posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Autumn. Requires a modern browser that supports WebGL.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Killer Mike and El-P have dropped their latest Run the Jewels album just in time for the weekend. A follow up to last year's widely acclaimed Run the Jewels (previously), it is, like its predecessor, free for the price of your email address. There's no word on when the promised Meow the Jewels project will materialize, but you can still donate if you are so inclined.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Three or four years ago I saw a photograph in an actual newspaper of a group of wetnurses and babies in an Italian orphanage. There were some rows of buxom young women in uniform, each one seated with a breast out feeding a baby. The young women all wore a kind of nurses cap and oddly, every single one of them had dark curly hair. There was an odd juxtaposition in the picture between the uniformity of the group - and they were pretty smart - and the intimacy of the action. The date must have been 1940's or 30's. Now I've tried googling this picture and while the searches have taken me to some unexpectedly alarming places, I've not found it. The closest I've got, in feeling and structure, is number 3 of 4 here; but this isn't it. So, consulting the diverse and extensive knowledges accumulated here, does anyone know the photograph and where I might see it again?I've been using combinations of 'wet nurse' 'italy' and 'uniform' in searches, and I'll be grateful for any advice about better search terms too. The photo is black-and-white.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
The UK's National Archives has today released the formerly secret files detailing MI5's monitoring of the British Marxist historians Eric Hobsbawm and Christopher Hill [PDF downloads available]. The Guardian reports. An official historian explains. Christopher Hill and Eric Hobsbawm were leading lights of the Marxist historiographical tradition that was so strong in British postwar scholarship. Hill wrote on the seventeenth century, a "Century of Revolution"; Hobsbawms's work focused on the capitalist world order born of the industrial revolution (I, II, III) - when he wasn't writing about jazz that is. Both Hill and Hobsbawm were members of the Communist Party of Great Britain Historians Group. Hill, along with many others, resigned from the CPGB after the Soviet repression the Hungarian Uprising of 1956, but not before the Historians Group protested against the Soviet actions in a letter published in both the New Statesman and Tribune. Notoriously, Hobsbawm, another signatory to the letter, refused to quit the Party, a decision that was to dog his public life and career - although it didn't stop him becoming a Companion of Honour in 1998.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I have a tub of cooked and marinated Mussel meat I bought today and I have just found that most of the animals are partly filled with a dark green mealy paste-like substance that looks like mud. Is this just roe? Or is it filth?Details Brand: Talleys brand New Zealand Greenshell Mussels, "Cooked, Shelled and Ready to eat" Genus: perna canaliculus Weight: 375grams Best before: March 2015 I purchased them today from supermarket and I have eaten and enjoyed this brand before.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Belgian natives and residents: Last Sunday I had to take a cab from Brussels Midi to where I was staying. During the course of the ride the driver proceeded to : text, talk on his phone, smoke and blast shitty French rap.When I took a picture of the cab # he said it was illegal and called a # he claimed was the police. When I deleted the picture and showed him that I had ( I do remember the cab #) he tried to take the phone from me. He did take me to my proper destination and thought he could pat me when I got out of the car. I was staying at a serviced apartment with no onsite receptionist and have been leery of reporting it until I moved to another place. He claimed the cab was private space, is it true I can't take pictures in one here? Googling taxi laws in Belgium turns up nothing even with auto translate. I DID find that he wasn't supposed to smoke or use his phone while driving.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Without komaga (literally "panel pictures"), there would have been no gekiga. Moreover, because by the mid 60s gekiga had become lingua franca in comics for adolescent boys and young men, and because without gekiga it is unlikely that the "cinematic" would have become the obsession that it did amongst manga critics and historians, one could also say that without komaga neither manga or its discourse would exist as we know them. Despite this, komaga's creator, Matsumoto Masahiko (1934-2005) has only recently been resurrected from the archive. Yet still has his work barely registered within the mainstream of manga scholarship, which remains stubbornly Tezuka-centric in focus. Ryan Holmberg looks at the work of pioneering manga artist Matsumoto Masahiko and his influence on manga as an artform.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I live in a small, 10-unit apartment and have an ongoing issue with noise. There is a constant humming sound around 375 hz that is particularly loud in our apartment and on our floor.We are almost right above the mechanical room which is in the basement and on one occasion I was able to go inside because the door was wide open (a carpet layer was storing his extra rolls in there) and the boiler seemed to be making a ton of vibration and noise but not at the same pitch. I thought maybe it was somehow making the pipes in the walls vibrate?? No idea, but here's a short recording of the sound that is going 24 hours a day and driving me and my fiancee absolutely batty: http://youtu.be/AIUCyhbrCns Thanks in advance for your guesses!