posted less than an hour ago on metafilter
Looking for more Detective mysteries like Ian Rutledge and Bess Crawford or Leaphorn and Chee.More interested in stories that develop characters, and are immersive in a time or place. Don't want gore or suspense or creepy.

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posted about 1 hour ago on metafilter
There is a recurring theme in some of my interactions at work that I am looking for ways to improve.As context, I am in the early years of a second career. I am the most junior person on my team; I also have 20 years of experience in a closely related field. For example, if my team lead heard me say the paragraph above ^^^ the immediate response could be, "please don't downplay your prior experience. You know we value that experience, right? I don't want you to ever think we don't value it." And I would say yes, thank you, I feel valued here. Then the next day, my team lead might stop by my office and say, "about what you said yesterday, it's important to remember that you're still the most junior member of this team. Your prior experience isn't in this field and doesn't apply here." And I would say yes, I understand that I am in the right role for me; have I done anything that isn't appropriate to my role? Team lead: "no, only what you said yesterday implied that you deserve a more senior role." Me: I'm sorry I came across that way. I didn't meant to imply that. I am very happy with my role. Then over the next couple of days, another team member comes to me and says out of the blue, "I hate that the company doesn't value you more based on your prior experience. You bring so much to the table. That should count for something." I would respond that this is the nature of a career change, this is the deal I signed up for, that I am valued here, and I am happy with my role. And hours later, my supervisor might stop by and say, "team lead mentioned you are really hung up on your prior experience. It's important to understand you are in a junior role now, and it would help if you were more deferential." By this point, I'm sure some frustration is showing, although I use my calmest, most professional tone as I say, yes, I understand my role, and I am sorry for coming across as not deferential enough. Supervisor, "I can't believe someone with as much experience as you doesn't understand how to defer to a team lead." Me: "I'm sorry, I did not intend to disrespect team lead. Is there anything specific I need to change?" Supervisor: "the only specific thing is what you said the other day about being the most junior person despite 20 years experience. We've talked about how that's the nature of a career change. I thought you understood." Me: yes, I understand, and I am happy in my role. This happens when I report back on how a project is going, or when I'm engaging in office small talk, or anything else. The pattern as I see it: I make a neutral, factual statement, and then team lead reacts to it in contradictory ways, telling me I need to work on being more X and being more not-X. The project is moving too fast, at the same time the project is moving too slow, is another example. The pattern includes team lead telling other people multiple distorted versions of what I said, as best I can tell from other people mentioning things out of the blue that jive with team lead's various interpretations. Please assume that both team lead and I will be staying in our roles for the foreseeable future and need to work this out. I am looking for how I can improve; practical advice on changing what I can.

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posted about 6 hours ago on metafilter
Toulouse becomes a labyrinth for this mythological tale. Behind the scenes: with the giant minotaur. The company website: La Machine. Their philosophy: AT THE HEART OF LA MACHINE'S ARTISTIC approach, MOVEMENT IS read AS A LANGUAge, as a source of emotion. THROUGH each of these LIVING ARCHITECTUREs, THE IDEA IS TO DREAM OF TOMORROW'S CITIES, AND thanks to this, TRansform THE WAY we look at our towns. Today, La Machine develops many projects in the field of urban development – Les Machines de l'Île in Nantes, Les Animaux de la place in La Roche sur Yon, Le Manège Carré Sénart... – as well as for street theatre – Long Ma Jing Shen, Les Mécaniques Savantes, La Symphonie Mécanique, L'Expédition Végétale, Le Dîner des Petites Mécaniques... The company, led by François Delarozière, came about thanks to artists, technicians and theatre designers working together for the construction of unusual theatre objects. To bring its creations to life, La Machine has set up two workshops, one in Nantes and one in Tournefeuille. They are home of many different trades and crafts from theatre and the arts, to industry and advanced technology. People and their skills are the very essence of the creative process.

