posted about 2 hours ago on metafilter
Pictures of the floor. Installed before we bought the house. Not asking for any particular reason, just interested. It's in pretty good shape for now but it does seem to scratch somewhat easily.

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
I'm in a major depressive episode and have been taking Lorazepam for three months. I've stopped last week, replacing it with Tiapride a week ago. While I've been feeling slightly better in terms of depression, a lot of joints hurt, some quite badly. What should I do?I'm also taking Zolpidem and Tianeptine. The pain is diffuse all over the body and sharper in various places around the shoulder and upper arm, elbow, wrist, fingers, sidebody, along the spine, under the ribs on my side bely, hips, knees, ankles, somtetimes toes on both sides. The left also sometimes has wandering sharper pain including in my groin and along he inside of the leg. I'm thinking it's one of four: 1. The meds, somehow. Possibly it will vanish after a while. 2. My posture. Due to depression/ meds/ confusion etc, I've been sitting a lot over the last months with bad posture in bed and playing merge magic. The pain started abruptly after I quit (and changed meds). I'm still sitting a lot though mostly reading metafilter and have no idea what else to do with myself (I'm on sick leave). 3. Arthritis or something longer-term and chronic. 4. I did an hour of somatic exercises the day before it started. It seemed almost pointlessly gentle. I've tried taking Nurofen (no change) and doing gentle exercises. I've even taken a couple of short walks. Those previously helped (though I never had the experience of pain all over, it was always more localized). Have you experienced this? Difficult right now to see a doc outside my psychiatrist and I'm in a country where psychiatry is in some ways still quite primitive, so docs here rarely if ever consider side effects, withdrawal effects, etc, and my psych is more worried about my state of mind than my body. Any advice on how to get rid of the pain? Gentle and simple stuff really appreciated, since I grow dizzy easily and get confused. Forgot to add that I also have had frequent tachycardia episodes before being diagnosed, in case that is relevant. Also, I've been menopausal for about 5 or 6 years and haven't had symptoms until this started (other than not having a period, that is, that's how I know). Thanks so much. Apologies for any typos.

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
Does the term netiquette seem obsolete to you? If so, can you point me to resources that say so?In the "I can't believe I'm using a question on this vein.." I'm taking a class in improving online teaching (which is otherwise a good class) and they keep using this word and I am having a visceral nails on a chalkboard reaction to it because, I think, having spent most of my adult life in online communities, I feel like the same etiquette largely applies both places and I feel like it makes online feel mystical but... is it just me? Thank you.

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
My US company has a business bank account (Azlo) that doesn't accept checks from international banks. A Canadian corporation wants to pay us by Canadian check. Getting them to pay in USD is a real hassle, so we'd like to accept the check... but have no idea how to get it into the Azlo account. In your experience, (a) what's the best way to deposit a Canadian check into a US business bank account that doesn't accept checks form international banks, (b) what steps did you take and (c) how long did it take?Some stipulations: For Reasons, I will not be opening a Canadian bank account or another US business bank account. I am aware of TransferWise but am not sure they can accept a Canadian check and then route it to my Azlo account in USD. If anyone has done this, how much did they charge for the service (I'm finding their site unclear) and how long did it take? This has been a huge headache. Thank you in advance for any insight you can give!

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
I am launching a big project soon, and would like to make it feel like An Event for the rather large team of people who have worked for two years to get this project done. I'm planning to have a project-related poster printed up and delivered to peoples' homes before the launch, but would love ideas for how to make this event feel special when everyone is completely done with Zoom.Are there other little things I can send? I'd love to make it feel as much like a tv show premiere/wrap party as possible, while maintaining social distance and safety. I do not want to ask people to gather anywhere. Help me think outside of the box!

