posted less than an hour ago on metafilter
I'll be leaving a database and would like to take all the emails I have received in my outlook with them to back up as message files. I have read around about various VBScripts that could be used to accomplish this but the explanations have been confusing even for someone like myself who is pretty savvy with scripts and working underneath the hood of some Microsoft Office Applications.Can someone please outline for me in detail how to execute these scripts so that they capture all the messages I've received and then saves them in some readable file (.txt or in other readily available format). I admittedly am not that comfortable with VBScripting and inputting the values into the VBA screens. What I am looking for is some assistance on how to save all these messages in my outlook in anyway efficient way possible. Preferably free as well.

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posted about 1 hour ago on metafilter
Coding bootcamp, or other options for the smart but school-averseMy daughter was a straight-A student in K-12, and went to the highest-rated magnet program in our city for high school. She tested well on the SAT and ACT, wrote a couple of kickass essays, and got into some very competitive universities... but then, in spring of her senior year, she decided it was all bullshit and dropped out of school. She tried community college, but wants nothing to do with community college -- and consequently, formal education at all at this point. She is a very good waitress, and supports herself on that, but she says she doesn't want to do that forever. She's 21 now, and wondering what to do with her life. So what can she do? She's very smart and very competitive, likes kids, likes to read, swing-dance, and brew beer. Needs a fair amount of alone time. Things she thought of: The military -- she has a DUI on her record, they might not take her, and she'd never be alone. Stay-at-home mom -- she'd be great at that, but it isn't something she can exactly just go do on her own. Things I thought of: Graphic designer -- she's meh about this. Coding bootcamp -- she's interested in this. Is coding bootcamp a good idea for someone like my daughter? Do they really take people from zero knowledge to job-ready? Did you do it? I found a lot of info online, but your personal experience would be very welcome. Do you have other ideas? Thanks for any help you can provide!

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posted about 2 hours ago on metafilter
Did I break some unwritten tipping rule when I "generously" tipped on a free meal?So a relative owns a restaurant where we go to from time to time, and typically we get a few items paid for and are billed for the rest. Tonight the relative graciously informed us that the entire meal was on the house. After some mild arguing, we accepted, but also left the waiter a tip. I tend to be a very generous tipper, especially for good service, and this was good service. I tipped 30% on what I quickly calculated to be the total bill. I'm also very discreet, don't brag or gloat, and really the only person who knows about how I tip is Mrs. Bitteroldman. It's just something I like to do, because I want to reward outstanding service, I'm in a good financial position to do so, and to acknowledge the fact that a few years back, I couldn't afford over-the-counter pain medication for a toothache and I just happened to get lucky in life. Anyway, I tipped, thought nothing of it, and made my way home. I guess the waiter told my relative about the tip; the relative told the spouse and the next thing I know, I'm getting an earful of "who do you think you are?", "we're not the Kennedys", etc. When I asked what was so offensive about what I did, the response was that because I got a free meal, by tipping generously, I was saying that I didn't need the owner to give me the free meal and I was trying to show them up. This doesn't make sense to me because the "transaction" was between me and the waiter. How does my tip reflect on what I think about the owners? Note that this is NOT an establishment where the bill includes the tip. It's possible that the tips might be shared among all the wait staff and kitchen, but I'm not sure. So did I do something wrong? If so, can you explain to me what I did wrong, hopefully in ways that are more gentle than the expletive-riddled rant I had to deal with this evening?

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
I'm looking for a special blender: powerful enough for ice crushing and smoothie making, glass jar (no "BPA free plastic"!), and as quiet as possible - I'd like to be able to attach a stainless steel smoothie cup to it as well so I don't have to clean two dirty smoothie-encrusted things. I would like to make smoothies after 630pm when my kids go to sleep without making the biggest ruckus ever. I'd also like for it to look nice. It doesn't have to be large. Does my blender exist?

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
Say you're a person in your 20s with an Associate's degree and you're looking for a new FT officey job. United States, based in a mid-size city. Receptionist, light bookkeeping, phones, etc. Where do you look? What do you need to do online?I'm trying to help someone close to me and I don't really know where to tell them to look or what to do as I have had a specific career path so there were listservs and databases in that area I could query. And it's been over 5 years since I looked for work, so things have changed. Hit me with your sites, articles and advice please!

