sam Brownback hailed the start of "a real live experiment", in which state income taxes were significantly lowered, a move Brownback described as "pro-growth" and "a shot of adrenaline into the heart of the Kansas economy" that would create "tens of thousands of new jobs." However, the sharp income tax cuts left the state with a significant budget shortfall, causing Brownback and the Kansas legislature to approve a second measure in 2013, one that canceled a scheduled sales tax decrease even as it lowered income taxes even further. The result was a radical reshaping of tax rates in Kansas (previously), where lower income Kansans who spend more of their income on goods and services saw their taxes go up sharply, while higher income residents saw a significant decrease in their tax burden. Promises of increased economic activity and job growth were left unfulfilled, and while Grover Norquist insists that the tax cuts will grow Kansas' economy, there is no denying that the state budget is in trouble, a fact that has led bond agencies to downgrade Kansas' credit rating, citing a $333 million budget shortfall. There has been a great deal of political fallout from the experiment as well, with Brownback losing the support of more than 100 current and former Kansas Republican politicians, who endorsed Paul Davis, Brownback's Democratic opponent in the 2014 gubernatorial election. With polls showing Davis ahead in the 2014 race, the election is beginning to look like "a referendum on supply-side economics".

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I need a visa for a work trip from the United States to Brazil and am slightly punch-drunk from bureaucracy. Please help me by confirming whether I'm reading these requirements right, or not.I apologize for asking such a boring question! I've read previous Asks, and have called three consulates but not yet reached any human beings. I need to get this figured out so I can buy a money order for the correct fee amount before my visa appointment next week --- otherwise, woe betide me. My two questions: 1) Given my circumstances, am I right that I need a business visa rather than a tourist one? 2) In general, am I right that the visa fee is determined by the country of one's passport, rather than the country in which one lives? Background. I'm travelling to Rio for two days to speak at a conference. I'm a Canadian citizen living in the United States with U.S. permanent residency (green card), travelling on a Canadian passport. I'll be paid for the talk by the company that's organizing the conference, which is the Brazilian branch of a multinational for-profit. Re type of visa. I think, but am not sure, that I need the business visa not the tourist one. I say that because the consulate site describes the tourist visa as for people planning "participation as an attendee or speaker, not paid in Brazil, in scientific or scholar conferences and seminars. For business related conferences and other events, please see instructions for business visas." On the business visa page it talks about meetings, but doesn't mention conferences or events. Nonetheless, I'm pretty sure the business visa is what I need, based on the description of the tourist visa. Re which country. According to the website of the consulate, "U.S. passport holders are exempted to pay a visa fee on a reciprocity basis," "U.S. citizens must pay a non-refundable $160.00 reciprocity fee," and "if you intend to enter Brazil with a non-U.S. passport, please check here to verify if you need a business visa." All those references suggest, to me, that the fee is determined by the country of your passport/citizenship, rather than the country of your residence. Yes? (Here are some relevant links in case you feel like poking around the consulate site.) Thanks in advance for any help -- like I said, I am finding myself befogged :)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
As Western universities drag their feet, the future of China's soft power push might be in the developing world. Confucius Institutes have been under close scrutiny recently, as many academics argue the Chinese government-funded institutes wind up restricting academic freedom at their host universities. In July, the American Association of University Professors published a report blasting the Confucius Institute model as a partnership "that sacrificed the integrity of the [host] university and its academic staff." The AAUP recommended shutting down U.S. Confucius Institutes unless they could meet certain standards of academic freedom and transparency.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My wife's deskjet is dying and I'm using a 17-year old laserjet for printing so it's time to upgrade our home printers. I'd like to get a networked color laser printer that I can just plug into our ethernet and print from both our PCs or a laptop on the wireless (we're a primarily PC household but have the occasional mac laptop). I'd ideally like a printer that can do double sided printing as well.I have an HP CP2025dn at work that I'm very happy with, but that seems a bit expensive for home use. On a quick search, the Brother HL4150CDN seems like it might fit our needs, but I'd love to hear what printers have worked well for you.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My good friend and I would like to plan a holiday for 7-10 days in February. Because Carnival will be happening around then, we are leaning toward South America. But where?Our wives and children will not be coming, so it'll just be the two of us. We are in our late 30s and we are both quite comfortable off the beaten path. We have a budget of about $2 - 3000 each. Neither of us have been to South America before. I was thinking Uruguay, because hey -- Uruguay! But we're open to all suggestions. Where is an interesting / adventurous / memorable place to go in South America for Carnival? It doesn't need to offer the biggest party. We have nothing against parties, but we're equally happy meeting other travellers, grokking the locals, bushwacking in wilderness, eating delish (or maybe just strange) food, etc. Bonus points if it's in Uruguay. Thanks (in advance) for your help!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
