posted about 21 hours ago on metafilter
"The difficult ... you're supposed to do right away. The impossible ... that'll take you a few days longer." Building your own town out near Tuscon, Arizona probably falls in the category of "the impossible," but Ed Keeylocko did that, a pickup truck of materials at a time. This is the story of Cowtown Keeylocko, built by an African-American with red hair and swamp green eyes, who was abandoned by his mother, a self-proclaimed minority of minorities. He served in Korea and Vietnam, and he returned to the US, where he took up ranching in Arizona. In December of 1974, he founded Cowtown Keeylocko, a western ranch that is "an odd mixture of the real and the fanciful." The ranch/town expanded by 1989 to have a mayor, citizens, its own zip code, fourty-six head of cattle, three ranch hands, 10,800 acres of land, and five buildings (Google books preview). The March/April 1996 issue of American Cowboy has a short article on Ed Keeylocko and his cowtown, and here's a more recent (but still dated) website on the mayor and trail boss of Cowtown Keeylocko, with stories from visitors and photos from a roundup.

Read More...
posted about 22 hours ago on metafilter
You are a bear. You wake up in a dimly lit cave. Your eyes are adjusted to the low light, so you are able to see the textures of your surroundings. You are about to begin a new day as a bear. There will be many obstacles, mental and physical, for you to overcome. You might find something important. You might meet someone important. You might get hurt. You might eat something. It is up to you. As a bear. (If you get stuck, perhaps you could ask A Bear for some Bear Advice.)

Read More...
posted about 23 hours ago on metafilter
I quit law school (a very prestigious, top five school) four years ago and have been working in education ever since (first as an aide for Autistic children, then as a substitute teacher for two years). In this time, my student loans have been accruing interest and keeping me up at night. I can qualify for loan forgiveness programs as long as I work for a non-profit or a school. Unfortunately, the work I was doing for the past four years did not count because I worked for private companies that contracted out to schools. For many reasons,(see below) I would now like to break into grant writing. I have written three successful grant proposals in my career (one for an educational outreach program in college, one for a Fulbright Grant, and one for an international NGO). I am currently strengthening my grant writing skills by taking webinars and utilizing other free online resources. How can I present myself as a viable candidate for these grant writing jobs? And how do I explain the many changes of direction on my resume and the long winding road I took to get here?More about my situation: I am open to any type of job as long as it is for a non-profit or a school. The main thing is that I want to have a full time job as soon as possible so I can start paying down my loans. I initially thought I should become a teacher, but that path seems less appealing now since the market for teaching jobs does not look well, and I'd have to double down on more tuition and time to get a teaching credential. I am confident in my general writing skills (we did a lot of technical and legal writing in law school, as well as the grant proposals I mentioned above) but will definitely use any suggestions on how to specifically beef up my grant writing skills. Quitting law school was a very emotional experience for me, I burned out and started questioning all my life goals. I fell into depression and was only able to take part time work during the past four years. At my lowest, I felt l like I was only operating at about 50%, but I have been steadily gaining confidence in the past two years and now feel ready to go 100% once again. Suggestions for any other types of jobs would also be appreciated. As long as it is 1) full time, 2) considered non-profit work, and 3) ideally able to start right away. Thanks for your help! I'm also happy to answer more questions about my experience or what I'm looking for.