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Yale's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library has just released brand new scans of the Voynich Manuscript. The entire collection is available in JPEG and TIFF, and the new scans look pretty nice. The Beinecke's main page for the Voynich (previously) gives a high-level overview of what the Voynich is, but René Zandbergen's site is probably a better place to start. Just want to poke around? Try the Voynich Manuscript Voyager, which lets you zoom in and bookmark any location in the book. Or the Voynichese Query Viewer, which provides visual search results. And don't forget the text, which the Voynich information browser provides in your choice of transcription. (Even the NSA has been curious.)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Maps of street layouts, coloured based on their orientation. Includes San Francisco, New York, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Paris, Chicago, Berlin, Boston and London.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Reanna Alder eats roadkill raccoon so you don't have to. (Article has no images except a highly processed one of a live raccoon.)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
When should I tell new partners about past abuse?In college, I was in a three year abusive relationship (my first real relationship) that included physical and emotional abuse as well as rape. Luckily I got out of there, and I've done a lot of healing in the intervening decade or so. In my twenties, I carried a lot of baggage and had a lot of triggers. Telling new sexual partners was a no brainer and generally came in the form of, "There's something really important I need to talk to you about." But water has (thankfully!) passed under the bridge. At this point I'm a pretty well adjusted grown ass woman who can have all the usual kinds of sex and doesn't have a panic attack when you walk behind me going up a flight of stairs, or wear a certain cologne, anymore. This is great for me, emotionally, but becomes awkward when I start seeing someone new. It's a pretty big part of my past. And there's no ideal time to talk about it. I recently was in a relationship of a few months, it never came up organically, and the longer we dated the more of an elephant in the room it became. I'm now starting to see someone new, and I'd like to handle it better this time. It's obviously not first date talk, and at this point it's not something I'd want to tell a one-off random hookup. But I felt like 3-4 months was too long to wait. So, when's the best time to talk about this long-past complicated life stuff? And what's the best way to bring it up, seeing as it doesn't impact my everyday life anymore?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I live in a shared house (not a college dorm) with 8 others. I am the only woman in the house. One of my roommates refuses to lock the door going outside despite my respectful, reasonable requests to keep the house secure and locked, and he has acted rudely towards me. I emailed the landlord but haven't heard back yet. What should I do?I live in the basement of a shared house in an area with the occasional shifty-person wandering the streets or yelling as they walk by. Regardless, I feel it is common sense and in the best interest of personal safety (and material safety) to keep the doors in the house leading outside locked. I especially feel vulnerable, being a woman, and the fact that a man once approached me in his car when I was alone at the bus stop, asking me to get in his car. All of the guys keep the outside doors locked and are very respectful, except for my roommate who lives in the room right next to mine, who will henceforth in this question be referred to as Bob. As the youngest, Bob just turned 18, and he is rather immature. Most of the others in the house, including myself, are 5-10 years older than him, to give an idea of our background. He's an international student and is rather spoiled by his mom, who pays his rent, as he goes to school, so it seems he's used to getting his way. He doesn't clean after himself in common areas, and he is inconsiderate of noise levels at night, as he has wild shenanigans with his friends that I can hear in the next room over. He hasn't exactly been easy to live with, especially as he smokes indoors, which is against the rules of our lease and is irritating to me. I live in the basement, and in this old, creaky house, sounds are very easily heard. This is especially true for doors opening/closing, and in that regard, Bob slams doors, no matter if it's the front door upstairs or the bathroom door in the basement. So, I can hear him slamming the basement door (so hard it makes the windows and door in my room rattle) and walk to his room, slamming that door too behind him. I noticed by accident once that he didn't lock the basement door after he came in once, and after some time, after I realized how loudly he slams the door, I noticed he never locks the door when he comes in from outside. This bothers me. It just seems like common sense to lock the door to keep the people inside and the house itself safe. I first started to raise this issue by leaving polite notes on the door to remind my roommates to keep the outside doors locked. It didn't change Bob, so I sent him a very polite email, stating that if he could please lock the door, I would appreciate it. Nothing changed still, and I got no response from him, so about a month later, (yesterday) I asked him in person if he could do that, and he said the door locks automatically. This is not true. The upstairs front door does, but not the basement door. I stated that the door does not lock