293 Thoughts I Had While Watching "Gilmore Girls" For The First Time. Gilmore Girls begins streaming on Netflix tomorrow.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My friend and I are interested in recommendations for books that explain fundamentals of computer science for readers without any prior knowledge - preferably not just about how to write code, but about computer science in a larger sense, and illustrated is especially helpful. For example, around 2003 I read a slim library book with explanations of fundamental computer science topics (including binary, machine code, and how compilers work) with cheesy 90s graphics, but I don't remember the title. What was that book, and what are others like it?Around 2006, my friend read a book that explained fundamental computer architecture and science without assuming any prior knowledge, and he doesn't remember the title of that one either. We were inspired to ask this after seeing tweets about How Computer Programming Works by Dan Appleman (2000) - here are a couple photos of it and a couple more. It looks great, but I remember cheesier graphics for mine, and my friend isn't sure that was the book he read, especially since he remembers reading about computer architecture as well as programming. We already know about Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software by Charles Petzold from 2000. We saw this previous question about "a book on the basics of how computers work", including its links to Usborne Introduction to Machine Code for Beginners (1983) and The Elements of Computing Systems: Building a Modern Computer from First Principles (2005). We're interested in books generally in this category as well as the specific ones we read. We're more interested in books aimed at grownups (or at least teenagers) instead of books aimed at children. For context, he's planning a computer science for non-programmers course at a university, and I'm interested in ways of teaching complex technical topics to newcomers. Thanks!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I have been looking for a new job for quite some time, and recently something interesting popped up on my radar. It's in my field, but in a different role than I've previously worked, and would require extensive international travel on a regular basis, but with promises of lots of time off in between trips. I have a spouse and two young kids. What does the hive mind think?I've been wanting to leave my job for quite some time -- the hours are draining (regular 70 hour weeks factoring in commute), I am micromanaged, and the work environment is relentlessly negative. The only upside is that I travel rarely and weekend work is pretty much nonexistent. The long hours mean I leave before my kids wake up in the morning and I get home in time to see them for maybe 45-60 minutes each night. I'm ready to be done with this. Unfortunately, I work in an industry where long hours are the norm, so searching for a new line of work at the moment is not a viable option, at least in the short term (commute is also non-negotiable for other reasons). I've searched for the past year for similar jobs in less crazy markets, to no avail. However, I've unexpectedly been offered a (rare) new position in my same field, but in a very different role. It would allow me considerable personal autonomy, the person who recommended me for the job can't say enough good things about the management, and the work sounds very interesting. The downside is that it would require considerable international travel -- about 40% of the time. The travel would be broken up in chunks -- a week here, 10 days there -- with one trip each year lasting approximately 16 days. However, I've been assured that I would be free to take extensive time off between trips. The previous incumbent in this job confirmed that this was the case. For example, if I traveled from Sunday to Saturday, I could get away with taking Mon-Wed off work before returning to the office on Thursday. It's been described as a sort of perk for spending so much time in the air. Much of the travel is in Latin America (I am in North America), so jet lag won't be a huge issue. This job would be for two years. The obvious downside seems to be the long periods away. My wife is a consultant who works from home and our kids are school-aged, so childcare is not an issue, but her burden would increase when I am away. The upside seems to be that when I am actually home, I'll have periods of unbroken time with my wife and kids -- time that I never get at my current position. My wife is on the fence as well -- the time away would be hard, but the promise of unbroken stretches together -- which we almost never get currently -- is very attractive to both of us. If I take the new job there will be no chance of returning to the old one. To those who have traveled a lot for work -- what do you think of this trade-off? What am I not considering.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Autumn is on its way and I'm looking for ways to make my living room as cozy, homey, warm, snuggly and relaxing as possible... while still keeping it tidy and stylish and without too much clutter.I want to make my living room an oasis of calm-cozy. Things I've done that have suited this goal perfectly are buying an overstuffed armchair for lounging in, tossing sheepskins over the chair and sofa, buying lots of tea lights/candles, and looking at new throw blankets. What are other things I can do to up the cozy factor and make me happy to spend the next few months snuggling up at home? If it helps paint a picture, my living room has a kind of eclectic-traditional-modern thing going on (not very precise, I know) with white walls and white upholstered furniture, a mix of antiques and mid-century pieces, wood floors with cream wool rugs, lots of artwork.

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