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
I'm looking for recommended movie versions of operas -- an example that comes to mind of the sort of thing I'm talking about is Ingmar Bergman's Magic Flute. I am NOT looking for filmed stage productions (like the Metropolitan Opera Live productions) or movies where only parts of operas are featured (like Amadeus) or movies based on operas where significant changes have been made from the libretto (like Carmen Jones), but whole operas filmed as movies. It's okay if they didn't get a normal cinematic release.

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
The appeal of symmetry in art or inanimate objects (74 submissions currently and growing). Previously.

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
After reading a "nicer" ending for the musical Hamilton proposed by a young fan, Lin-Manuel Miranda (as Alexander Hamilton) and Leslie Odom Jr (as Aaron Burr) decided to give it a shot. Written by and starring Tony-award winner Miranda and based on the Ron Chernow biography, Hamilton is a hip-hop musical about the life and times of the first Secretary of the Treasury. Hamilton starts previews soon on Broadway after an acclaimed and sold-out run at the Public. Previously, featuring the song the musical grew out of. Bonus: Leslie Odom Jr recreates Michael Bay's best work.

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posted about 3 hours ago on metafilter
Hi everyone, My younger sister is 12, very smart, and has expressed interest in becoming a scientist. She loves physics and astronomy, especially, but she may have some untapped interest in other scientific fields as well.As her older sister (I'm 27 and know zilch about anything having to do with equations or numbers) I'd love to support her and maybe provide her and my parents with some resources on STEM education and mentoring as she looks toward college applications in the future. (My parents are both in sales, and my other sister writes, so we're not particularly well-equipped here...) I'd love any leads on scholarships, grants, summer camps, after-school clubs, and other programs, especially any initiatives geared at young girls in STEM. She's biracial (Latina/Black) so I'm thinking there might be some programs of interest geared at girls/people of color, too. Any science-y MeFites who can help -- please give a shoutout! Thank you!

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
Nikolaus Harnoncourt conducts the Chamber Orchestra of Europe in Mozart's 40th Symphony. Second movement. Third movement. Fourth movement. The famous chromatic bit at the start of the development of the fourth movement. Program notes written for a performance of the piece by Redwood Symphony. Other performances: Harnoncourt conducts the Concentus Musicus Wien much later. Second movement. Third movement. Fourth movement. Frans Brüggen conducts the Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century. Second movement. Third movement. Fourth movement. Leonard Bernstein conducts the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Second movement. Third movement. Fourth movement. Nicholas Kenyon talks about the piece for NPR's "Must-Have Mozart" series. NPR: Mozart's Turbulent Final Symphonies. A visualization of the first movement.

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
RINGLESS Filofax Pocket Malden Setup | May 2015 Filofax Organization: Daily Planning System | How I Customize My Kate Spade Spiral Planner & Why I Use It Instead of Filofax | April 2015 Planner Setup: Franklin Covey - Hobonichi - Erin Condren | My updated planner setup part 1- Franklin Covey- Faux Filofax | New Giada Franklin Covey (Filofax/Planner) | Huge Decorating My Filofax Compilation: 4 Weeks in my Filofax [Previously]

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
I'm leaving a toxic workplace and officially declined an exit interview with HR, but the org is trying to sneak one in. Some snowflakes inside.-I'm leaving an ultratoxic bureaucracy on fairly short notice for another job. -I ignored the "Let me know if you want to do an exit interview, it can be done by email if you want" question from HR, only to get a calendar invite to an in-person interview from someone in the office. I then emailed my polite refusal to HR. I got some exit documents back. I confirmed with them verbally that the exit interview is voluntary. -The person conducting the exit interview came up to me and said they'd meet with me at the end of the day tomorrow. I went to their office to ask if other people would be present (by which I meant senior management), and they said no. They went over a checklist of things they'd be doing (keys, the usual stuff) and casually added that there'd "be a few questions." -There's been very high turnover, especially of late. Some of my former colleagues chose to speak their minds during the exit interview, but I understand this can come back to bite people, though I'm not sure specifically how. I believe honest feedback would be a waste of time and is not what they're actually interested in, and they love setting traps for people. They didn't bother to ask for an exit interview with a respected employee who'd put in many years at the place and had given ample notice. So, what are my next steps? What could go wrong if I politely but firmly refuse to answer the questions? Do I reiterate that I've declined an exit interview, email my refusal, or give boilerplate positive answers? I feel silly trying to, say, haul in my union rep for the last hour of my employment.

