posted 14 days ago on ars technica
So, you've got a Nexus device and keep hearing about these factory images, but have no idea what to do with them. It's ok—we're here to help. This guide will take you from a locked Nexus device to an unlocked device with the latest Android software on it. First, though, a warning: this will delete everything on your device. Factory images do a full wipe of your data partition, meaning your apps, settings, passwords, game saves, pictures, and everything else will be erased. Back up the stuff you want to keep. Download the SDK and image The windows-only SDK manager. First click here and download the "Eclipse ADT Bundle" from Google. This is the Android SDK. You'll need this to get your computer to talk to your phone, unlock your bootloader and push over the new files. It will work on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When he was arrested at his Chicago home in 2012 for hacking the website of security think tank Stratfor, the dreadlocked Jeremy Hammond was the FBI's most wanted cybercriminal. Authorities tracked him down with the help of top LulzSec member Hector Xavier Monsegur. But it has never been known how they managed to decrypt the contents of Hammond's hard drive, which the hacker was able to encrypt as agents armed with assault rifles were raiding his home. An Associated Press profile of the 29-year-old's life behind bars provides a possible answer. Hammond's password was "Chewy 123." Hashing algorithms protecting encryption keys are by design extremely slow, making cracking attacks harder to carry out. The more guesses the attacker tries the exponentially longer it will take. As demonstrated in previous Ars articles such as Why passwords have never been weaker—and crackers have never been stronger and Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331”, "Chewy 123" would be among the earlier candidates any experienced cracker would try. And assuming agents performed any research on their then suspect, "Chewy 123" would almost certainly have been near the top of the list. "Chewy," it turns out, was the name of Hammond's cat. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Ron Amadeo Hey Nexus owners, it's time to cash in on the best part of owning your device: super fast Android updates. The 2012 Nexus 7 update leaked a little early, but now Google has posted Android 5.0 factory images for most of the current lineup of supported Nexus devices. These aren't normal OTA updates, but full-restore factory images that will wipe out your devices data. An OTA update won't wipe out your device, but they can often take weeks to fully roll out. If you want to dive into Lollipop, here's the list of updated devices: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google Happy Lollipop day! Google has announced that OTA updates for Android 5.0 are rolling out to most Nexus devices now. The Wi-Fi Nexus 7s, Nexus 5, and Nexus 10 are all going from KitKat to Lollipop. A post on the Nexus help forums laid out the specifics: The over-the-air update for Lollipop is now starting! The update is starting for these devices: Nexus 6: Minor update to address bugs Nexus 9: Minor update to address bugs Nexus 5: Update from KitKat to Lollipop Nexus 7 WiFi (2012 & 2013): Update from KitKat to Lollipop Nexus 10: Update from KitKat to Lollipop It will also be put up on Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Note: The OTA update for 3G/LTE versions of the Nexus 7 2012 and 2013 have not yet started, nor have they started for the Nexus 4! The Nexus 6 and 9 are getting "minor" bugfix updates, too. We're still waiting on OTAs for the Nexus 4 and cellular versions of the Nexus 7. We're also waiting on factory images to be posted on the Nexus Factory Image page. Users can't do much to get an OTA, which can take several weeks to roll out to the entire device user base, but a factory image can be downloaded and applied right way with a little command line know-how. The Android update schedule has been a bit of a surprise this year, as Google's Nexus devices, which are typically the first to update, were beaten by Motorola. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
John Boehner at 2012 CPAC conference. George Skidmore An "Internet Sales Tax" is still far from imminent, despite being passed by a strong majority of the US Senate more than a year ago. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) made his opposition to the measure clear this week in a written statement, published this morning by The Wall Street Journal. "The speaker has made clear in the past he has significant concerns about the bill, and it won’t move forward this year," said a Boehner spokesman. Last year, the Senate passed the Marketplace Fairness Act on a 69-27 bipartisan vote. However, in the House, the bill met with more opposition, including pushback from two key Republicans: Speaker Boehner and Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA). Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Philae, as imaged from Rosetta after separation. In its first press briefing since the touchdown of the Philae lander on comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, ESA scientists announced they weren't entirely sure what happened after what appeared to be a flawless touchdown. With nobody on board to look out the window and tell controllers what's happening, the engineers have to rely on data from various instruments to determine the lander's current status. So far, that data's been somewhat confusing. What is clear is that Philae set down at the expected site on the surface of 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. As the initial data came in, controllers felt that some of the measurements they were seeing indicated that the harpoons that were intended to secure Philae to the surface had succeeded. But further data indicated this could not have been the case. Although it was clear that Philae had touched down, it was less clear whether it stayed down. Some instruments, along with the level of power coming into the solar panels, suggest that Philae was shifting its location and/or orientation. Yet various scientific instruments designed to work at the comet's surface were successfully sending back data. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Wikimedia An iPhone 5S, Samsung Galaxy S5, LG Nexus 5, and Amazon Fire Phone were all hijacked by whitehats on the first day of an annual hacking contest that pays hefty cash prizes for exploits bypassing security sandbox perimeters. Day one of the Mobile Pwn2Own competition at the PacSec conference in Tokyo repeated a theme struck over and over at previous Pwn2Own events. If a device runs software, it can be hacked—regardless of claims made by marketers or fans. Organized by the Hewlett-Packard-owned Zero Day Initiative and sponsored this year by Google and Blackberry, Mobile Pwn2Own awards as much as $150,000 for the most advanced hacks, with a total prize pool of $425,000. In exchange, contestants agree to turn over technical details to the organizer and keep them confidential until the underlying vulnerabilities have been patched. During the first day, according to this HP blog post, the following hacks took place: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Aurich Lawson vs Capcom, FIGHT! The Master Chief Collection launched earlier this week, a collection of classic Halo games that included an array of changes from the originals, such as improved graphics and customized, cross-game playlists. But there was another, more subtle change from the original Halo titles that I think more games should mimic well before being re-released as "remastered" collections. As Sam Machkovech pointed out in his review, "all four full campaigns are unlocked the moment you boot HTMCC, meaning you can skip ahead to a favorite part of Halo 3, then find a friend and pound out a beloved Halo: CE mission in online co-op." It's a design decision that makes us wonder: why wasn't this the case when the Halo games were originally released? For that matter, why do developers "lock" game content in the first place? The idea of locked content, which has to be "unlocked" through some sort of in-game achievement, is a peculiarity that games share with no other mass consumer art form. Books don't require you to read the prologue and author's note before diving in to Chapter 1. DVDs don't confirm that you fully comprehended the first act before letting you jump to your favorite scene in Act 2 (or make you suffer through the bad episodes of a TV show just to watch the good ones). Music albums don't require that you listen to songs in a certain order without the ability to skip around at will. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
"The Innocence of Muslims." A federal appeals court agreed Wednesday to reconsider its February takedown order of the inflammatory YouTube video "The Innocence of Muslims." The move by the San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals comes after digital rights groups and media outlets complained that the court's 2-1 decision "arguably expands the concept of copyright ownership in a manner that could allow the subjects of news coverage to exercise veto power over unflattering broadcasts" (PDF). The flap surrounds an actress in the 2012 video that sparked violent protests throughout the Muslim world. Actress Cindy Lee Garcia convinced the appeals court to remove the video after complaining that she received death threats and was fired from her work. Garcia said she was duped into being in the "hateful anti-Islamic production." The Southern California actress said she believed she would be appearing in an adventure movie, but in the end, she appeared for five seconds and asked: "Is your Muhammad a child molester?" Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
After months of trickling information, YouTube's subscription service for its videos and music has finally started to take shape. Dubbed YouTube Music Key, the service will launch next week as an invite-only beta to access high quality audio and ad-free videos. Leaks earlier this year suggested that YouTube Music Key would give access to a 20-million-song database, a radio-style streaming service called YouTube Mix, and ad-free, offline playback of music videos. "Starting today, you’ll see a new home just for music on your YouTube app for Android, iOS and on YouTube.com that shows your favorite music videos, recommended music playlists based on what you’re into and playlists of trending music across YouTube," states Google's blog post on the subject. Consistent with the rumors, subscriptions to YouTube Music key will also give customers access to the entire Google Play Music database, which includes 30 million songs. In addition to allowing ad-free offline play, YouTube Music Key subscribers will also be able to play videos on a mobile phone even if they lock the screen or start using another app, actions that normally kill playback. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: Google Nexus 6 Screen 2560×1440 5.96" (493 ppi) AMOLED OS Android 5.0, Lollipop CPU 2.7GHz quad-core Snapdragon 805 RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 420 Storage 32GB or 64GB Networking 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.1 Cellular Bands Americas SKUGSM: 850/900/1800/1900 MHzCDMA: 0/1/10WCDMA: 1/2/4/5/8LTE: 2/3/4/5/7/12/13/17/25/26/29/41CA DL: B2-B13, B2-B17, B2-29, B4-B5, B4-B13, B4-B17, B4-B29Rest of world SKU GSM: 850/900/1800/1900 MHzCDMA: not supportedWCDMA: 1/2/4/5/6/8/9/19LTE: 1/3/5/7/8/9/19/20/28/41CA DL: B3-B5, B3-B8 Ports Micro USB 2.0, headphones Camera 13MP rear camera with OIS, 2MP front camera Size 6.27" × 3.27" × 0.4" (159.26 x 82.98 x 10.06mm) Weight 6.2 oz. (176g) Battery 3220 mAh Starting price $249 with two-year contract, $649 unlocked Other perks NFC, wireless charging, "turbo" charging, Ambient notifications, always-on voice commands Another