posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story teamed with Globe Telecom's #CreateCourage campaign in the Philippines. [SLYT 2:02]

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
What can you tell me about this watch? Wondering about age, quality, rarity, durability, value, anything you happen to know. Thanks!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Craigslist has been (too) good to me, and I find myself in need of some kind of workbench to hold various tools. Please help me think about my construction requirements.I use my workshop for mostly metalwork to craft jewelry and small sculptures. I have a jeweler's bench, a decent torch work setup, and OK homes for an anvil and bench grinder. But I find myself without the bench space to work with a bunch of tools that I currently have and those that I hope to obtain in the future. Specifically, I'm looking for a "home" for a bench vise, belt sander, tabletop hydraulic press (example of the style I'm looking at), and a shear (throatless and/or a 3-in-one slip-shear-break). And I keep watching videos involving people doing things with bandsaws and metal lathes (again, baby sized) so those will likely happen some day too. Maybe a chop saw? I know that some things will need "permanent" table space (vise, press), other things I'm fine moving from a shelf to the table top as needed. I have about 8 horizontal feet to work with. No need for drawer storage, but a nice big shelf underneath would be nice (i have pegboard/french cleats for days in that room -- storage of small things isn't an issue). I want to use the bench-top for layout, so a nice contiguous open area is desirable. Between Mr. Motion and I, we have the skills and tools to do some reasonably complex welding and fairly simple carpentry, so DIY is the plan (barring a lucky Craigslist find). This is not the kind of "making" that I have any passion for at all, so I would like this to be as cheap and easy as possible while still ending up with something safe and sufficiently sturdy to last, say, 8 years. So, given the parameters above, here are my questions: What kinds of benches should I be looking at? Will just following a plan like this (welded steel square bar with MDF top and shelf) lead me astray in any way? Given that I won't be burning (much) on the table, is there any benefit to a metal top? Any reason why I'd want to go all wood? Any annoying mistakes that you've made that you'd like to warn me about? Any amazing plans I just have to see?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Spend an entire day riding trains and trams all over Tokyo.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Howdy good people! I've been tasked with adding ideas to a film and speaker series surrounding the local foods movement. So, I'm looking for recommendations for films to show to the locavores Please offer me some suggestions of your picks of this type of movie that has been released since 2014.I'm thinking of movies along the lines of Food, Inc. (2008) or King Corn (2007) (both excellent flicks if you haven't seen them), but the catch here is that I'm only looking for the freshest of films so that most people haven't had the chance to see them before at an independent theater or online. I'm also open to suggestions of other forums where this kind of film may be discussed or where upcoming releases of this nature might be announced. Thanks!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
In 1854, a French anatomist named Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire established La Societé Zoologique d'Acclimatation, the first acclimatization society, headquartered in the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, where he held a senior position. By 1860, the society had over 2,500 members, including diplomats, scientists, foreign heads of state, and military men. In another forty years, there were over fifty societies around the world, swapping species everywhere from Algiers to Tasmania. Some transplants died quickly, while others thrived, with European rabbits multiplying like, well, rabbits in Australia, European starlings taking down planes and ruining crops in the United States, while the English now battle American grey squirrels (previously). [via Presurfer] Saint-Hilaire showed an aptitude for mathematics, but was interested in natural history and of medicine, following in his father's footsteps. In fact, Isidore first taught courses in 1829, lecturing on ornithology in his father's place, then in 1837 appointed to act as deputy for his father at the faculty of sciences with the French Academy of Sciences in Paris, and professor of the museum on the retirement of his father in 1841. But he didn't live in his father's shadow. He was an authority on deviation from normal structure. In 1854 he coined the term éthologie (ethology) for the study of animal behaviour, and is credited with introducing the term teratologie (teratology) for the study of abnormalities of physiological development, and published Histoire générale et particulière des anomalies de l'organisation chez l'homme et les animaux (General and particular history of anomalies of organization in man and animals), which was in Charles Darwin's extensive library (Biodiversity Library with notes [previously, twice]; Internet Archive without