posted 12 days ago on ars technica
For me, it was hornets. One summer afternoon when I was 12, I ran into an overgrown field near a friend’s house and kicked a hornet nest the size of a football. An angry squadron of insects clamped on to my leg; their stings felt like scorching needles. I swatted the hornets away and ran for help, but within minutes I realized something else was happening. A constellation of pink stars appeared around the stings. The hives swelled, and new ones began appearing farther up my legs. I was having an allergic reaction. My friend’s mother gave me antihistamines and loaded me into her van. We set out for the county hospital, my dread growing as we drove. I was vaguely aware of the horrible things that can happen when allergies run amok. I imagined the hives reaching my throat and sealing it shut. Read 59 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
As of February 2015, the city of Chicago owes over $120,000 to its lawyers in the city’s attempt to defend itself against two stingray-related lawsuits. The discovery comes from new public records Ars has obtained. Last year, a local activist named Freddy Martinez made a request under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), asking the Chicago Police Department (CPD) to provide "any records pertaining to the purchase or reception of any IMSI catchers, commonly known as Stingrays (a trademark of Harris Corporation)." When the agency was not forthcoming, he eventually filed a lawsuit. Later, he filed a second lawsuit asking for: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);After some shenanigans with FedEx, our Surface 3 review unit arrived today. It's a neat little system. As revealed last week Surface 3 is not a successor to Surface 2. It doesn't have an ARM processor, it doesn't run Windows RT, and it doesn't have limited software compatibility. Instead, it uses a Cherry Trail Atom processor, it runs the full version of Windows 8.1, and it will run any x86 software that any other PC will run. The name is something of a misnomer, in fact: this isn't "Surface 3" so much as it's "Surface Pro 3 Lite." It's every bit the equivalent of the 12.5 inch Haswell system, just smaller and cheaper. The hardware feels every bit as well-built as all the other Surface systems, both Pro and non-Pro. The broad styling cues haven't changed since the systems were introduced: relatively unadorned, angular tablets, with an integrated kickstand. The Surface 3 is marginally more ornamented than its various brethren, with the Microsoft logo on the back now being shiny; it's made of precision cut pieces of polished stainless steel. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
In early September, 2013, the rain started in Colorado. It didn’t relent for an incredible five days, until it had dropped about a year’s worth of water. Washed out roads dominated the news images, but there were also more than 1,100 landslides in the rugged Colorado Front Range terrain. It was unlike anything seen in 150 years of recorded history there. University of Colorado Boulder’s Scott Anderson, Suzanne Anderson, and Robert Anderson (Suzanne and Robert are a married science duo, but Suzanne told Ars that “Scott is unrelated to us as far as we know”) saw an opportunity to learn something interesting from those landslides. Part of the area had been mapped two years prior by airborne LiDAR, which measures surface elevation very precisely. The researchers wanted to get a repeat survey funded right away to measure the changes, but Suzanne Anderson said their efforts were complicated by the sixteen day shutdown of the federal government in early October. In the end, the Federal Emergency Management Agency undertook its own LiDAR flights in November, though the data was slightly lower resolution. By calculating the differences in the 100 square kilometer overlap between the two LiDAR datasets, they could work out the volume of sediment that slid downslope and was washed downstream. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
https://twitter.com/ANIMALNewYork/status/585109173815402498 A four-foot tall bust of Edward Snowden's head, which was erected early Monday morning in a Brooklyn park, has since been taken down by the New York City Parks Department. An NYPD press office representative confirmed that the bronze-painted plaster bust of the National Security Agency document leaker had been taken down by city Parks employees, but the rep was unable to offer any answers to Ars about potential suspects or arrests due to an "ongoing investigation." The bust's creation and guerrilla installation were chronicled by New York arts blog Animal, complete with video interviews and blurred-face footage of the 100-pound Snowden likeness being installed on a Fort Green Park war memorial. That interview saw the creators confirm that they'd made the piece with aesthetic considerations like size and the bronze patina in mind, so it "honored the aesthetics that were already in place." In particular, the group wanted to equate Snowden's impact on American politics to the sacrifices of Revolutionary War POWs. