posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A consumer rights activist who led the charge against restrictions on phone unlocking has graded the four major US carriers and found three of them aren't fully complying with commitments they made to the government. The CTIA Wireless Association promised the Federal Communications Commission that carriers would meet six conditions by a deadline that passed last week. But Sprint hasn't met three of the conditions, T-Mobile fails on two of them and possibly a third, while AT&T meets five but possibly not the sixth, reports Sina Khanifar, who was credited by the White House for starting the petition that helped (temporarily) legalize phone unlocking. In addition to that legislation, carriers promised the FCC to post clear and concise unlocking policies on their websites, implement postpaid unlocking policies, implement prepaid unlocking policies, provide notice to customers when their devices are eligible for unlocking, respond to unlock requests within two business days, and unlock devices for deployed military personnel. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Loretta Lynch, tapped by President Barack Obama to become the nation's next attorney general, said that if she's confirmed, she likely wouldn't alter the Justice Department's landmark opinion that opened the door to legal online gambling for the first time. Loretta Lynch. Wikipedia Online, casino-style gambling was thought to be illegal in the United States until 2011, when the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) said it was OK (PDF) as long as it was done in-state and that Internet sports wagering was prohibited. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Next Wednesday, the ABC network will air an episode of hit sitcom Modern Family that unfolds entirely on Apple devices. The show's executive producer hit the interview circuit on Tuesday, offering official descriptions and comments to outlets like The New York Times about the first network TV show to take place exclusively on an OS X desktop. According to reports, the plot of the February 25 episode will revolve around main character Claire (played by Julie Bowen) trying to track down her daughter after a fight; as such, viewers will see the episode unfold from her laptop's primary screen while e-mails, Facetime calls, and texts pop up (along with visual gags like web browser usage to tell jokes). Producers confirmed they built a fake OS X Yosemite environment, upon which they overlaid footage shot exclusively on iPhone 6s, "new iPads," and Macbook Pros; supposedly, the latest OS X was chosen so that the episode could take advantage of its "Continuity" feature. While footage was shot on actual iDevices, camera crews had to hold phones on actors' behalf and then film simultaneous scenes in disparate locations to mimic the feel of people talking to each other through video chat. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A day after security Kaspersky Lab researchers detailed a state-sponsored hacking campaign with ties to Stuxnet, an online posting has been spotted in which one of the victims pleaded for help. "How do I stop this virus infecting my computer?" someone with the username dkk wrote in a forum in July 2010. "You insert the USB thumbdrive, the computer gets infected. Even when the patches has been applied, and autorun and autoplay has been turned off. The weirdest thing of all is, there is in fact no autorun.inf on the root of the infected USB drive." He went on to say the USB drive contained seven files all ending in *.lnk, along with a file called fanny.bmp. Sadly, no one ever responded. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The Apple Watch that Apple showed off at its September event has a few fitness features. It can track the number of steps you've taken, whether you've been standing or sitting, and the number of calories you've burned. It uses a combination of an accelerometer, heart rate sensor, and your iPhone's GPS to track this data, and its functionality as a fitness gadget is mostly related to the way and catalogues and sets goals based on that data. According to a report from the Wall Street Journal, Apple's original plans for the watch included other sensors that provided more detailed data. A sensor that "measured the conductivity of skin" to "gauge stress" and track heart rate was axed because it didn't work consistently. Dry skin, hairy arms, and the tightness of the watch on the wrist all affected the accuracy of the sensor. Other sensors could have measured blood pressure and the amount of oxygen in the blood, but consistency was again an issue. Additionally, had Apple used that data to provide advice or goals for users, it may have required regulatory approval from the FDA. These features may reappear in future models, but they haven't made it into the first-generation device. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Nintendo is working to increase the value proposition of its Amiibo toy line, announcing overnight that the figurines will soon be able to unlock time-limited demos for classic NES and SNES titles through the Wii U. The Wii U app, due in the first half of 2015, will allow players to enjoy "highlighted scenes" from selected games when they tap certain Amiibo to the Gamepad. The demo scenes will be constrained by a time limit, but other scenes will be available if you tap the Amiibo again, Nintendo President Satoru Iwata said in a presentation to Japanese investors. "We hope that when you tap your Amiibo, the quickly changing game scenes will pleasantly surprise you and make you feel as though you have just exchanged a game cartridge," Iwata said. Amiibo have quickly become a new pillar of Nintendo's business alongside gaming hardware and software, with 5.7 million in worldwide sales by the end of 2014. Nearly two-thirds of those sales have come from North America, Nintendo announced, with Link figures ranking as the most popular in all regions but Australia. In the investors presentation, Iwata reiterated plans to introduce "card versions" of Amiibo that could be used to unlock stuff without a figurine. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Linus Torvalds, creator and curator of the Linux kernel, has a quandary on his hands: Should he stick to Linux's long-time tradition of massive, multple-decimal-point version numbers, or should he abandon them in favor of shorter, more easily distinguishable major versions? The problem at hand is the imminent arrival of Linux 3.20. Unlike most major pieces of software, a new version of the Linux kernel is released every 10 weeks or so. In some cases, developers simply bump the major version number every time there's a big release, which is why we're now up to Chrome 40 and Firefox 35. The Linux kernel, however, has historically opted for a "conventional" scheme, which resulted in some incredibly long-winded version numbers such as 2.6.39.4. Back in 2011, with the release of Linux 3.0, Torvalds said those "2.6." days were over—and now here we are, a few weeks away from the release of Linux 3.20, and it seems we're on the cusp of the Linux kernel assuming a much simpler version scheme. "I'm once more close to running out of fingers and toes," muses Torvalds, before going on to suggest that it might be time to skip 3.20 and jump straight to 4.0. In a poll attached to Torvalds' Google+ post, which had more than 24,000 votes at the time of publishing, 54% were in favor of numbering the next version of the kernel Linux 4.0. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Unraveling a mystery that eluded the researchers analyzing the highly advanced Equation Group the world learned about Monday, password crackers have deciphered a cryptographic hash buried in one of the hacking crew's exploits. It's Arabic for "unregistered." Researchers for Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab spent more than two weeks trying to crack the MD5 hash using a computer that tried more than 300 billion plaintext guesses every second. After coming up empty-handed, they enlisted the help of password-cracking experts, both privately and on Twitter in hopes they would do better. Password crackers Jens Steube and Philipp Schmidt spent only a few hours before figuring out the plaintext behind the hash e6d290a03b70cfa5d4451da444bdea39 was غير مسجل, which is Arabic for "unregistered". The hex-encoded string for the same Arabic word is dbedd120e3d3cce1. "That was a shock when it popped up and said 'cracked,'" Steube told Ars Monday evening. He is the developer behind the free Hashcat password-cracking programs and an expert in password cracking. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Net neutrality advocates are generally pleased by the Federal Communications Commission's latest plan to regulate Internet service providers, but some are pointing out potential problems. Attorney Matt Wood, the policy director for advocacy group Free Press, told the FCC last week that it faces "legal obstacles" in how it intends to regulate Internet service providers. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler proposes to reclassify Internet service providers as common carriers in two parts. ISPs will be common carriers in their relationships with home Internet consumers. They will also be common carriers in their business relationships with "edge providers," companies that offer services, applications, and content over the Internet. "[B]oth the service to the end user and to the edge provider are classified under Title II [of the Communications Act]," the proposal states. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The developer behind indie title Fortress Fallout says that Bethesda Softworks parent company Zenimax Media has forced him to abandon the trademark for his game after allegations of infringement with the popular Fallout series. As Jordan Maron (aka YouTuber Captain Sparklez) discusses in a recent video, Zenimax asked in a letter that Maron "immediately expressly abandon the application for Fortress Fallout and cease any and all current or proposed use of any mark incorporating the term Fallout." Maron says his company, Xreal, has been forced to comply with the request due to a lack of resources. "Our lawyers said that Bethesda is a notoriously litigious company," Maron says in the video. "Obviously they have lots of money and resources at their disposal which me and my partner don't really have at the moment. So essentially we are being strong-armed into having to change our name, which is unfortunate because I personally don't feel there is any confusion between Fortress Fallout and the Fallout video game franchise." Bethesda and Zenimax did not immediately respond to a request for comment. We'd wager the average consumer would have little to no chance of confusing Fortress Fallout with Bethesda's popular post-apocalyptic RPG series, as Xreal's game is a free-to-play mobile title with 2D, tile-based graphics and multiplayer-focused strategy gameplay. Still, Xreal is now looking to rename the game, preferably to something that includes the word "Dungeon," according to Maron. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Almost three years ago, the Red Planet put on a bit of a show for anyone with a telescope big enough, and an eye trained enough, to spot it. As the Terra Cimmeria region of Mars’ Southern Hemisphere rotated into view, a faint bulge rose above the smooth curve of the planet’s surface. It looked like a cloud, but it was too tall and too weird. Starting on March 12, 2012, amateur astronomers reported seeing the odd lump on the Martian horizon. Reports continued to pour in over the next 11 days as the lump became even more obvious. It petered out some time before April 1, but a second occurrence was observed between April 6 and April 16. Each time, its form varied from day to day, and it was seen as dawn swept across the region—but not at dusk. Although the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter imaged the area daily, it did so in the afternoon, and nothing showed up. But using the images that were captured by amateurs, a group of researchers led by University of the Basque Country’s Agustín Sánchez-Lavega calculated the size of the fuzzy plume. It covered an area some 500 to 1,000 kilometers across and reached as high as 200 to 250 kilometers above the surface—that is, into Mars’ ionosphere and exosphere. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
On Sunday, LG confirmed that it had been indicted in South Korea after its Home Appliance Division President Jo Seong-jin allegedly damaged the doors of several Samsung washing machines in the days leading up to a trade show in Germany. On Monday, LG took the news to the general public, releasing edited CCTV footage that it says shows that Jo did not intentionally damage the doors. The indictment comes with charges of vandalizing Samsung's new “Crystal Blue” front-loading washing machines, as well as charges of defamation and obstruction of business. LG has called the claims “excessive” and has filed a countersuit. The drama has unfolded over a number of months, starting in September when Jo and a number of his LG colleagues attended the IFA Electronics Show in Berlin. The executives allegedly went to two retail stores in Berlin before the trade show began and inspected—or vandalized, if you're Samsung—Samsung's $2,700 washing machines. Samsung alleged that after the LG executives' handling, four of the doors of the front-loading washing machines no longer worked. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A father and son face off in a highly competitive game of Starwhal: Just the Tip, being demoed on a PS4 in Sony's section. 22 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);NEW YORK—I've been to my fair share of video game conventions over the years, but none of them had quite the same vibe as my first Indiecade. Held at Queens' Museum of the Moving Image this weekend, Indiecade East 2015 was part interactive art exhibit, part sporting event, part educational workshop, and part indie mixing bowl. Amid a smattering of VR demos hosted by Leap Motion, the top floor of the museum featured a curated selection of games based on the themes of love and rejection. The "love" titles ranged from the cute (Nina Freeman's Barbie doll sex "simulation" How Do You Do It) to the poignant (Rod Humble's abstract shape-as-metaphor game The Marriage) to the only vaguely love-related (Asteroid base's co-operative shooter Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime). On the "rejection" side, attendees could sample titles that had been denied release by various platform holders for one reason or another. These included religious Wolfenstein 3D knock-off Super 3D Noah's Ark on the SNES and iPhone-making simulation Phone Story, which hit a little too close to home for Apple's iOS App Store. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
One of the largest local police departments in the American South has revised its surveillance applications to judges, making its judicial requests to use cell-site simulators much more explicit for the first time. According to the Charlotte Observer, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) in North Carolina has “revised court papers that judges review before granting officers permission to track phones, in an effort to ‘improve the effectiveness of the process and provide greater transparency.’" The CMPD did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment and a copy of the new applications. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