notes), along with a number of his other publications. He also had big ideas about the role of animals in the destiny of humankind (Google books preview), namely that intelligent animals would realize that it was in their best interest to become subservient to the will of people, and in doing so, they would be present to see people make the world a better place. Enter La Societé Zoologique d'Acclimatation, The Zoological Society of Acclimatization. Within a few years of starting their society, they had opened a side branch in French Algeria, as well as the "Jardin d'Acclimatation," a zoo in Paris filled with all the animals that might soon roam France—Algerian sheep, Angora goats, yaks, elephants, and hippos. (It held other exhibits over the years, including a "human zoo", but is now a children's theme park.) Not all members of such societies shared Saint-Hilaire's views on a shared destiny. An exceedingly eccentric friend of Darwin, Francis Trevelyan Buckland, thought non-native animals could feed the booming population in England during the industrial revolution, but all they got were some exotic animals on the lawns of rich men, and American squirrels everywhere. In other cases, animals from their native lands were a comforting sight. When complaining that the swans were black, the eagles white... some mammals had pockets, others laid eggs... and even the blackberries were red (Gbp), you might think that the introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting (PDF) to Australia, as Thomas Austin thought in 1859,and he wasn't the first, but he still gets credit for the persisting plague of rabbits in Australia. Though the title "Acclimatization Society" has faded from view, they haven't gone the way of exotic animals in the zoos during the Siege of Paris in 1870 (Gbp). In New Zealand, over the course of a hundred years, acclimatisation societies themselves evolved from introducing foreign animals to the island nation to managing and conserving native and naturalized populations and habitats, while the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales learned much more quickly, moving from importing and releasing foreign animals to establishing and caring for zoological gardens. Similarly, the Central Acclimatisation Society of NSW retains its name to this day, but changed its actions to stocking introduced and native fish to support the region for recreation and its economy. To put this all in perspective, people have been impacting the world by introducing animals and plants to new habitats for a very, very long time. Just as 1492 was not a/the crucial turning point in food history, Acclimatization Societies weren't the first groups to drastically change local landscapes with new pests, and they definitely weren't the last. For an ever incomplete compilation, see Wikipedia's list of introduced species.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm making myself a new winter coat out of dark brown cashmere suiting. The fabric has a nappy side (left swatch) and a smooth side (right swatch) and I'm not *quite* sure which is the right side of the fabric.Ordinarily the smoother side would be the right side, the selvage seems to indicate that the smooth side is the right side, and the store owner who sold it to me folded it smooth side in (fabric is usually folded right side in when sold off a bolt by those who know fabric), so I'm pretty sure the smooth side is the right side, but this is the first time I've ever worked with woven cashmere, this project is an expensive and time-consuming one, and it's my first new winter coat in ten years, so I want to be absolutely sure I'm working with the right side. What say you, sewers of Metafilter?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
...is the Seattleites who drive in it. With the news that an actual measurable amount of snow fell in the Pacific Northwest, The Stranger is here with a few short films of low speed local failures to navigate a light dusting of the white stuff.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Ariadne, Jacqueline, North, and others unnamed are all part of the same system. They share a single body. They take turns "fronting" the body, controlling it. And when they're not fronting, the system members are free to roam an infinite landscape, a pocket reality that they call the "in-world". "Redwoods of the In-World" is an episode of the Here Be Monsters podcast recorded after the system got in touch with producers Jeff Emtman and Bethany Denton.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'd like to ask for a few months of a project-based subscription box as a Christmas present and am looking for recommendations!I'm not super artistic, but I love making things. So I think a project-based subscription box would be a fun treat, and would eliminate having to buy large packages of supplies that will never be used up. I could go down either the crafty or the electronic-tinker-y road, but would prefer something that's not just paper and pens/paint. Not that artistic. I like biology, math, and engineering would love to be good enough at electronics to make little robot-y things. I'm also not opposed to something with a more feminine crafty slant. I'm probably more looking to enjoy the process, but it would be nice to have an end product that's either genuinely decorative, somehow useful, or where the components could be repurposed in some way. I've looked at some of the big subscription-box-compendiums, but would like to hear from anyone who's actually tried or seen them. Both recommendations and warnings for ones to stay away from are welcome!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Looking for vegan main dish to bring to a Hanukkah party. My go-to is lentil shepherd's pie, but that's too much potato as latkes will also be served. No mushrooms, please.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