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
My family is thinking of adopting a cat. I have no idea where to begin. We are in the UK. Details below!We are thinking of adopting a cat. I have never had a cat (always had dogs) but we are not allowed dogs where we live. I think I like cats, but not sure as I've never had one! I do like the company of a pet. My husband has long been resistant to cats in particular, but has eased up a bit as our daughter (5) very much wants one. Also, he is into the idea even more now that we have the occasional mouse that needs some kind of deterrent. But I'm not sure where to begin. First, how do I find a cat that can deal with a (nice) kid? Second, indoor cat or outdoor cat? I have a friend who absolutely thinks outdoor cats are cruel -- but to me, surely it sounds the opposite? Most of my neighbors seem to have outdoor cats but admittedly there are also a lot of "lost cat" signs. We have a garden (not fenced in -- i.e., a cat could easily jump over the low walls connecting the houses), and the previous owners had a catflap. Also, we have quite a small flat (about 850 square feet) -- not sure if this matters, but I thought I'd put this out there. No idea where we would keep a litter box. We both work from home (even before the pandemic.) We used to travel a fair bit, but don't much anymore. We do have a few neighbors we could probably rely on to help cat sit. My husband also has a slight suspicion he might be allergic, but no hard evidence -- this is obviously something we'd have to explore. Also, any way of finding a cat that might particularly deter mice? (Not a dealbreaker if they are not interested.) I also know of people who have had cat-regret -- how can I best think about whether this is a good move for us in advance? Thoughts on how to proceed? Borrow one for a bit? Foster? Adopt? Aaargh

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
The Thick Blue Line - Patrick Blanchfield reviews Stuart Schraders' book Badges Without Borders, which covers the intertwined histories of policing and counterinsurgency in the United States. Better remembered today by his nickname, "Bull" Connor was an outspoken white supremacist who believed desegregation was a communist plot; just five years earlier, as commissioner of public safety in Birmingham, he had notoriously unleashed riot police, fire hoses, and attack dogs on nonviolent civil rights protesters. That such a man should have been on the receiving end of America's first 911 call is fitting. As Stuart Schrader reveals in his new book, Badges Without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing, the United States' 911 system was modeled on an earlier program pioneered by American-funded police forces fighting a Marxist insurgency in Caracas. In the 1960s, the link between America's wars abroad and its police at home was made by radical groups like the Black Panthers, the Third World Women's Alliance, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Efforts to raise public awareness about the OPS were quickened by revelations of torture at an OPS-advised island prison off the coast of Vietnam and the killing of an American trainer in Uruguay. Media pressure and congressional inquiries mounted, and the OPS was dissolved in 1974. But, as Schrader notes, the US has hardly stopped training and arming police in other countries; today it annually disburses hundreds of millions of dollars in police aid to Latin America alone. As the Soviet Union collapsed, the rationale shifted from fighting communist "subversion" to fighting terrorism, but the security state has become so normal it is basically invisible—as dependable and ubiquitous as calling 911. The Police Know Guerilla Warfare, Kyle Burke This is a messy story, since those connections flowed in multiple directions simultaneously. Cops in US cities used technologies, such as the handheld radio and CS gas, that had first been deployed in war zones abroad. US soldiers in Vietnam and elsewhere drew upon techniques police had pioneered in New York, Kansas City, and Los Angeles to transform local constabularies into effective and efficient forces. US-based police training academies produced thousands of graduates who carried with them lessons American cops had learned at home. Meanwhile, in official circles, policymakers and academics tended to conflate — and often exaggerate — the supposed threat of mass crime and communism, while urging the same solutions for both. The Imperial History of US Policing: An Interview with Stuart Schrader Stuart Schrader: My framework complements the existing scholarship on the carceral state's political development and policy history. I focus on the actors who implemented criminal-justice policy, rather than only the lawmakers who created the policy or the voters who support the lawmakers. Both are important, of course, but looking at the law-enforcement experts and leaders indicates that they composed an institutionally robust