CANCUN, Mexico — In 2009, one or more prestigious researchers received a CD by mail that contained pictures and other materials from a recent scientific conference they attended in Houston. The scientists didn't know it then, but the disk also delivered a malicious payload developed by a highly advanced hacking operation that had been active since at least 2001. The CD, it seems, was tampered with on its way through the mail. It wasn't the first time the operators—dubbed the "Equation Group" by researchers from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab—had secretly intercepted a package in transit, booby-trapped its contents, and sent it to its intended destination. In 2002 or 2003, Equation Group members did something similar with an Oracle database installation CD in order to infect a different target with malware from the group's extensive library. (Kaspersky settled on the name Equation Group because of members' strong affinity for encryption algorithms, advanced obfuscation methods, and sophisticated techniques.) Kaspersky researchers have documented 500 infections by Equation Group in at least 42 countries, with Iran, Russia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Syria, and Mali topping the list. Because of a self-destruct mechanism built into the malware, the researchers suspect that this is just a tiny percentage of the total; the actual number of victims likely reaches into the tens of thousands. Read 52 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The New Yorker has a massive in-depth profile on Apple’s Jonathan Ive, the iconically soft-spoken (and oddly swole) chief designer behind much of Apple’s equally-iconic modern product line. Ive is responsible for devices like the iMac and the iPhone, and the entire profile is an engaging read since author Ian Parker was given unprecedented access into the closed world of Apple’s design workshops. But there’s a fascinating tidbit buried about halfway though the piece that sheds some, ahem, light on a specific aspect of last year’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer. Since the trailer’s release back in November, Star Wars fans have filled entire message boards debating the usefulness (or dumbness) of the crossguards on the lightsaber featured in the trailer—even Stephen Colbert weighed in with his opinions. But while the weapon’s mini-lightsaber-crossguards received the lion’s share of the attention, the actual texture of the blade also attracted notice. Rather than the visually smooth surface that past on-screen lightsabers have had, the one in the trailer is…a bit flickery. There are lots of fan theories as to why this might be. Per the off-screen extended universe lore (which may or may not matter anymore), lightsabers contain one or more exotic crystals to focus their energy into a coherent, contained blade; different types of crystals yield different blade colors and properties. Perhaps the hooded figure in the trailer is using rough or raw crystals, or perhaps he hasn’t mastered the precise art of lightsaber construction? Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Samsung has just announced a new high-end Exynos 7 Octa SoC. It uses eight CPU cores—a combination of four high-end Cortex A57 cores and four low-end, power-saving Cortex A53 cores in a big.LITTLE configuration—and supports the 64-bit ARMv8 instruction set. However, its most significant new feature is Samsung's new 14nm manufacturing process, which promises performance and power consumption improvements compared to the existing 20nm process. Samsung is already shipping eight-core 64-bit Exynos chips on its older 20nm process, most notably in the Galaxy Note Edge and some variants of the Galaxy Note 4. Compared to those chips, Samsung claims that the 14nm version "enables up to 20 percent faster speed, 35 percent less power consumption, and 30 percent productivity gain." Those numbers don't tell us much in terms of actual clock speeds or performance-per-watt numbers, but it's safe to assume that the 14nm Exynos 7 will be able to run at higher clock speeds for longer while consuming less power. We don't know anything about the new Exynos' GPU yet. The 20nm Exynos 7 Octa uses a high-end Mail-T760 GPU from ARM, and we'll probably see something similar in the 14nm version. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
AT&T's gigabit fiber-to-the-home service has just arrived in Kansas City, and the price is the same as Google Fiber—if you let AT&T track your Web browsing history. Just as it did when launching its "GigaPower" service in Austin, Texas in late 2013, AT&T offers different prices based on how jealously users guard their privacy. AT&T's $70 per-month pricing for gigabit service is the same price as Google Fiber, but AT&T charges an additional $29 a month to customers who opt out of AT&T's "Internet Preferences" program. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