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
I recently had to add some air to my tires due to cold weather. Afterwards, I had to "reset" the TPMS, and then drive around for a while while a progress bar ticked from 0 to 99 percent. In as much detail as possible, what was my car (and its computer) actually doing during this time?I gather that somehow this kind of TPMS uses the rotation speed of the tires to infer tire pressure. But what data was actually being collected -- like, specifically, what was being measured? How is this data aggregated into an estimate of tire pressure? What algorithm was being used to do this, and what exactly did the progress percentage represent? I would really like to know this, for some reason. If there are any journal articles about this, I would love to at least skim them.

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
I play piano, and am trying to learn guitar. When playing even for a few minutes, I have wrist and tendon pain in my left (fretting) hand. What should I do?Other clues/notes: I've been a desk jockey for 20 years, but minimize the impact of typing and mousing by using a split keyboard and a trackball. I exercise regularly, and feel like my grip, though strong, (pull ups, swinging on bars) no longer has the endurance it had previously. I've looked at this guy, and his main advice is to ice your tendons every day. I don't have the issue of sore fingers or tired hands that some beginners have - it's pain running along my tendons. I also have trouble getting my left hand in to the proper position for fretting - specifically placement of the thumb on the back of the neck. I have trouble keeping the thumb flat. So what should I do - see a PT who specializes in this issue? Ice it? Work on flexibility? I'm not looking to be an elite musician who practices 4 hours/day, but 1 hour/day without pain would be nice.

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posted about 7 hours ago on metafilter
Eric Will Eat Anything on Ice Cream Reddit Tells Him to. It started here. Background Via

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posted about 8 hours ago on metafilter
I want to shut down my Facebook account, but I have a lot of photos and memories from the past 10+ years in there. Is there a company that would let me download the data and turn it into a journal-like book?

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posted about 9 hours ago on metafilter
I recall coming across a Perl coding example perhaps 15-25 years ago in one of the O'Reilly Perl books, and 'm hoping a graybeard or book collector can help.I've been buying/perusing O'Reilly books since they were plastic-spiral bound, and I spent a fair amount of time in that section of Computer Literacy and Stacey's Cupertino back when they existed. The coding example involved reproducing the OpenVMS 'DIFFERENCE' command. Cant't find it in Google etc., Scribd, O'Reilly's website or on Safari Books Online. I suspect the example predates O'Reilly's PDF publishing era and was deleted for subsequent editions of whatever book in which it was published. I can easily write such a beast myself these days, but I would like to know which book/edition it was in so I may confirm my memory. I am bracing myself for 0 replies to this amazingly arcane and obscure question.

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posted about 9 hours ago on metafilter
"Broken Face" And All, Becky Lynch Is Suddenly The Biggest Star In WWE: How Rebecca Quin seized the moment to create one of the most iconic photos in women's wrestling history and became one of the biggest things in professional wrestling despite being out of action for an unknown amount of time. (content warning: real blood)

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posted about 11 hours ago on metafilter
We had a leak that flooded the carpet in one bedroom. Landlord sent someone to vacuum up the water after the plumber repaired the leak. Then someone to repair the drywall and paint. The latter person used a moisture meter to check for mold. The carpet has not been replaced and was not pulled up to check underneath it when this happened, but the individual doing that work seemed to be knowledgeable. I have questions.The room in question still has a musty odor. The landlord seems to think all suitable repairs have been made. This is normally the toddler's room and I can't bring myself to let him sleep in there until I feel better about the state of it. If I push the landlord very hard we will probably end up having to move when the lease is up. I want to avoid that if I can. Strategies to influence the landlord or ideas for repairs we can do ourselves? Or is there an affordable home test I can use to check the air quality? If the air has mold and I can prove it, maybe he will do more.

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posted about 12 hours ago on metafilter
Former Bon Appetit editor Claire Saffitz is back in the BA test kitchen (at least temporarily), this time making gourmet Sno Balls. Previously: the shape of wafer, which includes Pastry Chef Attempts To Make Gourmet Kit Kats, Pastry Chef Attempts To Make Gourmet Cheetos, Pastry Chef Attempts To Make a Gourmet Twinkie, Pastry Chef Attempts To Make Gourmet Gushers.