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posted about 4 hours ago on metafilter
Authors as breakfast cereal mascots by Kate Gavino, creator of last night's reading, which is a collection of drawings and quotes from readings she attends in New York.

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posted about 5 hours ago on metafilter
This morning I woke up to a (very polite) note on my apartment door from a neighbor about my snoring. Not quite sure what action is appropriate to try and remedy the situation, or if it's my problem at all.The note was along the lines of "Dear Neighbor, I've been awakened by loud snoring from your unit several times in the past few months. I don't know too much about sleep apnea, but I know people usually don't know they have it. Might want to get that checked out." The note goes on to say the writer hopes I'm not offended -- really just thought I should know. I really don't want to be a noisy neighbor. I go out of my way to use headphones for music and walk softly, since I do live in an older complex with thin walls. I am 90% sure my bedroom backs up to an adjoining unit's bedroom, and I know there is a bedroom directly below mine. 1) I thought snoring wasn't necessarily a sleep apnea symptom, and I'm otherwise feeling good. Is loud snoring enough of a warning sign that I should talk to my doctor? I've thought about throwing one of those sleep-quality measuring apps on my phone as a first approximation of a "is something weird with my sleep schedule" meter, but I'm really unsure if that's likely to yield decent data (understanding of course that only a doctor + a sleep study could 100% diagnose or rule out). 2) As a considerate neighbor, what can I do here? I totally believe I snore (my father 100% snores, and I know I snore softly sometimes. I'd believe that maybe w/allergens in the air or something I snore louder?) I'm not really sure how to set it right, though, since it's an involuntary thing. Are those breathe-right strips worth trying? I can't really move my bed since it's along the only non-window, non-door wall in the room, which just happens to be shared with another unit.

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posted about 5 hours ago on metafilter
Enjoy! Best in translation.

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
My partner and I are considering a move from Adelaide to Sydney: help me learn to love life in the big city!The reason for moving is that Sydney offers better work opportunities for my partner. She has a job offer in Camperdown that she's very excited about. I'm likely to get a really good offer in Kensington. It's probably not difficulty to guess who the employers are, but nothing's official so I'd prefer not to name them explicitly. And as deeply attached as I am to my comfortable Adelaide lifestyle, I think my partner is right to think that she needs to leave town in order to move her career forward, because her opportunities here look very limited. My partner lived in Chicago for a long time, and I believe her when she says that there are awesome things that you can do in big cities that just aren't possible in smaller ones. There are things that offset the insane property prices, smaller living spaces and horrible traffic. In the abstract I can see how this is true, but I have no big city experiences of my own to back this up. I feel like I could love the big city: the things I like most about Adelaide are those respects in which it mimics a big one. I love that I can walk out of my office and ponder which of the 100+ restaurants in walking distance I should go get lunch at. I love taking trains to work. I love the huge crowds that appear when big events roll into town. But that's not the same thing as really living in a big city, and if we move I don't want to fall into the trap of trying to recreate an Adelaide lifestyle in Sydney. Sydney needs to be something I approach on its own terms, and not something I think of as a overpriced Adelaide with bad football. That way lies madness. I want to approach this with the mindset of a Sydneysider, not an Adeladean. I want to love Sydney, and apart from the NRL issue I think I can. So I need help imagining all those things that you can do in Sydney but you can't do in Adelaide. What kind of awesome lifestyle could we aim for in Sydney? Given our constraints a realistic living arrangement for us is a 3 bedroom apartment or townhouse in the inner west. At current prices the houses there are a bit out of our range, but units and townhouses around Marrickville or Dulwich Hill aren't too much of a stretch. We have two young kids and we're in our late 30s / early 40s. We're indifferent to beaches. I love to run, and I don't do it enough. We like hanging out in coffee shops and small bars, though kids can make it hard. Day trips on the weekend are great, especially if we can get there by train: the kids really like trains and they drive us nuts in the car. Also: As it happens we'll be in Sydney in a few days time (Sun-Wed) to scope things out (we're staying in Camperdown), so if anyone has any suggestions for what we could or should do while we're there I'd appreciate it.

