posted 1 day ago on metafilter
How Nextdoor.com is Tackling Its Racism Problem Previously on MeFi.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
One Third of Parents Avoid Reading Children Scary Stories, Study Finds [The Guardian] "A survey of 1,003 UK parents by online bookseller The Book People found that 33% would steer clear of books for their children containing frightening characters. Asked about the fictional creations they found scariest as children, a fifth of parents cited the Wicked Witch of the West from L Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, with the Child Catcher from Ian Fleming's Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang in second place. Third was the Big Bad Wolf, in his grandmother-swallowing Little Red Riding Hood incarnation, fourth the Grand High Witch from Roald Dahl's The Witches, and fifth Cruella de Vil, from Dodie Smith's The Hundred and One Dalmatians."

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Loomings.net , not to be confused with loomings.com

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
In the early 90s the US Department of Energy commissioned a study about how to warn people of the far future about a nuclear waste dump. (Previously and previouslier on metafilter). Have there been any artworks - music, theater, fiction, etc. - inspired by this study?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Margaret Atwood (and artist Johnnie Christmas) have created Angel Catbird, a comic book about a winged human/cat/bird hybrid. It will be published by Dark Horse, and chronicles the adventures of a genetic engineer whose DNA is mixed with that of a cat, and an owl. The comic is part of her advocacy work for Keep Cats Safe and Save Bird Lives.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
On 2 occasions in the last few years I developed a friendship with people I knew through work circles. I got to know them independently over a period of months or even years in what I would describe as deeper than acquaintance level friendship. Then they introduced me to their partner...In the first example, this guy is very judgemental about others being redneck types that are loud and like to drink and swear. When he invited me to his house to meet his wife, she greeted me at the door by jumping on me and wrapping her legs around me (she is of small build and have never seen each other or spoken before). Then it was obvious that she was drunk and she proceeded to pass out on the floor with her husband lovingly putting feet on her body saying "this is what I married". jokingly As I got to know them as couple, this was a few times a week occurrence. Even when she isn't drunk, she is extremely loud and forceful. She has always been lovely to me so I am not trying to paint her in a negative light. I was just taken aback by the fact that she would literally be the last person I would imagine her husband marrying. Not just from his personality but from who he gets along with and how he speaks of people with similar personalities as his wife. Yet it is also clear that he has a deep affection for her so it's not like he can't stand her or anything. Just what the f? The other example is a woman who is very sweet natured but of generally poor health. She always described her husband as the kindest man she knew and went into great detail how he took care of her when she was ill. The first time I met him, he talked in glowing terms about Nazis and then took one of my comments the wrong way and angrily accused me of being a "feminist bitch". Literally the last thing you would expect of how his wife painted him. I am generally perceptive about people and those are the exceptions; most people have partners within the range of what you would expect after knowing them. How would you describe those situations? Maybe these people have a public side that is not even close to who they truly are. I sort of see someone's partner as a reflection of their innermost desires and needs. Someone who they are totally themselves around. It's also like these people are not really aware of this discrepancy. What would be the most likely explanation for this?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
In Russia's Arctic north, a new kind of gold rush is under way: With the sale of elephant tusks under close scrutiny, "ethical ivory" from the extinct woolly mammoth is now feeding an insatiable market in China. This rush on mammoth ivory is luring a fresh breed of miner – the tusker – into the Russian wilderness and creating dollar millionaires in some of the poorest villages of Siberia. NPR: As Arctic Ice Melts, It's A Free-For-All For Oil ... And Tusks National Geographic: Tracking Mammoths (paywalled link) In related news: Mammoths could become a protected species to curb laundering of elephant tusks.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Suggestions, please, for small, cheerful objects to include in a care package for two kids, somewhere around 11 and 16, grieving a sudden loss.The kids have suddenly lost their much-loved step-mother. What can I send them to make them smile a little, or have a little bit of distraction? He's older, she's younger, and, while I don't know them well, I know they enjoy things like "My Little Pony" and chess and probably "Steven Universe." They're also just starting school; what might be useful or fun for a locker? Are there fun candies (non-melty, as it's still summer here) or other food items that might be good? No food allergies, afaik. Specific suggestions encouraged, as I am not good at picking out presents. Thank you!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have come to realize that I have issues with assertiveness and am looking into therapy. How would I look into this? Would CBT be a good fit?I found a local therapist who does assertiveness training using CBT. I've never done CBT so I don't know if it's good for my needs. My problem is that I either tend to be too aggressive and tell people to back the fuck off or I can be too passive, indecisive and let myself and my ideas be run over. I want to find the middle ground and learn to be assertive yet calm by nature. I read somewhere online that CBT involves going over your week to try to go over parts that illustrate the issue at hand. However my regular day to day isn't very social so I don't have interactions with others that illustrate my problem most weeks. Does this mean this form of therapy wouldn't work for me?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
That's the question, but complicated by a two-week long trip to Asia coming up and Zika.My partner and I were planning to start trying to conceive next Spring. We live in NYC where there are some Zika cases but nothing endemic. We are thinking about pushing our timeline up to now so we can maybe conceive without having to worry about any mosquito months. (Obviously, I don't know if it will take a month or take a year but I do track my cycle now, so I know when my fertile days are). The issue is we have a two-week trip planned to Asia in October. So I could be anywhere from 0-8 weeks pregnant at that time. It is crazy to travel at that stage of pregnancy? I'm more worried about having a crappy/nauseated/overly fatigued time than getting sick over there. I'm leaning towards trying anyway because who knows?! But would like some group feedback on the validity of that choice. Thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