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posted about 13 hours ago on metafilter
On July 31st, known illustrated jocularity Wondermark (previously) posted an innocuous comic strip beginning with the phrase "Check out my sick elephant!" For the next three and a half months, ending(?) only this past Thursday, every Wondermark strip centered around this one phrase, eventually spiraling into a dramatic(??) storyline with numerous recurring characters—including, yes, several sick elephants. In the eighth strip, wordplay based on slight phonetic variation began appearing, and the phrase was no longer relegated to the first panel; in the last strip, over twenty different variations of increasing obscurity appeared in short succession. In-between is only chaos. The author, David Malki !, answered questions about the sick elephant saga in this podcast and this recent reddit AMA, including noting that at one point, his readers who wanted more sick elephants outnumbered his readers who wanted fewer by roughly 7:1.

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posted about 13 hours ago on metafilter
I have made a map with four points on it, and I can't find how to save it. I can preview the directions, but when I click out of that, the map has disappeared. I make it all over again, and when I click out, it's gone. This is on an iPhone.This has to be simpler than what I'm running into, so I have obviously missed something important. Somewhere, there must be a "save map" selection, but for the life of me I can't find it. All I want to do is create a map with a starting point, a first destination, a second destination, and then a third and final destination. Think along the lines of "picking up two friends on the way to the restaurant." I want it to save the map, and then read the directions aloud to me tomorrow in the car. All suggestions appreciated.

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posted about 13 hours ago on metafilter
"It's named for a sun-loving fungus that lives in cow dung, but the dance form of Pilobolus, which has been gaining momentum for more than 30 years, is a lot more exciting, but we'll let you judge for yourself" (an interview and performance segment from 9 years ago, related to Pilobolus' 2007 Oscar performance). How Pilobolus brings shadows to life (Wired Masterminds video). Pilobolus is more than shadow-dancing, but that creativity and whimsy is always present. From early on, the company "made a specialty of playful topsy-turvy entanglements that defied anatomical logic" and which sometimes "gave rise to bizarre imagery" (blurb from an almost hour long Pilobolus Dance Theater performance/ lecture, recorded in 1998 at C. D. Hylton High School in Woodbridge, VA). About Pilobolus: Pilobolus crystallinus is a phototropic (light loving) fungus. Commonly known as "Hat Thrower," its spores accelerate 0–45 mph in the first millimeter of their flight and adhere to wherever they land. The father of Jonathan Wolken was studying pilobolus in his biology lab when the group first formed. The name was apt, and stuck. Pilobolus previously: Pilobolus Dance Theater (October 23, 2011) -- a brief overview OK Go Dance (July 29, 2011) -- OK Go + Pilobolus = All Is Not Lost (plus another overview of the dance company) The stilt palm. Easter lilies. Pilobolus. (January 17, 2001) -- Plants that move, and the people who study them. Bonus video: Pilobolus performs on Penn & Teller: Fool Us in a piece of movement and magic, inspired by Harry Houdini, called "Escape"

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posted about 14 hours ago on metafilter
Would you look at my webpage layouts, and tell me what's wrong with my eye -- and how to fix it? That is, why is most of my design work shitty, and how do I get good?Sometimes I can make a layout that looks OK to me. Other times not. I don't know how I made the better work better, but I can see that it is -- and, more often, I can't put my finger on why the shitty work is shitty... but I can see that is. I know that graphic design is both a talent and a discipline people go to school for but I was wondering if you had a few examples of my layouts, could you diagnose my eye problem? Provide some links/resources/advice? I'm mocking up some ideas for a webpage for my sister, a budding freelance writer. She doesn't know exactly what she wants -- but she says she doesn't want a cookie-cutter template site. Here's what I have so far:ForestToastPantoneWavy I would love to hear, in as much detail as you feel like giving me, what is wrong with these layouts. I would love to hear that I seem to consistently do $thing, and instead I should do $otherThing. I do know that templates exist specifically to protect people's eyes from work like mine, and that if my sister wants a job, she should use a template -- taken as read, guys, got it! Thanks for any help you can give me!