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
With Vancouver's average detached home price rising 28% to $1.12M (CAD), what the heck is going on? Canadaland's Jesse Brown interviews South China Morning Post columnist Ian Young, author of Hongcouver about wealth migration, racism, and immigration schemes. Canadaland went from hobby status to full-blown crowd-sourced media startup back in October of 2014 with a successful Patreon fundraising campaign.

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
What is a word (or phrase!) for the unpredictable imposition of irrationally high standards? Further description/examples inside.Specific examples of the type of word/phrase I'm thinking of: excessive anger at someone using a cell phone in an otherwise-quiet public space; taking offense at a friend entering an unlocked front door without knocking first; a guest helping oneself to a second glass of wine without asking; violation of archaic rules of etiquette such as beginning eating before the hostess; taking offense at well-intentioned but unsolicited advice; a general arbitrary overreaction to slight (possible) breaches of etiquette and a rationalization about why the breach is SO BAD. I'm especially thinking of when offense being taken depends on external factors outside of the alleged bad actor's control. I'm trying to think of a way to concisely describe something I've observed in others; not for purposes of confrontation, but as a means of getting my own head around what's problematic about it and how/why it happens. I'm just having trouble naming it.

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
Ok go easy on me, this is my first question ever. My super responsible 14yo daughter wants to have a couple of boy friends stay the night along with a couple of girls.My first thought (I don't know why; my dad in my ear, I guess) was "No f-ing way!" But she said "So if I was gay, would you still let my female friends stay over?" Touche, kid. Also, it's super common in European/Scandinavian countries which tends to neutralize the forbidden nature of sex that we seem to foster here in America. I trust my daughter implicitly and I know (from having been a teenage girl) that the most conservative/controlling parents are the ones with teenage girls who sneak out at night. I am a pretty trusting and liberal parent, determined to keep an open mind and keep the dialogue open with my kiddo. But I don't want my house to be the teenage love-shack, either. So. What do you think? Would you allow boy/girl sleepovers?