For years, the standard line in Ling 101 courses has been "Monkeys and apes can't make human speech sounds because of the shape of their vocal tract". A new paper is challenging that idea; NPR write up here. Using live X-ray data from living monkeys (as opposed to plaster casts of dead ones), researches showed that a variety of macaque vocal tract configurations can produce a range of human speech sounds, with the notable exception of the "i" sound in "beet". Using their data, the researchers created synthesized monkey vowels, which humans were able to tell apart in a perception experiment. Listen to a simulation of what it would sound like if a monkey said "Will you marry me?"* here. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately), the monkeys still appear to lack the neural control necessary to actually produce the sounds on their own, so there won't be any talking monkeys any time soon. *For linguists keeping track at home, they replaced the /i/s with /ɪ/

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
It's come to this, MeFi. My husband is literally impossible to shop for. I need help! The best present I ever gave him was setting up a D&D game for him and his friends, so experiences are a bigger hit than actual items. He does art in his spare time, but a gift certificate to the art store is useful but not inspired. Any random things he might want he just... buys for himself, so there's nothing that he's been eyeing but won't buy for himself. He isn't that big on stuff for the sake of stuff. He loves books but is a librarian and basically has a free steady supply of books, so they aren't exciting gifts anymore. He likes the usual Star Wars-y stuff that dudes of the Metafilter persuasion are typically into, but Think Geek type stuff isn't up his alley. If there was a really unique weird UFO/Bigfoot/Lovecraftian type of item that might work. Current likes: podcasts (comedy/nerdy/weird ones), weird alien and HP Lovecrafty stuff, beer, making art, comics, and British Premier League soccer. My budget is around $100, so something like giving him a weekend away for a podcast fest would be amazing but I am too broke for that. He did MegaGame's Watch the Skies a couple of times and really enjoyed that, so I'm wondering if there's something similar to that in the New Englandy area. Does anyone have any suggestions for interesting experiences or things that might fit this really particular bill?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Alsarah and the Nubatones performed a Tiny Desk Concert at NPR.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I was careful not to twist my stitches while casting on, nor in the first few rows, and I've really enjoyed the beginnings of this piece. Until I realized: the twisting just keeps twisting.Everything I've searched online and in books contains advice for twisting during cast-on or about intentionally twisted stitches. I just need to know if, partway through the first bands of this hat, my work has twisted irrevocably. Is there any chance I can straighten it out as I decrease and transfer to double-pointed needles at the end of the pattern? If it's toast, I guess I also need to know how to avoid doing this in the future, assuming I am meticulous about casting on. Would stitch markers help with this?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Through a few quirks of planning, I have a voucher for $260 worth of train fare on Amtrak that I need to use up by March. I'd like to use it on one of the two three-day weekends we have this winter - any suggestions where?Assume New York/Penn station and a friday night as the departure, and I'm more flexible about the return time on that Monday. And ideally the $260 should be a round trip; which means I can't go TOO far from Penn Station. So we're pretty much looking at east of Mississippi. I'd also like to avoid visiting cities I've already visited: so Boston, Hartford, New Haveh, Philadelphia, and DC are out. I'm also looking at more southerly places (I considered Montreal briefly, but I suspect that in Winter it'd be cold as balls). I'd also like to avoid renting a car when I get there, so somewhere where I could easily get around on foot or on public transit would be ideal. More into museums and historical stuff and "hey, this is a cool street, let me take a walk and look at things" than I am into night clubs and shopping. Quirkly little festivals would be good too. Hit me!