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posted about 14 hours ago on metafilter
The growth of yoga and meditation in the US since 2012 is remarkable: The number of Americans who meditate has tripled. Yoga is up 55 percent. "Yoga and meditation, two ancient practices, are now officially the most popular alternative health approaches in the United States, each used by around 35 million adults. That's the word from a report (PDF) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention out [last] Thursday, which looked at the changes in the use of yoga, meditation, and chiropractors between 2012 and 2017." Mindfulness Is Going Mainstream Because of Science: Mindfulness has gone from hippie-dippie magical thinking to science-based health hack. What gives? ... One of the biggest problems of the study of mindfulness as a field is the fact that there isn't a uniform way by which people can describe mindfulness and meditation. There are many practices—from transcendental to more rudimentary "focus and breathe" practices—of varying intensities, practiced by a wide demographic of people. "Just like sports is a word that refers to many practices, so too it is with meditation; different kinds of meditation changes the brain in different ways," Davidson said. The tiny community of scientists who are attempting to understand how mindfulness affects the brain have had to be creative in their study design to make their experiments rigorous, believable, and above all, replicable. Davidson described his study design as one that is similar to drug studies: "One group is meditating, the other is doing something to improve wellbeing but not meditating," he said. "We ask whether meditating caused these changes in the brain and in health. We have to make sure they're not simply correlates. Using rigorous randomized trials, we can definitely ascertain that meditation is causing these changes and is not ancillary." That, in a nutshell, is the challenge scientists are grappling with—being able to prove that practicing attention and self-reflection in a very specific way can change the brain in measurable ways. Proving this used to be impossible, but in an age where magnetic resonance machines are widely available to peer into the brain's electrical activity and where medical measurement of indicators is better than ever before, there's reason to believe that we are incredibly close to proving how mindfulness can alter the architecture of the mind—or not. Harvard Gazette, Part 1: When science meets mindfulness: "Researchers study how it seems to change the brain in depressed patients." Part 2: With mindfulness, life's in the moment. "Those who learn its techniques often say they feel less stress, think clearer." Meditation helps veterans with PTSD, Defense Dept. experiment finds. All sessions were once a week for 90 minutes. How Meditation Changes Your Brain — and Your Life. When neuroscientists tested expert meditators, they discovered something surprising: The effect of Buddhist meditation isn't just momentary; it can alter deep-seated traits in our brain patterns and character. Daniel Goleman and Richard Davidson tell the story of this revolutionary breakthrough in our understanding of how meditation works. The four experimenters in the control room team watched, transfixed, while the next meditation period was announced. As John Dunne translated the next instruction to meditate into Tibetan, the team studied the monitors in silence, glancing back and forth from the brain wave monitor to the video trained on Mingyur. Instantly the same dramatic burst of electrical signal occurred. Again Mingyur was perfectly still, with no visible change in his body's position from the rest to the meditation period. Yet the monitor still displayed that same brain wave surge. As this pattern repeated each time he was instructed to generate compassion, the team looked at one another in astonished silence, nearly jumping off their seats in excitement. Meditation in the Time of Disruption: Mindfulness and meditation have become big business for tech-savvy entrepreneurs. But can you really unplug and reset while tied to an app on your phone? Companies like Headspace and Insight Timer say yes. But longtime practitioners, philosophers, and scientists aren't so sure. That meditation and mindfulness have entered the repertoire of global capitalism isn't surprising: In the face of stagnant wages and an ever-deteriorating boundary between work and whatever we do outside it, why not shift the responsibility of finding peace to the individual? Put another way: Next time work makes you feel less than human, should you gently speak truth to power, or should you use mindfulness to self-regulate and maintain function in an oppressive system? And should you choose to self-regulate, are you tacitly thanking the oppressive system for giving you the tools of self-regulation to begin with? Furthermore, how much of this experience—this process of spelunking into my mind—should be comfortable and brightly colored? How much should feel good? ... So, is it "working"? To invoke the refrain of Grecian skeptics, epokhe—I can't say for sure what I should find convincing and what I shouldn't. Music sounds better, and I think my timing has improved comedically, and I have come to see my wife and children as bulbs in a great chandelier: When one light dims, so dims the whole room. The Magnificent, Mysterious, Wild, Connected and Interconnected Brain: Our brain is like a wild, raging electrical storm that wondrously enables us to make our way. Yet a lot of mindfulness literature makes it sound like a very simple machine. Two leading neuroscientists suggest better ways to think and talk about the brain and the mind. A newsstand publication called Mindfulness Made Simple contains a two-page spread on "How Mindfulness Physically Changes Your Brain" that points to mindfulness causing growth in the presumed good parts of the brain and shrinkage in the bad parts. It takes some preliminary research out of all context and states it pretty much as fact. Any honest neuroscientist will tell you that we simply do not know this much about how the brain is affected by mindfulness, since we don't even have a single definition of what mindfulness means. And what we feel we know today will be eclipsed by findings after our lifetime. Humbleness is the watchword when it comes to assertions about how the brain and the mind work. A book from a major publisher sells itself as "Mind-Hacker's Guide to Shifting into Brain 3.0." It promises that you can use science to rewire your brain. Among its claims: You can "overcome PTSD without medication by strengthening neural circuits in Brain 3.0, making your emotional immune system stronger." Let's be clear. This is not science. It is snake oil. The problem, scientists and science educators point out, is not that people are being coached and coaxed to "use their brains better." The problem is using pseudo-science as evidence for the effectiveness ofa practice or to present outmoded models of the brain and mental experience. These models are often taught to children in school, who go home and tell mommy and daddy that the amygdala is bad and the prefrontal cortex is good. Is it fair to reduce something so wondrous as the brain to a couple of parts—even if this mythology helps children to notice their reactivity and calm down? Related post: MettāFilter