automatically. He refuted my statement. This went back and forth another time, to which I said, if you could please just make sure it is locked that would be great. He said he would try to do so. Today after work, I came home to see the basement door once again unlocked. I went over and locked it and thought I heard someone outside, so I opened it in case it was one of my roommates and they didn't have a key (which I now realize wasn't smart, in case it was someone sketchy outside). It was Bob, smoking outside this time. "Oh sorry," I said, and then I remembered that yesterday, I didn't recall that the front door locks by itself, so I thought to make that distinction to him so he could understand, in case he was confusing which door locks by itself, and kind of in a "hey I want to be helpful, the front door locks but not the basement door" way. I did so in a conversational, friendly manner. Bob got testy with me and asked me what my problem was and why I care. He asked me if I don't lock my bedroom door. "No, I do," I told him, and I tried to explain to him why it's important to keep the door locked, so that strangers don't get in, nothing gets stolen, people are safe, we still have to leave our rooms to use the bathroom, kitchen, etc. He very rudely said, "I don't have to do what you say!" And I said, no you dont, but does he understand why I want to keep the door locked? He said it doesn't matter, since my bedroom door is locked and told me that "I'm not going to lock it. It locks automatically. If you want to lock it, you do it! Don't bother me, I'm trying to smoke! Go talk to the landlord!" To which I reiterated that it does not in fact lock automatically and I told him I thought he was rude. He said "I think you're rude! Go away!" and slammed the door in my face. I promptly sent an email to my landlord, asking if he could do or say anything to Bob, but I haven't heard from him yet. Bob was really disrespectful and immature. I want him to be evicted, because he doesn't care about keeping the roommates and the house we live in safe by just taking a simple one-second step to lock the door, and he is breaking the lease agreement by smoking in his room. I don't know how the other roommates feel- we are all together for financial reasons of low rent and keep to ourselves, aren't friends with each other, etc. What can I do here? I feel like living in a house that has open doors is something I'm not comfortable with, but I don't want to move to another place soon because I'm planning on relocating for a job in a few months, so it would be a hassle, as I had a hard time finding a place to rent to begin with. Help? Thank you Hive Mind.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
17 Brilliant Short Novels You Can Read in a Sitting by Lincoln Michel at Electric Literature: This week author Ian McEwan expressed his love of short novels, saying "very few [long] novels earn their length." Certainly it seems like a novel has to be a minimum of 500 pages to win a major literary award these days, and many genre novels have ballooned to absurd sizes. I love a good tome, but like McEwan many of my favorite novels are sharpened little gems. It's immensely satisfying to finish a book in a single day, so in the spirit of celebrating quick reads here are some of my favorite short novels. I've tried to avoid the most obvious titles that are regularly assigned in school (The Stranger, Heart of Darkness, Mrs Dalloway, Of Mice and Men, Frankenstein, The Crying of Lot 49, etc.). Hopefully you'll find some titles here you haven't read before. Lazy Readers' Book Club — "This is where you go when you want to read quality books that don't take years to finish. My mission is to increase interest in reading by providing cool, short book recommendations for all ages. From interest comes devotion." 50 Incredible Novels Under 200 Pages — Emily Temple at Flavorwire. 46 Brilliant Short Novels You Can Read In A Day — "Great reads under 200 pages. Mostly."; Daniel Dalton for BuzzFeed. 20 Classic Novels You Can Read in One Sitting — Mark Nichol, Daily Writing Tips; and from Huffington Post, These Amazing Classic Books Are So Short You Have No Excuse Not To Read Them. Bonus link for fun: Reading Recommendations · Classic Novels from The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I want something to protect my pants from bike grease. Holding the pant tight with a conventional pant-holding-device is not sufficient, I still get chain grease all over my right calf.What I'm looking for is something that actually covers a good portion of my calf while I ride. I have searched the hills and valleys of the internet, using search terms like, "chain protector" "pants chain protector" "leg gaiter" "leg shield" "pants strap" etc.... I finally found this but it seems really over the top and I'm afraid the neoprene would be too hot. The Shin Shackle is basically what I'm looking for, but it does not seem to exist anymore. Yes, I have cleaned my chain and only add a very small amount of new lube.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
My (Greek Orthodox) aunt gave my mom this bracelet to give to me. It is one of those anti-"Evil Eye" bracelets. Attached to each end of the bracelet is this coin-like thing. I am having a hard time deciphering what is pictured on the coin and what it symbolizes. Any knowledgeable folks know more than Google about this?It looks to me like some kind of lamp/oil lantern is depicted, but I can't say for sure, and all the Googling in the world has not yet turned up this exact icon. I assume it has to be some kind of Orthodox talisman, but I don't know, and my aunt hasn't gotten back to me on it yet. Picture is linked below. Anyone here know for sure what this is about? http://i59.tinypic.com/2ijqmw2.jpg