Read More...
posted about 24 hours ago on metafilter
I need tips on ridding myself of new-relationship anxiety, releasing the need to control and the need to know where it's going, and allowing the relationship to unfold naturally.I'm in my early 30's an currently in the fledgling stages of a new relationship. Every time I find myself dating someone new who I actually like and want to continue seeing, as I am now, I find myself experiencing the same emotions and behaving the same way. For those of you familiar with attachment theory, I'm anxious-preoccupied. I also have major abandonment fears. So, how this manifests is that I become incredibly anxious. I feel the need to figure out where it's going, what his intentions are, what his feelings are for me... and I want the answers RIGHT NOW. I make contact more than is probably a good idea to prompt them to remember I exist, or to nudge them about tentative plans. (Pathetic.) I check my phone/FB/email constantly. I wonder/worry/obsess about whether I'll ever even hear from him again. I get all anxious about whether he's seeing other women or interested in other women, even when it's at a time when objectively everyone else would think he should still be keeping his options open (i.e., the very beginning), and give myself mental deadlines of when I should expect to hear from him next and what the consequences will be if I don't ("If I don't hear from him in X days after I last contacted him about our tentative plans for the weekend, that means he's absolutely no longer interested and I will nix him as an option, even if he reaches out at a later date"). It's as though I expect an insta-relationship, despite objectively knowing that it takes time for a relationship to develop, and when he doesn't behave as I want/expect him to, I'm hurt/disappointed. I keep this to myself, but on the inside, I'm torturing myself. It makes dating guys who I actually like a horrible experience, rather than a fun one. This happens for me whether it's been one date, or three months - the anxiety remains constant. I don't know if the guy actually picks up on my behavior or my feelings, or if my energy travels through the universe and he picks up on it an intuitively knows that I'm obsessing, but I sense my "need to know now!" is the cause of many of my relationships not quite taking off. Strangely enough, when it doesn't work out, I bounce right back. I'm not heartbroken or sitting around pining or anything. I've had many people tell me that I live in a world of black and white, and I need to learn to embrace the grey, the "land of maybe," that I need to allow relationships to unfold naturally, to not mentally cut someone off when they fail to meet my expectations on a rigid timeline. I find this very difficult, if not impossible. This is what I need help with. I have no patience. So, my request of all of you is: What can I tell myself, what mindset can I aspire to have, what changes to my thinking do you recommend? Keep in mind that I have a very full, awesome life - I am very social, enjoy activities/hobbies. So the whole, "Keep yourself busy! Fill your life up!" type responses won't help. I've already got that down. :/

Read More...
posted about 24 hours ago on metafilter
Disney Junior's Doc McStuffins is an animated children's show about 6-year-old Dottie McStuffins, who wants to be a doctor like her mother, and pretends to be a doctor to her toys. Doc McStuffins has done well as a TV show, but it's as a doll that Doc's success has been stratospheric, with over $500 million in sales last year. "'When little white girls embrace Doc McStuffins, for them Doc McStuffins is a girl, and Doc McStuffins is powerful,' Dr. [Margaret Beale] Spencer said. 'For a little black girl, it may be all of those things, but also that she's black.'"

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Women are more likely to be lied to at the negotiation table Women are more likely to be lied to at the negotiation table, according to a recent study led by UC Berkeley researchers at the Haas School of Business. The study, published online July 14, determined that women are more likely to be lied to than men from a series of face-to-face negotiations among about 300 MBA students at Haas.…The cultural stereotype is that women are "too nice" to accuse someone of lying, but the study found that whether or not women were lied to was rooted in how their competence was perceived by their negotiating partner, [lead researcher] Kray said. This Slate article discusses the study, which is behind a paywall on ScienceDirect.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I am in the market for a slow cooker, which one to buy?I am looking to buy a slow cooker and looking for recommendations. My biggest ask is-are there slow cookers that the ability to cook more than one dish at a time (dividers?) I use a pressure cooker and in that I layer two items at once with the help of metal dividers (rice/lentil etc.) Is this possible in a slow cooker, please recommend any if you have seen/have one. Other asks if possible- A good fitting lid Different heat options (high/low etc.) Programmable if possible Budget is around $100 Also, in my search I came across a Fagor electric multi cooker, has anyone used it?