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
It's the same old story, partner loves his parents, they make me a little crazy (and I think make him unhappy). Help me better understand them, and their family dynamic, so I can better navigate the minefield, watch out for potential negative affects on my children, not let their negative patterns become our negative patterns, help my husband be his happiest self and not let it make me a neurotic mess.The straw/event that is provoking me to ask this question is that our just walking daughter pulled a heavy glass coffee table top (I'd say weighs at minimum 50 pounds) off it's base and onto her foot. And while I'm still comforting the screaming child they (including my husband) are creating elaborate explanations as to why the sudden and dark bruise means it was actually a pinch and so nothing to worry about, instead of crushing blow which we might want to, you know, monitor or something. All of this in contradiction to the actual physics of the thing which they all saw. It seemed like it was much more important to them that they create a comfortable story which would make them feel better, than to address the actual injury. And I realized that this is at the heart of so much of what I don't understand, drives me crazy and worries me about their family dynamic. This level of denial about potential risk is RIFE, and they (MIL in particular) become very upset when these "happy stories" are overtly challenged. We had a 6 month relationship misery tornado (tears, recrimmination, guilt, silent treatment, etc.) when we expressed concern that their large, untrained, hyperactive, kangaroo like, out of control dog (we didn't say it that way of course!) could jump on our premature infant son and hurt him, so we wanted to not have them in the same room until the baby was bigger or the dog was under basic control. WE were the bad guys because MIL felt ambushed and attacked and they were sure that the dog is really sweet and doesn't mean any harm (we don't disagree with the last two points, but they are irrelevant to whether the dog may actually cause harm). There's a little guess culture I suspect, but this seems more extreme. It worries me because of course it's dangerous to ignore potential dangers just because they make you uncomfortable, but also because it feels so emotionally dismissive. Anyone elses' feelings just don't matter. This is kind of subtle and insidious, and so in a way I'm more worried about it. Big physical dangers are easy to make a boundary and say "nope. sorry. not gonna happen.", but the slow subtle message of "your pain isn't yours/important", and how often we sorta just go along with the happy story because it's not worth the possible shit storm, seems really potentially damaging to the psyche. I'd love to find ways to counteract this message both with my children, and my husband. Probably related: They are profoundly self absorbed, almost exclusively talk about themselves/their family. Much of this is in the form of reminiscing/story telling which almost feels mythos building to me. They tell the same stories repeatedly. I'm always supposed to be so damn impressed. The first time I met them they did not ask a single thing about me the entire day. Asking about our lives or my family are typically perfunctory and just jumping off points for their thoughts/ideas/stories. They are extremely critical of others. There's also multiple generations of alcoholism in the family. Internally they deal with conflict by MIL nagging/hinting and being passive aggressive, FIL continuing to do whatever thing MIL doesn't like, they both act out a bit, everyone ignores these embarrassing displays and pretends everything is hunky dory, rinse wash repeat. I believe hubby was traditionally put in the position of making the peace, making MIL feel better or giving them a "safe" outlet for their negative energy (IMO some heavy and inappropriate shit for a kid). But this is just guesswork on my part. I on the other hand come from a split family where one half is super "talk it out" loving supportive constructive hand holdy (they rock) and the other half is more along the lines of "he who yells loudest wins" (not ideal). So my reaction to conflict is the polar opposite all this denial, repression, passive aggressive shit makes my stomach hurt and keeps me up at night. It makes me feel anxious, bad about myself, like I did something wrong, angry/defensive b/c I didn't do anything wrong, worried, sad and so tired. For what it's worth, I think they are doing the best they can with what they have. I feel sympathetic to the origins of their challenges, and I do think their intentions are good. They are trying to be good to us, and take care of us, and all of that. They love us the best way they know how. We overall have a good relationship with them, although it takes a not insignificant amount of emotional management on our part. So help me (better) cope, subvert, counteract, heal, not internalize, etc. Professional literature or self help references, strategies, anecdotes, random advice, are all welcome!

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
For all new experienced nurses- I am in my second week in hospital for clinical rotations .i am going for my BSN. I feel I want to cry- so much I need to learn, so little I know. Now I discovered I am germofobe to.... Worry about getting hiv, hep etc Then today I had an experience- clinical instructor told me to do a blood sugar. Did it and in the end she tells me to put everything in the gloves and toss. Stupid me, stupid me, stupid me decides that I need to put the test strip in my hands at the end and of course I felt a pinch because the strip is pointy on all 4 ends. I was wearing gloves, and I did not see any blood coming off my finger. Washed my hands but now of course I freak out. My clin instructor says I am fine because I was wearing gloves and it is not that I poked myself with a needle. What do you think all you experienced nurses? Do you agree? Am I crazy? I need serious help I guess

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
Google's algorithm shows prestigious job ads to men, but not to women. Here's why that should worry you. But how much of this is us and how much of this is baked into the algorithm? It's a question that a lot of people are struggling to answer.