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Since it first started getting major buzz and attention around the start of the decade, Bandcamp has become the go-to place for anyone and everyone (that is to say, artists without agents and established labels) to release their albums. Musicians point to an artist-friendly approach to business and design, allowing for direct relationships with listeners and minimal interference. And there's been a treasure trove of undersung gems ever since. But the sheer breadth and volume could be hard to navigate, to say the least, leaving many to just wander around the "aisles" aimlessly (some would argue this is a good thing). This year Bandcamp launched Bandcamp Daily (previously) as an attempt to provide some curation around this vast catalog of releases, with a crack staff of knowledgeable, respected music critics. Now they've put out their Best Albums of 2016, and it's a stunner. No manner how clued in you are to music this year, it's a safe bet much of this will be new and worthwhile, and in many cases these releases had been languishing with only a handful of fans until now. While other tastemaker sites and year-end lists all too often parrot the same few artists a consensus has formed around, this one offers something different. The list in sections: #100 – 81; #80 – 61; #60 – 41; #40 – 21; #20 – 1.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
Writing at the lefty quarterly journal The Baffler, Stanford Social Innvoation Review editor (and former Boston Review editor) David V. Johnson offers a critical look at Ezra Klein's and Matt Yglesias's Vox.com. He labels it "explatainment" and considers its relative sucess at one of its intended central missions, to become an authoritative source of information (not merely journalism) in the style of Wikipedia. Vox's well-known penchant for liberal-educated-white-guy mansplaining is addressed, as well the biases (hidden and not-so-hidden) inherent in modern hybrid information-entertainment delivery.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I recently purchased a tapestry version of an amazing two-color print of a octopus/kraken attacking a ship. But I'm seeing piece of this print used on other homegoods sites so obviously this is not the retailer's original image, and I'd prefer to purchase goods from the original artist. Also the hunt for the source is irresistible.I got this throw for our guest room (with starry navy curtains we're going for a unsettling Lovecraftian feel for our unwitting sleepers-over.) But it's nasty polyester and I'm returning it. The retailer is "Ambesonne." I saw the same print reused, with everything removed except for the tentacles, on this retailer's ("Ink and Rags") site. Now I had no doubt that the print was not the first retailer's original image, or both retailers are the same, but when I saw the second item I was filled with an anger by proxy about the reuse of this image. So with an ulterior motive of still being able to purchase this as a blanket or duvet, I want to track down the original image and hopefully the artist. If the artist can't be tracked down, I'd settle for a high-res image from which I could have a custom duvet printed. I don't want to communicate with either of these retailers. I've googled and google image search by upload'd the fuck out of this and am now in a perpetual scroll through DeviantArt. I created an Imgur post with a few images of the items cropped down to the print.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm likely to join my dad for a skiing vacation in Austria in early February, and I'm considering adding on 3-6 days traveling in the area by myself either before or after. Flying in/out of Zurich. The problem is, I don't know how to vacation in Europe in winter. Halp?I'm a very experienced world traveler (6-week solo trips through Southeast Asia, to take one example, are my jam). But the vast majority of my adventures have been in warm temperatures and in non-European places. Usually I just walk until I see something interesting - a market, a temple, street food, street performers, a sign for hiking trails/caves/waterfalls/elephant rides/whatever. I spend a lot of time eating and peoplewatching and exploring "off the beaten path," and I try not to spend a lot of money. How would this work in Zurich or the surrounding area in the winter? My imagination is failing me here. Walking all day may be annoying and possibly treacherous if there's snow/ice/slush on the ground; it sounds like food is rather expensive; I'm not really interested in museums (beyond one afternoon perhaps). Are these assumptions at all accurate? Am I missing some obvious attraction like a famous food market or a great art/music scene somewhere nearby? Maybe it would make sense to go to a smaller place like Bern or Interlaken or (really tiny) Gimmelwald? Or maybe I should try a nearby country like Slovenia or Italy? (I have a U.S. passport, if that's relevant.) My dream would be something like: go to a big city for a few days (eat tasty things and look at the beautiful architecture and see some ice sculpting or a trendy arts performance perhaps), then go to a tiny village on a lake for a few days (sit in cozy cafes and walk around/on the lake and do something outdoorsy but not ski-related like maybe try icefishing or a glacier walk if these are remotely affordable). Does anything like this exist? (Sorry if this is completely unrealistic; I have only started to research this question and don't know that much about what Zurich or the area is like yet, and most guides talk about either the warm seasons or the holidays, neither of which will be relevant here.)