and long-lasting constituency. They have consistently advocated on their own behalf. Policing experts backed a "war on crime" and supported this martial vocabulary before lawmakers or voters did because police stood to benefit from it. Historians of the carceral state have debated whether conservatives or liberals should bear responsibility. In fact, both do. The experts I investigate convinced both conservatives and liberals to build a powerful policing apparatus using the justifications that also convinced both to spend endlessly on the national security state: rampant threat inflation. This was no coincidence. The people I examine traversed — and bridged — the national security state and the carceral state. And they carried their finely crafted apocalyptic warnings with them across the globe. Conflating communism and crime paid dividends. Small Wars Journal Book Review: The Chickens of Empire Come Home to Roost During the Nixon years, the "reformist" elements of the police/counterinsurgency nexus would be largely dropped, as conservatives "disdained any sort of social intervention beyond crime prevention or attenuation"(p. 218) either at home or abroad. Overseas that meant pulling back from the "developmentalist" agenda of US foreign assistance. Domestically it meant the response to urban "insurrection" in the United States increasingly moved toward "avowedly coercive approaches [that] dispensed with economic development components."(p. 236) The loss of faith in and patience for "development" in the Global South in the 1970s, and the turn to a repression-only approach to dealing with radicalism, thus mirrored the domestic turn toward "order-maintenance policing," as well as the replacement of rehabilitative carcereal strategies with more purely punitive ones. In the end, Badges without Borders shows how the logic of policing and counterinsurgency, as developed in interlinked ways both and home and abroad, were and remain inseparable from racialized logics that see empowerment of non-whites as inherently subversive of the established order. An Empire Of Patrolmen, an interview by Jonah Walters It's striking how the politics of this endeavor was so submerged. Police reformers even denied what they were doing was political at all! It's almost like, for the professionalizers, police are like dentists — they use a discrete set of skills to do a clearly defined job, which is more or less the same in every society. For dentists, that job is filling teeth. For the police, that job is repression. SS: It's important to keep in mind just how anti-democratic the idea of professionalization is, especially when you apply it to the police. To continue with the dentist analogy, if you and I went to a meeting of the American Dental Association and said, "Let us, the people, tell you how you should give somebody a crown," they would laugh at us. They would remind us that they're experts, that they have specialized training, and so they're not actually answerable to us. That's the kind of relationship the police professionalizers of mid-century wanted to develop with the public. They don't want to be accountable to an untrained public of voters, or even lawmakers. They want to only be answerable to themselves. They want the respect and protection that comes along with specific types of training. That is what professionalization means in a nutshell. An aid in developing this type of rhetoric was anti-communism: denounce anyone who insists on public oversight or review of police activity as a commie. The Making of the American Gulag, Schrader - "During the Cold War, the "police apparatus" was held up as a prime example of Soviet repression. Yet in its efforts to fight subversives, the United States ended up with its own carceral state. " Policing Empire, 2014, Schrader Yet we should be skeptical of calls for police reform, particularly when accompanied by cries that this (militarization) should not happen here. A close look at the history of US policing reveals that the line between foreign and domestic has long been blurry. Shipping home tactics and technologies from overseas theaters of imperial engagement has been a typical mode of police reform in the United States. When policing on American streets comes into crisis, law-enforcement leaders look overseas for answers. What transpired in Ferguson is itself a manifestation of reform. The Global Policeman Will Always Shoot People, Schrader - "Suleimani's killing shows U.S. police and military power can't be separated." The Disturbing Parallels Between US Policing at Home and Military Tactics Abroad Counterinsurgency and Community Policing: More Alike than Meets the Eye How the US institutionalized surveillance American Violence From Ferguson To Fallujah The other side of the COIN: counterinsurgency and community policing [PDF] The Empire Comes Home: Counterinsurgency, POlicing and the Militarization fo America's Cities 'Counterinsurgency' to Fight U.S. Crime? No, Thanks