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My spouse's mother, a senior citizen, just learned this year that she has heart failure. She survived multiple heart surgeries recently, a harrowing process during which she said she never wants to go through that again. Great! We assumed this meant that she was seeing this as a wakeup call to change her eating/exercise habits and stress levels so that she could get healthier. Several weeks later, it turns out that she is going back to all the old habits that helped contribute to heart disease in the first place. Is there any hope for her changing her deeply-ingrained habits? If so, what can my spouse do from afar to help support mom? If there isn't any hope for her adjusting her lifestyle, then how can we learn to accept her choices and still give her the support she needs?We live far away from her, and my spouse has spent much time visiting, patiently trying to help her choose healthier foods, and cooking at home. MIL who lives alone, won't cook for herself, and has also rejected the idea of hiring a personal chef, or eating prepackaged meals. She prefers to continue eating at the same restaurants, and will order foods that are not considered heart-healthy at all, or very unbalanced in favor of sugar/salt. While she is certainly stubborn, she is also quite possibly confused because she has received many conflicting opinions on how to eat healthier, both from her doctors, and from society in general. The good news is that she was never a smoker, and only drinks rarely. Specifically, I'm looking for A) examples of people who had major "wakeup calls" and drastically changed their habits at an advanced age. What is required from an emotional perspective to be able to reverse such deeply ingrained habits? And B) How can we better accept a person's choice to refuse to change their unhealthy habits?

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
The Great War helped create the influenza pandemic of 1918, which eventually brought an early end to the Great War. "I had a little bird, Its name was Enza.  I opened the window, And in-flu-enza. ~ Children's Skipping Rhyme, 1918"

