posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A functional iPhone X, unlike the ones that went through recent stress testing. (credit: Samuel Axon) In the past few days, some iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch users reported a bug that autocorrects the single letter "i" to either "A," an exclamation point, or a symbol that resembles a question mark in a box. While the bug doesn't appear to affect all users, it's widespread enough for Apple to be working on a fix for it. According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, Apple plans to fix the problem in forthcoming iOS beta and public releases that should come sometime this week. Apple originally claimed the bug was linked to the release of iOS 11.1. However, the Wall Street Journal report found some devices running iOS 11.0.3 also experienced the problem. The patch to be released from Apple should fix the problem for any devices affected by the bug. Apple did not comment on what could be causing the issue, but the Internet always has its theories. Some claim the bug stems from both an autocorrect problem and an emoji rendering issue. No matter the cause, it's a peculiar issue that can make any kind of text input slightly irksome. Incorrect characters are not sequestered to Apple apps and programs, either—any text can be affected, including tweets and Instagram captions. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Xbox One X. But what good is a monolithic box without some software to test on it? (credit: Microsoft) Our review of the Xbox One X was as comprehensive as we could get at the time. Microsoft set our embargo roughly one week after our systems arrived, along with an assurance: the system's "enhanced" catalog of major games, designed to tap into the X's beefy, $500 spec, would be ready ahead of the embargo. That wasn't quite the case. We tested roughly a dozen enhanced games (and whether older games benefited from X power) ahead of our deadline, which was enough to declare a few things: what the system is capable of, its general value, and the issue of relying on patches that only a fraction of Xbox owners will tap into. As we said, publishers barely touched Kinect, an add-on that used to ship with every Xbox One. It's a bit apples-and-oranges, but we still have to ask: will developers devote more effort for something with less adoption? More patches have rolled out in the days between our embargo lifted and the system's public launch, and, after testing them, we wanted to give you a fuller sense of what to expect from Xbox One X. In short: after adding impressions of another dozen high-profile games on Xbox One X, our system review is unchanged. Some games get incredible, obviously apparent boosts on 4K sets. Others don't. And while the console is great—and sometimes stronger than PS4 Pro—your purchase decision should probably hinge more on the games you already own, the games you'd like to own, and whether you own a 4K TV. Read 48 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The original Amazon Echo was a weird device. Did anyone really want a speaker with an always-on assistant waiting for your next command? As it turns out, people did—so much so that now there are more speakers, lamps, baby monitors refrigerators, and (soon) cars that have Amazon's Alexa built in. But even though Amazon opened up Alexa to other companies to integrate into their products, Amazon hasn't stopped improving the original Echo. The second-generation Echo just came out, and while the most obvious differences lie in the device's design and its reduced price tag, Alexa has gone through a number of changes and improvements as well. However, if you're familiar with the Echo and Alexa in general, you might be disappointed to find that the new Echo doesn't provide a drastically different experience from the original. But that's OK—the new Echo shows that updated devices don't have to reinvent the wheel to be better than their predecessors. Read 41 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about the new Apple headquarters during a media event in Cupertino, California on September 12, 2017. (credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images) According to newly-leaked documents, in recent years, Apple used a Bermuda-based law firm to take advantage of highly-advantageous (though legal) tax arrangements in Jersey to mitigate its tax burden as much as possible. The so-called Paradise Papers, which were leaked to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, show that as the so-called "Double Irish" tax loophole began to close, Apple began shopping for a new place to park its hundreds of billions in offshore cash. As one of the world’s largest corporations, Apple's tax practices have been scrutinized in recent years. Under American law, companies must pay a 35-percent corporate tax rate on global profits when that money is brought home—so there is an incentive to keep as much of that money overseas as possible. Also, due to various tax law exemptions or loopholes, large multinational companies typically do not pay the full 35 percent. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Elon Musk of SpaceX, left, and Scott Pace, right, of George Washington University, testify before the Senate Subcommittee on Defense under the Committee on Appropriations in 2014. (credit: George Washington University) In recent months, the executive secretary of the National Space Council, Scott Pace, has worked assiduously behind the scenes to develop a formal space policy for the Trump administration. In a rare interview, published Monday in Scientific American, Pace elaborated on some of the policy decisions he has been helping to make. In the interview, Pace explained why the Trump administration has chosen to focus on the Moon first for human exploration while relegating Mars to becoming a "horizon goal," effectively putting human missions to the red planet decades into the future. Mars was too ambitious, Pace said, and such a goal would have precluded meaningful involvement from the burgeoning US commercial sector as well as international partners. Specific plans for how NASA will return to the Moon should become more concrete within the next year, he added. In response to a question about privately developed, heavy-lift boosters, the executive secretary also reiterated his skepticism that such "commercial" rockets developed by Blue Origin and SpaceX could compete with the government's Space Launch System rocket, which is likely to make its maiden flight in 2020. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Sci-Hub) First came the $15 million fine a New York federal judge imposed on Sci-Hub, a scientific research piracy site that has freed tens of thousands of research papers from behind paywalls. That was in June, and the site's overseas operator, Alexandra Elbakyan, said she'd never pay plaintiff Elsevier or stop the infringing behavior. Elbakyan Now on Friday, a Virginia federal judge dinged the site for another $4.8 million for the same infringing behavior, this time from a lawsuit brought by the American Chemical Society. The latest Friday order (PDF), like the previous order (PDF), demands that domain providers stop servicing Sci-Hub. The site has been playing a game of domain Whac-a-Mole for years in a bid to skirt US judicial orders. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A digital identity card issued by the Republic of Estonia. (credit: Republic of Estonia, Interior Department) A crippling flaw affecting millions—and possibly hundreds of millions—of encryption keys used in some of the highest-stakes security settings is considerably easier to exploit than originally reported, cryptographers declared over the weekend. The assessment came as Estonia abruptly canceled 760,000 national ID cards used for voting, filing taxes, and encrypting sensitive documents. The critical weakness allows attackers to calculate the private portion of any vulnerable key using nothing more than the corresponding public portion. Hackers can then use the private key to impersonate key owners, decrypt sensitive data, sneak malicious code into digitally signed software, and bypass protections that prevent accessing or tampering with stolen PCs. When researchers first disclosed the flaw three weeks ago, they estimated it would cost an attacker renting time on a commercial cloud service an average of $38 and 25 minutes to break a vulnerable 1024-bit key and $20,000 and nine days for a 2048-bit key. Organizations known to use keys vulnerable to ROCA—named for the Return of the Coppersmith Attack the factorization method is based on—have largely downplayed the severity of the weakness. Estonian officials initially said the attack was "complicated and not cheap" and went on to say: "Large-scale vote fraud is not conceivable due to the considerable cost and computing power necessary of generating a private key." Switzerland-based smartcard maker Gemalto, meanwhile, has said only that its IDPrime.NET—a card it has sold for more than a decade as, among other things, a way to provide two-factor authentication to employees of Microsoft and other companies—"may be affected" without providing any public guidance to customers. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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THE COSBY SHOW—"Where's Rudy?" Episode 10—Pictured: (l-r) Malcolm-Jamal Warner as Theodore 'Theo' Huxtable, Bill Cosby as Dr. Heathcliff 'Cliff' Huxtable, Keshia Knight Pulliam as Rudy Huxtable, Tempestt Bledsoe as Vanessa Huxtable. (credit: NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images) The production company that made The Cosby Show has sued the BBC (.pdf) over a documentary the British network aired about the rape allegations against Bill Cosby. Carsey-Werner, the production company that is the plaintiff in the case, says that the documentary is infringing its copyright because it uses eight audiovisual clips and two musical cues from The Cosby Show. The documentary, titled Bill Cosby—Fall of an American Icon, was broadcast on a BBC channel in the United Kingdom on June 5 of this year. That was the same day that Cosby's prosecution for one assault began in Pennsylvania. (The trial ended in a hung jury.) The UK production company that made the documentary, Sugar Films, is also named as a defendant in the case. The complaint lists eight video clips that are used in the documentary. All are between seven and 23 seconds long, except for one clip that lasts 51 seconds. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An AT&T Cell on Wings. (credit: AT&T) AT&T is using an LTE-equipped drone to reconnect some Puerto Ricans who lost wireless service after Hurricane Maria. This obviously isn't a permanent fix for Puerto Rico, where 48 percent of cell sites are still out of service more than a month after the hurricane wrecked telecom infrastructure on the island. But the drone—AT&T calls it a Flying COW (Cell on Wings)—is providing wireless connectivity in an area of up to 40 square miles. "As we work to permanently restore our network, this experimental technology is providing data, voice, and text services to customers," AT&T said in an announcement today. "This is the first time an LTE cell site on a drone has been successfully deployed to connect residents after a disaster." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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"I don't have the re-releases with me." (credit: Aurich Lawson / Lucasfilm) On Monday, November 6, major media-acquisition news landed: 21st Century Fox had reportedly held talks to sell all of its assets to Disney. CNBC's unnamed sources say those talks have since stalled, but the mere possibility got nerd tongues wagging. What would happen if those two media giants joined in unholy matrimony? In addition to questions about Disney and Fox's shared rights to Marvel Comics properties, one franchise stood out: Star Wars. Our own Lee Hutchinson talked at length about how Fox figures into the future of Star Wars' past, so we're resurfacing this 2014 article, which looks at the logistical and legal hurdles that existed on the eve of the original trilogy's first major Blu-ray launch. Until we hear any firmer news about Fox and Disney, of course, this is all a bit of a pipe dream, but who knows? Disney is doing all kinds of things with the Star Wars universe now that it has purchased the franchise away from George Lucas. In addition to the three sequel films, there will be "at least three" spin-off movies, which will likely be origin stories for some of the supporting cast of Star Wars characters. The House of Mouse is pouring a tremendous amount of time and money into Star Wars, and Disney could be the new arbiter of the Holy Grail of Star Wars requests: a remastered release of the unedited, non-special-edition original trilogy. Unadulterated, "pure" versions of the original Star Wars films are difficult to come by. Except for one sad, low-resolution release on DVD in 2006 (which we'll discuss in a moment), the films have only been available in their modified "Special Edition" forms since 1997, when George Lucas re-released the films to theaters with a series of changes. Some of those changes aren't bad at all—the fancy new attack on the Death Star in Episode IV is perfectly cromulent—but others are absolutely terrible. In Return of the Jedi, Jabba's palace gains an asinine CGI-filled song-and-dance interlude. Dialogue is butchered in Empire Strikes Back. And in the first movie, perhaps most famously, Han no longer shoots first. Read 32 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A functional iPhone X, unlike the ones that went through recent stress testing. (credit: Samuel Axon) As we suspected in our review, the iPhone X is not faring well in the first drop and durability tests. Two different drop tests showed immediate damage to the device. Consumer electronics site CNET ran a drop test from a height of three feet. The glass at the corner of the phone cracked on the very first test, which dropped the phone on its side. A second test dropped the phone on its face, leading to even more fractures. CNET concluded that dropping the phone without a case is "out of the question." The damage CNET encountered was only cosmetic—a more extreme drop test from SquareTrade showed damage to functionality as well. SquareTrade is a company that offers protection plans for mobile devices, so it should be noted that the company has an incentive to convince consumers that their devices may be at risk. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
People line up to enter the federal courthouse in San Jose, California in July 2012. It was the first day of trial in the patent battle between Apple and Samsung. (credit: Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) The colossal courtroom clash between Apple and Samsung over patents won't be making a second appearance at the Supreme Court. The two tech titans went at it in front of juries in San Jose over the course of two blockbuster trials, held in 2012 and 2014. Both times juries returned verdicts in favor of Apple—the first ordering Samsung to pay more than $1 billion in damages, the second ordering a payment of $120 million. News today concerns the second verdict. In 2016, the $120 million verdict was thrown out entirely by a panel of judges on the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which hears all patent appeals. The judges said that patents on Apple features like smartphone autocorrect and "slide to unlock" were invalid in light of prior art. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A battery installation built by BYD in 2015 in LaSalle County, Illinois. (credit: BYD) Though a lot has changed since 2016, not much has changed for energy economics in the US. The cost of wind generation continues to fall, solar costs are falling, too, and the cost of coal-power energy has seen no movement, while the cost of building and maintaining nuclear plants has gone up. And none of those conclusions reflect subsidies and tax credits applied by the federal government. The conclusions come from Lazard (PDF), an asset management company that publishes cost estimates for various types of electricity-generation assets each year. Lazard’s numbers reflect the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE), which averages the estimated costs of construction, maintenance, and fuel for electricity-generating assets over the number of megawatt-hours that each asset is expected to produce over its lifetime. In other words, the LCOE is the lifetime cost of a turbine divided by the amount of energy that turbine will produce over its lifetime. LCOE is a good way of comparing electricity generation sources that vary dramatically in cost to build and cost to maintain. The result, tracked over years, is one way of gauging how the US energy mix is changing and could change in the coming year. Though the new presidential administration was expected (and still is expected) to be a boon to coal and nuclear energy, those efforts are still mired in the political process. And even if they succeed, thwarting the cost advantages of wind and solar energy while propping up coal and nuclear power will require not-inconsiderable amounts of intervention from the US government. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A magnifying glass is seen in front of a Google search screen. (credit: Photo by Michael Gottschalk/Photothek via Getty Images) Canadian courts can't rule the Internet—at least not outside Canada. A US federal judge has stopped a ruling from the Canadian Supreme Court from going into effect in the US. The Canadian order would have ordered Google to de-index all pages belonging to a company called Datalink, which was allegedly selling products that violated the IP of Vancouver-based Equustek. When the order came down earlier this year, Google filed a lawsuit in US federal court seeking to render the Canadian order unenforceable stateside. Google called the Canadian order "repugnant" to the First Amendment, and it pointed out that the Canadian plaintiffs "never established any violation of their rights under US law." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge According to a report from Bloomberg, chipmaker Broadcom is launching an ambitious campaign to acquire Qualcomm, best known as the default System on a Chip (SoC) and cellular modem vendor in most smartphones. Broadcom has reportedly made an unsolicited offer to buy Qualcomm in a deal valued at $130 billion, which, if it succeeds, would be the largest acquisition in tech history. It's not a done deal, however. Qualcomm apparently isn't happy with the offer, with Bloomberg saying that Qualcomm thinks the deal "undervalues the company." Publicly, Qualcomm has only said it is "evaluating" the deal. Qualcomm is best known for its near-monopoly on the high-end smartphone SoC market, with its "Snapdragon" line of chips. At its heart, any Android phone worth talking about has a Qualcomm SoC, which combines the CPU, GPU, RAM, cellular modem, and other components into a single chip. Qualcomm gained this near-monopoly on the back of its 3G CDMA patents, which Sprint and Verizon rely on for network connectivity. When buying a Qualcomm SoC, you get an integrated Qualcomm modem, covering Qualcomm's patent portfolio, while saving space and power thanks to the on-chip solution. If you use a non-Qualcomm SoC, you generally need a separate modem, which is less power- and space-efficient than a single-chip solution. And if you don't use a Qualcomm modem, you also owe the company hefty royalties. By leveraging its cellular patents, Qualcomm made its SoCs the path of least resistance for OEMs. The chips offer superior performance for a lower price while locking out their competition. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Renault, Mercedes, and Ferrari engines power the first three cars off the grid in this year's Mexican Grand Prix. (credit: Clive Mason | Getty Images) The 2017 Formula 1 season is rapidly drawing to a close. There are two races left to run, though with ever-decreasing stakes. Mercedes' Lewis Hamilton sealed his fourth championship in Mexico at the end of October after a series of component failures, own goals, and general misfortune at Ferrari put Sebastian Vettel's chances to the sword. The really interesting developments in the sport aren't happening on the track but in conference rooms and press releases. The reason? The proposed changes for 2021; specifically the cars' engines and hybrid power units. Liberty Media (the sport's new owner) and the FIA (which writes the rules) are trying to respond to disenchanted fans, but it's a tricky job. All three engine manufacturers (Mercedes, Renault, and Ferrari) have turned their noses up at the new engine regulations, with Ferrari CEO Sergio Marchionne even threatening to quit the sport should things not go his team's way. None of this is new to F1. Power struggles break out every time new regulations or contracts threaten the teams' self-interests as they jockey to retain advantages and not lose out, even for the good of the sport. Bernie Ecclestone showed over several decades that he was more than up to the task, dividing and conquering the paddock in the name of F1. But this will be the first big test for Liberty. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge If you've been zealously guarding your money since 2010, waiting for the day StarCraft II would finally be cheap enough to try out, you're in luck. At Blizzcon over the weekend, Blizzard announced the game would be transitioning to a free-to-play model, offering significant portions of the single- and multiplayer content for no charge starting November 14. As explained on the Battle.net blog, players will be able to download StarCraft II's original "Wings of Liberty" single-player campaign for free. Players who previously paid for "Wings of Liberty" will be able to get "Heart of the Swarm" expansion for free instead, and players who purchased an expansion previously will receive an exclusive Ghost skin and three new portraits. Players will also be to earn full, free access to ranked multiplayer play, including units from all three of the game's expansions. That mode will be locked until players notch a single unranked or AI win on 10 separate days ("our way to preserve the quality and integrity of the ranked experience," Blizzard explains). Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Intel's render of an 8th-generation H-series processor. The discrete GPU and stacked HBM2 memory are side by side. (credit: Intel) In a bid to build better chips for gamers and other PC enthusiasts, Intel has announced the 8th-generation H-series mobile processors will have a feature that's nothing short of astonishing: they'll integrate AMD GPUs. The 8th-generation mobile processors currently on the market are U-series chips. These are 15W processors using a revised version of the 7th-generation Kaby Lake architecture. The GPUs of these chips are part of the same piece of silicon as the CPU. In moving from 7th to 8th generation, the number of CPU cores and threads doubled to four and eight respectively. Aside from some minor changes however, the GPUs' portions are largely unchanged since the 6th-generation Skylake. H-series chips have a bigger power envelope; for the 7th generation, the chip can draw up to 45W. In the past, they've used that higher power rating to support more cores and higher clock speeds—they've had four cores and eight threads for several generations now—but they've sported substantially the same integrated GPUs as the low-power parts. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(video link) REDMOND, Wash.—Ahead of Xbox One X's November 7 launch, Ars Technica was invited to hang out at the company's Xbox campus and chat with one of the console's leading managers. With this opportunity in mind, we grabbed a camera crew and asked as many questions of Kevin Gammill, the Xbox division's "core platform group program manager," as we could. For the most part, we stuck with questions about the past, present, and future of the Xbox One X console, which the company is positioning as a current-gen "upgrade" option. Team Xbox wants players to feel comfortable that their games will work on any Xbox they buy from here on out, whether that's the more budget-minded Xbox One S or the brand-new, $500 Xbox One X. The more expensive option has its merits, particularly 4K-friendly updates (which are significantly less than an equivalent PC) for those with such a TV. But we took the opportunity to ask questions about concerns we ran into during our tests. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Behold the craziness of Essen... (credit: Owen Duffy) Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com. Every October, the German city of Essen becomes the epicenter of tabletop gaming geekdom. Tens of thousands of visitors descend on the International Spieltage fair, where publishers from around the world debut their up-and-coming releases over four frantic days of dice chucking, card shuffling, and cube pushing. For gamers, it’s an enthralling, bewildering, almost intimidating spectacle. Where gaming events in other countries, like Gen Con in the US or the UK Games Expo, incorporate celebrity guests, panel discussions, and side attractions, Essen is focused squarely on the games—everything from light and fluffy family favourites to impenetrable brain-melters. Read 48 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Canyon Uranium Mine Tower, Arizona, 2013. (credit: Kaibab National Forest) The US Forest Service recently submitted a report (PDF) to the Trump Administration, suggesting that an Obama-era order could be revised to allow uranium mining on National Forest land, reopening old tensions in an area that sustains tribal interests, mining operations, and outdoor activities. The report was submitted in response to a March presidential order requiring all agencies to review their body of rules, policies, and guidelines pertaining to energy development in the United States. Agencies were directed to provide the White House with a list of items that might weigh down the development of domestic energy resources “with particular attention to oil, natural gas, coal, and nuclear energy resources,” according to the Forest Service, which is an agency within the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The Forest Service ultimately outlined 15 agency rules, regulations, and agreements that could be rescinded or modified to favor fossil fuel or nuclear energy. Many of the recommendations involved revisions to existing paperwork or fee schedules that the Forest Service imposes on energy companies seeking to do business in National Forest land. One item suggested that the Forest Service exclude low-risk energy projects on national land from “unnecessary and possibly time consuming environmental assessments.” Another suggested a revision of how energy projects are assessed in sage-grouse habitat. The wild bird’s habitat has been a political sticking point for fossil fuel advocates and environmental advocates alike. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / After fecal transplants from responding humans, the gut cells of mice (blue) were flooded with cancer-fighting immune cells (red, green) (credit: Dr. Luigi Nezi]) New, potent cancer therapies can act like daggers pressed into the hindquarters of the immune system, prodding it to lunge at any cancerous cells in the body. When the drugs work, the immune system tramples tumors into oblivion. But they don’t always work—in fact, cancer drugs can fail 60 to 70 percent of the time. The drugs might not give the immune system a sharp enough sticking in every patient. But according to a pair of new studies, it may not be the immune system that needs a swift kick—it may be the gut. Some intestinal-dwelling bacteria appear to corral and train immune cells to fight off cancer cells—prior to any spurring from cancer immunotherapies. Without such microbial priming, the drugs may only offer a futile prod. In both studies, published this week in Science, researchers found that the cancer patients who saw no benefit from the drugs (non-responders) were the ones who lacked certain beneficial gut bugs, particularly after taking antibiotics. Meanwhile, cancer patients who did respond to the drugs had bacteria that could prompt the immune system to release chemicals that get cancer-killing immune cells—T cells—to chomp at the bit. When the researchers transferred the gut microbes from their human cancer patients into germ-free mice with cancer, the rodents mirrored the patients’ fates. That is, mice that got gut microbes from non-responding humans also did not respond to immunotherapies. But, the mice that got microbes from responders responded. And when researchers swapped responder gut microbes into non-responding mice, the mice converted and fought back the cancer. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An icon of exploration. (credit: NASA/JPL) I've made no secret that the Voyager probes' journey through the outer Solar System was a major influence on my childhood. So I was shocked to find out that I had missed the airing of what may be the definitive story of their mission. I was fortunate enough to correct my mistake thanks to NYU's science journalism program. For anyone else at all interested in science, NASA, space, or the human side of science, this review serves as a warning: the story will be shown one more time on November 15. Do not miss it. The story is a documentary called The Farthest, a name that focuses on Voyager 1's current fate as the only human-made object to have left the Solar System. But the movie follows both Voyagers from when they were just an idea struggling to get funding, through potentially mission-ending issues, and on to their status as the definitive exploration mission of the last century. And The Farthest does all that primarily through the words of the scientists who ran the mission and analyzed the data in real time as it came in. The scientists are quirky, expressive, passionate, and fundamentally human, things that are lacking from most portrayals in popular culture. The film helps you come away with the sense that, even though nobody has seen or touched this hardware in decades, the Voyagers are fundamentally a story of human endeavor. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Close-up of an opened prescription bottle, labelled as containing the opioid hydrocodone, as a number of its pills lie on a white surface, March 14, 2017. (credit: Tom Kelley/Getty Images) An 84-year-old doctor in New London, New Hampshire, appeared in state court Friday in an effort to regain her medical license, less than a week after closing her office on October 28. State authorities claim that—because Dr. Anna Konopka doesn’t have a computer, much less know how to use one—her organizational skills are lacking, according to the Associated Press. “The problem now is that I am not doing certain things on a computer,” she told the news service. “I have to learn that. It is time consuming. I have no time.” Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / T-Mobile and Sprint stores in Herald Square in New York City in 2011. (credit: Getty Images | Richard Levine ) T-Mobile USA and Sprint today finally gave a definitive answer about whether they will merge. The telecomm giants said that they have stopped negotiating and will remain independent entities. The wireless carriers "were unable to find mutually agreeable terms" and want to "put an end to the extensive speculation around a transaction," they said in a joint announcement. Over the past few weeks, numerous merger updates have bubbled up from anonymous sources. Initially, the merger seemed to be a done deal. Merger talks then seemed to break down, only to be revived again a couple days ago. But none of those rumors were confirmed by the companies' chief executives. That changed today when T-Mobile CEO John Legere and Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure both said that there won't be any deal. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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