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Barrett Brown, the brash journalist and former member of Anonymous who was sentenced in January 2015 to over five years in federal prison, had his e-mail privileges suddenly revoked, seemingly for corresponding with journalists. On Sunday, Brown’s supporters published his account of the punishment, describing how he suddenly lost access to his prison-supplied e-mail account on March 31. In the ensuing days, Brown attempted to contact various prison officials to get further information, including someone named “Trust Fund Manager Coleman.” As he wrote: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
One of the newly-elected board members of the Bitcoin Foundation—the 2.5-year-old organization that was meant to bring order to the famously open-source and freewheeling cryptocurrency—has declared the group "effectively bankrupt." While the Bitcoin Foundation obviously does not have control over Bitcoin itself, it’s the closest thing to a public face that the community has. Individual memberships start at $25, while corporate memberships start at $1,000 annually. The non-profit’s own tax filings from 2013 show that it ended that year with over $4.7 million in total assets—nearly five times as much as it had at the same time the previous year. It has yet to release financial details for 2014. The organization was founded in 2012 by a number of Bitcoin luminaries who have since fallen, and the group itself has been marred by controversy in recent months. Of its original five founders, one is in now prison (Charlie Shrem), another oversaw the collapse of the largest Bitcoin exchange (Mark Karpeles), and yet another has since left the United States for a Caribbean nation known for offshore banking (Roger Ver). Of the original board members, only Bitcoin lead developer Gavin Andresen has remained. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Author George R.R. Martin has a huge success on his hands with HBO's adaptations of his unfinished Game of Thrones series (the book series is known as The Song of Ice and Fire), and it looks like Martin and HBO are going to try to recreate the magic well after the high-fantasy is over. Ars has confirmed a report from the Hollywood Reporter saying that Martin's new show will be called Captain Cosmos and it will follow the story of a sci-fi writer in 1949. “The writer spends his time penning stories no one else would dare to write,” the Hollywood Reporter says. (Unlike GoT, it's unclear how many brother-sister sex scenes or episodes depicting the literal flaying of people will be featured in this fictional writer's stories.) Martin is no stranger to working for TV, and reports say that Michael Cassutt, who worked with Martin on the 1980s Twilight Zone reboot, will be the author of the first episode. While his TV projects are advancing, Martin continues to get a lot of flack on the Internet (and from fans who approach him in real life!) for being slow to publish his sixth installment of the Song of Ice and Fire series, The Winds of Winter. The fifth installment, A Dance with Dragons, was published in 2011. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: HP Spectre x360-13t Entry level Top spec As reviewed SCREEN 1920×1080 IPS at 13.3" (166 ppi), multitouch 2560×1440 IPS at 13.3" (220 ppi), multitouch 1920×1080 IPS at 13.3" (166 ppi), multitouch OS Windows 8.1 64-bit Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit Windows 8.1 64-bit CPU 2.2-2.7GHz Core i5-5200U 2.4-3.0GHz Core i7-5500U 2.2-2.7GHz Core i7-5600U RAM 4GB 1600MHz DDR3 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 GPU Intel HD Graphics 5500 HDD 128GB SATA SSD 512GB SATA SSD 256GB SATA SSD NETWORKING Dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2x2, Bluetooth 4.0 WWAN None PORTS 3x USB 3.0, mini-DisplayPort, HDMI, headphone/microphone dual jack SIZE 12.79×8.6×0.63" WEIGHT 3.26lb BATTERY 3-cell 56Wh Li-ion WARRANTY 1 year depot 3 year onsite 1 year depot PRICE $899.99 $1,769.98 $1,149.99 OTHER PERKS 1080p webcam, SD card reader ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);The HP Spectre x360 is a straightforward proposition. It's a PC Ultrabook that, like so many others, is clearly inspired by the MacBook Air: metal body, thin and light, favoring portability and longevity over performance or expandability. To that basic package, it borrows a trick from Lenovo's Yoga line. The hinge folds all the way back, turning a slimline laptop into a slightly chunky tablet. The latest iterations of the MacBook Air and Yoga both have some shortcomings. The MacBook Air continues to be lumbered with screens that are, these days, just not up to scratch. Their resolution is relatively low, and their TN technology results in poor viewing angles and color accuracy. This was unexceptional when the MacBook Air was first introduced, but today devices with IPS screens are abundant, both from Apple and others. They easily outclass the MacBook Air displays. The Yoga Pro 3 has a pretty screen and an extraordinarily elaborate hinge, but its performance—using a new Broadwell Core M processor—left something to be desired. This might have been OK if the battery life had been magnificent, but it wasn't. The laptop managed just over five hours in our browsing-based test and three and a half hours in our 3D test. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A new daily service inspired by Ars Technica's own Steam Gauge project gives a detailed breakdown of estimated sales and player data for every game on Valve's Steam service. Steam Spy uses the same kind of random sampling methods that we first outlined in our initial Steam Gauge post to estimate total ownership, median play time, recent play time, and more for all the games on Steam. The service is updated everyday, and a simple, clean interface lets users explore the data based on user-reported player location, game genre, release date, developer, and more with just a few clicks. On the Steam Spy About page, Cypriot gaming blogger Sergey Galyonkin cites a "cool idea of Kyle Orland from Ars Technica" as the basis for the site (thanks!). He also warns users that Steam Spy has many of the same limitations as Steam Gauge before it: a small margin of error inherent to sampling about 100,000 user profiles a day, temporary skews from "free weekend" numbers, missing data from other distribution methods,  and results that are "completely unreliable for recently released games." Still, the site represents an invaluable resource for anyone interested in demystifying the usually opaque world of game sales stats. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A federal appeals court is asking the Obama administration to explain why the government should be allowed to keep secret its plan to shutter mobile phone service during "critical emergencies." The Department of Homeland Security came up with the plan—known as Standing Operating Procedure 303—after cellular phones were used to detonate explosives targeting a London public transportation system. SOP 303 is a powerful tool in the digital age, and it spells out a "unified voluntary process for the orderly shut-down and restoration of wireless services during critical emergencies such as the threat of radio-activated improvised explosive devices." Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
GM was on a roll at the New York International Auto Show last week, debuting not one but three new cars. In addition to new Chevrolet Malibus and Sparks, the company also unveiled the Cadillac CT6, a range-topping sedan packed with interesting innovations. After seeing it up close, we think the CT6 may well be the company’s most convincing home-grown rival to the mighty German super-sedans like Audi’s A8, BMW’s 7-Series, and Mercedes-Benz’s S-Class. Luxury sedans are important cars even if their often-weighty price tags mean few of us will ever own them. Car makers use these four-wheel flagships to introduce new technology to the marketplace, and buyers become automotive early adopters. Airbags, anti-lock brakes, and other safety features like electronic stability control that we now take for granted first showed up in things like Mercedes-Benz S-Classes before they trickled down to the masses (actually, the first two arguably showed up several years earlier on American cars, but that’s another story). The CT6 hews to this trend, mating clever lightweight construction techniques with new engines and a few other tricks. A look at the CT6's chassis. The section around the front wheel is an aluminum casting, and the long rails that run down the side are aluminum extrusions. Jonathan Gitlin The CT’s monocoque chassis is a mix of aluminum (both extruded and cast) as well as steel, cutting weight by more than 200 lbs (90 kg) compared to a conventional steel chassis. This design required new ways of bonding the chassis together in order to avoid the possibility of galvanic corrosion. GM has some experience in this area, having developed (along with engineering firm Pratt and Miller) a technique of doing just that for the Corvette racing car several years ago. Although this isn’t exactly the same method, CT6 chief engineer Travis Hester told us that it is yet another example of technology transfer from a racing program that’s improving road cars. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A New York County Supreme Court judge ruled that 26-year-old nurse Ellanora Baidoo can serve divorce papers (PDF) to her soon-to-be ex-husband, Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku, via Facebook. The ruling is one of the first of its kind, and it comes at a time when even standard e-mail is still not "statutorily authorized" as a primary means of service, the judge wrote. A number of courts have allowed plaintiffs to use Facebook as supplemental means of service since at least 2013, but Baidoo has requested that the social media service be the primary and only means of telling Blood-Dzraku that she wants a divorce. The circumstances for the decision are unique, however. As the New York Daily News reported, Baidoo and Blood-Dzraku, both Ghanaian, were married in a civil service in 2009, but when Blood-Dzraku refused to marry in a traditional Ghanaian wedding ceremony, the relationship ended. The two never lived together, and Blood-Dzraku only kept in touch with Baidoo via phone and Facebook. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Diagnostic software preinstalled on many Dell computers is now being flagged as a potentially unwanted program by antivirus program Malwarebytes following the discovery of a vulnerability that allows attackers to remotely execute malicious code on older versions. The application known as Dell System Detect failed to validate code before downloading and running it, according to a report published last month by researcher Tom Forbes. Because the program starts itself automatically, a malicious hacker could use it to infect vulnerable machines by luring users to a booby-trapped website. According to researchers with AV provider F-Secure, the malicious website need only have contained the string "dell" somewhere in its domain name to exploit the weakness. www.notreallydell.com was just one example of a site that would have worked. Dell released an update in response to Forbes's report, but even then, users remained vulnerable. That's because the updated program still accepted downloads from malicious sites that had a subdomain with "dell" in it, for instance, a.dell.fakesite.ownedbythebadguys.com. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
In 2010, researchers at Harvard Business School claimed to have found (PDF) that striking powerful poses caused hormonal and behavioral changes. "Power poses" seemed to raise testosterone, lower cortisol, and increase risk-taking behavior. As with all research, replication was needed to check the validity of the results. An attempt at replication using additional controls, published recently in Psychological Science, found no behavioral or hormonal effects of “power poses," although they did result in a boost in subjective perception of power. In other words, the original research did not hold up. The idea that powerful poses could have hormonal effects ties in with a prominent idea in behavioral science: the hypothesis that physical interaction with the environment affects cognitive behavior. It would make sense that there should be a physiological vehicle (such as hormonal changes) for this effect. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
HBO talk show host John Oliver on Sunday landed his biggest interview yet since leaving The Daily Show: famed National Security Agency document leaker Edward Snowden.  The interview, which followed a lengthy Last Week Tonight monologue about American Internet surveillance, took place in Snowden's current home of Moscow. It began with a comedic, tone-setting declaration: "Holy shit, he actually came! Edward fucking Snowden!" After jokes about whether Snowden missed American icons like truck nuts and Florida, however, Oliver got to work asking about Snowden's motives and the dichotomy between domestic and foreign surveillance. "How many of those documents have you actually read?" Oliver eventually asked. When Snowden said he'd "evaluated" them, Oliver pressed: "There's a difference between understanding what's in the documents and reading what's in the documents. When you're handing over thousands of NSA documents, the last thing you want to do is read them." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Rumor has it that we'll get a long-overdue hardware refresh for the Apple TV set-top box at WWDC this year, along with an SDK that will let developers make applications for the platform without Apple's direct involvement. One feature it apparently won't include, however, is higher-resolution video support: BuzzFeed reports that the box won't support 4K output. This is primarily because 4K is far from a mainstream feature—it still doesn't have wide support from the studios that produce content, the cable and streaming providers that serve that content, and the consumers who view that content. The report suggests that the storage and bandwidth costs associated with 4K video are high enough that it won't become a mainstream feature for some time. The current Apple TV box is just over three years old and it's long past time for an upgrade, especially if Apple plans to let developers make apps that do things other than stream video. It has 512MB of RAM and a single-core version of the four-year-old Apple A5 SoC, and while that's sufficient for 1080p video streams, the Apple A8 will run circles around it in general performance. Rumors of a new Apple TV have been circulating for years, but there are signs that Apple is finally ready to move ahead with its plans: the old Apple TV got a fair amount of stage time at the company's March product event, and the Apple TV now "starts at $69" even though the $69 model is the only one you can currently buy. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
