posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Law enforcement officials in Washington state will now be required to get a warrant before deploying a stingray, according to a bill that was signed into law by the governor on Monday after unanimously passing both houses of the state legislature. Washington’s law, which takes effect immediately, is not the first in the United States, but it may impose the most stringent requirements. A handful of states, including Virginia, Minnesota, and Utah have similar laws on the books. Washington’s, though, imposes extra requirements that compel police to describe the technology and its impact in detail to judges—presumably despite any nondisclosure agreement that those agencies may have with the FBI and the dominant manufacturer of the devices, Harris Corporation. Both the FBI and Harris have previously refused to respond to Ars’ direct questions. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Verizon today announced it will buy AOL for $4.4 billion, with CEO Lowell McAdam saying the once-great "AOL has once again become a digital trailblazer." Verizon will get into bunch of different businesses by virtue of owning AOL, assuming regulators approve the acquisition. AOL still has more than 2 million dial-up Internet customers, with average quarterly revenue of about $21 per subscriber. AOL is also "a leader in the digital content and advertising platforms space," Verizon said. Perhaps of most concern to anyone who reads news sites, Verizon noted that it would own AOL's "premium portfolio of global content brands, including The Huffington Post, TechCrunch, Engadget, MAKERS and AOL.com." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Supreme Court of Sweden has rejected WikiLeaks’ founder Julian Assange’s appeal that his detention order be annulled, concurring with a lower appellate court. According to a nine-page Swedish-language opinion released Monday, the Supreme Court found that there is no reason to reverse the order (Google Translate), with one of the five judges dissenting. "We are of course disappointed, and critical of the Supreme Court's way of handling the case," Assange's lawyer Per Samuelson told Reuters. “This decision has been taken without letting us close our argument." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The US government's prosecution of a South Korean businessman accused of illegally selling technology used in aircraft and missiles to Iran was dealt a devastating blow by a federal judge this week. The judge ruled that the authorities illegally seized the businessman's computer at Los Angeles International Airport as he was to board a flight home. The authorities who were investigating Jae Shik Kim exercised the border exception rule that allows the authorities to seize and search goods and people—without court warrants—along the border and at airport international terminals. US District Court judge Amy Berman Jackson of the District of Columbia noted that the Supreme Court has never directly addressed the issue of warrantless computer searches at an international border crossing, but she ruled (PDF) the government used Kim's flight home as an illegal pretext to seize his computer. Authorities then shipped it 150 miles south to San Diego where the hard drive was copied and examined for weeks, but the judge said the initial seizure "surely cannot be justified." After considering all of the facts and authorities set forth above, then, the Court finds, under the totality of the unique circumstances of this case, that the imaging and search of the entire contents of Kim’s laptop, aided by specialized forensic software, for a period of unlimited duration and an examination of unlimited scope, for the purpose of gathering evidence in a pre-existing investigation, was supported by so little suspicion of ongoing or imminent criminal activity, and was so invasive of Kim’s privacy and so disconnected from not only the considerations underlying the breadth of the government’s authority to search at the border, but also the border itself, that it was unreasonable. The defendant was accused of unlawfully selling Q-Flex Accelerometers—models QA-2000-10, QA-2000-20, and QA-3000—manufactured by Honeywell Aerospace. They require an export license before they can be sold from within the US. Kim was accused of selling the technology to intermediaries in China and Korea before their ultimate destination of Iran. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Nintendo's next console seems likely to reverse the company's recent policy of mandatory region locking, which limits software to run only on hardware sold in the same geographic area. In a recent Q&A with investors (translated by NeoGAF), company President Satoru Iwata said, while "nothing has been decided yet, we're currently investigating internally what problems there would be in realizing [a region free system]. You can think of that as the current situation. I understand your desire, so I'd like to look at it optimistically going forward." Iwata's statement applies solely to Nintendo's next console, the still-nebulous "NX" that was officially announced in March. Removing the region locks that exist on the Wii U and 3DS, however, "presents various issues, so we don't consider that to be very realistic," he said. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Online copyright enforcer Rightscorp contacts alleged Internet pirates, sometimes on their cell phones, and demands $20 per song from them. It's a business that has led to tens of thousands of payment demands, but Rightscorp is far from profitable. But Rightscorp needs cooperation from ISPs to get contact information for its targets, and many ISPs don't cooperate. Now, one ISP, Birch Communications, has seen through the legal process, quashing a Rightscorp DMCA subpoena issued last September. “Our first order of business when anyone requests access to a customer’s private information is to refuse, absent a valid subpoena or court order, which we then scrutinize as we did with Rightscorp’s illegal subpoena in this matter,” said Christopher Bunce, Senior VP and GC for Birch, in a press statement about the matter sent out today. "Rightscorp’s attempt to gain access to our customers’ data was in essence a piracy fishing expedition." Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Illinois State Police recently received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to add “unmanned aircraft” to its list of tools for the next two years. In a statement released to the Sun-Times Media Wire, the police department said that it was intentionally avoiding the word “drone” because “it carries the perception of pre-programmed or automatic flight patterns and random, indiscriminate collection of images and information.” The state police said they worked with legal professionals and civil rights groups like the American Civil Liberties Union to minimize the privacy impact on average citizens. The force maintained that it needed the drones because “the ability to obtain accurate measurements and clear images from aerial photographs will significantly reduce the amount of time highways are closed during the initial investigation of major traffic crashes.” Two years ago, the Illinois General Assembly passed the “Freedom from Drone Surveillance Act,” which says that the use of drones is prohibited in the state with a number of exceptions. Ed Yohnka, spokesman for the Illinois chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, told Ars that back in 2013, the ACLU worked with the state police and other law enforcement agencies to put in place some ground rules before law enforcement agencies actually started incorporating drones into their work. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Classic Japanese game developer Konami hasn't had a very good month. Now, its seeming collapse has received another stake through the heart: a new Castlevania-like game is being made by that series' most important producer. Koji Igarashi—the series' longest-running producer and the guy who got credit for revitalizing the series by working on PlayStation classic Symphony of the Night—launched a Kickstarter on Monday for a game that resembles Castlevania in everything but name. The mockup screenshots for Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night paint a familiar picture for Castlevania fans, full of gothic environs, hand-drawn characters, undead warriors, magical weapons, and, of course, whips. The game, which will be available as a digital download to backers who donate at least $28, is Igarashi's first major project announcement since he left Konami last year. While Konami still holds the right to that series' trademarks and its characters, it doesn't have a lock on the 2D action/platform/RPG mashup that Igarashi helped revive years ago. "Publishers of the world told me that gamers no longer care for this style of game," Igarashi said in a Kickstarter pitch video while sitting in a dark, mysterious castle and sipping a glass of red wine. He then threw his wine glass to the ground and exclaimed, "But I know they are wrong!" Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The National Security Agency's authority to collect US phone data en masse is set to expire at the end of this month, and key votes on the program in both houses of Congress are expected to come up this week. But if the bill that reaches the Senate floor is Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's straight renewal of the program and doesn't include any reforms, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) has said he'll filibuster it. "I'm tired of extending a bad law," Wyden said on MSNBC yesterday. "If they come back with that effort to basically extend this for a short term without major reforms like ending the collection of phone records, I do intend to filibuster." Wyden, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, has been talking about surveillance overreach since well before the Snowden leaks occurred in 2013. It isn't clear how many Senators would support a straight renewal of Section 215 of the Patriot Act, but it seems very unlikely that they would get the 60 votes needed to overcome a filibuster. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