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm thinking of taking a bread maker as a gift for a family that I'll be visiting in Mumbai, India. What potential problems might I be overlooking?I'm thinking of taking a bread maker as a gift for a family that I'll be visiting in Mumbai, India. Can anyone tell me how hard it will be to get ingredients locally? The specific ingredients that I am most concerned about are: bread flour, dry milk, dry yeast. I know 220V power will be an issue as well so I plan to either include an adapter with the bread maker or, if possible, buy one that works with 220V and has the right kind of plug. If I go with the 220V bread maker I could buy it in Mumbai but I don't know if these things are even sold there. Thank you for any feedback on either of these concerns.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
In case of cute emergency, here is a three-banded armadillo named Rollie playing with his favorite toy.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
How do the elderly process loss?I'm right now facing up to the imminent death of a parent. My grandmother is facing the death of a child. This is the first time I'm experiencing such grief and a large part of it is because my parent is dying young with hopes and potential unfulfilled. This experience is making me wonder what the elderly go through when they lose someone in their own age group. Does grief at loss have the same sharp edge if you lose a 94 year old sister as when you lose one in her thirties? More generally, does it become easier with multiple bereavements? Will it be easier for my grandmother to deal with losing a child at this age given that she's already lost parents, one of her siblings and a spouse? Personal experiences are welcome as are suggestions of reading material.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Your 2000th snowflakey question on the how to be an emotionally healthy single person. How can I live for myself and grow my social networks instead of seeking validation from my abstract idea of a desirable partner? Navel-gazing after the jump.I'm female, in my 20s, bisexual, and recently realized that my relationship boundaries are not where they should be. I grew up culturally and gender non-conforming, rebellious, and naively hopeful that I would grow up to be an Independent Enlightened Woman and yet I find myself living for (imaginary) male attention. I don't know what part of it is just the human condition, and what part of it is gendered programming that I need to deprogram. The Mythical Senpai But, this imaginary male attention isn't male attention in general. I'm talking about this mythical desirable partner my subconscious has pieced together from all the people I found attractive in the past. He's like a mythical senpai that I constantly live in the shadow of, despite the fact that I am an adult with bigger concerns that I should be dealing with, and the fact that he isn't a real person. My automatic negative self-talk mostly take the form of "Why are you doing this/What are you doing/Why aren't you better, senpai won't be impressed and you'll never find someone awesome and compatible with you, ever." I find that really weird especially since I mostly fail at female performance anyway. I'm not genderqueer (I firmly identify as female), and I occasionally like to wear cute tops, but I don't go out of my way to look attractive. When a past partner said "I like long hair," my first instinct was to chop it off and rock a pixie (and I did and he continued to find me attractive). So my inner critic doesn't criticize my beauty/fashion regimen, but it does criticize bigger things--like my health, physical desirability (in terms of athleticism), career, choice of hobbies, ambition, my place of stay, the things I take pleasure in, etc. It makes me second-guess everything and it's such a drag. I *know* that if my mythical senpai disliked all these things about me, we wouldn't be compatible anyway, so why bother trying to impress him? Why bother trying to impress anyone other than myself at all, especially since I am not a people-pleaser? Despite this level of self-awareness, my inner critic still pops in with more comments of "senpai wouldn't be impressed!" and I'd take it seriously on an emotional level and feel like such a failure. It's hard for me to counter the negative self-talk in the moment, so instead I just use my powers of too much imagination and conjure up Frida Kahlo, and wonder what she'd say if she were with me on a smoke break. I imagine her saying that X element in my life is intriguing and a source of wonder, and I should keep at it and fuck what senpai thinks. That keeps the inner critic at bay, but eventually the negative self-talk will start up again with the "senpai wouldn't be impressed!" framing. Actual Relationship and Validation-Seeking History When I was a teenager, I was the female equivalent of the nice guy. I crushed hard on older male friends and spent a lot of time around them (which explains why I use the "senpai" metaphor). Since I crushed hard on geeks, I spent many hours of my life listening to them ramble on about subjects I didn't care much about, or listen to them mansplain our shared fandom and interests. I innocently thought all the time spent would turn things into something more romantic, and when I expressed my interest, I was continually rejected. I've continued to always do the approaching. I'm in my mid 20s and I think that only one guy has ever bought me a drink, ever. I've come to accept that people generally won't approach me because I am not conventionally attractive and I am a weird mix of political views, geeky interests, and ethnic/cultural backgrounds. I'm okay with doing the approaching, and the internal locus of control is nice. But then I wonder how that can cross into validation-seeking behaviour in the present. But when I click with someone, it feels like worlds colliding and the momentum is intense. I had never felt the need to slow down a relationship because the connection is so intoxicating, and it's such a relief to be desired and understood. But once the honeymoon period ends and the actual relationship starts, I find myself acting as the parent in the relationship, trying to "train" the other one to be more responsible, and to take the risks in life I want to take but am too anxious to pursue. Eventually I learned that this is a terrible relationship dynamic and I should stop living vicariously through my partner because it just ends in frustration for everyone. I spend probably a little over six months single between relationships. I've never had a period where I was intentionally single. I also haven't dated around or kept things light much, because attraction and compatibility seems to work like a binary switch for me. There's not a lot of people I find attractive, but when I find someone, I get very one-track minded. I back off when they don't express interest, but it seems like I just fantasize about mythical senpai until I find the next actual attractive person. But as I reflect on my romantic choices thus far, I wonder where I'd be if I didn't spend so much of my 20s so focused on relationships and trying to get other people's shit together. I want to channel my energy into my own personal development, and create my own definitions of success and attractiveness and so on. I want to see myself as successful and attractive without demonstrating validation-seeking behaviours, if that makes sense. I want to grow my friendships and networks, all these things that don't go away when a relationship ends. I don't want my personal life to be defined by relationship of the year anymore. At least I am not dependent on a particular person for a relationship (I read Baggage Reclaim and I'm good with breaking things off and No Contact), but I am still dependent and defined by relationships in general, and I really would like to find something else to orient myself towards. I want the inner voice challenges me to appeal to the better parts of my humanity, rather than to an arbitrary attractiveness scale to please some imagined male attention. I've been single for the past two weeks, and before that three month relationship, I was single for 10 months. The last breakup was a brand new pattern to me, because my past self would have spent at least a year trying to fix things instead of facing the deal breakers. But despite the fact that my ex and I are still attracted to each other and my ex was interested in fixing things, I decided to end it because it easily could've been a time-suck and yet another distraction from getting the rest of my life together. What To Do? I'm contemplating doing the intentionally single thing. But what if "the one" shows up then and I lose him/her because I didn't pursue him/her? Should I still be open to a relationship, just not actively seeking? Or should I just clamp down on any desires and urges for that kind of companionship, and pretend I'm a monk with vows of celibacy for a while? I disabled my OKC account and it feels wonderful to no longer browse around and wonder what attractive people think about my profile. It's such a relief to no longer have that channel of checking out cute people, then feeling all defeatist and self-conscious that they're nowhere near me and I'm not good enough for them. And online dating is the worst because people are always very attractive when the interactions are just through short messages. In real life, I'm not attracted to people who don't share an intense emotional and conversational rapport with me, so it's a non-issue. And how much is my frenemy senpai internal criticism related to my relationship history? Is it just a red herring and not related at all? I don't know, what do other people's internal self-talk sound like? Is the senpai thing weird but part of human nature, or does senpai need to get evicted from my brain? And why is my mythical senpai a dude? Why am I attracted to women, but less interested in impressing them? Is seeking male validation that strongly programmed in me, or is it just that I have more relationship history with dudes? I have been treated for anxiety and depression in the past, although I am not seeing a therapist at the moment. I would like to hear your thoughts or be recommended books and blogs to read. I really want to spend the rest of my 20s (and life) putting more energy into other aspects of my life, and have non-relationship-oriented internal self-talk. I want to evict senpai. Thanks! Throwaway email: askmefievitsenpai@gmail.com (yes, evit is missing a c)