A friend of mine is looking to buy a new car; her top choice right now is a Kia Soul (backup choices are the Honda Fit, Mazda3 and Nissan Juke). The thing is, while she's read every review she can find, is confident she can get a good deal, and has been happy with her test drives (plural), neither of us actually knows anyone with Soul, to ask an actual owner what they think of the car, would they buy another, that sort of thing.So: does anyone out there own a Kia Soul? What can you tell us about it, good bad or indifferent? How is the car holding up --- is it high or low maintenance, how is road wear & tear treating it? Many thanks!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I've created a character for a roleplaying game that takes place in a modern urban supernatural setting. She is a crafty, street smart hacker who is not strong but is very dexterous and good with her hands. She specializes in improvised weapons. What are some weapons that would make sense for her?Looking for both long-term weapons she can use in multiple situations (sturdy knife, for example) as well as short-term weapons that she would only use in a pinch (chair leg, Molotov cocktail, Millwall brick ). Bonus points for weapons that make use of her hacking skills.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Is it possible to get over anxiety like mine about nursing? I'm not exactly keen to try, but I feel like I'm failing at having a career before I even started. Can I still have a successful career with a nursing degree I never intend to use?I graduated from nursing school in May and moved back in with my parents while looking for work. Only, I haven't applied to a single nursing job yet. I'm mostly applying to low level healthcare admin positions, and I've gotten a couple calls back. I had one interview, and looking over my resume the interviewer started off with a baffled "why would you apply for this, you know how much more you could make as a nurse, right?" I was prepared for this question and I think I handled it well, but obviously this is going to be an issue with any application I submit. My mom asked me today, "are you not applying to nursing positions because of fear or anxiety?" I answered yes. She said "considering the rewards, don't you think you should try to work past that?" I'm not sure what rewards she was referring to. It could be financial—nurses are well compensated in my area and new grads can easily clear 80k in acute care. The jobs I'm applying for would pay me half that, or less. Or she could have been referring to the reward of having a well-respected job. I don't know. But her question was something that I had been considering myself for a while, and of course because it was something I was already insecure about I got angry and closed the door on her like a petulant teenager. I'm not sure if I should try to work past my anxiety, or if I even could. I did a 4 semester program to get my bachelor's in nursing. 1st semester, we couldn't do very much as students, and my issues with anxiety were minimal. However, as we progressively took on more responsibility with patient care, my anxiety mounted. When I get anxious I cry and hyperventilate. I call these my "episodes." In clinical, before my final semester, it was not uncommon for me to excuse myself to the bathroom to have an episode, but I was able to get back on the floor pretty quickly, with one exception where I couldn't stop. I was sobbing during mid-day conference and my instructor didn't let me finish the day. Mostly I got away with it though, people probably just thought I had IBS or something with my little bathroom excursions. Sometimes I would even say I had an upset stomach. By 4th semester we were supposed to be taking on the role of primary nurse for a full load of patients with the supervision of a preceptor. This level of responsibility turned me into an absolute mess. More than usual, and much less discreet. I would cry on my way to my night shift, on my break, and on my way home in the morning. I would sometimes start to cry and hyperventilate during report from the day nurse, just hearing about the patients I would have to care for. My preceptor and many other nurses on the floor were witness to this humiliation. A few times I left shortly after report because I could not pull it together. I had started to become preoccupied with thoughts of death. One night, I left the floor for my break, crying as usual. I went up to the top of the parking garage and sat on the edge, scooting forward as far as I dared, letting my legs dangle over the side. I didn't want to kill myself, I just wanted to feel like I could do it if I needed to. I needed to feel like there was an out, I guess. I was at a pretty low point. I felt humiliated by my own behavior, I felt like worthless slime that couldn't amount to anything. Anyway, someone saw me and called the cops. I tried to run away when they came up the stairs but they caught up with me and started to ask me questions. I somehow convinced them through more humiliating tears that I did not intend to hurt myself. I went back up to the floor, but of course after that I was barely functional. I spent the next 2 hours locked in the leadership office having a fairly unhinged episode, probably my worst to date. My preceptor took over my patients for me during this time. They were asleep, but it was still unacceptable, of course. I was put in clinical jeopardy after that. Still, despite all that, I managed to complete all 225 hours of my senior preceptorship and graduate manga cum laude. I am proud of myself for that, and I'm still not sure how I did it because I have never been more miserable. I think the only thing that got me through it was thinking I could just go work at Starbucks or something when it was all over. I wouldn't have to step foot in a hospital again. That was long, but I think I needed to get that out. And I wanted to demonstrate why I don't want to touch nursing with a 10-foot pole. And it's not just about my comfort, I don't really think someone like me should be caring for patients. I know there are non-bedside nursing positions out there, but I don't want to be responsible for anyone's care in any way. I don't even really want these healthcare admin positions but I feel like I am more likely to get a call back. Also I hate being asked for health advice, though friends and family do it all the time now. My parents know that I had anxiety and doubts about nursing, but they don't know the extent of it. I've never told anyone what I have written above, particularly not the parking garage story. FWIW I used a couple different therapists and tried a couple SSRIs during nursing school, I didn't feel that either helped very much. On the other side of all of this, I am giving up a lot of money and career potential. What should I do?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
"Refrigerate after opening" bacon bits spend 6 hours at 74 degrees: can I put them back in the fridge and continue to use them indefinitely (or over the next few weeks)?I stumbled into the kitchen this morning to discover that our tasty little packet of Wellshire Farms Bacon Bits spent the night (or about 6 hours) next to the coffee grinder and not in the fridge. I don't think they are shelf-stable, as my Whole Foods sells them in the refrigerated section and the package says to refrigerate after opening. Dumping them all into a giant omelet this morning would be delicious, but it is not an option. Sigh. Thanks in advance, oh wise ones!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Zoe Quinn's new game (SLYT).