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
Ta-Nehisi Coates writes A Letter To My Son - "This is your country, this is your world, this is your body, and you must find some way to live within the all of it." Coates' book Between The World And Me will be out earlier than planned, that is, next week. Coates reads an excerpt. A small selection of recent pieces: Color-Blind Policy, Color-Conscious Morality I endorse all of these initiatives and ideas—but not because they are targeted policy. They are not. And you will hear no policy targeted toward black people coming out of the Obama White House, or probably any White House in the near future. That is because the standard progressive approach of the moment is to mix color-conscious moral invective with color-blind public policy. It is not hard to see why that might be the case. Asserting the moral faults of black people tend to gain votes. Asserting the moral faults of their government, not so much. I am sure Obama sincerely believes in the moral invective he offers. But I suspect he believes a lot more about his country which he chooses not to share. The Brief and Tragic Life of Kalief Browder The numbers which people like me bring forth to convey the problems of our justice system are decent tools. But what the numbers can't convey is what the justice system does to the individual black body. Kalief Browder was an individual, which is to say he was a being with his own passions, his own particular joys, his own strange demons, his own flaws, his own eyes, his own mouth, his own original hands. His family had their own particular stories of him. His friends must remember him in their own original way. The senseless destruction of this individual must necessarily be laid at the feet of the citizens of New York, because it was done by our servants, and it was done in our name. Nonviolence as Compliance When nonviolence is preached as an attempt to evade the repercussions of political brutality, it betrays itself. When nonviolence begins halfway through the war with the aggressor calling time out, it exposes itself as a ruse. When nonviolence is preached by the representatives of the state, while the state doles out heaps of violence to its citizens, it reveals itself to be a con. And none of this can mean that rioting or violence is "correct" or "wise," any more than a forest fire can be "correct" or "wise." Wisdom isn't the point tonight. Disrespect is. In this case, disrespect for the hollow law and failed order that so regularly disrespects the community. The Clock Didn't Start With The Riots When you think about the period of Jim Crow and the stripping of black people's right to vote, this is not the mere stripping of some sort of civic ceremony. It's the stripping of your ability to have any sort of say in how your tax dollars are used. It's this constant stripping, this taking away of rights that allowed us to enter into a situation that I talk about in "The Case for Reparations," where—within the 20th century—you have programs being passed by which white families can accumulate masses of wealth through housing. The main group of people who are cut out of that are black people.

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
From Software left fantasy for horror, and the results are mind-blowing. More detailed analysis and spoilers below the jump. WARNING! THIS POST CONTAINS MAJOR SPOILERS FOR THE GAME BLOODBORNE. IF YOU HAVEN'T PLAYED THIS YET AND WOULD LIKE TO, IT SPOILS SOME COOL REVEALS LATER IN THE GAME! LIKE EVEN MOUSING OVER URLS COULD SPOIL STUFF - BE WARNED. Bloodborne and Lovecraft horror is an 11 minute video essay (once again: many spoilers) that examines the Lovecraftian mythos that Bloodborne draws from, and the way that it mechanically ties to ideas of cosmic horror. Games critic Joshua Trevett goes deeper, talking about the social and cultural ramifications of Lovecraftian horror, and how Bloodborne turns those on their head, People go crazy for Lovecraft, and blinders go up the instant his name is mentioned. His endless legions of fans don't really feel comfortable acknowledging that so much of what informed his ingenious take on horror was his terror of immigrants, particularly black people, and the squalor in which they were made to live. All he could manage to do with that fear was loathe them ... Lovecraft's work was good enough, and its inception gross enough, that it deserves descendants which take a closer look at it and do some real unpacking. Thankfully, Bloodborne came along to do just that

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posted about 9 hours ago on metafilter
I will be moving to a new city for a new job soon, along with my husband and 1-year-old. We're trying to work out which features of a house/flat we would really benefit from and which we don't need so much.Our ideal situation is a big house in its own grounds with excellent public transport links a short walk from my office. Our budget won't stretch anywhere near that, though, so we're going to have to compromise on some things. This could mean a tiny 4th-floor flat right in the middle of the city near my office, a bigger house with gardens further out in the suburbs, or anything in between - and we don't have a lot of time to choose. Possibly relevant: we don't drive (but will be in Edinburgh with good public transport), husband works from home, and we'll be aiming to live here until Catseye Jr. is four or five but will be leaving before she starts primary school. So: did you appreciate having as much room as possible? Outside space: worth the pricier rent or not? Better to live right in the city with a shorter commute, or further out where it's cheaper and quieter? Advice like "make sure you can fit a stairgate on the staircase" or "ideally get somewhere with a bathtub, not just a shower" or "laminate flooring and downstairs neighbours is not a good combination" is also much appreciated.

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