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Cockblocked by Redistribution: A Pick-up Artist in Denmark Unlike in America, where bestsellers goad already overworked and underpaid women to Lean In even further, the assumption in Denmark is that feminism is a collective goal, not an individual pursuit. Danish women are less likely to be financially dependent on men and therefore feel less pressure to "settle" or change their behavior by, in Roosh's words, "adopting a pleasing figure or style that's more likely to attract men." [...] Roosh comes to the conclusion that women who aren't as dependent on men for financial support are not susceptible to the narcissistic salesmanship that constitutes phase one: "attraction." That's why Roosh fails to advance to the second level—"trust"—without being creepy. Thus "seduction" is almost always out of the question... In her essay "A Marxist Theory of Women's Nature," philosopher Nancy Holmstrom argues that women's lives are less free than men's under capitalism "both because they are dependent on men and because they have children dependent on them." Therefore, "traditional sexual values constrain women more than they do men," and women "are less able to act to realize their own desires" and must be "more passive and oriented to other people's wishes than men." But in societies with a less marked sexual division of labor, those sexualized generalizations dissipate. Marginalized women who need male spouses to flourish might, indeed, find pick-up artists alluring. But women in countries that have gender-equalizing policies supported by an anti-individualist culture may not.American Prospect: How the Left Sees Liberty The problem with libertarian and right-wing notions of liberty is not just that they implode; it's that there is a more plausible notion of liberty offered up by progressives that is only achievable through leftist political economy. [...] When individuals have their economic well-being secured, they do not have to put up with mistreatment from those whose private economic support their life might otherwise depend on. Freed from the specter of want, women do not have to tolerate abusive would-be spouses, workers do not have to tolerate abusive bosses, and people of color do not have to tolerate racial subjugation. When protected against the possibility of economic retaliation, people can speak more freely, associate more freely, and practice their faith more freely. In short, having their livelihoods publicly secured gives people much more genuine liberty to do what they'd like. And that's what really seems to matter when we talk about liberty, not some property rights formalism. Washington Monthly: Social democracy offers many outstanding benefits. Shutting down sexist, predatory jerks is one of them Deeply unequal societies like ours are also breeding grounds for a host of simmering resentments, petty tyrannies and everyday sadism. You see these in abundance with the PUAs. They are full of rage because they believe they have been denied the effortless access to the hot chicks to which they are inherently entitled. This rage is misogynist in nature, but it also contains more than a hint of a class element. The PUAs frequently express fury that the women they are attracted to are supposedly only interested in rich guys (see: their crackpot theories about hypergamy). But rather than doing something politically constructive with these resentments — like advocating for social democracy! — they end up taking out their rage on the women who are even more powerless than they are. That's depressing, for sure. Even more disturbing is the larger media and internet culture of rancid misogyny in which these guys operate. But Baker's intriguing article gives me hope that there is a way out of this mess. Stephanie Coontz in the NYT: Why Gender Equality Stalled (previously) When family and work obligations collide, mothers remain much more likely than fathers to cut back or drop out of work. But unlike the situation in the 1960s, this is not because most people believe this is the preferable order of things. Rather, it is often a reasonable response to the fact that our political and economic institutions lag way behind our personal ideals... This is where the political gets really personal. When people are forced to behave in ways that contradict their ideals, they often undergo what sociologists call a "values stretch" — watering down their original expectations and goals to accommodate the things they have to do to get by. This behavior is especially likely if holding on to the original values would exacerbate tensions in the relationships they depend on. When you can't change what's bothering you, one typical response is to convince yourself that it doesn't actually bother you. So couples often create a family myth about why they made these choices, why it has turned out for the best, and why they are still equal in their hearts even if they are not sharing the kind of life they first envisioned. Under present conditions, the intense consciousness raising about the "rightness" of personal choices that worked so well in the early days of the women's movement will end up escalating the divisive finger-pointing that stands in the way of political reform. Our goal should be to develop work-life policies that enable people to put their gender values into practice. *Girls' Globe: Feminism and Motherhood in the Nordic Countries *Think Progress: U.S. Ranks 23rd For Women's Equality, Falling Behind Nicaragua, Cuba, and Burundi New Statesman: The sexist pseudoscience of pick-up artists: the dangers of "alpha male" thinking "At its root is the idea that the hunter-gatherer societies that existed before the Agricultural Revolution reflect our primitive, and undeniable, nature. That the mating rituals of 200,000 years ago are still there, in our bones... In contrast, we can be reasonably sure that prehistoric human societies were non-hierarchical, egalitarian and cooperative, as are the majority of today's hunter-gatherer societies that have survived, and that human nature still tends towards these instincts." Buzzfeed: Study: Pickup Artist Training Works, But Makes You Feel Bad About Yourself "As their dating skills improved, Baranowski's participants apparently felt a certain amount of guilt — they perceived themselves as less moral, in some ways, than they had when they started. This guilt appears common in pickup artist circles, so much so that various bloggers have posted strategies for combating it." Religion Dispatches: Conservative Christianity's "Come to Jesus" Moment in Wake of Elliot Rodger Shootings "Many commentators have discussed the "pick up artist" (PUA) culture in which Rodger's ideology is based, but broader cultural forces shape the exaggerated ideas of gender roles that are the foundation of Rodger's misguided notions of masculinity and entitlement—including most conservative Christian constructions of strict gender roles. Though they approach beliefs about masculinity from different perspectives, both PUA and contemporary portrayals of conservative Christian masculinity share some similar points. Rodger himself was not directly influenced by conservative Christianity, and I do not mean to imply he was. Rather, what I want to suggest through these comparisons is a larger cultural framework that shapes American notions of masculinity and sexuality." Katie Baker, again in Dissent Magazine - Risk, Rated X: Geopolitics and the Pickup Game "Sexism affects the perception and practice of geopolitics beyond rants on a pathetic sub-forum. While Roosh and his minions may take a more radical (and ridiculous) stance, their comments are parroted by some of the most powerful politicians and commentators in the country. Media Matters recently compiled a stunning array of quotes from U.S. conservatives who feel Obama can't measure up to Putin in terms of virility. After all, what's manlier than unilateralism—along with domestic policies that stifle gays, women, and dissenters?" *front-page link previously in MeFi comments: Rosie M. Banks & RogerB