PlayStation Vita owners who purchased the system before June 1, 2012 can now claim monetary or downloadable game rewards as part of a settlement with the FTC over misleading advertising claims made by Sony. Claimants can now go to vitaclaims.com and fill out a PDF form including their personal information and the serial number of their Vita system (or an original purchase receipt). Eligible owners who print and mail back the form will be able to choose from one of the following: A check for $25 A $25 credit to their PSN account Any one of the following three packages of downloadable games: Action/Adventure pack: God of War Collection (PS3), Beyond Two Souls (PS3), Twisted Metal (PS3), Unit 13 (Vita) Family Friendly pack: Little Big Planet 2 (PS3), Puppeteer (PS3), Uncharted: Golden Abyss (Vita), ModNation Racers (Vita) Variety pack: God of War Collection (PS3), Little Big Planet 2 (PS3), ModNation Racers (Vita), Unit 13 (Vita) The settlement resolves complaints the FTC brought against Sony for advertisements that oversold the Vita's "Remote Play" feature with the PS3 and which falsely suggested that live online multiplayer was available on the portable over a 3G connection. Customers who registered an early Vita with Sony through PSN should be receiving e-mails about the settlement shortly if they haven't already. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
On Saturday morning, one of Google's root certificates expired, causing millions of users' mail clients to suddenly protest. The certificate for Google's intermediate certificate authority (Google Internet Authority G2) was used to issue Gmail's certificate for SMTP, and the expiration at 11:55am EDT caused many e-mail clients to stop receiving Gmail messages. While the problem affected most Gmail users using PC and mobile mail clients, Web access to Gmail was unaffected. Google reported on the company's Apps status page that engineers had been alerted to "issues with Gmail" at 1:21pm EDT on Saturday. In a later status update, a company spokesperson noted that "affected users are able to access Gmail but are seeing error messages and/or other unexpected behavior" and that "smtp.gmail.com is displaying an invalid certificate." The root certificate for Google's certificate authority was issued by GeoTrust. By 4pm EDT Saturday, the certificate had been updated and is now valid until December 2016. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: Hisense Chromebook Screen 11.6" 1366×768 LCD (135 ppi) OS Chrome OS CPU 1.8GHz quad-core Rockchip RK3288 RAM 2GB DDR3 GPU ARM Mali-T760 HDD 16GB eMMC SSD Networking Dual-band 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.0 Ports 2x USB 2.0, HDMI, microSD headphone jack Size 11.7 x 8.8 x 0.6” (297.7 x 224.55 x 15.3mm) Weight 3.3 lbs (1.2 kg) Battery "Up to 8.5 hours" Warranty 1 year Price $149.00 Other perks Webcam We're getting new Chromebooks all over the price spectrum lately. We recently reviewed the brand-new Chromebook Pixel, which has hardware that's well-worth $1,000 even though that's a lot to pay for a system running Chrome OS. Today we're taking a closer look at one of the new $149 Chromebooks, which are cheaper than any Chrome OS laptop has been to date. We weren't really sure what to expect from Hisense's $149 Chromebook. We've seen Hisense hardware before in the form of $99 and $149 Android tablets from a time when those things hadn't become common. Those devices were OK, but they cut enough corners that we had trouble recommending them for people who could spend a little more. This Chromebook, on the other hand, is surprisingly good—it's still budget hardware to be sure, but in many respects it's pretty similar to the $199 to $299 Chromebooks that are already out there. Look and feel The Hisense Chromebook is all plastic, about like you’d expect. Both the top and bottom are covered in a matte textured material that looks pretty good, while the palmrest is a smooth matte plastic instead. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The ability to walk upright is a defining characteristic of humans, one that emerged through a long evolutionary history. It's not just a matter of the right bones; our muscular, skeletal, and neural systems have evolved to enable our coordinated movements. The nerves allow us to develop a gait that is optimized to minimize the amount of energy necessary by modulating aspects of our movement such as our step length or arm motions. Even with all that optimization, walking can be tiring; in fact, people expend more energy walking than any other daily activity. As we age, walking often becomes even more difficult. For decades researchers have explored ways to mitigate the energy cost associated with walking—studies that are typically aimed at helping those who are weaker or disabled. Recently, scientists and engineers started to look at this issue from a new perspective; they questioned whether the human gait is as efficient as it can be. This interdisciplinary research team developed a device that behaves as an unpowered exoskeleton. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Most astronomical events, with the exception of the explosive ones, take place over long periods of time. Thankfully the Universe is big, so we can reconstruct most of them by looking at many examples that collectively represent a timeline. It's an exception to be able to watch something develop in real time. But an international team of researchers may have done just that. With a pair of observations 18 years apart, they've spotted what appear to be large jets of material erupting from a massive protostar. The findings provide information that can help inform our models of the formation of massive stars. Star formation is a careful balancing act. The force of gravity that pulls material together is counteracted in part by the energy built up as the material collapses and compresses. That energy causes what's termed "radiation pressure," which pushes against the infalling material. To actually form a star, some of that heat has to be shed. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A New York Police Department detective has issued an apology of sorts for his xenophobic verbal attack on an Uber driver that went viral after it was filmed by a backseat passenger. "I apologize. I sincerely apologize," detective Patrick Cherry told a New York NBC station. The YouTube video has generated more than 3.3 million hits following Monday's secretly recorded West Village tirade. Cherry was stripped of his badge and removed from the FBI Joint Terrorism Task force as a result of the incident. YouTube The tape shows the officer pounding the vehicle of the unidentified driver and yelling, "I don't know what fucking planet you're on." He also blurts: “I don't know where you're coming from, where you think you're appropriate in doing that. That's not the way it works. How long have you been in this country?” Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Congenital heart disease—a problem with the heart that exists at birth—is a leading cause of death among infants in the US. Sadly, there are many risk factors: infections, genetics, environmental factors, maternal diet, body mass and glucose intolerance, maternal age at the time the child is born, and more. The trickiest may be maternal age, however, as it’s not something women can necessarily control as they are preparing to have children. A paper published in Nature by Schulkey et al of Washington University has provided evidence that maternal exercise may limit the risk of congenital heart failure due to maternal age. The findings suggest that older women who are interested in having children may be able to cut the risk of their infants developing heart problems through regular exercise. The researchers wanted to determine whether the maternal age effect is due to changes in the mother or in the oocyte (the egg). To find out, the investigators used mice that were missing one copy of the Nkz2-5 gene, which made the mice predisposed to heart defects known as ventricular septal defects. This particular defect, in which the chambers of the heart are not properly separated, is the most common defect in this strain of mice. The second most common defect, atrial septal defects, did not appear frequently enough to allow statistical conclusions. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A Swiss trade journal (Google Translate) covering the watch industry reports that Apple can't immediately sell its upcoming Apple Watch in the alpine nation due to an existing trademark. The public broadcaster RTS published the 1985 French-language filing on Thursday, clearly showing that a company called Leonard Timepieces has the trademark for an image of an apple with the English word “APPLE." That trademark, which only applies to watches and watch parts, lasts for only 30 years. It's set to expire on December 5, 2015. The Apple Watch is set to go on sale in nine countries worldwide on April 24. This developing situation could mean that Swiss customers will have to wait several more months to buy it, or interested buyers must simply pop over the border to France or Germany to get one. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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