posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Dish A federal appeals court has denied Fox’s bid to immediately shut down the Dish Anywhere streaming platform. The United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit thinks that the broadcaster's issues with the service are best sorted out through a trial. Fresh off of its victory over TV startup Aereo, Fox had argued that Dish “engages in virtually identical conduct when it streams Fox's programming to Dish subscribers over the Internet—albeit also in violation of an express contractual prohibition—has repeatedly raised the same defenses as Aereo which have now been rejected by the Supreme Court.” Fox asked the 9th Circuit to impose a preliminary injunction, one that would put a halt to the service—but the court declined to do so. Fox's request is part of a broader case that will take far longer to complete. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The US Secret Service is warning hotel operators to be on the lookout for malware that steals passwords and other sensitive data from guests using PCs in business centers, according to a published report. The non-public advisory was issued on last Thursday, KrebsOnSecurity reporter Brian Krebs reported Monday. Krebs said the notice warned that authorities recently arrested suspects who infected computers at several major hotel business centers around Dallas. In that case, crooks using stolen credit card data to register as hotel guests used business center computers to access Gmail accounts. From there, they downloaded and installed keylogging software. The malware then surreptitiously captured login credentials for banking and other online services accessed by guests who later used the compromised PCs. The report is a poignant reminder why it's rarely a good idea to use public PCs for anything more than casual browsing of websites. Even when PCs are within eyesight of a business center employee, librarian, or other supervisor, and even when it is locked down with limited "guest" privileges, there are usually a host of ways attackers can compromise machines running either Windows or Mac OS X. Krebs wrote: Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google I/O 2014 Keynote The tablet version of Gmail (the phone version is pictured below). 21 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } We've already gathered up a bunch of screenshots from the Android L preview release, but there will be way more to Android L than just the notification panel, settings, dialer, and calculator. To get a better idea of what's in store for us, we went on a screenshot hunt for Google-created Material Design apps. Between various Google I/O sessions and the Material Design guidelines, the company has been dropping a ton of hints about what L will look like. After scouring all the design docs and I/O sessions, we threw together a gallery of the more revealing design examples. Left: The e-mail app from the Material Design docs. Right: Gmail Google A lot of these mockups are from the Material Design guidelines and (mostly) don't represent Google-branded products. You can see an example of this above, where the example e-mail app (left) doesn't have the correct color theme or action button, items have an extra line of text, and the app is missing some minor UI elements like stars and a timestamp. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Miami police are probing footage of a fracas between two officers that was captured on a GoPro and eventually made public on YouTube. The recording is among the latest video to surface involving police shenanigans,  and it underscores that it's not just the populace under today's surveillance microscope. Local media describe the video as officer Marcel Jackson stopping a Chevrolet for allegedly unsafe driving. The driver turns out to be Lt. David Ramras, an internal affairs veteran. The video shows the internal affairs officer get out of the car before a tussle eventually ensues. Jackson throws Ramras to the ground and backup officers hit the scene. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Schoelkopf Lab, Yale The RAM in our computers is constantly refreshed to ensure that it maintains the intended information. For most of us, however, a bit flipped somewhere in the memory of our cell phones or laptops is no big deal. But in many data situations, like banking or rocketry data, a flipped bit can be catastrophic. For this, there's error-correcting RAM, which does exactly what its name implies: catches and fixes any errors that occur. One way to catch an error involves what's called a parity bit. These bits are tacked on to the end of a larger collection of bits (typically a byte) and simply indicate whether the collection sums up to an even or odd number. If the parity and the contents of the byte don't match, then an error must have occurred. Although the ability to catch and correct errors is very useful in traditional RAM, it may be even more essential in quantum memory, as most of these memory technologies have a fairly short life span before they interact with their environment and lose their contents. In a potential step toward error correcting quantum memory, researchers have created the first quantum parity bit, which keeps track of the number of photons stored in a neighboring optical cavity. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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EETimes Google Glass has been struggling a bit lately: Android Wear showed up to eat the product's lunch, and there was almost no mention of Glass at the company's recent I/O conference. To make matters worse, The Glass KitKat update made the device slow and buggy, and it removed video chat, one of Glass' highlight features. Now the founder and former head of Google Glass, Babak Parviz, is leaving Google for Amazon. Parviz announced the move on his Google+ page, updating the "About" section to say: I founded and led a few efforts at Google (among them, Google Glass and Google Contact Lenses are public so far :) prior to moving to Amazon and work on a few other things now... The contact lens mentioned in Parviz's profile is the glucose-detecting Google Contact Lens, which was announced at the beginning of the year. Parviz has been working for some time on embedding technology into contacts; he previously put an LED in a contact lens. Late last year, Parviz stepped down as the head of Glass to work on other projects, and he was eventually replaced by Ivy Ross, a marketing executive from Art.com. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Microsoft, Sandyford, Co. Dublin Red Agenda Global governments, the tech sector, and scholars are closely following a legal flap in which the US Justice Department claims that Microsoft must hand over e-mail stored in Dublin, Ireland. In essence, President Barack Obama's administration claims that any company with operations in the United States must comply with valid warrants for data, even if the content is stored overseas. It's a position Microsoft and companies like Apple say is wrong, arguing that the enforcement of US law stops at the border. A magistrate judge has already sided with the government's position, ruling in April that "the basic principle that an entity lawfully obligated to produce information must do so regardless of the location of that information." Microsoft appealed to a federal judge, and the case is set to be heard on July 31. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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mpclemens Patrick Sensburg, chairman of the German parliament's National Security Agency investigative committee, now says he’s considering expanding the use of manual typewriters to carry out his group's work. In an appearance (German language) Monday morning on German public television, Sensburg said that the committee is taking its operational security very seriously. "In fact, we already have [a typewriter], and it’s even a non-electronic typewriter," he said. If Sensburg’s suggestion takes flight, the country would be taking a page out of the Russian playbook. Last year, the agency in charge of securing communications from the Kremlin announced that it wanted to spend 486,000 rubles (about $14,800) to buy 20 electric typewriters as a way to avoid digital leaks. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Joseph No For almost two years, Ars has advised readers to use a software-based password manager to ease the password fatigue that comes from choosing and securing dozens of hard-to-guess passcodes that are unique to each site or service. A research paper scheduled to be presented at a security conference next month underscores the hidden dangers of selecting the wrong products. The researchers examined LastPass and four other Web-based managers and found critical defects in all of them. The worst of the bugs allowed an attacker to remotely siphon plaintext passcodes out of users' wallets with no outward sign that anything was amiss. LastPass and three of the four other developers have since fixed the flaws, but the findings should serve as a wakeup call. If academic researchers from the University of Berkeley can devise these sorts of crippling attacks, so too can crooks who regularly case people's online bank accounts and other digital assets. "Widespread adoption of insecure password managers could make things worse: adding a new, untested single point of failure to the Web authentication ecosystem," the researchers wrote in their paper, titled The Emperor's New Password Manager: Security Analysis of Web-based Password Managers (PDF). "After all, a vulnerability in a password manager could allow an attacker to steal all passwords for a user in a single swoop. Given the increasing popularity of password managers, the possibility of vulnerable password managers is disconcerting and motivates our work." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Insomniac Games' first Xbox-exclusive game, the stylized shooter Sunset Overdrive, will reach Xbox One consoles on October 28. The designer's promotional "Sunset TV" YouTube series was updated this morning with details about the game's pre-order program, and in that clip, an Insomniac rep alleged that digital pre-ordering will finally reach Xbox Live in time for the game's launch. As Gamespot reported, Insomniac's Brandon Winfrey answered a question about the game's "Day One Edition" content—including exclusive costumes and guns—and assured fans that digital buyers will receive the same content. Winfrey then added, "You can't preorder it digitally yet, but soon you will be able to." This announcement lines up with public comments made by Xbox chief Phil Spencer during E3, during which he described pre-buying and pre-downloading as "things we look at as important to our long-term success." Microsoft has yet to confirm Insomniac's announcement, which means we can't say when digital pre-ordering will reach the console, nor whether digital pre-ordering will come with a pre-download feature à la Steam. Without that loading capability, which eases the pain of multi-gigabyte downloads, we see little reason to cough up early cash for a game that has yet to receive a single review (unless fans really want exclusive pre-order costumes that badly). Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Verizon Internet customers who want to watch Netflix at high quality and without interruption just can't catch a break. While Comcast subscribers saw near-immediate speed improvements after Netflix paid for a direct connection to the Comcast network, Netflix performance on Verizon remains poor—and it's getting worse. Netflix's latest ISP speed rankings, released today, show that the average prime time streaming speed on Verizon FiOS dropped from 1.9Mbps in May to 1.58Mbps in June, a decline of 17 percent. Verizon DSL dropped from 1.05Mbps to 0.91Mbps, a decrease of 13 percent. Verizon FiOS previously dropped from 1.99Mbps in April to 1.9Mbps in May, while Verizon DSL had dropped from 1.08Mbps in April to 1.05Mbps in May. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A single, nondescript diagram is the only glimpse of the "Apple iBeacon" hardware the FCC documents give us. Apple Apple may be looking to boost usage of the iBeacon feature it introduced in iOS 7. Late last week, router manufacturer Securifi spotted FCC documents certifying a new "Apple iBeacon" device, suggesting that Apple wants to offer beacon hardware alongside a list of smaller third-party manufacturers. As 9to5Mac reported over the weekend, the FCC documents tell us very little about this device or its intended audience. The device was tested only in the same area of the 2.4GHz wireless band used by Bluetooth devices, suggesting that it is dedicated beacon hardware and not some kind of Wi-Fi-enabled multipurpose device. (2.4GHz Wi-Fi operates at slightly different frequencies from those tested here, and all recent Apple hardware with Wi-Fi includes support for 5GHz Wi-Fi as well.) The only available image of the device, seen above, shows an on/off switch and a micro-USB port that could be used for power or device configuration. Whether the hardware would be made available to the general public, to stores looking to set up iBeacons, or to developers looking to test the feature is unknown. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Raspberry Pi Foundation The Raspberry Pi, a tiny computer for hobbyists and developers, has been generally unchanged in the two-plus years since it launched, but today a new piece of hardware goes on sale. The updated "B+" model has the same Broadcom BCM2835 processor as the original and still has 512MB RAM, but it uses less power, has more connectivity options, and features other upgrades over the previous Raspberry Pi Model B. Here are the key improvements, as described by Raspberry Pi creator Eben Upton in today's announcement: More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model B. More USB. We now have 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour. Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version. Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W. Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply. Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes. "This isn’t a 'Raspberry Pi 2' but rather the final evolution of the original Raspberry Pi," Upton wrote. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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By your command. Sean Gallagher Earlier this month, I spent a day working in the throwback world of DOS. More specifically, it was FreeDOS version 1.1, the open source version of the long-defunct Microsoft MS-DOS operating system. It's a platform that in the minds of many should've died a long time ago. But after 20 years, a few dozen core developers and a broader, much larger contributor community continue furthering the FreeDOS project by gradually adding utilities, accessories, compilers, and open-source applications. All this labor of love begs one question: why? What is it about a single-tasking command-line driven operating system—one that is barely up to the most basic of network-driven tasks—that has kept people’s talents engaged for two decades? Haven't most developers abandoned it for Windows (or, tragically, for IBM OS/2)? Who still uses DOS, and for what? To find out, Ars reached out to two members of the FreeDOS core development team to learn more about who was behind this seemingly quixotic quest. These devs choose to keep an open-source DOS alive rather than working on something similar but more modern—like Linux. So, needless to say, the answers we got weren’t necessarily expected. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Surprise! Strong Bad, it's me! Homestar Runner! From school! homestarrunner.com Homestar Runner co-creator Matt Chapman made a bunch of 20- and 30-somethings happy when he said earlier this week that the cartoon could be making a comeback later this year following a successful experiment on April Fools' Day. If you watched the cartoons during their heyday, the news probably sent you down a nostalgic rabbit hole where you spent two hours re-watching all of your favorite episodes. If you happened to miss out on Homestar during its peak, here's what you need to know: creators Matt and Mike Chapman made a lot of different Flash cartoons for the site, but the most popular were Strong Bad E-mails, also called "sbemails." Every week, Strong Bad (the luchador-looking guy in the picture above) picked a different fan-submitted e-mail to answer, and hilarity ensued. The site was updated regularly throughout the early 2000s before becoming more irregular later in the decade, and updates mostly ceased in 2009 as the Chapman brothers moved on to other projects. We've combed through the archive and assembled 10 Strong Bad e-mails that do a pretty good job of showing what this odd Internet cartoon could be at its best. It's impossible to call out all of the good ones, but if these hook you the complete collection is still available here. Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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NASA Astronomers may be the world champions at giving fantastically dull names to spectacular objects. Over the years, catchy monickers like GRB 130606A and SDSS J150243.09+111557.3 have graced our pages. That trend has carried over into the naming of exoplanets, which picked up names like KOI 784.02 (where KOI is just short for "Kepler object of interest"). That's led at least one company to try to fill the void by letting people pay for the right to (completely unofficially) name a planet. At the time the naming program first hit the news, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) made a statement that reminded everyone that the names would have no official weight. However, the IAU also recognized that the public was excited about the prospect and suggested it might do something about the situation. Unfortunately, the IAU's definition of "do something" involved kicking the problem to a committee, which is often where large organizations send ideas to die. Yet the Public Naming of Planets and Planetary Satellites Working Group has come through. About a year ago, it determined that exoplanet names should follow the rules that govern the naming of minor planets in the Solar System. And it suggested that any group that wanted to run a non-commercial naming campaign (meaning, you can't charge to name a planet) should get in touch. A year later, the IAU is announcing its first naming campaign, run in collaboration with the citizen science site Zooniverse. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Mary Anne Grady-Flores, a 58-year-old Ithaca, NY grandmother of three, faces a one-year county jail sentence after being charged with second-degree criminal contempt. The punishment comes after her repeated participation in peaceful anti-drone protests at the Hancock Air Base in DeWitt, NY (located in Central New York near Syracuse). In October 2012, Grady-Flores was taken into custody after a drone protest. According to the Syracuse Post-Standard, 16 people from the Upstate Coalition to Ground the Drones and End the Wars (UCGDEW) blocked three gates at the New York National Guard Hancock Field during the demonstration. They were taken into custody to be charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct, and a protection order was eventually issued to prevent Grady-Flores from going near Col. Earl Evans, the mission support group commander at the 174th Attack Wing of the New York Air National Guard. Boing Boing notes protection orders are at times given to non-violent stalkers, and this one was valid for one year according to the paper. Timing was not on Grady-Flores' side. In February 2013, Grady-Flores and 11 other UCGDEW members were being sentenced (this time to 15 days at a local penitentiary following new disorderly conduct charges; trespassing charged were dismissed). According an account Ellen Grady (Grady-Flores' sister) gave the Post-Standard, Grady-Flores was in attendance at the base to photograph the events this time rather than protest herself. But in the initial sentencing hearing, DeWitt Town Justice David Gideon said her intent was "completely irrelevant" to her additional criminal contempt charge since Grady-Flores admitted to being on base property. Grady told the Post-Standard that Grady-Flores was "was not a threat to Evans and... unaware that her actions in February violated the protection order." Grady-Flores eventually went to trial for criminal contempt in May and was found guilty. Her sentencing took place this week. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Flickr user: Dierk Schaefer Two teams creating devices that stimulate the brain to restore memory function have been granted $37.5 million by DARPA to develop the technology. Both will initially work with people with epilepsy who have been given implants to locate where their seizures originate. The researchers will reuse the data gathered during this process to monitor other brain activity, such as the patterns that occur when the brain stores and retrieves memories. One team will then attempt to map these patterns by recording the brain activity of epilepsy sufferers with mild memory problems while they play a computer game about remembering things. The pattern differences between the best and worst scores among these patents will be used to develop an algorithm for a personalized stimulation pattern to keep the brain performing at an optimal level. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The OnePlus One may be giant in most hands, but perhaps less so in a T-Rex's! Sam Machkovech Specs at a glance: OnePlus One Screen 1920×1080 5.5"(401 ppi) IPS OS Cyanogenmod 11S (based on Android KitKat 4.4.2) CPU 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 330 Storage 16GB or 64GB, no MicroSD slot Networking GSM 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz, LTE bands 1/3/4/7/17/38/40, Dual Band 802.11b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS Ports MicroUSB 2.0, headphones Camera 13MP rear camera, 5MP front camera Size 152.9 mm x 75.9 mm x 8.9 mm Weight 162g Battery 3100 mAh Starting price $300 unlocked Other perks RBG notification LED, NFC In our time using the new OnePlus One smartphone, we tried our best to ignore its cost. We wanted to focus on its remarkable traits—its quality 5.5-inch screen, magnificent battery life, Cyanogenmod functionality, quad-core processor, 13MP backward-facing camera, unnecessarily nice front-facing camera, handsome design—and judge them in a vacuum. "Focus solely on how it stacked up to the best-selling modern Android sets"—that was our mantra. But it's hard to ignore the magical, mystical fact that we actually had a OnePlus One in hand. Months after the phone’s public reveal, and at the beginnings of its odd, invite-only shopping process, the notoriously hard-to-buy phone arrived. And once the price came up, all bias was completely overtaken: $300 for the 16GB model, $350 for 64GB, completely unlocked, no contract necessary. Google and LG's Nexus 5 is the only other smartphone that comes close to matching OnePlus’ smartphone-to-price ratio, and OnePlus is hitting this price without the benefit of Google's deep pockets. It’s tempting to pin that detail as the headline of any review. Yet the truly remarkable “how’d they do that” part of this phone isn’t its cost, but its quality. Read 36 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A series of redacted emails and other documents obtained by the Associated Press shows that contrary to the assertions of the White House, intelligence officials had knowledge beforehand of  British intelligence officials’ efforts to destroy data in the possession of the UK newspaper The Guardian. The emails show that former National Security Agency director Gen. Kenneth Alexander was briefed on the plans days before GCHQ analysts oversaw the destruction of a laptop at The Guardian’s offices in London. On July 19, 2013, as British officials were stepping up pressure on The Guardian to turn over the data—including threats of a police raid and prosecution under the UK’s Official Secrets Act—Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger consented to the destruction of the data and the laptop it was stored on rather than turning the data itself over to GCHQ.  The documents obtained by the Associated Press from the NSA under the Freedom of Information Act show thatRichard Ledgett, then director of NSA’s Threat Operations Center and a member of NSA’s “Media Leaks Task Force,” sent an email within hours of Rusbriger’s assent to the destruction to Gen. Alexander entitled, “Guardian data being destroyed.”  “Good news, at least on this front,” Ledgett wrote, forwarding an email from a redacted source. Alexander forwarded the news to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper—“Jim- Here is the report I got.” On July 20,  a few hours after the destruction of the Guardian laptop was complete, Clapper was verbally briefed by Gen. Alexander on the destruction. He sent a thank-you email to  Alexander for the “conversation” as a reply to the original email thread. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Hope you guys like Hulu, because that's what you're going to be using to watch South Park from here on. Since 2008, fans of the Comedy Central cartoon South Park have been able to stream the show’s entire library (minus a few permanently redacted episodes) from the South Park Studios site. But according to a new post on the show's official blog, this fan-friendly unlimited streaming arrangement will soon be ending: South Park is moving to Hulu. Folks who want to watch more than a limited selection of old South Park episodes will either have to resort to physical media or begin paying $7.99 per month to subscribe to Hulu Plus. Under what the blog post describes as an "exclusive, multi-year" agreement, the current offering of streamable South Park episodes will remain available until September 24 at both the show’s official site and also on Hulu. After September 24—the start of the show’s 18th season—new episodes will be available to both standard Hulu and Hulu Plus customers the day after they air (Variety’s writeup says that the official South Park Studios site will also have next-day streaming, but that isn’t mentioned in the blog post). The big change is the paywalling of past episodes. After September 24, free Hulu users and visitors to the show’s official site will only be able to watch "a revolving selection of free episodes." Unlimited access—which today is free—will only be available for Hulu Plus users. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 16 days ago on ars technica