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
How can my friend increase her earnings in the alternative health field?I have a friend in the northeast US who is in the alternative health field. She's currently living paycheck to paycheck and wants to increase her earning potential. Her main interests are in yoga, meditation/mindfulness, herbalism, daily ritual, music, and wilderness therapy. The Transpersonal Psychology MA at Naropa University seems tailor fit for what she wants to do, but she's wondering if there are better options for her. Should she instead pursue a degree in social work or clinical psychology? The thought doesn't thrill her and she doesn't want to go into debt, which she would have to, were she to pursue more formal education. Should she be pursuing more training, i.e. yoga teacher training, meditation teacher, certified community herbalist, wellness coach, instead? How can she increase her earnings in the alternative health field? Any suggestions for her are appreciated.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Are you combing Netflix trying to find all the TV shows you missed the first time around? Or maybe you just want to take a nostalgia trip and revist all of the great television that is gone but not forgotten? So much good TV! Problem is, it's not like you can stand at the office watercooler chatting about that awesome episode you saw last night...especially if it first aired in 1994. So what do you do when you want to really mull over an episode you just watched? You listen to some great podcasts with fans discussing in depth your favorite shows, that's what. Angel - The Angel Rewatch Battlestar Galactica - The Resurrection Cast a Battlestar Galactica Intro Podcast Breaking Bad - Breaking Good - Breaking Bad Podcast Buffy the Vampire Slayer - Art of Slaying: A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Retrospective Dexter - Dissecting Dexter Friday Night Ligths - The Friday Night Lights Podcast Lost - LOST Rewatch Seinfeld - Seinfeld Challenge Podcast Star Trek - Star Trek: The Rewatch The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson - The Carson Podcast Twin Peaks - The Twin Peaks Podcast Veronica Mars - The MARS Effect The X-Files - Kumail Nanjiani's The X-Files Files - X-Files Truth What are some good ones I missed?