After pranksters used Google Map Maker to draw an Android peeing on an Apple Logo and engage in other acts of spammy vandalism, Google has announced that it will temporarily shut down its online map editor while it rethinks its approval process. The statement, which was first spotted by Search Engine Land, makes it clear that the service isn't going away forever, just shutting down while a new moderation system is under construction. "Given the current state of the [moderation] system, we have come to the conclusion that it is not fair to any of our users to let them continue to spend time editing. Every edit you make is essentially going to a backlog that is growing very fast," Google rep Pavithra Kanakarajan wrote. "We believe that it is more fair to only say that if we do not have the capacity to review edits at roughly the rate they come in, we have to take a pause. We have hence decided to temporarily disable editing across all countries starting Tuesday, May 12, 2015, till we have our moderation system back in action." Google Map Maker in action. Ron Amadeo Google Map Maker is a browser-based online map editor that allows users to add to and edit Google Maps. There are tools for roads, railways, buildings, walking trails, bike paths, parks, lakes, and complex road geometry. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
We often talk about the lost magic of owning a physical thing, whether that’s books, CDs, or the wondrous black slab of plastic that is the vinyl record. Holding that object in your hand, flicking through its dog-eared pages and admiring its intricately crafted artwork, imparts a sense of ownership that you just can't replicate with a Kindle or a convenient subscription to Spotify. The trouble is, making physical objects is hard, not to mention expensive. That's especially true of the vinyl record, where pressing plants aren't exactly ten a penny. And yet, despite the high cost of manufacturing and end price to the consumer, vinyl sales are very much on the up. According to Nielsen, vinyl album sales in the US have grown an impressive 260 percent since 2009, reaching 9.2 million units last year, while in the UK sales reached a 20-year high of 1.29 million in 2014. Of course, these numbers are but a tiny fraction of music sales as a whole, but—regardless of whether it's customers chasing that creamy analogue sound, or there are just a lot more hipsters around these days—there's a demand to be satisfied. But if you're not a big record label with deep pockets, getting the capital together to produce a run of vinyl is tricky. Even if you do raise the cash, how do you decide how many to make? Too few and people are left wanting; too many and you're left with stock you can't sell. It's a problem that the recently launched Qrates is hoping to solve. Qrates is an intriguing mix of the old and the new, consisting of a vinyl pressing service, a crowdfunding system, and a digital store all rolled into one. Using the site's online tool, you can upload your music, design the label and sleeve, choose your preferred playing speed (33 or 45), the weight and colour of the actual record, and how many you'd like (there's currently a nice low minimum order of 100). Qrates gives you an estimated cost, and then works with a regional pressing plant to fulfil your order. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A Southern California woman claims she was fired after uninstalling an app that her employer required her to run constantly on her mobile phone—an app that tracked her every move 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Plaintiff Myrna Arias, a former Bakersfield sales executive for wire-transfer service Intermex, claims in a state court lawsuit that her boss, John Stubits, fired her shortly after she uninstalled the job-management Xora app that she and her colleagues were required to use. According to her suit (PDF) in Kern County Superior Court: After researching the app and speaking with a trainer from Xora, Plaintiff and her co-workers asked whether Intermex would be monitoring their movements while off duty. Stubits admitted that employees would be monitored while off duty and bragged that he knew how fast she was driving at specific moments ever since she installed the app on her phone. Plaintiff expressed that she had no problem with the app's GPS function during work hours, but she objected to the monitoring of her location during non-work hours and complained to Stubits that this was an invasion of her privacy. She likened the app to a prisoner's ankle bracelet and informed Stubits that his actions were illegal. Stubits replied that she should tolerate the illegal intrusion….. Intermex did not immediately respond for comment. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