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I'm trying to make an individually portioned, freezer-friendly pasta bake with shredded chicken but am struggling to work out the steps. I'm a truly clueless cook especially when it comes to meat and freezing stuff-- please help!So I'm following this Mushroom Marsala Pasta Bake recipe, but I want to add shredded chicken to it (yes, it must be shredded-- not cubed or anything else). And it will all be destined for the freezer, in individual-size foil pans. My intuition tells me that it'll taste better if I freeze it unbaked, and wait to bake when I'm ready to eat. Is that right? Then, what's the best way to prepare the chicken? I usually make chicken in the pressure cooker while making stew or stock (i.e. with lots of liquid) so in this case I would just cover the chicken with some stock and maybe marsala. Or should I just make a regular chicken marsala recipe on the stove and then shred that then combine with the cooked pasta?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
My boyfriend's favourite sweet is a dessert bar made by our local bakery that is a weird hybrid of cherry pie (flakey crust and cherry pie filling on the bottom) and cake (with pink icing, on top). Pictures: side view and top view, bakery's picture (top right). I want to make him some for Christmas, and give him the recipe so he can make it whenever he wants. There's just one problem: I can't find the recipe. It's possible that it's an older recipe from the era of Jell-o mould salads (the bakery owners boast that most of their recipes date back to the 1960s when their Grandmother started the bakery out of her home). They call them "cherry supreme" bars but that name has been too generic to be helpful. Googling "cake pie hybrid" turns up some fascinating but ultimately unhelpful results. Social anxiety makes it highly unlikely that I would ever work up the nerve to just ask the bakery if I could have the recipe (which strikes me as a long shot anyway). My Google-fu is failing me, and I'm not an experienced enough baker (especially when it comes to pie crust) to feel comfortable just winging it. Help me hive mind? Does anyone recognize this dessert and know it by another name, or even have a recipe, or just have better Google skills than me?

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I have a lot to do, but I'm extremely picky and perfectionist. I keep having panic attacks and end up procrastinating! How can I sidestep the panicking part and just start?!!Hi Mefites! Everyday I have a list of things to do, and more than enough time to complete those tasks. And yet I often find myself spending somewhere from 1/3 to 2/3 of my time freaking out and running around in circles (usually mentally). It's annoying because I want so badly to get my work to be as good as I picture it. But I just can't quiet down my mind half the time! For your reference, I already implement a lot of lifestyle things: I'm restarting therapy soon, I take medicine, I exercise a few times a week, I socialize sometimes, I eat and sleep and drink water... I am looking for pro-tips and techniques for just getting started! Does anyone else have this problem? Do you have any tried-and-tested solutions? Thank you!

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
With six weeks to the inauguration of the current President-elect, the son of a Hebridean continues to make the press. Across a smorgasbord of controversy, Boeing and China and a union leader are tweet-called out, Taiwan are on the phone, Ben Carson has (awkward) a top job, Flynn jnr is out but Flynn snr stays in while Goldman Sachs is further in, Mr Coal is given the EPA, Coulter wavers, his wall may not be built after all, and conflicts of interests (one picked at random). Problems with the recent election such as interference and voter suppression (post title) (also, game) continue to be discussed while Jill et al continue with their recount battle. Elsewhere, think pieces about the Democratic party abound, and Hillary continues to stack up the votes. Also California, Biden for 2020, a large bipartisan bill heads Obama's way, some Federal bureaucrats are waiting to see what happens and a prophecy. Housekeeping. Please... - Don't go after each other, don't poke known sore points. - Take it to Chat for context-free, exclamations and other existential reactions. - Check before submitting a link whether it's already been done in this thread. - Don't paste huge swathes of text from somewhere you're linking to anyway. - If needed there are self-care recommendations from the mods, or try writing or commenting on a non-political post on MetaFilter, good nutrition, sleep or company, or walk away from screens and enjoy nature for a while. MetaTalk * MeFi in the time of Trump - managing news. * What are YOU doing? * MeFites offering refuge for the holidays and Friendsmas. * 123: NOT ME THAT DAY (monthly podcast). For legacy content see the many posts tagged with election2016. The election reference wiki explains some of the terminology used in comments on these threads. On the Blue * Donald Trump is Time's 2016 Person of the Year. * "A new president, new justice appointees changed the dynamic". * What your social-media news feed could look like if things go wrong (not the new election thread). A few of Andy Borowitz's recent short pieces: Taxes, Chris Christie, Obama and Trump, Ben Carson, and a poll.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
I have checked online for advice, but the bits in the address I have do not seem to match up with the bits that are mentioned in the how-to article. Help!The address was given to me all on one line, like this: Laurel Heights #103, 1048-57, Makata, Oaza, Kobayashi-Shi, Miyuzaki-Ken I have changed some numbers and words slightly at the beginning to avoid posting the exact address. I also have a version in Japanese (also all on one line) but I don't know how to anonymize that so I didn't include it. Thanks!

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