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
For example, should the phrase be "I care naught for him" or "I care not for him"? I see the argument for the former (i.e. "I care nothing for him") and the latter ("I don't care for him"), but is one better than the other? Are they interchangeable, or significantly different?

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I remember reading a fairly substantial and data-driven article that was published after 2000 in a major publication (economist, new yorker, etc) that discussed the overall improvement in the state of the world since the early 20th century.It discussed changes in poverty, disease, mortality and other metrics as indicators of the overall positive and (importantly) incremental changes that have defined the last century. I was having a fairly heated discussion regarding a current world conflict and wanted to point to it for reference. While gapminder does a wonderful job of displaying the data, the article had very well-thought out reasoning to explain the data. It had the tone of being written by an economist or jurist. My googlefu has failed me so I turn to you.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm looking for a place to move to in London that is similar to Walthamstow and Leytonstone, but isn't either one. Can you suggest such a place?If you've spent significant time in either place, you probably already know what I mean. I'm looking for a place with a reasonably lively high-street or shopping area, quiet side streets, at least one big supermarket, some green or park-like areas, some trees, and 1 or more pubs with lots of character. When it comes to the latter, Walthamstow has several with gastro-pub food, quiz nights, occasional folk/jazz/bluegrass night or comedy/theatre upstairs and Leytonstone has one such place and a decent 'spoons. So no boring suburbia, no purpose-built sprawl with gang violence. And I would like to live somewhere on the Northern or Victoria line, preferably an hour or less from Euston. Leytonstone would be ideal, if it weren't on the central line (hot, crowded, need to change). Seven Sisters is an option, but one I'd like to postpone for now. Is there an area like this further up the Northern line? Will consider south of the river.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Where can I find large and sturdy corrugated shipping boxes in the Boston area?I need some large shipping boxes – something like this would be ideal – that I can pick up in the Boston-Cambridge area. I've considered ordering the linked boxes from Uline, but the smallest number they'll sell is five (I only need two or three), and then there's another $100 or so for freight shipping (since they're too large to ship by UPS). $200 for some shipping boxes seems like a bit much. None of the boxes available from places like U-Haul or the UPS Store seem to be the size we need. Since the linked boxes seem to be a standard size (air cargo E containers), I would expect them to be available somewhere in the Boston area, but the googles have not been helpful. I know this is a bit specific, but there must be somewhere around here to buy boxes of this sort. Does anyone have any leads?

