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Enlarge / Roughly translated, many parts of the Voynich Manuscript say that women should take a nice bath if they are feeling sick. Here you can see a woman doing just that. Since its discovery in 1969, the 15th century Voynich Manuscript has been a mystery and a cult phenomenon. Full of handwriting in an unknown language or code, the book is heavily illustrated with weird pictures of alien plants, naked women, strange objects, and zodiac symbols. Now, history researcher and television writer Nicholas Gibbs appears to have cracked the code, discovering that the book is actually a guide to women's health that's mostly plagiarized from other guides of the era. Gibbs writes in the Times Literary Supplement that he was commissioned by a television network to analyze the Voynich Manuscript three years ago. Because the manuscript has been entirely digitized by Yale's Beinecke Library, he could see tiny details in each page and pore over them at his leisure. His experience with medieval Latin and familiarity with ancient medical guides allowed him to uncover the first clues. After looking at the so-called code for a while, Gibbs realized he was seeing a common form of medieval Latin abbreviations, often used in medical treatises about herbs. "From the herbarium incorporated into the Voynich manuscript, a standard pattern of abbreviations and ligatures emerged from each plant entry," he wrote. "The abbreviations correspond to the standard pattern of words used in the Herbarium Apuleius Platonicus – aq = aqua (water), dq = decoque / decoctio (decoction), con = confundo (mix), ris = radacis / radix (root), s aiij = seminis ana iij (3 grains each), etc." So this wasn't a code at all; it was just shorthand. The text would have been very familiar to anyone at the time who was interested in medicine. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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flightradar24 Life in the 21st century doesn't mean being able to ignore natural disasters; 150mph winds, tsunami waves, and earthquakes will still mess up one's day. But living in what used to be the future does allow us to understand such phenomena. We can even simulate it, albeit poorly. Living in 2017 also allows you experience it vicariously, at a macro scale, live and at home. For years now, people have been collecting geotagged data and building online map layers, visualizing global shipping or air corridors. Scientific agencies publish data from satellite geosensors measuring land and sea temperatures. And we can use them to watch nature remind us of our place. Take flight tracking. Yesterday, Jason Rabinowitz—@AirlineFlyer on Twitter—live-tweeted the progress of a Delta Boeing 737-900 that raced to into and then out of Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in Puerto Rico before Hurricane Irma made its presence known. The plane, flying JFK-SJU under the flight number DL 431, landed just before noon on Wednesday. In less than an hour, it had refueled, taken on 173 passengers, and then was back on its way to JFK. This time as DL302—which we noticed took off almost half an hour early—it was last plane to leave the island that day. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Yesterday, the credit reporting agency Equifax revealed that the personal data of 143 million US consumers, as well as "limited personal information for certain UK and Canadian residents," was exposed by an attack exploiting security flaws in the company's website. Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses, and some drivers license numbers were all exposed—information which could be used to pose as individuals to gain access to financial accounts, open new ones in their names, or file fraudulent tax returns. Equifax responded by offering all US citizens a one-year credit monitoring service. But the leaked data could have a much longer lifetime than a year on the black market for identity theft and credit fraud, because the information obtained in the attack is irreplaceable. Unlike relatively disposable data such as credit card information or bank account numbers, the data obtained from Equifax could be held for years before use and still be effective. So what can affected consumers do? Unfortunately, as things stand, the burden is on you to protect yourself in the long term—and the credit reporting agencies stand to profit from it. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Pluto’s first official surface-feature names are marked on this map, compiled from images and data gathered by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft during its flight through the Pluto system in 2015. (credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/Ross Beyer) On Thursday, the International Astronomical Union announced that it had officially accepted the names for 14 features on the surface of the dwarf planet Pluto. While members of the scientific team behind the New Horizons probe had used a variety of names both informally and in academic publications, there was always the chance that those names would be tweaked or changed entirely. Now, 14 of the monikers have officially entered the record. At least one of the names has already undergone a change from the initial weeks after New Horizons' visit. The large, heart-shaped plane was originally termed Sputnik Planum in honor of humanity's first orbital hardware. But well before this new announcement, that had been changed to Sputnik Planitia in order to bring it in line with naming conventions. Sputnik Planitia is a clear example of the overarching theme identified for naming Pluto's features: famed explorers, human or otherwise. Other spacecraft honored include Hayabusa and Voyager, which each get a Terra, or large area of rugged terrain. There are proposals for Pioneer, Venera, and Viking Terra as well, but these haven't been formally accepted yet. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Intel demo of an HTC Vive with WiGig at Computex this year. (credit: Intel) Intel is ending production of its 60GHz 802.11ad, also known as WiGig, controllers and antennas later this year. Anandtech writes that the company has sent end-of-life notifications for the high-speed wireless parts, and it will stop making and selling them in just a few months. 802.11ad boasts higher performance—up to 4.8 gigabits per second—than 802.11ac, but its use of the 60GHz frequency, rather than the 5GHz or 2.4GHz of mainstream Wi-Fi, means that it's limited to a very short range. It also requires line of sight between the device and the base station. Penetration through walls is essentially non-existent, so using 802.11ad as a Wi-Fi alternative would require a base station in every room. This limits 802.11ad's use as a networking interface, but it does have an alternative use as a cable replacement. A handful of 802.11ad docking stations have come to market, enabling a laptop to connect to a monitor and other peripherals without using wires. In this application, the short-range and line-of-sight requirement is a lesser issue—both laptop and dock will probably be adjacent on a desk—but it hasn't had much mass-market impact. Apart from anything else, most people docking their laptop will probably want to charge it at the same time, so at least one cable is required anyway. With USB Type-C and Thunderbolt 3, that one cable can deliver both power and connectivity—up to 40 gigabits per second, nearly ten times the performance of WiGig—anyway. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: GotCredit) By all accounts, the Equifax data breach is, as we reported Thursday, "very possibly the work leak of personal info ever." The incident affects possibly as many as 143 million people. The breach, via a security flaw on the Equifax website, included full names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver license numbers in some cases. Many of the affected consumers have never even directly done business with the giant consumer credit reporting agency. But if you want to find out if your data might have been exposed, you have to waive your right to sue the Atlanta-based company. We're not making this up. The company has now published a website allowing consumers to input their last six digits of their Social Security numbers to find out. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Dangerous molds fill the walls of a flooded home in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 14, 2006, six months after Katrina. (credit: Getty | Fort Worth Star-Telegram) Humans inhale somewhere between 1,000 and 10 billion mold spores on an average day—let alone on days after catastrophic flooding or a Category 5 hurricane hits, when fungal flare-ups can ensue. Each one of those teeny spores has the potential to embed in our moist, warm lungs. There they can unfurl fungal tendrils that grow like kudzu, invading and engulfing our organs, slowly choking the life out of us as mold bursts from our seams. Luckily, our immune systems keep most of us safe from such an agonizing death. But they don’t pull it off with a bloody, fungal massacre each day—no, they use a much more dignified defense, according to a new study. In the lung, immune cells get cozy with invading fungal spores, then trick them into pushing their own self-destruct buttons, researchers reported Thursday in Science. When the researchers used genetic engineering to override the spore’s self-destruct system, immune cells in mice were powerless to stop the fungal infiltration. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Note 8 gets ripped apart. That's a lot of pieces! (credit: iFixit) A new device has come out, so it's time for iFixit to attack the phone with a battery of heat pads, pry tools, and screwdrivers. The site recently tore the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 asunder, revealing its gooey innards. And I mean "gooey" literally, because as usual the Note 8 case is assembled mostly with glue. The front and back glass panels are put on with glue, and the battery is glued in. Getting access requires lots of heat pads and gentle prying. As much as iFixit doesn't like it, glue is a reality of the smartphone industry, though—fasteners are big and expensive. The glue probably also helps with water and dust resistance, which seems to be accomplished by a rubber gasket around the perimeter of the device. While iFixit disapproved of the usual glued-together construction, the site praised the Note 8 for having several modular components. The headphone jack is easily removable via a plug. The USB C port lives on a separate daughter board as opposed to being soldered to a single board. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A pair of YouTubers will not face any fines for undisclosed promotion of a Counter-Strike: GO (CS: GO) gambling site they owned, as part of a settlement with the FTC announced this week. Last May, Trevor “TmarTn” Martin and Thomas “Syndicate” Cassell came under fire for videos promoting CSGO Lotto, a site that lets players gamble using in-game skins as a form of currency. Those videos breathlessly promoted the site with titles like "HOW TO WIN $13,000 IN 5 MINUTES" but did not disclose that the site in question was itself owned by the video makers. Martin and Cassell will not face fines as part of the settlement but have agreed to "clearly and conspicuously disclose any material connections with an endorser or between an endorser and any promoted product or service" in the future. That punishment is barely even a slap on the wrist for what the initial complaint called a "deceptive act or practice" that could mislead and harm consumers. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Travis Kalanick, ex-CEO of Uber Technologies. (credit: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Federal investigators are probing an internal program, dubbed "Hell," that Uber used to keep tabs on its leading competitor, Lyft, the Wall Street Journal is reporting. "Uber created fake Lyft customer accounts, tricking Lyft’s system into believing prospective customers were seeking rides in various locations around a city. That allowed Uber to see which Lyft drivers were nearby and what prices they were offering for various routes," the Journal reports. "The program was also used to glean data on drivers who worked for both companies, and whom Uber could target with cash incentives to get them to leave Lyft." Federal investigators are reportedly probing "whether 'Hell' constituted unauthorized access of a computer"—which is a federal crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the anti-hacking statute Congress passed in 1986. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images) Over in the UK, the Goodwood Revival is just getting underway. It's a race-weekend/fancy-dress garden party, where people dress up in period attire to match the vintage and historic cars that battle it out over the course of three days. The racing is the antithesis of what we saw a few weeks ago in Monterey, although the cars are no less rare or valuable. And best of all, the entire thing is streamed on YouTube: The Goodwood circuit was one of the UK's fastest. It was built in Sussex on the Goodwood Estate in 1948 but closed in 1966 as it became too dangerous for the cars of the time. When Lord March (who owns the estate) realized the success of his Goodwood Festival of Speed, a decision was made to reopen the circuit, but the only racing that happens there is for classic cars. What makes the Revival truly amazing are both the cars and drivers that turn up to compete. For one thing, you literally won't see an assortment of cars like these anywhere other than at Laguna Seca during Car Week. As I type this, nine (!) Ford GT40s are lapping a rather wet track in search of pole position for the Whitsun Trophy, which happens on Saturday afternoon. (Did I mention all the races have cool names?) Second, everyone takes the racing a lot more seriously than in California—a lot. Part of that is the driver lineup; in addition to the wealthy amateurs, pros are drafted in for the weekend. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / LAS VEGAS - JUNE 11: Greg Scherick (L) at the CineVegas film festival in 2006. Scherick has sued Gizmodo Media Group, claiming that an article in Jezebel about his project "Superstar Machine" was libelous. (credit: Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for CineVegas) An Oregon life coach, represented by the lawyer who won a $140 million verdict against Gawker Media on behalf of Hulk Hogan, has filed a defamation lawsuit against Jezebel, one of the websites that was once part of Gawker's online media group. Jezebel, a culture and news site geared towards women, ran a story about a group called "Superstar Machine," which quoted some ex-members referring to the group as a "cult." The founder of Superstar Machine, Greg Scherick, has sued Jezebel for defamation. The article described Scherick as running a self-help group in which women gathered around him in a semi-circle and Scherick proceeded to "call people on our shit," in the words of one former follower. Scherick would tell women "what he perceived their spiritual and romantic failings to be," according to the article. This often led to tears, and crying in the group was "frequent" and "praised." Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Hurricane Irma at dawn on Friday, shown in a GOES-16 photo. (credit: NOAA) On Thursday afternoon Eric Blake, a hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center and one of the country's foremost experts on these storms, took to Twitter to offer a few capstone thoughts on the storm bearing down on Florida. "Irma has me sick to my stomach," he wrote. "Need to be very lucky for it to miss Florida now." Blake lives in Miami, like the rest of the NHC forecasters, and said Irma sends "chills" down the spines of residents there. "This hurricane is as serious as any I have seen. No hype, just the hard facts. Take every life-saving precaution you can. I have little doubt Irma will go down as one of the most infamous in Atlantic hurricane history." This is a sobering message coming from someone like Blake, who above all preaches calm and preparedness during hurricane season. Here, he is saying that a realistic worst-case scenario hurricane is coming to the state of Florida. As we will discuss below, some questions remain about intensity and track, but parts of the state are going to get hit exceptionally hard. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
TVR The new TVR we were teased with earlier this week has now seen the light of day. TVR has returned to the Griffith name for this 500hp (373kW) rear-wheel drive V8 with a manual gearbox, a downforce-generating underbody, and as few driver aids as is possible to fit to a car and still meet European type-approval. We've already seen the chassis, a mix of steel tubes with composite panels (carbon fiber sandwiching an aluminum honeycomb) bonded on for stiffness. Now we know what the rest of the car looks like. That bright red body is also made from carbon fiber, which keeps the Griffith's weight nice and low. At just 2,756lbs (1,250kg), TVR met its power-to-weight target, and the Griffith will be a very quick car to 60mph (under four seconds). It will also exceed 200mph. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / This reed warbler hasn't cottoned on yet. (credit: Per Harald Olsen / Wikimedia Commons) Cuckoos are nest parasites. That means they lay eggs in the nests of other birds, which then put the effort into raising the chicks. So you'd think they'd be quiet about it. Yet female cuckoos have a tendency to make a bubbly, chuckling call while they’re laying their eggs. That’s a strange thing for them to do, because host birds aren’t too fond of cuckoos. That chuckle doesn’t sound at all like the male cuckoo call. But it does have similarities to the call of the sparrowhawk, which led researchers Jenny York and Nicholas Davies to wonder whether the call might be a purposeful deceit—a ruse to distract the hapless host birds while their nest is being violated. York and Davies’ paper in Nature Ecology & Evolution this week provides evidence that the cuckoo chuckle does indeed seem to distract host birds by making them fear a sparrowhawk attack. Faking it Plenty of species have evolved to mimic predators, often for their own protection. For instance, the wasp beetle mimics a stinging wasp, causing predators to steer away. Cuckoos seem to be a fan of that tactic: some cuckoo species look quite a bit like hawks, and this seems to protect them from mobbing by other birds. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple's annual September product event is happening Tuesday, and all signs point to it being huge. First, it'll be the inaugural event for the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus. Second, the company is expected to release three new iPhones, which is a change from recent norms. Third and most importantly, the iPhone 8 will be the showstopper of the event. It's expected to look very different than any iPhones that came before it, it'll sport a bunch of new features never seen before on an Apple handset, and it'll probably be expensive, too. New iPhones aren't the only announcements to come on Tuesday: we'll likely see a new Apple TV and an updated Apple Watch. After the announcements made at Apple's WorldWide Developers Conference in June, we will also hear about forthcoming software releases. But make no mistake: this is primarily an iPhone event, and it might be the biggest one since the device debuted in 2007. An iPhone by any other name... We're assuming the next big iPhone will be called the iPhone 8, following Apple's numerical naming system, but we don't know for certain. Rumors suggest we'll see three new handset models on Tuesday: two with smaller updates that look familiar, and one totally new device. In that case, the most obvious naming system would be the iPhone 7S, the iPhone 7S Plus, and the wild-card iPhone 8. Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: US Navy) It's a sad reality in 2017 that a data breach affecting 143 million people is dwarfed by other recent hacks—for instance, the ones hitting Yahoo in 2013 and 2014, which exposed personal details for 1 billion and 500 million users respectively; another that revealed account details for 412 million accounts on sex and swinger community site AdultFriendFinder last year; and an eBay hack in 2014 that spilled sensitive data for 145 million users. The breach Equifax reported Thursday, however, very possibly is the most severe of all for a simple reason: the breath-taking amount of highly sensitive data it handed over to criminals. By providing full names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and, in some cases, driver license numbers, it provided most of the information banks, insurance companies, and other businesses use to confirm consumers are who they claim to be. The theft, by criminals who exploited a security flaw on the Equifax website, opens the troubling prospect the data is now in the hands of hostile governments, criminal gangs or both and will remain so indefinitely. Hacks hitting Yahoo and other sites, in contrast, may have breached more accounts, but the severity of the personal data was generally more limited. And in most cases the damage could be contained by changing a password or getting a new credit card number. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Drugs. (credit: Getty | Joe Raedle) The manufacturer of EpiPen devices failed to address known malfunctions in its epinephrine auto-injectors even as hundreds of customer complaints rolled in and failures were linked to deaths, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The damning allegations came to light today when the FDA posted a warning letter it sent September 5 to the manufacturer, Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc. The company (which is owned by Pfizer) produces EpiPens for Mylan, which owns the devices and is notorious for dramatically raising prices by more than 400 percent in recent years. The auto-injectors are designed to be used during life-threatening allergic reactions to provide a quick shot of epinephrine. If they fail to fire, people experiencing a reaction can die or suffer serious illnesses. According to the FDA, that’s exactly what happened for hundreds of customers. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / One of Raef Lawson's promotional shots on his IMDB page. (credit: IMDB) The sole plaintiff going to trial over his treatment in the "gig economy" has a serious problem. Under cross-examination yesterday, former GrubHub deliveryman Raef Lawson admitted that he lied on his applications to GrubHub, got paid for shifts he barely worked, and took affirmative steps to avoid doing deliveries. Lawson also acknowledged that, before applying to GrubHub, he consulted with his attorney, who has specialized in lawsuits against so-called "gig economy" companies, like Uber and Lyft. These companies typically provide workers with part-time work and flexible shifts, but few other benefits. And Lawson was fired from another gig economy platform, Postmates, which directly accused him of fraud. Lawson, an aspiring actor who made ends meet with various day jobs, sued GrubHub in 2015. He said that he should have been classified as an employee, not a contractor. He's suing for back wages and overtime. A magistrate judge denied class-action status to Lawson's case, but Lawson and his lawyer have persisted, despite having a total damage claim that amounts to less than $600, and they are now at trial in San Francisco. A win for Lawson could set the stage for future, bigger litigation wins against GrubHub and other gig economy companies. Read 51 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Michael Theis) Equifax, a provider of consumer credit reports, said it experienced a data breach affecting as many as 143 million US people after criminals exploited a vulnerability on its website. The US population is about 324 million people, so that's about 44 percent of its population. The data exposed in the hack includes names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and, in some cases, driver license numbers. The hackers also accessed credit card numbers for 209,000 US consumers and dispute documents with personal identifying information for about 182,000 US people. Limited personal information for an unknown number of Canadian and UK residents was also exposed. Equifax—which also provides credit monitoring services for people whose personal information is exposed—said the unauthorized access occurred from mid-May through July. "Criminals exploited a US website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files," Equifax said in a statement late Thursday, without elaborating. That leaves open a wide range of possibilities, with injection bugs, faulty authentication mechanisms, and cross-site scripting vulnerabilities topping the list of the most widely exploited website flaws. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / In the movie Her, a man falls in love with a commercially available AI. Maybe it was developed at the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab? (credit: Annapurna Pictures) In one of the most lucrative partnerships ever between a corporation and a university, IBM will team up with MIT to engage in 10 years of "fundamental AI research." The $240 million deal will go toward the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, a mix of IBM researchers and 100 MIT academics working at the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The goal, said IBM reps, is to "advance AI hardware, software, and algorithms related to deep learning and other areas, increase AI's impact on industries, such as health care and cybersecurity, and explore the economic and ethical implications of AI on society." Working from offices in Kendall Square—a neighborhood that's become an incubator for many hybrid academic/corporate startups—researchers at the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab will be focused on basic research with an eye toward commercializing what they discover. IBM wants to "encourage MIT faculty and students to launch companies that will focus on commercializing AI." MIT has had a number of these academic/corporate partnerships over the years. Perhaps most famously, the MIT Media Lab has contributed to countless successful products, and tech companies can pay to outsource their research and development to Media Lab groups. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A GIF showing the difficulty/skin-color choices in South Park: The Fractured But Whole (credit: Ubisoft) Writers from John Scalzi to author Shannon Sullivan have called being white living life in "easy mode" when compared to the treatment that people of color receive. The upcoming RPG South Park: The Fractured But Whole takes that concept and integrates it right into the gameplay, increasing the difficulty for created characters as their chosen skin tone becomes darker. Eurogamer was among the first to notice and publicize the feature. At a recent preview event, the site captured footage showing difficulty levels ranging from "easy" for a light-skinned character to "very difficult" for the darkest skin option. "Don't worry, this doesn't affect combat," character Eric Cartman says as you operate the slider. "Just every other aspect of your whole life." As the developers clarified to Eurogamer, the difficulty setting "affects the amount of money you receive and the way other characters speak to you throughout the course of the game." That raises the concept beyond a throwaway joke on the character creator and into an integral part of the way the game proceeds. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A more detailed look at how some ground-source systems work: cold fluid absorbs some of the heat from the ground, and that low-level heat is transferred to another liquid in a heat exchanger, which heats the home. Vector illustration. (credit: Getty Images) Earlier this summer, a Silicon Valley startup called Dandelion was born out of Alphabet’s X Labs. Dandelion hoped to popularize an old and dusty, but energy-saving, technology—that is, ground-source heat pumps. On Thursday, the company released more details on how it plans to complete its first 2017 run. Dandelion’s pitch to customers and investors was that it had developed new drilling equipment and techniques that would allow it to drill 400-foot-deep holes in a residential yard in a fraction of the time it would take for older ground-source heat pump companies to do the same. But, in August, the company had few details on the internal half of the system (that is, the half that actually operates within your house). Today, Dandelion announced a partnership with a local ground-source heat company in upstate New York called Aztech. Together, they hope to iron out some of the more squirrely practical details on how a tech-sector startup will place complicated infrastructure in residential homes. The division of labor is as such: Dandelion will drill the holes in the ground, and Aztech will inspect the home and install the outdoor pipes to the home’s existing ductwork. The heat pump itself—a large cabinet made by a company called WaterFurnace—will provide heat and cooling during the winter and summer months. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Thursday, 12z European model operational run; forecast for Sunday morning at 8am ET. (credit: Tropical Tidbits) Hurricane Irma continues to move west-northwest toward the Straits of Florida at a good clip, about 16mph. At this rate, the storm remains only about 60 to 72 hours from reaching the southern Florida coast, if it indeed makes landfall there. The National Hurricane Center's updated track forecast for the storm as of 11am ET is shown below. The gallery below provides information about the last 10 track forecasts from the National Hurricane Center (they are updated every six hours), going back to the morning of Tuesday, September 5. At that time, the professional forecasters at the Miami-based hurricane center had the storm moving into the Florida Keys, between Southern Florida and Cuba, early on Sunday morning. As we get closer to this weekend, the logical question becomes "how much can we trust these track forecasts?" Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Francis Rawls A man jailed for two years for refusing to decrypt his hard drives must remain confined while he appeals his contempt-of-court order to the US Supreme Court, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. Francis Rawls, a fired Philadelphia cop, has been behind bars since September 30, 2015 for declining a judicial order to unlock two hard drives that authorities found at his residence as part of a child-porn investigation. After a two-year failed effort to convince the lower courts that his confinement amounted to a Fifth Amendment violation of his constitutional right against compelled self-incrimination, his lawyers asked a Pennsylvania federal judge if Rawls could be released pending the outcome of a forthcoming appeal to the US Supreme Court. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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