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I am converting from Sole-Trader to a Private Limited Company (for liability reasons). I am the Director (100% share-holder) and sole person who does "the work". Do I need an accountant or a legal advisor or both?Mainly I'm wondering: 1. Whether I need Employers Insurance (since i'm the director/worker) 2. How I should pay myself for "the work" that gets done by me. 3. If I'm doing "the work" do I need a formal engagement between my person and the company? 4. Am I then an "employee" or can the "director" do "the work"? and pay themselves a directors salary? 5. Does this IR35 Thing Apply to me. 6. Is the PAYE / NIC stuff hard to setup?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
The Most Exclusive Restaurant in AmericaDamon Baehrel's methods are a marvel, and his tables are all booked until 2025. Or are they?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
For years, passengers on Washington State ferries have spent their trip working on communal jigsaw puzzles. It is a delightful, adorable thing. Here are some pictures. Here are a few more. The New York Times is on it.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Best Supporting Weirdo is a movie mashup of " interesting, eccentric, and iconic characters", introducing themselves, making famous moves and saying famous quotes, and reacting to everything (often with NSFW language).

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I have read quite a few articles that state that there's no such thing as being bad at math, that often it is just the case that you haven't had a specific subject explained to you in a way that made sense to you, or that you just have to work harder at it. That resonates with me, but clearly there's a limit to that and I wonder what that limit is.I know that theoretical math at the university level is one of the hardest subjects and that even people who are the best in their class in high school often have trouble with that. So, I wonder if there is any consensus about what a level of math is that most college students could reach, given enough motivation and good explanations. I'm interested in both experiences from math teachers/people who took higher level math classes in college, and articles that are written about this. I'm in Europe so general explanations would be preferred because I have no clue what Americans learn in which classes. I'm assuming college students, so people who have the IQ/skills to go to college, but not necessarily people who had advanced math classes in high school.

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I recently visited Seattle in the US and saw quite a number of rainbow flags and rainbows painted on pedestrian crossings in Capitol Hill. WTF? Did I just happen in the midst of LGBT land or is there another significance I missed?