The U.S. Department of Justice announced late Friday that a Chinese businessman has been charged with hacking into the computer systems of Boeing, Lockheed Martin and other aerospace companies. The alleged hacker, Su Bin, is accused of helping unidentified co-conspirators to identify what to steal from the companies' networks—including data on the F-22 and F-35 fighter aircraft and the C-17 cargo plane program. Su, also known as Stephen Su, an executive for a Chinese aerospace company with offices in Canada, was arrested by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in British Columbia on June 28, in cooperation with the FBI. According to the Justice Department, Su and the unknown hackers based in China started to collect data in 2009, and continued until 2013. The Justice Department claims that the group "gained remote access from China to information residing on the computer systems of U.S. companies including cleared defense contractors.”  In an email Su sent, he said the aircraft data would help Chinese aircraft designers “stand easily on the giant’s shoulders,” and ""allow us to rapidly catch up with U.S. levels," NBC reported. Ars will update this report with more details as they become available. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Prolific leaker evleaks, whose stock in trade is smartphone-related rumors, has said that Microsoft is going to produce a Lumia phone running Android, branded "Nokia by Microsoft." This isn't the first time that this kind of rumor has been floated, with both Windows and Windows Phone talked of as candidates for running Android apps. The logic is very simple: developers aren't writing apps for Windows's Metro environment or Windows Phone. They are writing apps for Android. Put those apps on Windows and Windows Phone and the app problem is instantly solved. Of course, the downsides of this approach are quite clear. If Windows Phone or Windows can run Android apps, why should developers looking at Microsoft's platform bother writing Windows Phone and Windows apps? Might as well just write Android apps and have an app that works both on Microsoft's platform and beyond. This logic applies even to those developers who have taken the plunge and created Windows or Windows Phone apps; why bother maintaining them when an Android app could target the very same users plus many more? Read 44 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Last month, the French parliament took a strong stand in favor of small book retailers. The governing body voted in favor of a proposed law to ban major online book retailers—including Amazon and the French retailer FNAC—from offering free delivery on book orders. The logic here is evident: hit consumers in the pocketbook, and they'll be more inclined to shop local. English language French-news site France 24 reported at the time that the country had "one of the highest number of traditional book shops in the world—with a total of 3,500, of which around 800 are single independent businesses" (that's compared to about 1,000 total in the UK). Amazon, at least, has not taken this situation lying down. The free delivery law took effect on July 8, and France 24 reported this week that the digital retail behemoth has found a workaround (at least for the shipping—a five percent discount on book orders has been removed). "We are unfortunately no longer allowed to offer free deliveries for book orders," Amazon.fr's FAQ (Google Translate) reads. "We have therefore fixed delivery costs at one centime per order [$0.01 Euros, or a single penny] containing books and dispatched by Amazon to systematically guarantee the lowest price for your book orders." This is by no means the first time France has tried to put a damper on major US tech companies dabbling in books or other reading materials. In 2011, the country updated an old law related to printed books that then allowed published to impose set e-book pricing on Apple and others. And in 2012, there was the very public dispute between French lawmakers and Google over the country's desire to see French media outlets paid for having their content pop up in search results. At least for now with this most recent situation, an online giant has found a relatively quick and easy way to regain the upperhand. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Any market tips in there? Flickr user: Richard LeBlanc In the financial world, some shares have new owners every second. Today, much of the buying and selling is done by computers, but many trades still rely on human intuition—the gut feeling of the experienced trader. “Nobody can predict the market, but traders are expected to,” Richard Taffler, professor of finance at the University of Warwick, said. “This creates anxiety.” Anxiety is just one of the emotions that play an important role in driving financial markets. Understanding what happens in the brains of traders as prices move up and down could possibly tell us something about a market’s future developments. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Alec Smith at the California Institute of Technology and his colleagues conducted group-behavior experiments. They had between 11 and 23 students play multiple rounds of a game that simulated a market situation. For every round of the game, three of the participants were inside a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine, which identified parts of the brain that have increased or decreased activity during the trading. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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