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posted about 14 hours ago on metafilter
I'm looking for things to read on the concept of home -- what makes for feeling that one is at home, how people identify places as their homes, psychology behind it, what meaning people ascribe to it, how people feel at home in transient situations, etc. Non-fiction, books, articles, fiction -- anything!

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posted about 14 hours ago on metafilter
I will be taking a pretty short notice solo trip to Bermuda to celebrate landing (and keeping) my new job.I will be there from Tue. Nov. 27 through to Fri. Nov. 30. I will be staying at Cambridge Beaches in the north-west part of the island. It is not a super long stay, so what are the absolute must sees or dos in Bermuda? I am not a very active person and swimming in the sea kind of freaks me out, but walking along a beach and swimming out a little is fine. I love walking, seeing beautiful scenery, having great foods. And one of my favourite activities is sitting somewhere with a beautiful view, with an outstanding drink in my hand (cocktail, coffee, tea, wine, whatever), in a place tranquil enough for me to read a book. I'm fine with museums or galleries but I am not really a history buff. I am strongly considering visiting the Crystal and/or Fantasy Caves as well as the nature reserve around them. Any recommendations? Restaurants, cafés, parks, galleries, walking trails, beaches (there are so many!), St. George versus Hamilton, unique things that can't be found or consumed anywhere else?

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posted about 15 hours ago on metafilter
I know you are not my optometrist. Pretty much my question- is it safe ( the manufacturer says 6nights 7 days is ok) my optometrist office says take them out nightly. I really hate looking for my glasses to go pee at night or reading with them before going to sleep. Thanks in advance p.