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Why/how are US patients who have contracted ebola virus disease identified by name to the newsmedia?Isn't this a massive violation of medical privacy? Is it legal?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the film Zulu, which depicts the Battle of Rorke's Drift (previously) in 1879. Here's a little history of the production, as well as ten things you may not know about the film and an argument that it's the best British war film ever made. Film Historian Sheldon Hall discusses the film's legacy, and Zulu leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi (who portrayed his own great grandfather in the film) reminisces about the shoot.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In Canada, if someone asks you if you are recording a conversation, can you lie and continue to record it?My friend, "Joe", thinks this is fine, because it isn't illegal to record a conversation under one-party consent laws. My other friend, "Steve", thinks it could fall into surreptitious recording, because the other person has no reason to think you are recording. Joe thinks you would have to be daft to think that there's any duty to tell the truth nor any duty not to record and he notes that wiretapping laws are meant to protect people from intercepted communications for nefarious reasons, not to interfere with someone recording a conversation they might want on record for later (such as a business contract). Who's right? Canada is a one-party consent jurisdiction, so you don't need permission from other people if you're part of the conversation and stay in the room or on the line. I can't find anything that says it's illegal to lie. The surreptitious recording laws seem to apply to wiretapping and parabolic devices, not when someone whips out an iPhone and lays it on the desk or has it sticking out of their pocket.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
My mother is convinced she is the product of an incentious relationship by her mother and her grandfather. Genetic testing proved inconclusice due to the poor quality of the samples available from her grandfather (my greatgrandfather) and her mother (my grandmother) as both were deceased by the time the testing was done. My parents are first cousins (my maternal and my paternal grandmothers are sisters). I have a child by my SO (not a relative). I constantly worry for his long-term health. This whole issue was extremly worrying to me during pregnancy, but I expected my worries to decrease once he is older, and especially as he continues to develop fine physically and mentally, developing right on target. He will soon turn 6 and I worry more than ever, every little quirk gives me sleepless nights.Do you know of online resources on the effects this history of inbreeding might have on my son in the long term? Is my worry justified? Should I just let it go? I live in Europe, in a predominately Catholic country were marriage among cousins was legal when my parents married. I have adult siblings, one of which has very obvious mental issues (he lives in a home), and some physical problems but I am not legally entitled to know his diagnosis and he refuses to tell me. My guess is a spectrum disorder, some form of autism (I mention this only to give you an idea what my fears are). The other sibling prefers not to be involved in any way, some mild social issues are obvious but they might just be from growing up in a dysfunctional family. I myself have some social problems, fears, but no physical or mental issues (if I say so myself) at least not more than the average mother of a young child. I did some years in therapy for depression (about 10 yrs ago) and dealing with growing up in a dysfunctional family. My mother claims that she herself was conceived from an incestous relationship her grandfather supposedly had with his adult daughter (my mother's mother). My mother attempted to have this proven by genetic testing several years ago but the difficulty is that the genetic material available was not of sufficient quality, so the result was ambigous. Both her mother and grandfather passed away decades ago so it is not possible to obtain better samples and repeat this. The year in question is 1937 and no family member is alive anymore who was an adult then and might know. My father, who passed away some years ago, did believe her but not based on any fact, only his feeling (he did not know the grandfather in question). So this whole angle might be rubbish. My mother is a very egocentric person and styling herself the product of incest serves a purpose in her personal life. She nver considered how this might make us, her children feel. She definitely does have some mental problems and is in treatment for those. What worries me very much are my mother's claims that she herself has an autistic spectrum disorder ( I cannot find out if her treating doctors and therapists agree - the information is confidential) and her assertion that "all the men in our family have it too, including your dad and your son". During my pregnancy she predicted my son would turn out to be autistic. She keeps telling me that if she had known about her origin at the time of marriage she would not have married her cousin and how this is going to ruin my sons life now. My son is not on the spectrum (I trust our pediatrian in this judgement), but I cannot seem to shake this nagging feeling that maybe something is wrong with him after all. When he turned four I was frantic, so fearful and noticed for the first time how it affects my attitue towards him. I am so afraid I see hints of mental illness in just normal behaviour. I have considered having him tested against the advice of the pediatrician and will of his dad, but so far I decided against it as where we live such testing is not readily available privately and the pediatrician