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posted about 5 hours ago on metafilter
Sometimes I spend several days at places with dialup-quality internet. No Netflix? Fine. But I feel cut off from news (24-hr talking heads on satellite TV are no substitute) and relevant (and sometimes frivolous) discussion. I basically live off of MeFi and https://text.npr.org . Where else can I go?

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posted about 5 hours ago on metafilter
I have many chronic illnesses, and some are flaring up right now. I need to work, I need to do my physical and occupational therapy, I need to eat and take medication. But I'm really struggling to do anything more productive than laying in bed watching Netflix. Please tell me your tips, tricks, and hacks to push through flare-ups to get things done!

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posted about 5 hours ago on metafilter
A dear friend of mine runs an art and re-use community non-profit and the covid has hit its operations pretty hard. She's come to me asking about the difficulty level of hosting an online clothing swap event set up like a math trade as a possible means of recreating a common event that they used to hold in shop. This feels... hard?I know BoardGameGeek has been running a Math Trade for seemingly forever, but I'm not super familiar with this outside of that context. I'm a front-end engineer, but I gather this seems rather difficult on the backend to match trades appropriately. Are there any other well known examples of this out in the wild that anyone can think of? Good related reading? Perhaps a better event-as-a-service stand-in that might be recommended instead?

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
Over the past 20 years, renowned illustrator John Burgoyne has produced more than 150 intricate, hand-drawn illustrations for Cook's Illustrated magazine. In 1886, the US Government Commissioned 7,500 watercolor paintings of every known fruit in the world. Now, using materials from the USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection, you can make your own Cook's Illustrated poster! (Some assembly required.) 2019 OpenCulture article on the collection is here, with great examples and interesting context. My own fave, the pawpaw. Pomological Collection previously. Direct link to the images: https://usdawatercolors.nal.usda.gov/pom/home.xhtml And if you just want prints of the original magazine art, you can buy those here: https://shop.americastestkitchen.com/framed-prints/berries-print.html

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
Rose Christo's* infamous fanfic My Immortal has been covered on the Blue before, from the initial debates over intentionally bad fanfic, the Youtube adaptation, and the search for a definitive answer on its authorship. But somehow, until Scott Alexander came around, nobody had been brave enough to ask the real question: "Is My Immortal really an alchemical allegory?" *Maybe

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
I often have to compose big pdfs from (bits of) smaller pdfs. Preview for Mac used to be really good at this but no longer copies and pastes pdf pages between thumbnail or contact sheet views. Has Preview lost functionality? Is there any way to get its original behaviour back?I'm on Catalina 10.15.4. Right now I appear to be able to both cut and copy (the "Edit" menu flashes blue when I use the keyboard shortcut, and the pages selected disappear when cutting) but when I try to paste into the thumbnail or contact sheet views the keyboard shortcut doesn't work and the "Edit > paste" option is greyed out. I've tried: force quitting pboard from activity monitor; restarting the laptop; copying from and pasting into various different pdfs (including new ones), none of which are in any way protected as far as I can tell. Insert and delete still work, so there is an incredibly time consuming workaround, but is there a way to have it "just work" like it used to?

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
We're moving! And we don't know where or what we're doing yet. We won't have any idea until after we have moved. So how do we decide what to pack?Some plans involve keeping lots of things for a household. Some plans include keeping next to nothing. We definitely won't want the burden of having kept things if we need to be traveling light, and we are very low income so if we need the various things it would be nice to have not gotten rid of them. How do we make this decision given that we need to decide before we have the relevant information?

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
Looking for name / info on a roasted Medieval or English dish of smaller animal heads progressively protruding from mouths of larger ones (like, a small bird's head sticking out of fish's head sticking out of a swan's head sticking out of a boar's head)Over the years I've seen this sort of meal depicted in a number of movies, tv shows, and books. It seems to be rare, but real. Not sure where and when it originated-- Medieval times, the Middle Ages, Tudor England, etc. It was probably ordered by royalty and the wealthy to show off at feasts. However, haven't been able to find any mention or photos of it online, partly because it's difficult to describe precisely to a search engine. Wondering if it's a hoax, or actually does exist. Even if the former, still there should be some imagery and descriptions available. Thanks

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
Laura Kampf gives some Workshop Tips - Measuring, Marking & Math tips about how to avoid using math while making stuff.

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posted about 9 hours ago on metafilter
Like a cliche, I've been trying a sourdough starter. Last night, I made a dough with it for the first time, and this morning I notice there is liquid on top of the dough. Is it okay, or what can I do to rescue it?I've been feeding a tiny starter for about a month, one feeding a day, 15g flour / 15g water / 10g starter. This is my first bake with it; the starter smells at least somewhat sourdoughy. Over the weekend, I tried to increase the amount of starter with two larger feedings, first tripling my standard feed and then doubling it again so it was enough for a recipe. It was a little bubbly but not very bubbly; the starter hasn't ever been very bubbly or active, maybe on the second or third day but not since. I used this no-knead NYT recipe -- 475g flour, 6g salt, 300g water, 180g starter and left it on the counter overnight in a large bowl covered with cling film. This morning, about 12h later, the dough looks like this. It has risen some but not a lot, and there's a small amount of liquid around the dough at the edge of the bowl, maybe a tablespoon or two. The liquid tastes salty, and doesn't have any alcohol taste. (My googling for this problem talks a lot about sourdough 'hooch' which doesn't make a ton of sense since the starter has all the flour in the world.) What should I do here? Should I give it more time and hope it rises more? Should I add in some standard yeast to try and ensure it rises? Something else? I was hoping to have it for supper, so I still have 6 hours until I'd like to have it in the oven.