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posted about 15 hours ago on metafilter
Roughly coincident with Dacre Stoker and J.D. Barker's prequel to Dracula (excerpt 1; excerpt 2) contending for a Goodreads Choice Award for Horror, Philip Spedding at The London Library has announced an intriguing find: "Bram Stoker was a member of The London Library but until now we have had no indication whether or how he used our collection. Today's discovery changes that" (video walkthrough of the evidence). Alternative copies of the sources listed in the article are available online. Sources for Dracula: Transylvanian Superstitions by E. Gerard The Book of Were-Wolves by Sabine Baring-Gould Pseudodoxia Epidemica by Thomas Browne Magyarland (volume 2) by Nina Elizabeth Mazuchelli The Golden Chersonese by Isabella L. Bird Round About the Carpathians by Andrew F. Crosse On the Track of the Crescent by E.C. Johnson Transylvania; Its Products and Its People by Charles Boner An Account of the Principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia by William Wilkinson Curious Myths of the Middle Ages by Sabine Baring-Gould Germany Present and Past (volume 2) by Sabine Baring-Gould Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors by Fletcher S. Bassett The Origin of Primitive Superstitions by Rushton M. Dorman Credulities Past and Present by William Jones The Folk-Tales of the Magyars by W. Henry Jones and Lewis L. Kropf Superstition and Force by Henry C. Lea Sea Fables Explained by Henry Lee Anecdotes of the Habits and Instincts of Birds, Reptiles, and Fishes by Mrs. R. Lee The Other World; Or, Glimpses of the Supernatural (volume 2) by Frederick George Lee Popular Superstitions, and the Truth Contained Therein, with an Account of Mesmerism by Herbert Mayo The Devil: His Origin, Greatness, and Decadence by Albert Réville A Tarantasse Journey through Eastern Russia in the Autumn of 1856 by William Spottiswoode The Spottiswoode Miscellany edited by James Maidment Traité des superstitions qui regardent les sacraments by Jean-Baptiste Thiers The Phantom World (volume 2) by Augustine Calmet The Land Beyond the Forest by E. Gerard La magie et l'astrologie dans l'antiquité et au moyen age by L.-F. Alfred Maury Narratives of Sorcery and Magic by Thomas Wright Things Not Generally Known by John Timbs Roumania Past and Present by James Samuelson A Glossary of Words Used in the Neighbourhood of Whitby by F.K. Robinson of Whitby The Natural and Supernatural by John Jones History and Mystery of Precious Stones by William Jones On Superstitions Connected with the History and Practice of Medicine and Surgery by Thomas Joseph Pettigrew Fishery Barometer Manual by Robert H. Scott The Theory of Dreams (volume 2) by Robert Gray Sea Monsters Unmasked by Henry Lee "The Birds of Transylvania" (part 2) by Charles G. Danford and John A. Harvie Brown Previously: Dacre Stoker; contemporary reviews of Dracula; and the discovery of another preface to Dracula.

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posted about 16 hours ago on metafilter
I want to understand some acoustic theory to design solutions for outdoor noise (or at least communicate better with acoustic engineers). I know of software for this but want to know just enough of the nuts and bolts. There's lots of info available but I don't want all of it and don't know where to start.I want to introduce some new methods into exterior acoustic design and acoustic engineers here are reluctant to go beyond what they know. Knowing more would help me come across better. I'd like to know how I would go about calculating: A Sound attenuation from source to proposed receiver? B Sound level/pressure? at receiving boundary? C What volume or face area of a given material* I would need to (not sure what) to reduce received decibel level from e.g. 75 to 65 Decibels? *I have info on sound absorbing capacities of various materials and plants (all plants have their own specific level of sound absorption). BUT - is it even possible to know 'enough' to do the above, or is this like asking about knowing 'enough' about brain surgery?

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posted about 16 hours ago on metafilter
Hi Folks, I'm looking for some free video editing software apps for high school students. They will be creating an interview-style news report and will need to stitch together the questions and answers they create. I need something compatible with both Android and IOS. All of the students have smart phones. One may be using a laptop. I saw some previous questions, but they were over 4 years old. Many thanks on behalf of a colleague!