sees no need to put it in motion. She feels it would be too stressful and unjustified. My SO thinks I am hysterical. He knows my family background but is not worried by it. For example our son loves numbers, has always loved them and I only worry as I see his love for numbers as a bad sign instead of enjoying his pleasure. His maths skills are just right for his age, so it is just a preference not unusual talent. I think what I need to do is to educate myself in order to put the demons at rest. I spend so much time observing our son and sleepless nights overthinking him, googling, interpreting, and I need to stop. Also, is this something I need to tell my son once he is old enough to father children? Would you tell him? The internet is so full of information but I feel lost in sorting the chaff from the wheat and this is why I ask for your help. What i am looking for are online resources or real books which help me understand the impact of close relative /first cousin parentage on the resulting children, and their children - with the possible addition of second generation inbreeding (if my mother's claims are true which no one knows). I have no scientific background, scientific articles I found on Google Scholar were to difficult to comprehend. So I get stuck with the kitchen psychology and pseudo science. I believe I have read just about any forum on autism or spectrum disorders - this is not helping me as it only feeds my fears. So what I am looking for is something written for the lay person but by a reputable scholar - that would be fantastic. PS - to anyone who feels I ought not to have had the child: he was unplanned and a total but very welcome surprise.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I just got fired. I was miserable and stressed and planned to have a talk with the CEO on Monday. Instead, he fired me today. I'm in California. What rights, if any, do I have? I was an exempt employee, got no notice, and am being treated like I embezzled something. As it happens, my boss was super frustrated because he wanted me to implement various things more quickly, didn't tell me until 2 weeks ago, and then fired me today. I'll survive but desperately need my health insurance and have no savings, as this was a low-paying startup. Cobra is expensive: Could I maybe suggest a proposal where I consult for insurance alone? All ideas welcome. Thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Yep, sorry, another "I quit my humanities PhD and I have no idea how the real world works" thread. Except I haven't actually quit yet; this is more like advance research. It's seeming increasingly likely that I may have to leave ABD for the sake of my mental health, so I'm looking for input on how to manage the early stages of a transition to a career (ideally arts-related) where I'll have little relevant background. This post is also an early step in my effort to encourage more constructive coping behaviors after fairly serious depression.To make a long backstory as short as possible: I've had serious anxiety problems around academic writing throughout grad school. The intensity of those feelings--combined with, I'll admit, personal immaturity, avoidance, and a whole bunch of denial--led me to develop severe procrastination habits starting around the MA stage. The procrastination, of course, just made the anxiety a thousand times worse (I took my quals on klonopin), and the whole thing ultimately snowballed into me spending my first dissertation year doing not much of anything at all. As the procrastination dragged on, I became severely depressive and ashamed about the writing I wasn't doing (the solitude, and some personal life issues, contributed to this as well) and developed terrible secondary coping habits that killed my motivation in most other areas of life. At its peak, I spent two straight weeks in bed, and for seven months was spending huge chunks of every day on blahtherapy (which, if you've never been there, is, we'll just say....not the best place to talk about adult problems.) Fast forward to today: I've had therapy and meds, and am overseas on a research fellowship. In the last month I've managed to start writing again, but the residual influence of all those bad habits is (I hope understandably) still huge, productivity is extremely slow, my focus is still not fantastic, and there is virtually nothing enjoyable about the process at all (nor do I feel terribly interested in my topic right now.) I'm slowly working my way out of the avoidant behaviors too, but again, it doesn't seem realistic to expect overnight change (right now I'm still at a point where going to the aquarium, or taking a long walk and letting myself actually enjoy it, feels like progress.) Denial about my future held on longest of all the problems (see this post, where I talked a lot about being lonely but didn't mention the academic uncertainties at the root of it because part of me still believed a week of good behavior would transform me into the hyper-functional King of Professorland), but lately I've started to feel like it would be a good next step if I started thinking about that from a more realistic/adult perspective too. It's entirely possible, given my current pace of writing--which, I've learned the hard way, I can't exceed without suffering big recovery setbacks--that I won't be able to finish the dissertation by the end of this fellowship. And even if I do, it seems healthy, given the way I feel about academic writing (to say nothing of the state of the academic job market), to start considering career options that don't require it. And that, as they say, is where mefi comes in. I'm hoping you guys can give some preliminary advice on how to manage the early stages of what will (if it happens) be an awkward transition. I know any career path I choose is