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posted about 9 hours ago on metafilter
This Lickable Screen Can Recreate Almost Any Taste or Flavor Without Eating Food (Gizmodo): "...The Norimaki Synthesizer takes a more aggressive approach through the use of five gels that trigger the five different tastes when they make contact with the human tongue. ¶The color-coded gels, made from agar formed in the shape of long tubes, use glycine to create the taste of sweet, citric acid for acidic, sodium chloride for salty, magnesium chloride for bitter, and glutamic sodium for savory umami. When the device is pressed against the tongue (Youtube), the user experiences all five tastes at the same time, but specific flavors are created by mixing those tastes in specific amounts and intensities, like the RGB pixels on a screen. To accomplish this, the prototype is wrapped in copper foil so that when it's held in hand and touched to the surface of the tongue, it forms an electrical circuit through the human body, facilitating a technique known as electrophoresis." Norimaki Synthesizer: Taste Display Using Ion Electrophoresis in Five Gels (study PDF)

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posted about 12 hours ago on metafilter
Both Michael Roth's The Web Opera and HERE's all decisions are made by consensus use our screen-mediated world as a narrative given.

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posted about 13 hours ago on metafilter
I usually start my day by saying "hey Siri, what's the weather out there?" as I walk to the bathroom and she tells me. But asking "what's on my calendar" I get "you need to unlock your iPhone first." Where can I find a list of all the usable commands I can do when my phone is locked?

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posted about 19 hours ago on metafilter
My husband is white; I'm Asian-American. We live in New York City. We are trying to talk about the BLM protests happening in our country. I'm troubled by his responses. I know one of the best things we can do right now is have these difficult conversations with loved ones and confront our own bias and racism--- but I'm struggling and need help.He stated that while he understands that racism is real, that black people are oppressed, that he has a ton of white privilege, and that cops need more mental health screening/training and accountability, he is very upset that the police are being villainized and that there is not enough media coverage of the police being endangered or mistreated in the protests. He has family who are police officers and believes that the majority of police officers are good public servants who are just trying to do their jobs and often put themselves in danger to help others. He gets emotionally worked up when discussing the neglect of sympathy for police in the media and our social media networks. He thinks mainstream media is biased by downplaying coverage of police being mistreated and police vehicles being vandalized, which taxpayers will need to pay to replace. He's horrified by the looting and thinks the protests can lead to riots where our own windows might get smashed in from the chaos. I affirmed that it's a valid perspective to be mindful and respectful of the danger that police officers face and that there are plenty of good cops, but I was thrown off that his reaction was mostly about this issue. Like, with all this going on, he is getting worked up that the police are putting themselves in danger and there is not enough sympathy for THEM? He tried to explain that he's not excusing or downplaying the terrible things happening to the protesters, but he's upset about this blind spot in the media and keeps specifically turning the conversation to the looting and lack of sympathy for police whenever we discuss the protests. Relatedly: Amy Cooper. He thinks both people provoked each other- Christian Cooper didn't need to call out her behavior, shouldn't have started filming her while there was no one else around, and shouldn't have lured her dog with a treat. He said it shouldn't be a crime to call the police if you are scared. He cited several instances where black men had threatened physical violence against him unprovoked in public and while he just walked away, he thinks that calling the police should be an option for him if things had escalated and he shouldn't be destroyed on the internet for doing so. I responded that everyone should have the right to call the police if they are scared and feel just as safe as he does that they will protect him and do their jobs, but not everyone has that privilege. I responded that Christian Cooper was more in danger in that situation than that woman and that documenting is unfortunately necessary now in case something happens. She called the police knowing what just happened with George Floyd and intended to put this man's life in danger. I honestly think the treat was weird too, but in no way justifies her actions and I really have not heard anyone else even attempt to justify Amy Cooper's actions in any way- again, I was taken aback. The thing is, my husband believes that most police just want to do their jobs and don't go around instantly killing black people. He's horrified by the numerous cases in the media, but he said he did his own research and found that more white people are killed by the police than black people. He's not sure what is the proof that black people are significantly more likely to be killed by the police to the extent that people are so outraged and these protests are happening. I don't know what to make of his sympathizing more with the police and Amy Cooper and not understanding why people are so upset. I didn't see these issues as being complicated or needing more evidence. I'm angry and not particularly inclined to consider "both sides," but maybe I should try. This isn't just about shutting someone down- this is about me talking with my husband and growing together. I feel like I am failing as an ally because I am having trouble articulating this. He's not completely wrong- I understand he has a different perspective on the police because he's white and he has family who are police officers, and I DO want him to call the police if he's ever in genuine danger of being harmed. What information can I share with him that may resonate with him more? Is it just a matter of information-sharing and ignorance? Is it me- should I be working to be more nuanced in my understanding of this? I'm not white; I want him to unpack his white privilege, but I don't necessarily fully understand how his whiteness can inform his views either. He's been loving, supportive, and proactive about understanding the issues I face as an Asian woman and how to support our future children with their interracial identity-- this really isn't about that, but sharing to say that we have committed to having healthy dialogue about race as part of our relationship. I want to understand what I may be missing here and what he may be missing here. I'm having trouble thinking this through on my own because we are in quarantine together in a small apartment and my mental health is already frayed from the ongoing pandemic and news.