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posted about 17 hours ago on metafilter
How do I know when I'm ready to "settle down"? Can a single person "settle down"? This question is specifically about getting a dog and furniture, and more existentially about a person's reasons for and ability to make long-term plans.(Skip to the bottom for the actual questions.) I've been extremely lucky the last few years. I had a job that paid me well enough to take a month-long vacation abroad, spend various holidays with a friend in a nearby city, and spend this last year traveling and going to grad school abroad. I'm now at the point where (I'm almost broke and) it's time to choose a city, find a job, and stay put for a while. I think I've narrowed down my next city to either Chicago or New York because I have a good friend or two in each city (friends who will probably move away in the next 2-5 years) and this is important to me right now. All of my family and most of my friends will not be living near Chicago or New York, so I will travel occasionally to see them. I'm also aware I will most likely not be able to afford a dog or an apartment with fewer than 3 roommates if I move to New York, but I have wanted to experience living in New York while my friend still lives there (although this desire is decreasing with age). I'm aware I don't have 100% control over which companies in which city will make me job offers. I always assumed that "settling down" would happen when I magically found a solid partner and had a reason to stay in one place, could split rent with someone, and have another person to help take care of the dog, but this isn't in the cards for me right now. I'm currently in a relationship with a really great person, but due to financial and visa issues (and my inability to find a job here), I anticipate the relationship ending once I return to the U.S. I've previously had pretty consistently annoying dating experiences (see post history for an example), and although I'd like to take a year dating hiatus after my current relationship, I would like to find a long-term (permanent?) partner in the next decade ideally. Although, again, I have no real control over this. Once I've lined up a job in one of these cities, I would really like to "settle down" as a single person, which to me means living with as few roommates as possible, finding a place for myself where I can invest in some furniture to set up my apartment the way *I* like, and getting a dog regardless of finding a partner. I feel like life is filled with too many unknowns for me to guarantee anything about the next 1, 3, or 10 years of my life, however, and apparently that's an important thing to have before getting a dog. **** The questions: I'm 29 soon and I'd like to increase my quality of life by getting the things I've wanted for years. I want to settle down, but I'm not sure I'm ready. Is this reasonable for where I am in life? Or is getting a studio and buying my own furniture a waste of money -- and as my friends and family say, do I travel too much to have a dog for the next 10-15 years, even though in the past 10 years I haven't traveled so much as I've moved (with a few exceptions) and I don't anticipate having those opportunities again anytime soon? And what if I "settle down," but then for some unforeseeable reason, I decide to "un-settle down"? I feel like I have very little control over how my life goes. The whole appeal of Chicago is the idea of "settling down" with a studio apartment and a dog and living the life I felt I couldn't have yet because I never met the right partner and I had other things to do in the meantime. On the other hand, would doing those things mean limiting my other possibilities and ... settling, somehow? What do you think? Am I overthinking this?

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posted about 17 hours ago on metafilter
For over a decade I have been using Lucida Sans Typewriter (LST) as the terminal font in Mac OS X and now all other fonts look weird to me. I recently upgraded to High Sierra and when I try to change the terminal font, LST looks entirely messed up. It has additional spaces between each character and the characters don't seem to be LST, but perhaps Monaco? I'm at a loss as to how to get it to work. Any suggestions?The font came with an old installation of Microsoft Office and has worked fine for each OS upgrade until now. LST works in all other applications I have tried and it validates correctly in the FontBook app. Things I have tried: copying the font from ~/Library/Fonts to /Library/Fonts; making sure permission were all readable; rebuilding the font cache.

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posted about 17 hours ago on metafilter
I'm looking for recommendations for science podcasts that are not wildly inappropriate for a 10-year-old. She especially requests paleontology, geology, biology, archaeology, and the 13-year-old wonders about forensic anthropology.

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