going to involve an adjustment process where I'm working my way into the field, but I'm less clear on how that process will be different because I'm a 33-year-old ABD PhD student. I've looked at versatilePhD, but most of their testimonials seem to come from PhDs (not ABDs) who'd already spent a fair amount of time volunteering or freelancing in the field they transitioned into--and who sound, from their descriptions of life in grad school, like extremely high-functioning people overall. My energy, by contrast, is still pretty depleted, and I think I'd be rushing myself to take on any secondary commitments right (maybe in a couple months, if my visa even allows it.) As for specific careers, I'm open to suggestions, but my thinking seems to be slowly coalescing around "move to New York and do 'something' connected with the arts." This could mean publishing (university or independent, preferably), gallery/museum work, foundation work, advocacy, nonprofit, something to do with film, whatever. Something that involves travel would be ideal, if that's possible. So suggestions from people in arts/literature-related fields would be especially welcome. I'm willing to work my way up (of course), but I'm 33 and would like to be in a reasonably stable position (read: decent income, some advancement potential/connections/"real" responsibility) after not too huge an amount of time--although I have no idea if that's a realistic expectation. At the same time, academia has me pretty worn down at the moment, so being in a secure position with relatively basic responsibilities might not be such a terrible thing for a little while. I have 9.5 months left on this fellowship, enough time to work out a strategy. So, questions! What kinds of transitional jobs (read: the job(s) I get to pay the bills right after I leave academia while I'm working towards the new career) are viable in my situation? What kinds of long-term careers make sense for me? Is it reasonable to bypass the internship stage when I have so much education (but not the PhD)? What are the hardest parts of the transition (any advice on managing moving logistics)? What are the first 3, 6, 9 months of the transition like? How do you "break into" a field that isn't necessarily related to your background? Will my age be a problem (I look younger than I am, if that influences things)? How/where can I research options in the time I have? Am I insane to think I can leave, ABD, after this much unproductive time in academia and still be successful in a different field? Stories from people who left at the ABD stage and found their way to happy, creatively fulfilling lives would be especially nice to hear! Advice that plays up the benefits of finishing the PhD is well taken but not really what I'm looking for.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In my twitter feed this afternoon, I happened upon a heartbreaking tweet about a new dad who has stage 4 lung cancer and only weeks to live is desperate to find a book that he remembers from his childhood to leave to his infant daughter. All he can recall is that it is about a yellow bird that wears goggles and wants to fly, but all attempts fail.He thinks that it was published in the UK in the 1980s (apparently he lives somewhere in the UK, but was in the US as a child, so personally, I wouldn't focus so much on that part, but it's one of the few possible details about the book that's been listed on twitter. For awhile they thought that the book had been identified--Frankie Flies seemed to fit the bill--but after receiving more details, it wasn't the correct book. There are already librarians and people who work in publishing trying to help out on twitter, but thus far everyone is coming up empty handed. I figured that it wouldn't hurt to post the question here in the hopes that someone might remember this book. The friend who is tweeting about this was pretty gutted when it turned out that Frankie Flies wasn't the right book after all.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
6-speed manual transmission, standard clutch--not "paddle" or "semi-automatic" or "clutchless." Two ways to stop:1) Use the brakes to brake the car: 5th or 4th or whatever gear you're in, neutral, no downshifting, coast to full stop with car not in gear. 2)Use the clutch/engine to brake the car: 55mph in 5th gear, 45mph in 4th gear, 35mph in 3rd gear, etc., downshifting through the gears to slow the car down, then into neutral--instead of into 2nd--when you're only doing 20mph or something. I've always done #1. For 25 years, no matter what gear or how fast or the RPM's, I put the car into neutral, then use the brakes to stop. I was taught that downshifting was hard on the engine and the clutch, and that the only time you want to slow down by downshifting is when icy/snowy/slippery road conditions make brakes useless b/c there's not enough traction to keep you from sliding. Today, I was going like 55mph in 5th gear when I saw a red light up ahead and did my thing:5th gear to neutral, brakes to a full stop. The guy I was driving with-- a coworker that I don't know well enough to know if he or isn't full of shit, but who says he knows " a lot about cars"--told me that I was doing it wrong. He said that with a manual transmission, you want to downshift through the gears to slow down, then use the brakes to come to a full stop. I said he was wrong. Who's right?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People Toby W. Rush's "Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People" covers a massive range of topics like pitch, rhythm, scales, intervals, and harmonics. The online book itself is arranged as a collection of about 50 PDFs that offer diagrams, notes, and tips for everything music theory related. Via Lifehacker.

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