posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A Core M CPU package based on the Broadwell architecture. Intel Intel's Broadwell CPU architecture has only just started rolling out, and most of the processors that use it aren't even supposed to launch until early next year. The new 14nm manufacturing process is causing the delay, but yesterday at the Intel Developer Forum the company tried to demonstrate that Broadwell's lateness wouldn't affect the rest of its roadmap. To that end, Intel highlighted a couple of working developer systems based on the new "Skylake" architecture, as summarized here by Anandtech. The company didn't go into specific performance or power consumption numbers (both because it's early and because Intel probably doesn't want to take the wind out of Broadwell's sails), but it showed working silicon rendering 3D games and playing back 4K video to prove that the chips are working. The first Skylake processors are reportedly due out late in 2015 following the beginning of volume production in the second half of the year. Here are the basic facts we already know about Skylake: it's a "tock" on Intel's roadmap, meaning it introduces a new architecture on a manufacturing process that's already up and running. In this case, that's Intel's 14nm process, which Intel insists has recovered from its early problems. Some of the CPUs in Intel's lineup—specifically mid-to-low-end socketed desktop CPUs—will get their next refresh using Skylake instead of Broadwell. Whether this is because Intel wants to reserve 14nm manufacturing capacity for lower-power, higher-margin chips or because it just doesn't think the power-consumption-obsessed Broadwell is a good fit for regular desktops is anyone's guess. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
INFERNOS project Maxwell's demon is one of the most famous thought experiments in physics. In its traditional formulation, a demon sits next to a small hatch that separates two chambers. It observes the velocity of any gas molecules heading toward the hatch from one room and only opens the hatch when the velocity exceeds a certain value. Over time, the demon will raise the temperature of one room while cooling the second—something we know is thermodynamically impossible. Over time, the demon's domain has been expanded, as researchers realized the same issue applied to a variety of other problems. One reformulation came from physicist Leo Szilard, who noted you can have a demon-based engine. Now, 90 years later, researchers have built a Szilard engine that operates using a single electron. In the process, the researchers confirm that setting the digital bit of information describing the engine's state has an energetic cost. In its original formulation, the Szilard engine was a chamber with pistons at either end and a single gas molecule in the middle. Slide a divider down in the middle, and the gas molecule will wind up on one side or the other. This will push one of the pistons out, providing the potential for doing some work for "free" without the input of energy. (This being a thought experiment, the pistons are assumed to move without friction.) You can then remove the divider, let the chamber re-equilibrate, and do it all over again. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
On Wednesday, Dutch consumer electronics maker Philips and its subsidiary Woox Innovations announced the new Fidelio M2L headphones, which plug directly into the Lightning port on Apple devices. The headphones are the first third-party audio accessory to use the Lightning port, and they may have even beaten Apple to the punch. Apple talked about Lightning-connected headphones at WWDC in June and bought headphone maker Beats earlier in the summer, leading some to speculate that such an accessory was in the works. In June, Apple expanded its Made for iPhone (MFi) program for third-party accessory developers to include the possibility of Lighting port headphones. The specification allows those devices to receive 48kHz digital stereo output and send 48kHz digital mono input. By avoiding the headphone jack on newer iPhones and iPads, Philips says that it can provide “high resolution audio.” UK reviews site Pocket Lint describes the headphones as delivering “24-bit Digital to Analogue Conversion (DAC) and amplification in the headphones themselves.” Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A design for a Rolls-Royce robotic ship based on the research of the EU's Project Munin. No crew required. Rolls Royce A European Union-funded research project called MUNIN is looking to make international cargo shipping more energy and cost efficient, essentially turning "seafaring" into a desk job. Named for one of the Nordic god Odin's raven sidekicks, the goal of the MUNIN project is to create autonomous ships that can sail themselves from port to port. This would reduce energy consumption by lessening lighting, eliminating fresh water production, and getting rid of an onboard crew. The project is the subject of a workshop at the SMM maritime conference in Hamburg, Germany, today. MUNIN is being led by researchers from the Fraunhofer Center for Maritime