year, another Nexus phone. Google's flagship devices are the fast track for the newest software, but they've typically been devices of compromise. A bad camera, no LTE, or a poor battery—there's always something. The compromises were usually easy to forgive thanks to the incredible—probably subsidized—pricing scheme that Google has used in the past. This year, Google has tapped the newly Lenovo owned Motorola to build a massive, 6-inch monster of a phone with a 1440p screen. It has nearly doubled the price up from $350 for the Nexus 5 to a whopping $650 for an unlocked Nexus 6. Google says they're aiming for more "premium" devices this year, and the company is working with all four big US carriers to offer the phone with a two-year contract. The price is well into the range of flagship devices from other companies, and it makes us less forgiving of any faults we might come across. The Nexus 6 is still not really expensive for what it is, though. Consider that an unlocked Galaxy Note 4 costs around $800 and has a smaller screen, and you're still getting a deal on Google's giant phablet. Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Android updates don't matter anymore—or at least that's what many people think. Back-to-back-to-back Jelly Bean releases and a KitKat release seemed to only polish what already existed. When Google took the wraps off of "Android L" at Google I/O, though, it was clear that this release was different. Android 5.0, Lollipop is at least the biggest update since Android 4.0, and it's probably the biggest Android release ever. The update brings a complete visual overhaul of every app, with a beautiful new design language called "Material Design." Animations are everywhere, and you'd be hard-pressed to find a single pixel from 4.4 that was carried over into 5.0—Google even revamped the fonts. 5.0 also brings a ton of new features. Notifications are finally on the lockscreen, the functionality of Recent Apps has been revamped to make multitasking a lot easier, and the voice recognition works everywhere—even when the screen is off. The under-the-hood renovations are just as extensive, including a completely new camera API with support for RAW images, a system-wide focus on battery life, and a new runtime—ART—that replaces the aging Dalvik virtual machine. Read 171 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
billy kerr The Justice Department says it's perfectly legal for the Federal Bureau of Investigation to cut Internet access of hotel rooms, pose as repairmen, and gather evidence of illegal activity—without a court warrant. The government said in a court filing late Monday that the Caesars Palace occupants—who called the hotel desk to fix the problem—invited the undercover agents into their Las Vegas rooms, which is enough consent where a warrant is not needed. "Law enforcement has long been permitted to obtain consent by posing as a confederate, business associate, or service provider. In fact, the government uses ruses every day in its undercover operations, and consent obtained by such ruses is valid unless the deceit leaves the occupant with no choice but to consent to an entry. In this case, the ruse—which involved a brief interruption of DSL service for which no Fourth Amendment intrusion was necessary, and which did not interfere with the occupants' other means of Internet access—was not coercive," federal prosecutors wrote [PDF] in defense of the tactic. This initiative preceded the arrest of an alleged leader of a well-known Chinese crime syndicate and other associates. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson. AT&T AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said today that his company will "pause" investments in fiber networks until the net neutrality debate is over. The statement came two days after President Obama urged the Federal Communications Commission to reclassify broadband as a utility and impose bans on blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. "We can't go out and invest that kind of money deploying fiber to 100 cities not knowing under what rules those investments will be governed," Stephenson told investors, according to Reuters. "We think it is prudent to just pause and make sure we have line of sight and understanding as to what those rules would look like." Stephenson was speaking at a Wells Fargo event. AT&T said in April that it would "expand its ultra-fast fiber network to up to 100 candidate cities and municipalities nationwide," but it never promised to build in all of them. Buildouts were dependent on local officials cooperating with the company. AT&T has also claimed that it will bring fiber to "two million additional locations" if the federal government approves its purchase of DirecTV. But AT&T has never said how many customers will get AT&T fiber if the deal isn't approved, making it impossible to judge whether the potential investment would be an increase over existing plans. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Lockheed Martin A United Nations commission is meeting in Geneva, Switzerland today to begin discussions on placing controls on the development of weapons systems that can target and kill without the intervention of humans, the New York Times reports. The discussions come a year after a UN Human Rights Council report called for a ban on “Lethal autonomous robotics” and as some scientists express concerns that artificially intelligent weapons could potentially make the wrong decisions about who to kill. SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk recently called artificial intelligence potentially more dangerous than nuclear weapons. Peter Asaro, the cofounder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRAC), told the Times, “Our concern is with how the targets are determined, and more importantly, who determines them—are these human-designated targets? Or are these systems automatically deciding what is a target?” Intelligent weapons systems are intended to reduce the risk to both innocent bystanders and friendly troops, focusing their lethality on carefully—albeit artificially—chosen targets. The technology in development now could allow unmanned aircraft and missile systems to avoid and evade detection, identify a specific target from among a clutter of others, and destroy it without communicating with the humans who launched them. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Yesterday, during an official visit to China, President Obama joined with Chinese President Xi Jinping to announce an agreement to control future carbon emissions. Previously, the US committed to cutting its carbon emissions by 17 percent relative to 2005 levels; those cuts were expected to be reached by 2020. The new goal would give the US until 2025, but it involves significantly deeper cuts: at least 26 percent. China hadn't previously set specific targets, although it has raced to establish itself as a renewable energy powerhouse. The country has the largest installed wind capacity and trails only Germany in photovoltaics. Now, Beijing has agreed to work toward having its emissions peak in 2030, a goal that will almost certainly see the country retiring some coal generating capacity before its full lifetime. As a major manufacturer of renewable energy generating equipment, China clearly has an economic interest in pushing for its expansion. The severity of its pollution problems also provides an impetus to move away from coal for its power generation. In the US, the move away from coal has largely been economic, driven by the availability of cheap natural gas. The impetus for further cuts in emissions, however, may come from EPA rules that are being developed under the auspices of the Clean Air Act. These rules, however, have drawn harsh criticism from Congressional Republicans, who now have majorities in both chambers. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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NEW YORK—The next versions of Visual Studio and .NET were given their official names today—Visual Studio 2015 and .NET 2015—along with a first preview release using this name. Visual Studio 2015 will also take the next step along Microsoft's path of making Visual Studio into a cross-platform development tool. Visual Studio 2013 took strides in this direction with its preview support for HTML5/Cordova apps, and with Xamarin, .NET developers can reach multiple platforms. In Visual Studio 2015, that cross-platform reach is going to include C++ too. Microsoft's development environment will include support for the Clang compiler and LLVM infrastructure for targeting Android and, in a later iteration, iOS. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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NEW YORK—Earlier this year, Microsoft open sourced a big chunk of .NET, publishing its new compiler, Roslyn, and many .NET libraries under the Apache license. Today, the company took that same open sourcing effort a great deal further. Microsoft announced that its full server .NET stack, including the just-in-time compiler and runtime and the core class libraries that all .NET software depends on, will all be open sourced. The code will be hosted on GitHub and published under a permissive MIT-style license. With this release, Microsoft wants to make sure that the .NET stack is fully functional and production quality on both Linux and OS X. The company is working with the Mono community to make sure that this platform is "enterprise-ready." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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President Obama announces the nomination of Rep. Melvin Watt, left, as Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) and Tom Wheeler, right, as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), on May 1, 2013. White House Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler is not convinced that the FCC should treat consumer broadband service as a utility despite President Obama urging him to do so. A report last night in The Washington Post says Wheeler met Monday with Web companies including Google, Yahoo, and Etsy and told them that he wants to find a compromise that addresses the concerns of Internet service providers such as Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and AT&T. Wheeler was formerly a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industries. “What you want is what everyone wants: an open Internet that doesn’t affect your business,” Wheeler told attendees of the meeting, according to the Post's sources. “What I’ve got to figure out is how to split the baby.” Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
green kozi New research from two American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) affiliates definitively shows local law enforcement surveillance technology spreading throughout California—with hardly any public oversight. The ACLU of Northern California (ACLUNC) and the ACLU of California (ACLUCA) reported Wednesday that California’s 58 counties and its 60 largest cities have collectively spent over $65 million on such technology over the last decade. Often, the money comes through federally-funded grants or outside foundation money that city councils and county boards of supervisors are all-too-ready to accept. "We found evidence of public debate related to surveillance technology adoption less than 15 percent of the time," the ACLUCA told Ars in a statement by e-mail. "None of the 52 communities with two or more surveillance technologies publicly debated every technology. We found a publicly-available use policy for fewer than one in five surveillance technologies." Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It's estimated that there were once four billion American chestnut trees in the eastern US. Now there are almost none. Oak Ridge National Lab The relationship between the US public and genetically modified organisms is a bit ambiguous. Efforts to label GMO foods were defeated in California, while some Hawaiian islands have banned the planting of GMO crops. But for most Americans, these issues remain pretty abstract. That may change thanks to work taking place in upstate New York. There, scientists are planning the return of an American icon in a genetically modified form. And if all goes according to plan, ten thousand GMO chestnut trees could be ready to plant in as little as five years. People could find them in parks and playgrounds and even in their neighbors' yards. The American chestnut was once a major feature of the Appalachian forests, with its range covering the entire East Coast. But it fell victim to an invasive species: a fungal blight has pretty much wiped out the species in its native range. A few nearly dead trees sporadically send out shoots, and some survivors outside its normal range are the only reasons we're still able to grow any American chestnuts. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A watch face, the rearranged menu, and the about screen. Phandroid With seemingly everyone getting in on the Lollipop party, you can rest assured that your wrist will not be left out of the proceedings. Phandroid has gotten its hands on a leaked version of what it is calling "Android Wear 5.0," an upcoming update to Android Wear. The update reportedly bumps the base OS from Android 4.4 to Android 5.0 Lollipop and adds a few much-needed improvements. The best sounding one is an undo function to bring back cards that you've accidentally swiped away. Right now, any accidental input can delete a card forever, and it's very frustrating. The report says that after dismissing a card, "just swipe upwards and you'll be presented with an undo option." The fabled Watch Face API is reportedly included in the update, which will finally give developers a supported way to create custom watch faces. The custom watch face market is alive and well right now, but they all use undocumented APIs. As part of the new API, weather notifications can be displayed directly on the watch face, with the report showing little weather icons that could be displayed directly on the background. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google We're still waiting for the Nexus Factory Image page to update with Lollipop builds for all the Nexus owners out there, but Android Police has managed to snag a link direct from Google's servers before the page gets updated. 2012 Nexus 7 (Wi-Fi) owners: Your build of Lollipop is here. That link should get you the LRX21P build of Android 5.0 direct from Google's servers. The 2012 Nexus 7 is the first 7-inch tablet from Google and should be one of the oldest devices to get updated to Lollipop. This is a factory image, so as part of the install, your entire device will be wiped. Instructions on how to use this are here. You'll need to install the SDK, boot your phone into a special flashing mode, and do some command line work to unlock your bootloader and update to Lollipop. If that sounds too complicated, you can always wait for the OTA, which will do a non-destructive upgrade. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Andrew Cunningham If you were thinking that a high-end handset or a Nexus would be the first device to get the Android 5.0 update, guess again: as far as we can tell, the $179 second-generation Moto G is the first phone to receive a final version of the update. Other phones, including the second-generation Moto X and the LG G3, have made steps toward a Lollipop update, but the Moto G appears to be the first device to move beyond the testing phase. Our unlocked US version of the phone is downloading its 386.7MB Lollipop update now. Motorola's "Moto" phones are known for their relatively clean, "stock" versions of Android, and as such the official release notes for the Moto G's Lollipop update focus mostly on things that will be coming to all Moto and Nexus phones that will get Lollipop. High on the list are the new "Material Design" UI, lock screen notifications, multi-user support (brand-new to phones, though it was introduced to Android tablets in version 4.2), and the "Project Volta" battery life enhancements. As of this writing, this update only appears to be rolling out to the larger, second-generation Moto G. Even though the internal hardware is substantially identical, there are no updates available for our first-generation model from late 2013. Expect other Moto phones and the supported members of the Nexus family to begin getting their Lollipop update in the coming days. Our coverage, including our full Lollipop review and several pieces revisiting older devices running Lollipop, will continue as those updates roll out. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Wikimedia Microsoft has disclosed a potentially catastrophic vulnerability in virtually all versions of Windows. People operating Windows systems, particularly those who run websites, should immediately install a patch Microsoft released Tuesday morning. The vulnerability resides in the Microsoft secure channel (schannel) security component that implements the secure sockets layer and transport layer security (TLS) protocols, according to a Microsoft advisory. A failure to properly filter specially formed packets makes it possible for attackers to execute attack code of their choosing by sending malicious traffic to a Windows-based server. While the advisory makes reference to vulnerabilities targeting Windows servers, the vulnerability is rated critical for client and sever versions of Windows alike, an indication the remote-code bug may also threaten Windows desktops and laptop users as well. Amol Sarwate, director of engineering at Qualys, told Ars the flaw leaves client machines open if users run software that monitors Internet ports and accepts encrypted connections. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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