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Many types of quilt blocks can be built by stitching together simple geometric shapes. Then there's paper (sometimes called foundation) piecing. Paper piecing is an old technique (wikipedia suggests very old) that's been steadily developing over the past few decades along with the modern quilting movement. It was originally developed as a way to improve precision and speed for traditional blocks, but paper piecing also allows for tiny, intricate scraps of fabric, precise intersections, and acute angles by sewing against a fixed background (either permanent muslin fabirc or temporary paper) rather than pre-cutting and sewing triangle A to triangle B. The general technique involves working outward from a starting patch, and is somewhat easier than it sounds. Once you have the technique down you can get much more complex than that, whether you favor traditional, modern, or really modern styles. For a peek behind the masterpieces, here's Statler and Statler.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Let's say I would like to organize 6 friends to go see a baseball game. There's one problem: ticket purchases have to be done at the same time to ensure that people sit together. How is this circle squared?Ideally, all members of the group would arrive outside of the game, and the ticket purchase would be done at once minutes before first pitch. This ensures that tickets are bought after it is certain that people will not get stuck at work late, since that is usually not known until very late in the day due to late-breaking news. However, not everyone gets off of work at the same time, the group cannot wait for everyone to arrive at the same time because this would cause an unknown number of innings to be missed. Alternately, one person assumes all risk and forecasts how many tickets are needed and attempts to buy at the last possible moment, emailing people tickets before heading out the door. (I have learned the hard way not to book the day before.) Because it is rude to overbook, that person must forecast precisely with no margin of error. This is usually me, and there is usually a margin of error. In your experience, what is the best way of solving this problem so that no tickets are bought that go unused, and that those that arrive before first pitch are able to see the game? (The alternate solution, which is to just go by my damn self with a scorecard and a half-smoke, is perfectly amenable to me but it might be better for my health if I went with friends once in a while.)

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Who knew structural engineering could be so sweet? Justina Yang is the "paper engineer" behind Fiber Lab, a design studio located in her sunroom. She creates paper art, décor, bracelets, bowties, and lamp shades. In her short videos, she demonstrates how to make your very own dodecahedron; a whimsical carousel that produces beautiful waves and teaches you about wave interference; a mesmerizing interactive kinetic wave sculpture; a string art geometric love story; and a delicious-looking paper croissant.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
After a year and a half of trusty service, my Mirena IUD seems to have been sucked into unknown parts of my uterus, taking its strings with it and leaving me with dull cramps 24/7. Has this happened to you or anyone you know?I went to my OB/GYN this morning, and they saw a glimpse of the strings but couldn't grab them to take the IUD out. Now I have to wait until next Tuesday to be seen for an ultrasound to figure out if it's embedded/crushed/twisted in my uterus or elsewhere. Then who knows what will happen. Googling results in a million horror stories, so I thought I'd ask here, as this is a pretty pro-Mirena group of ladies. If it did happen to you, what was the process to get your IUD removed? How long did it take from initial doctor appointment to resolution? The longer I have these cramps and insane abdominal bloating (I look 5 months pregnant), the more anxiety I have about this piece of metal jabbing through my uterus and escaping to the great beyond. Please talk me down, Mefites! I had no other Mirena side effects until now.

Read More...
posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Does anyone have any suggestions for a flashcard app for iPad for practicing *writing* kanji? Or any recommendations for Japanese review sites for iOS apps?My situation is a bit unusual: I'm a fluent Japanese listener, speaker, and reader, but because of computers, I haven't actually *written* kanji out by hand in over a decade. So while I can read stuff like 「攪拌機で均等に掻き混ぜる」, I get stuck writing the most simple, basic kanji. I'm therefore looking for an app, preferably a flashcard app with spaced repetition or the like, that I can use to go back and practice kanji, from the true basics through the whole set of 常用 kanji. I would imagine that these would be largely be apps aimed at Japanese folks, for passing the kanji kentei or the like, so Metafilter is not the best place to ask, which leads to the second question: I'm new to iOS (in fact, I'm not even getting the iPad until tomorrow), so I have no idea which review sites are decent and which are paid shill crap. This is especially true for the Japanese iOS market, because Japanese review sites are, on the whole, paid shill crap. So even if you don't have any kanji writing flashcard app recommendations, can anyone recommend any Japanese iOS app review sites whose reviews are even worth looking at?

Read More...