Logistics and Services. The goal is to prove the safety of unmanned ships and then push for changes in international maritime regulations to allow them to ply the seas. Nearly all of the technology required to operate ships autonomously is already available, as Ørnulf Rødseth, a researcher at the Norwegian Marine Technology Institute, said in a report published in advance of SMM. "The technology for electronic positioning, satellite communications, and anti-collision measures already exists," he said. “Many vessels are also equipped with advanced sensor systems." But he admits that having the technology and getting governments and international authorities to buy in are two separate issues. "This is why there is a lot of talk about the costs issue, as well as the concerns of shipowners and the general public. We mustn’t forget that current rules and legislation all assume that there are people on board.” In order to get regulatory buy-in, researchers will need to demonstrate that autonomous systems can make the safety of robotic ships at least as good as manned ones. And hopefully, the lower speeds and automated responses of robotic ships could actually reduce collisions and other accidents at sea. As Rødseth noted, 75 percent of accidents at sea are caused by human error. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A deserted launch-day line highlights the lack of interest in the Xbox One in Japan. The Xbox brand has always been exceptionally weak in Japan, where consoles from local companies Sony and Nintendo traditionally perform much better than Microsoft's hardware efforts. But the recent launch of the Xbox One in the country has been underwhelming even by Microsoft standards. Japanese game magazine Famitsu reports that the Xbox One sold 23,562 units in its first four days of local sales after launching in the country on September 4. For context, the PlayStation 4 sold 309,000 units in its first week of Japanese sales in February, and even the Wii U mustered 308,000 units at its Japanese launch. Those latter two launches were considered somewhat weak by historical standards for Japanese console launches, but they still put Microsoft's latest launch to shame. The Xbox One's Japanese premiere is even worse than that of the Xbox 360, which sold a paltry 60,000 Japanese units in two days after launching in late 2005. The Xbox 360 went on to sell just over 1.63 million systems in Japan over its lifetime, compared to over 12.7 million Wii units and 9.3 million PS3 units in the country. The original Xbox wasn't a big success in Japan either, but it managed to limp past two million regional sales by December 2005, nearly four years after its launch. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Video of the mobile phone version of iArm Wrestle Champs being played. Among all the ballyhooed features that Apple talked about for its upcoming smartwatch yesterday, the Cupertino giant didn't really discuss the prospect of gaming on the tiny wrist-screen. Apple has instead left it to indie outfit Flying Tiger Entertainment to announce the first official game for the Apple Watch, a port of its iOS and Android title iArm Wrestle Champs. Actually, calling iArm Wrestle Champs a video game might be giving it a bit too much credit. It's more of an interactive soundboard that reacts to a real life arm-wrestling match, using the phone (or watch) accelerometer to detect when one player or the other is victorious. Humanity seemed to do just fine figuring out arm wrestling's winners before iDevices existed, but with the app, you get a nice audio reward when you pin the opponent's arm. Like it or not, this is the kind of non-traditional game that's probably going to be prevalent on devices like the Apple Watch. With a touchscreen small enough to be almost completely obscured by a tapping finger, games on the device will have to rely on other inputs, like the rotating "crown" on the side (Pong, anyone?), the accelerometer/GPS/altitude sensors, voice commands, or even the heartbeat monitor. Similarly, the "taptic" feedback motor inside may end up providing more useful gaming output than the watch face itself. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
If you like geology, you’re used to relying on an active imagination. Most geologic processes occur too slowly to see them play out for yourself. Many of the exceptions are dangerous enough that you might not want a front row seat or rare enough that the odds of being there to witness it are disheartening. Sometimes, though, the Earth throws us a bone—or in this case, a gigantic slab of granite. One interesting way that rocks weather and crumble apart is called “exfoliation.” Like the skin-scrubbing technique, this involves the outermost layers of exposed igneous or metamorphic bedrock sloughing off in a sheet. Over time, this tends to smooth and round the outcrop—Yosemite’s Half Dome providing a spectacular example. We’re not entirely sure just what drives the peeling of an outcrop’s skin like this, but the classic explanation is that it’s the result of bringing rocks that formed at great pressure up to the surface. Once there, the outer layers can expand slightly, creating a physical mismatch with the layers below them. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Operation Sports EA Sports has often used the slogan "If it's in the game, it's in the game" (or a shortened version) to highlight its simulated fidelity to the real world. So it's perhaps not too surprising that former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice will be removed from Madden NFL 15 following his indefinite suspension from the real world NFL yesterday. Rice had already been serving a two-game suspension for a domestic abuse incident involving his then-fiance Janay Palmer in a hotel elevator earlier this year. On Monday, Rice was dropped from the Ravens and then suspended indefinitely by the NFL after TMZ posted a video of Rice knocking Palmer out, obtained from the elevator's surveillance camera. "With Ray Rice's indefinite suspension from the NFL, he will be removed from Madden NFL 15," EA Sports said in a short statement. "This roster change will take place by this Friday." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:["top"], collapse: true});CUPERTINO, CA—When Apple hosts an event, people listen up. So on September 9, the company's event at the Silicon Valley-based Flint Center for the Performing Arts attracted a rabble of journalists, corporate partners, and a small handful of protesters shouting about working conditions in Apple's factories. You've no doubt heard about the announcement of Apple's new hardware line, which includes the iPhone 6 and the (huge) iPhone 6 Plus, as well as the Apple Watch. But these events often become a spectacle in and of themselves, without even touching on the new hardware or software. The day starts at the crack of dawn for most tech journalists, developers, and Apple employees, and ends with a well-earned drink sometime after the sun goes down. Just as we did with WWDC 2014, Ars thought we'd bring you a little flavor of what we saw outside of the main attraction—consider it a tour of the sideshows and the good people we found milling about the perimeter after the ushers shooed us out of the concert hall. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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On Monday, the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) announced plans to move survival training for all Soyuz passengers to a Russian naval base in Sevastopol, Crimea, after claiming to have "annexed" the peninsula from Ukraine earlier this year. The strategic move could put the US and other nations in a diplomatic bind as American, European, and Japanese astronauts-in-training would need to travel to the newly annexed territory without Ukrainian-issued visas. If the foreign crew refuses to travel to Crimea, the astronauts would fail their training and would be disqualified from their trip to the International Space Station (ISS), which is due for a routine crew replacement. As NBC News notes, the Sevastopol base was commonly used a decade ago for Russian splashdown survival training, when the country’s space program was headed by the Russian Air Force. "But as space budgets dwindled,” NBC says, "that training was transferred to a small lake near Moscow that was deemed adequate for the basics.” Today, the space program is managed by Roscosmos and the budget is even tighter, so money issues are likely not responsible for the move back to Crimea. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enough paper-thin preview events, enough alphas, and enough betas: As of midnight early Tuesday morning, we at Ars finally began fulfilling our Destiny. The long-hyped online shooter from Bungie launched on four consoles simultaneously overnight, and with no major press or critical preview period to speak of, we are only a brief number of missions, multiplayer battles, and public events into our loot-loaded, outer-space quest. We'll return later this week with enough spent ammo beneath our feet to fuel a full review of the game, but for now, we're stepping away from our controllers for a moment to describe what we've played so far—and whether we think it merits madly dashing to your retailer of choice for a day-one plunge. Déjà vu For those who dove into the game's beta, which eventually became free and available on all four platforms for a limited time, prepare for a serious case of déjà vu. The first slew of missions, set in the game's Old Russia landscape, are essentially identical to July's tease. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Apple Watch Sport and its blue Sport Band Megan Geuss CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:["top"], collapse: true});CUPERTINO, CA—It would be exaggerating to say we got “hands-on” time with the Apple Watch that the company announced this morning. Apple had several tables sprinkled throughout its hands-on booth (the large white building you may have seen in pictures), and you could try on some watches at those tables. But those watches were in a non-interactive demo mode, and the only opportunity we got to see the watches actually working were in carefully guided mini-presentations given by the people at the tables. Those little song-and-dance routines ran us through the same kinds of things that Tim Cook talked about on stage when he introduced the Apple Watch earlier today—using the “digital crown” to scroll and zoom, drawing and tapping out small messages to people in your contacts list, and a surface-level glance at some of the fitness information. We saw what it looks like to change watch faces, and to customize them. We experienced the "taptic" vibration the watch uses to let you know it wants something, and it was indeed as subtle as Cook said it was. We just didn’t get to actually take the watch's software for a spin, something that’s kind of integral for an accessory that you’re meant to have with you all the time. Megan Geuss Apple Watches come in many different colors and sizes. 14 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The one thing we did manage to get a better sense for was the sheer variety of different Apple Watches. The watch itself comes in the standard stainless steel Apple Watch body, the aluminum body of the Apple Watch Sport, and the 18 karat gold body of the Apple Watch Edition (3 options). Each of those types of watches comes in either 38mm high or 42mm high models (six options). Each watch also comes with two different color options (12 options). Each can be paired with one of six different band styles (72 options). Each band comes in a variety of different colors. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Microsoft is in talks to buy Swedish game developer Mojang, best known for its block-based zombie survival building game Minecraft. Citing a "person with knowledge of the matter," the purchase would value the developer at more than $2 billion. The purchase would be a surprising one. Mojang founder Markus "Notch" Persson has been critical of Microsoft, claiming that Windows 8 could be "very very bad" for indie developers. When Facebook bought VR goggle company Oculus earlier this year, Persson cancelled development of a virtual reality version of Minecraft, saying that "Facebook is not a company of grass-roots tech enthusiasts." The price is also remarkable. Minecraft is the only Mojang game that's reasonably complete. Card strategy game Scrolls is currently in beta, and planned space-based sandbox game 0x10c was cancelled in 2013. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A man harasses a woman while another man kind of stands around doing nothing. A beautiful microcosm of recent events. Feminist Frequency A set of IRC logs released Saturday appear to show that a handful of 4chan users were ultimately behind #GamerGate, the supposedly grass-roots movement aimed at exposing ethical lapses in gaming journalism. The logs show a small group of users orchestrating a "hashtag campaign" to perpetuate misogynistic attacks by wrapping them in a debate about ethics in gaming journalism. The saga grew from a single blog post written by an ex-boyfriend of Zoe Quinn, a game developer who designed Depression Quest. The post was a lengthy diatribe filled with details about Quinn's alleged relationships with men, including a tryst with a gaming journalist who works for Kotaku. Anonymous users on reddit and 4chan spun this material into a story about how Quinn allegedly slept with multiple gaming journalists in return for coverage, though the allegations did not support such a claim. The journalist in question had quoted Quinn, once, months before they dated; he never wrote about her or her development efforts again. Nevertheless, Quinn soon had her accounts hacked and her personal information stolen (experiences she was accused of fabricating). Quinn's opponents tried to turn the entire situation into an ethical debate about the relationship between gaming press and game developers. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
For a brief period 15 years ago, this was console gaming's state of the art. Wikipedia While seemingly the entirety of the Internet was off paying attention to Apple announcing new phones and watch, something weird was happening to my Twitter feed. Apparently, someone had messed with my settings so that my feed displayed tweets on a 15 year delay for a couple of hours. That means that, instead of Apple tweets, my followers got to go back in time and experience a portion of my liveblogging from Sega's Dreamcast launch-day keynote address from September 9, 1999. We figure this technical snafu is as good an excuse as any to look back on the Dreamcast as it existed 15 years ago today, when it hoped to be the savior of a once-proud Sega still recovering from the failure of the Sega CD, 32X, Saturn, et al. Below are my live tweets as they were written 15 years ago, along with some accompanying commentary that has the benefit of a decade and a half of hindsight. [Editor's Note: For those with defective sarcasm genes (or just those feeling a little bit slow today), I will state up front that these are not actually tweets from over six years before Twitter even existed. Sega didn't even have a keynote-style launch event on 9/9/99. I just thought these somewhat jokey "livetweets" would be a fun way to reminisce on the launch of Sega's last console, and