On May 9, a Korean People's Army Naval Force submarine test-launched a ballistic missile off the eastern coast of North Korea. The test launch, reported by North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper, only traveled about 150 meters, according to South Korean defense officials. But it demonstrated that North Korea had developed the capability of performing submerged launches of missiles well ahead of previous intelligence estimates. Based on the launch, South Korean officials now believe that North Korea could have a limited submarine-launched missile capability deployed to its fleet of submarines within the next five years. The test comes as South Korea nears a decision on the deployment of a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-ballistic missile system. China has been pressuring South Korea to not allow the deployment, but an earlier, barge-based test of the submarine-launchable missile (named "Polaris-1" by North Korea) on April 22 has made the deployment more likely. North Korean press images of Kim Jong-un's successful supervision of the "Polaris-1" launch. Polaris-1 is apparently a close copy of a Soviet-era R-27 submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM), a liquid-fuel missile which had the NATO designation SS-N-6 "Serb." This is the third test launch of the missile this year, but it is the first submarine launch. Developed in apparent violation of a UN resolution banning North Korean ballistic missile development, the missile could have a range of about 1,500 miles. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
With a month left before net neutrality complaints can be filed to the Federal Communications Commission, Internet service providers are continuing to sign agreements to prevent network congestion and a potential scolding from regulators. The latest agreement was announced today between AT&T and Level 3, an Internet backbone operator that has accused broadband providers like AT&T of not upgrading interconnection points, allowing Internet performance for consumers to be degraded. A month ago, Level 3 told National Journal that it was "evaluating our options" and "still experiencing interconnection point congestion as some large consumer ISPs continue to attempt to leverage control over access to their users to extract arbitrary tolls." While the FCC's net neutrality order bans paid prioritization of traffic after it enters providers' networks, it doesn't ban payments for interconnection, which happens at the edges of the network. However, the FCC set up a complaint process so it can decide whether particular demands are unreasonable and prod companies into providing enough capacity to prevent Internet slowdowns. Complaints can be filed beginning June 12. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Comex, the enterprising hacker behind a number of high-profile iOS jailbreaks such as JailbreakMe.com, has seemingly managed to get a Web browser to run on the Apple Watch. As you can probably imagine, the one-inch screen of the Apple Watch isn't the best way to experience your favourite websites. There's a video embedded below of Comex poking around the Google homepage on his Apple Watch. The Apple Watch, by virtue of its tiny screen, has a very different interface from Apple's other mobile devices. While it hasn't been confirmed by Apple, a third-party developer has stated that Apple Watch OS 1.0 is based on iOS 8.2—but instead of running Springboard (which displays the iPhone and iPad home screen), the Watch runs a front-end launcher called Carousel. Comex hasn't given any details about his Apple Watch hack, but presumably the underlying version of iOS contains a Web browser (perhaps for debugging purposes) that he somehow managed to launch. Another possibility is that managed to side-load some kind of Web browser app onto the Watch. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Those who have already picked up "the best damn spaceship game" Ars has ever played may be pleased to hear that they'll soon get the steam version of Elite: Dangerous for free. That also applies to anyone who backed the game's Kickstarter campaign, and for any new purchases made on the Frontier Developments website. While there's a certain amount of goodwill attached to giving away Steam keys, it's more likely that Frontier Developments is keen to keep sales on its website and away from Valve's steep 30 percent cut. "We always appreciate it when you buy direct from our store because it means we can put more into supporting and developing Elite: Dangerous," wrote Frontier Developments' community manager Edward Lewis in a forum post, "but we know a number of long-time players and backers like to play through Steam and we think it’s fair everyone has that option, not just new players." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Russian company MCST (Moscow Center for SPARC Technologies) has released the Elbrus-4C, a reasonably high-performance quad-core CPU that may grant Russia some technological independence from American chip-making giants Intel and AMD. Despite the company's name, the Elbrus-4C uses the Elbrus ISA (instruction set architecture), not SPARC. Elbrus is a closed and proprietary architecture, so exact details are hard to come by, but we do know about one particularly interesting feature: x86 emulation. If you remember the Transmeta Crusoe, it sounds like the Elbrus architecture does something very similar: at run-time, x86 program code can be translated and executed through a virtual machine. This method isn't as fast as providing x86 support in hardware, but it gets the job done. The Elbrus-4C, while highly advanced by home-grown Russian standards, is by no means a bleeding-edge chip; it's a quad-core part built on TSMC's last-last-generation 65nm process. It's capable of hitting a rather heady clockspeed of 800MHz, which equates to (a fairly decent) 25 gigaflops of 64-bit double-precision math. The tech specs say that the Elbrus-4C has 986 million transistors, which is pretty hefty considering there's no integrated GPU. All in all, Elbrus-4C is probably a few years behind western chips, but it's difficult to make a direct comparison. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Using the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers have observed a gas clump in the early stages of its gravitational collapse for the first time. The activity occurred in a galaxy only three billion years after the Big Bang. It’s long been predicted that these clumps could form in gas-rich galaxies from larger disks of gas. And once formed, scientists believed the clump would continue to collapse, creating stars in the process. But until now, we've not observed the genesis of a star-forming clump, and there have been some questions about whether these objects would be able to sustain their collapse against the outward pressure created by the forming stars. These stars produce intense light which can actually put a significant amount of pressure on the surrounding gas, accelerating it away. By pushing against the surrounding gas, the first stars can prevent the formation of later ones. The new observation shows an extremely young clump, less than ten million years old—the researchers project its total lifespan will be about 500 million years. If that’s the case, it and similar clumps could grow into globular clusters, smaller blobs of stars orbiting at angles that bring them drastically away from the plane of the galaxy’s disk. Alternatively, these clumps could even contribute to a galaxy’s central bulge. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Last year’s Wolfenstein: The New Order was a surprise critical hit, successfully blending fast-paced action, strong character development, pulp aesthetics, and Nazi-based technological horror into a refreshingly bizarre big-budget first-person shooter. But developers MachineGames and publisher Bethesda Softworks chose to follow that success up not with a set of expansions or a DLC plan, but instead with a smaller standalone adventure: The Old Blood. In making a smaller game, they took a gamble—could the Wolfenstein cocktail work a second time, without all the ingredients of its fuller predecessor? For The Old Blood, the answer—eventually—comes to a qualified yes. But for a relatively short game, it has a major problem of pacing, with almost all of its best bits pushed into the second half of the game. In so doing, it reveals that its standalone structure might have severely limited its potential as a game. Let’s push things forward The core issue is one of progression. One of The New Order’s greatest strengths was how it gave a sense of progress as you moved through its levels. Everything about it reinforced the idea of progress—you met more characters, learned more about the alternate history, got better weapons, fought tougher enemies, found new locations, and even acquired entertaining collectibles, like English rock’n’roll songs sung in German. This gave the original game a propulsive momentum. Every component worked in harmony to maintain player interest in the world at a level beyond the combat engine. On the other hand, The Old Blood keeps a narrow focus on a single mission in (another) Castle Wolfenstein and the nearby city of Wulfsburg. Other characters exist primarily to just give you missions or attack you. These pawns offer almost nothing like the sustained relationship development of The New Order, and Old Blood foregoes clever secret areas and backstory hints hidden throughout that game. The only notable collectible in The Old Blood is numbered piles of gold. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Tesla CEO Elon Musk formally announced last week that his electric car company will spin off a new battery business. Tesla Energy—now distinct from Tesla Motors—will manufacture lithium ion batteries for households and businesses that can be used to augment solar or wind-powered systems, or just to provide an extra layer of redundancy for customers connected to the traditional grid. But over the next several years, Tesla's consumer-grade batteries may not make much financial sense for households in many places around the US. Unless traditional power is very expensive in your state (as it is in Hawaii), it's likely cheaper to stay on the grid when the sun goes down every day, especially if utilities buy back excess solar from rooftop systems (as they do in California). And though consumers might want batteries to use as backup electricity, for a multi-day emergency scenario a generator can still deliver more power for less money. So what's Tesla Energy's business model? Consumer batteries have garnered most of the media's attention, but Musk admitted in an earnings call this week that Tesla Energy's near-term target demographic is actually business and utilities. “We expect most of our stationary storage sales to be at the utility or industrial scale,” is how he phrased it. Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