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Our six month old gorgeous baby now sleeps with us -- I'd like her to be able to sleep on her own, in a crib, without the Merlin sleep suit, through the night, and gulp, in the same room as our toddler. Hope me?Our six month old has slept either in a sidecar co-sleeper or in bed with us since she was born. She is snuggly and sweet. She's still breastfeeding. To get her to sleep, we either rock her or nurse her to sleep. At night, she's actually not so bad -- not incessantly nursing, but does want to nurse maybe 2-3 times a night, and is usually easily resettled. At night, I sometimes see her self-soothe, by turning her head a few times or (rarely) taking her thumb. Oh, did I mention she uses one of those Merlin sleep suits? She LOVED being swaddled, and still doesn't seem to have great control over her arms and legs, so the Merlin suit has helped. She naps pretty well in the sidecar crib -- a longish nap in the mornings and afternoons (45 minutes to 1.5 hr) and a short nap in the late afternoon. Co-sleeping has worked out for us -- we get a lot of sleep, and I like seeing her little face. But, you know, we need our bed back. BUT the place she will eventually sleep is with my toddler. My toddler is now a great sleeper in general, though a bit of crying when I leave the room is inevitable. The toddler goes to sleep about a half hour after the baby's ideal time (can shift this.) Toddler seems OK with baby joining the room. We bought the crib, and are planning now to set it up in our room temporarily, and then putting it in with the toddler. So how do I do this? I am not entirely anti-CIO, but I did Ferber in desperation with my older kid and it was just so awful and it only lasted a few weeks (I was probably inconsistent in retrospect.) But yeah, I know at least some crying is inevitable. I'm happy to do this in stages, but don't want it to take longer than a month ideally. Any thoughts/suggestions on how to do this? I've read so many sleep books but would love personal experience!

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
John V. Muntean's magic angle sculptures: The Shape of Imagination | Knight Mermaid Pirate Ship | Dragon Butterfly Jet

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
Mychal Denzel Smith, author of Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, discusses his new book: "We have to be willing to let go of the things that we think that we like about ourselves because if they are things that deny others access to respect and dignity and humanity, then they're not things worth having. So we have to be willing to let go." (MDS: previously) Alicia Garza: "Lots of people who are great people are implementing and protecting systems, practices, structures that fundamentally exclude, disenfranchise, marginalize black people." also btw (the 'NKs' are making waves...) The Fed's Effect on Black Americans - "The U.S. Federal Reserve appears to be paying more attention to how its policies affect black Americans. This is a wise move... The Fed rightly aims to pursue policies that are best for the economy as a whole. But I don't believe that it will be seen as truly representative of all Americans unless it understands the differential impact of its policy choices on key demographic subgroups." Federal Reserve under growing pressure to reform system, goals - "Fed Up, a network of community organizations and labor unions that wants a more diverse, transparent and income-inequality aware central bank, will meet with Kansas City Fed President Esther George... Currently 11 of the 12 regional Fed presidents are white, 10 are male, and none are black or Latino. At the Board level, the highest echelons of the Fed, Yellen is the first woman chair in the central bank's 103-year history." Minneapolis Fed chief Neel Kashkari says racial economic gap needs forceful response - "A U.S. central banker on Wednesday pledged to devote more resources to addressing economic disparities between black and white Americans, saying the high rate of unemployment among African Americans is 'really troubling'... Kashkari, a former Republican candidate for California governor, is the son of Indian immigrants and the only one of 17 Fed policy-makers nationwide who is not white." The Movement For Black Lives Gets Behind A Universal Basic Income - "No other social or economic policy solution today would be of sufficient scale to eradicate the profound and systematic economic inequities affecting black communities." Rewrite the Racial Rules: Building an Inclusive American Economy - "In order to understand racial and economic inequality among black Americans, we must acknowledge the racial rules that undergird our economy and society. Those rules—laws, policies, institutions, regulations, and normative practices—are the driving force behind the patently unequal life chances and opportunities for too many individuals. In this report, Andrea Flynn, Dorian Warren, Felicia Wong, and Susan Holmberg examine the racial rules across six different dimensions: income, wealth, education, criminal justice, health, and democratic participation. Ultimately, we show why the rules structuring our economy matter for the well-being of black Americans. And, against the backdrop of stark racial economic inequality dating back centuries, we make the case for pushing past both explicit and implicit exclusions, as well as ostensible race-neutrality."

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posted 2 days ago on metafilter
I've scoured the interwebs but can't find this info - who were the comedians who opened for Louis CK this night?

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