reflect on how much technology and the gaming market has changed in the intervening period.] Read 40 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The iPhone 5S, 6, and 6 Plus. Megan Geuss CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:["top"], collapse: true});CUPERTINO, CA—Big phones, long the domain of the Android and Windows Phone OEMs, are finally a reality on Apple’s side of the fence. The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus catapult the iPhone into the large-screen era after two years at the 4-inch screen size introduced by the iPhone 5, and the larger sizes drastically change what the phones are like to hold and to use. Meet the new iPhones Let’s start with some general observations that apply to both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 5 and 5S both had flat fronts, sides, and backs with well-defined edges, but those are gone in the iPhone 6. The glass on the front now curves down slightly all the way around the edge to meet the newly-curved sides and back of the phone. It sort of recalls the iPhone 3G or 3GS, which had similar curves but used plastic all the way around instead of aluminum and glass. I’ve long since gotten used to the harder edges of my iPhone 4S and 5S, but the iPhone 6 is softer all the way around. Megan Geuss 12 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The back of the phones are made out of aluminum with some clearly visible cutouts made to allow wireless signals in and out. The design as a whole is more reminiscent of the 2012 iPod Touch than current iPhones, an observation that extends to the slightly protruding camera lens. You won’t notice this bulge if you keep your phone in a case or sit it on a soft surface, but if you set the phone on a hard table it definitely will wobble a bit in place. Both phones feel lighter than you’d expect them to—4.55 ounces for the 6 and 6.07 ounces for the 6 Plus, compared to 5.64 ounces for the 5-inch HTC One M8 or 5.08 ounces for the new Moto X—but they still feel as sturdy as you’d expect from an Apple product. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Microsoft has reached a deal with the US government in which it will agree to be held in contempt of court in order to move an e-mail privacy case on to appeal. The case is over a government demand for e-mails stored on a Microsoft server in Dublin, Ireland, that are related to an investigation into narcotics trafficking. The Obama administration has said that the company must comply with valid warrants for data, even when the data is held overseas. Microsoft say that's wrong and that the ability to enforce US law stops at the nation's borders. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Good day to you, Arsians! How's your computer storage situation? If you're fiending for a reasonably priced SSD upgrade or a massive multi-TB drive to back your SSD up, today's Dealmaster has you covered with options from Intel, Seagate, and Western Digital. Elsewhere in today's listings, find a variety of Dell monitor and laptop options, a few 4K TV sets, and markdowns on Microsoft Office, both in standard and 365 flavors. Featured deal: Intel 520 Series 240GB SATA 6Gb/s 2.5-Inch SSD for $109.99 with free shipping (list price $299.99) Hard drives and SSDs: Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Artist's conception of a watery Mars. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center It’s become clear in recent years that Mars had lots of water in its distant past. But that raises the question—when did Mars stop being so Earth-like? And what happened to cause the change? One way to address such questions is by analyzing rocks from different times in the planet's history. While no samples from the red planet have ever been brought back, meteorites have landed on Earth that scientists identified as originating on Mars. One such meteorite is called Northwest Africa (NWA) 7533. This dark, glossy meteorite originally formed some 4.43 billion years ago, not long after Mars itself finished accreting. And, crucially, it contains zircon grains, which provide clues to the planet’s past. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Intel Free Press Motorists popped for texting-while-driving violations in Long Island could be mandated to temporarily disable their mobile phones the next time they take to the road. That's according to Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, who says she is moving to mandate that either hardware be installed or apps be activated that disable the mobile phone while behind the wheel. The district attorney likened the texter's punishment to drunk drivers who sometimes are required to breathe into a device before turning on the ignition. "Like ignition interlock devices, transdermal alcohol monitoring ankle bracelets, and personal breath testing instruments, DA Rice believes that available technologies must be employed in criminal sentences to change behavior and save lives. The cost of each of these devices would be borne by the offender," the prosecutor said in a press release. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This is the story of a click wheel. Jacqui Cheng When apple.com returned after the event announcing Apple's new iPhone 6, 6 Plus, and Apple Watch, one of its longest-standing members was gone: the iPod classic. Along with it goes the 30-pin dock connector, marking a complete transition to the Lightning connector for Apple's entire mobile device fleet in exactly two years. The iPod classic was part of Apple's lineup starting in October 23, 2001. The product hadn't been updated since the 6th generation version was released in 2009; over the last five years, it has existed as a single solitary $249 160GB model. Now that Apple is able to offer iPhones in 128GB solid-state storage options, the iPod classic would have felt particularly redundant as a product. It was also the last existing product not to use the Lightning connector that Apple introduced with the iPhone 5 in 2012. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Taramisu Thirty-three companies that make equipment used by Internet service providers today called on the US to avoid regulating Internet service as a utility. IBM, Cisco, and Intel signed the letter to US Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, along with Alcatel-Lucent, Arris, Broadcom, D-Link, Ericsson, Panasonic, Sandvine, and others. “The Administration must act to protect against calls for utility-like common carrier regulation that would threaten demand for Internet infrastructure, reduce incentives for investment, hinder innovation and jeopardize [the Internet’s] success,” the companies wrote. Consumer advocates have called upon the Federal Communications Commission to reclassify broadband as a utility and ban “fast lanes” in which Web services pay ISPs for faster and more reliable access to consumers. The FCC has proposed rules that would require ISPs to provide a minimum level of service to all legal applications, but without banning fast lanes or classifying broadband as a utility under Title II of the Communications Act. The FCC's plan instead relies upon its weaker “Section 706” authority. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It's been more than two-and-a-half years since he was charged, so it's easy to forget that the US still sees Kim Dotcom as an Internet fugitive. The US Department of Justice still hopes to extradite him from New Zealand and bring him to trial on criminal copyright charges for inducing piracy through actions he undertook at his former company, Megaupload. Dotcom is still fighting to stay out of the US, and an extradition trial is now scheduled for February 2015. Now, Dotcom has won an interim victory—thanks to a ruling from the New Zealand Court of Appeal, he's finally going to get some of the data that was seized from his computers and other devices when his house was raided in January 2012. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The 40-year-old federal rules that support the National Football League's TV blackout policy could finally be eliminated this month. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler today scheduled a vote for September 30 on "a proposal to get rid of the FCC’s blackout rule once and for all," he wrote today. "There is no better example of an FCC rule that has outlived its usefulness and deserves to be eliminated than our sports blackout rule," Wheeler wrote. "In 1975, the Commission enacted rules barring cable from airing a game that has been blacked out on the local television station because it was not sold out—strengthening the NFL’s blackout policy. Today, the rules make no sense at all." Pro football doesn't need the government's help to boost ticket sales, "and we at the FCC shouldn’t be complicit in preventing sports fans from watching their favorite teams on TV," he continued. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Do you have any of these older iPhones? Here's our advice on whether it's time for a replacement. Andrew Cunningham A new iPhone is here. You've spent most of the day watching Apple's announcement, the coverage around it, the reaction to the announcement and the coverage, and the reactions to those reactions. It's the standard tech news rigmarole, which can be fun, but ultimately doesn't really help people make purchasing decisions. Let's assume you're a current iPhone owner, and you're being tempted by the new one's wiles. We're here to throw some water on the early adoption fire, to be the voice of reason that tells you whether it's really practical to upgrade or not. Here's a list of all the phones that are going to run iOS 8, and what you should be thinking about if you're looking for a replacement. iPhone 5S owners: Keep your phone This recommendation doesn't surprise anyone, right? If you have an iPhone 5S, you didn't buy a phone all that long ago. Your iPhone supports pretty much every iOS 8 feature, from Handoff, to the performance-boosting Metal graphics API, to 64-bit apps, to TouchID. Given Apple's reputation for secrecy even among different internal teams, it's a safe bet that a whole bunch of iOS 8 was developed on an iPhone 5S, for an iPhone 5S. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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