The LG G4 15 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } Specs at a glance: Samsung Galaxy S6 Screen 2560×1440 5.5" (538 ppi) LCD OS Android Lollipop 5.1 CPU Six-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 (two 1.8 GHz Cortex-A57 cores and four 1.44 GHz Cortex-A53 cores) RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 418 Storage 32GB Networking Dual Band 802.11b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.1, GPS Ports Micro USB 2.0, headphones Camera 16MP rear camera with OSI, 8MP front camera Size 148.9 x 76.1 x 9.8 mm Weight 155 g Battery 3000 mAh Starting price "Ask carriers" Other perks RGB notification LED, NFC, laser autofocus, color spectrum sensor, removable battery, MicroSD slot, IR blaster LG's newest flagship, the LG G4, almost feels like someone read a bunch of Android forums and wrote up a checklist of all the current hot-button issues. You want a non-plastic back? Check—we've got leather. Nervous about Qualcomm's Snapdragon 810? Check—we've got the 808. You want a removable battery and MicroSD card? Double check. At first glance it looks pretty good. LG missed a few things from its checklist though. No matter which back you get, the sides of the phone are still plastic. As much as the removable battery will please those that need more battery life, there's no wireless charging or quick charging here. LG also neglected to support Lollipop's always-on voice commands. It's a mixed bag, and whether you like it will depend heavily on what you think is the most important in a smartphone. Design The back of the phone comes in leather or plastic. The back is plastic no matter what, with the leather option having the material glued on and an exposed plastic back side. The stitches down the middle are certainly unique, and are reminiscent of a leather car seat. Read 29 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Amazon has been granted a patent for its previously announced, potentially still just theoretical drone delivery system. The online retail giant originally unveiled 'Amazon Prime Air'—a plan to deliver books, Blu-Rays and toilet paper by unmanned aerial vehicle—in December 2013. Since then it has been attempting to get regulatory approval from the US Federal Aviation Authority to start testing and—eventually—deploying the idea in the real world. Ahead of approval in the US, so far only granted for limited tests in sight of a pilot, it has tested the idea in Canada, and has a development center in the UK. While it remains an ambitious plan, Amazon maintains it is not science fiction and that it aims to "get packages into customers' hands in 30 minutes or less" with the system. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 16 days ago on ars technica
OAKLAND, Calif.—Tucked away in a small office on a side street in the historic industrial zone of West Oakland, something magical is happening. Dave Rauchwerk and a team of eight people are creating a $9 computer, designed to dovetail the success of their $249 Raspberry Pi-based camera. Their $1 million venture-backed startup, Next Thing Co., aims to put this crazy-cheap, hackable computer into the hands of as many people as possible. The computer—known as the CHIP—hit Kickstarter on Thursday. Already it’s blown through its target goal of $50,000. As of this writing, the company has raised over $407,000 from over 8,000 people, including this reporter. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 16 days ago on ars technica
While Chinese Premier Xi Jinping visited Moscow this week to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, the Middle Kingdom and Russia also signed a 12 page agreement (Russian) that essentially pledges their cybersecurity support to one another. Or, put another way: they agree not to attack each other online. Reading news accounts of the agreement, and the document itself via Google Translate (unfortunately Ars has zero Russian speakers on staff), it appears that the document contains a lot of generalities on cooperation and repeated language referring to national sovereignty over the Internet. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 16 days ago on ars technica
When John and Carol Lehman tried to get a $600 refund from Comcast for payments on a cable box they say they gave back to the company five years ago, Comcast offered them the money on one condition: sign a non-disclosure agreement. The NDA might seem like a good tactic for avoiding the kind of bad press that has long plagued Comcast, but it didn't work. 6ABC Action News in Philadelphia had the story this week. The news spot played a recording of a Comcast representative telling the Lehmans, "we will issue a $600 even credit, pending that you sign a non-disclosure agreement." 6ABC also showed the full non-disclosure agreement. We made a transcript so you can read the whole thing: Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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