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posted about 23 hours ago on metafilter
I want to buy my mom a comfortable, quality pair of flip-flops like the pair of Reefs I bought years ago and still wear - the "Ginger" flip-flops with woven fabric straps and a soft, slightly arch-supported base -- but a bunch of reviewers on their site say that the sandals are not good any more -- too rigid, not true to size, low quality. What should I buy instead?Here are the things I'm looking for: -- Woven straps (not leather, not plastic) that are pliable and soft -- A soft and smooth base (if it's too rigid, it will irritate my mom's feet) -- Quality (I'm fine with paying more, but I want them to last) -- A tiny bit of arch support (Not required, but would be nice) I'm disappointed that Reefs don't seem to be as good as they used to. Are there any other good brands?

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posted about 24 hours ago on metafilter
I'm considering speaking to my vet about anxiety meds for my dog.You know how everyone talks about how wonderful their rescue dog is, how they are so loved and fit right in? This is not one of those stories. This is the story of an 8 week old puppy who is now 2 years old who causes me more stress than joy she brings to my life. She was fostered until 8 weeks with siblings, but without mom in the picture. I adopted her, thinking that at such a young age I'd be able to mold her into a good dog. Despite proper socialization techniques, countless hours and money spent trying to address her issues, improvements are very, very slow. I've read every book and really put effort into getting her more calm. Exercise is great, but it never has an effect on her behavior. What are her issues? Well there's a lot but her high level of anxiety affects everything else. She's afraid of most things, and as soon as we overcome one fear, another grows in its place. She goes into a panic, and it's like she can't take in or process anything. I feel like if I can't get her to downshift even a little, all the strategies in the world won't work. I don't want to give her up but I also can't leave my home for a night away because she's too anxious for other people and struggles with both people and dog interactions. I feel like I'm in prison. I'm at the point of wanting to explore pharmaceutical options in combination with training. What I'm NOT looking for: resources on dog anxiety (I have them), ridicule or being shamed for having a tough dog What I want: whether dog anxiety meds were useful for your situation, empathy,

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posted about 24 hours ago on metafilter
My son really wants to read comic books but the ones we have (Uncle Scrooge) are way above his head. What are some good comic books for early readers? He is just getting to the stage of sounding out three letter words.I'm happy for him to read comics, but Uncle Scrooge is way too hard and he can't follow the plots (and reading these is getting tiring, as he keeps interrupting to point to a new explosion to ask "What does HE say?") I'd love something at a Dr Seuss or Sandra Boynton level, something for beginning readers. What ideas do you have, fellow quarantined parents of tiny people? He is almost 4 1/2.

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posted 1 day ago on metafilter
1985 was a ridiculously strong year for music releases. June 1, 1985 saw the release of Sting's first solo album The Dream Of The Blue Turtles [YT playlist]. It was inescapable for months, with massive hit singles. And it has Branford Marsalis on saxophone! Side A: If You Love Somebody Set Them Free [video], Love Is The Seventh Wave [video], Russians* [video], Chidren's Crusade, Shadows In The Rain Side B: We Work The Black Seam, Consider Me Gone, The Dream Of The Blue Turtles, Moon Over Bourbon Street, Fortress Around Your Heart [video, video option two] Bonus B-sides: Another Day If You Love Somebody Set Them Free (Extended Remix By John "Jellybean" Benitez If You Love Somebody Set Them Free (Torch Song Mix, Produced By William Orbit) Consider Me Gone (Live) Love Is The Seventh Wave (New Mix) Gabriel's Message [video] The Ballad Of Mack The Knife [maybe not the b-side version. correct length, though] Bonus film: Bring On The Night (documentary about recording and touring The Dream Of The Blue Turtles) [1h21m, Ed. note: this is really good, sadly missing about 8 minutes at the end]

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