9 more images in gallery ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);Mobile World Congress happens in about two weeks, but LG just couldn't contain itself. The company announced the LG Watch Urbane, a smartwatch aiming for the "luxury" crowd. The specs are identical to the LG G Watch R: a round (that's fully-round) 1.3-inch, 320×320 P-OLED display sits atop a 1.2GHz Snapdragon 400 with 512MB of RAM and a 410mAh battery. The real draw of this watch is the design, which LG's press release says is for the "sophisticated and cosmopolitan wearer"—basically, it looks like a normal watch. The Watch Urbane has a stainless steel body and a 22mm removable leather watch band. The device runs Android Wear, has IP67 water and dust resistance, and a heart rate sensor. While there are no dimensions for the product yet, LG says it is thinner than the 9.7mm G Watch R, and has a smaller bezel. The bezel also ditches the G Watch R's second marking on the bezel, which often proved irrelevant when using the watch. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Today Dish announced that its live TV streaming service will soon include access to four new channels—Epix, Epix2, Epix3, and Epix Drive-In—as well as 2,000 movies and TV shows from the Epix network's subscription video-on-demand service. Sling TV launched earlier this year in an attempt to capture the growing market of cord cutters—people who've stopped paying for cable or never paid for cable in the first place because they consider it too costly and don't want to pay for lots of channels they don't watch. Sling TV said the Epix channels and Epix movies on demand will be available as a separate package for customers to buy in addition to the base package, which starts at $20. A spokesperson for the service would not say how much more the Epix package would cost but noted that Sling TV would announce pricing soon. Sling TV currently sells a Kids package, a News package, and a Sports package that customers can buy in addition to the base package. Each of those additional packages costs $5 extra per month for a handful of demographic- and content-specific channels. “Epix offers new releases like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Wolf of Wall Street and Star Trek: Into Darkness, as well as classics like Pretty in Pink and Airplane!” the Sling TV press release stated. The Epix network was founded in 2009 and is co-owned by Viacom subsidiary Paramount Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), and Lionsgate. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The long-awaited Assassin's Creed movie is finally moving ahead, with Ubisoft revealing the film has officially entered production. The video game adaptation will be released on December 21, 2016. Word of the production came from the most mundane of places though—Ubisoft's quarterly financial call. The publisher is co-producing the film with studio New Regency, which has had a golden period in recent years with films such as 12 Years a Slave, Birdman, and Gone Girl under its umbrella. "We have the pleasure to announce today that the green light has been given by New Regency, and the production has already started," said Ubisoft's CEO Yves Guillemot. "This is a very important milestone for the project and for our team on Assassin's Creed." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Since before GamePro started using cartoon faces to measure "fun factor" back in the '80s, review scores have been an integral part of the game industry. But there are a few recent signs that the practice of sticking a number or a letter grade at the end of review text may be losing some of its appeal. Among the largest of those signs: popular gaming hub Eurogamer announced earlier this week that it's dropping its long-standing ten-point review score scale in favor of a vaguer "recommendation" system. While Eurogamer's editors say review scores have always been somewhat reductive and antithetical to nuance, they now argue that the concept of scoring is particularly ill-suited to the way games are made and released today. "How should we score an excellent game with severe networking issues?" Eurogamer asked rhetorically. "A flawlessly polished game with a hackneyed design? A brilliantly tuned multiplayer experience with dreadful storytelling? If you expect the score to encompass every aspect of a game, the task becomes an exercise in futility. Add an inflated understanding of the scoring scale in many quarters—whereby 7/10 and even sometimes 8/10 are construed as disappointing scores—and you have a recipe for mixed messages." Eurogamer isn't alone in this decision. Before Joystiq regrettably folded last week, the site made a similar decision to throw out review scores last month. "Between pre-release reviews, post-release patching, online connectivity, server stability and myriad other unforeseeable possibilities, attaching a concrete score to a new game just isn't practical," Joystiq's Richard Mitchell wrote of that decision. "More importantly, it's not helpful to our readers." Last year also saw a few smaller outlets turning against the gaming review score: TechnoBuffalo in September and GameXplain in April. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: Hp Stream and Pavilion Mini Stream Mini Pavilion Mini (base model) Pavilion Mini (upgrade model) OS Windows 8.1 with Bing 64-bit Windows 8.1 64-bit CPU 1.4GHz Celeron 2957U 1.7GHz Pentium 3558U 1.9GHz Core i3-4025U RAM 2GB 1600MHz DDR3 (upgradeable to 16GB) 4GB 1600MHz DDR3 (upgradeable to 16GB) GPU Intel HD Graphics Intel HD Graphics 4400 HDD 32GB M.2 SATA SSD 500GB 7200RPM HDD 1TB 5400RPM HDD NETWORKING 2.4GHz 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0, gigabit Ethernet PORTS 4x USB 3.0, DisplayPort, HDMI, SD card reader, headphone jack SIZE 5.71" x 5.71" x 2.13 (145 x 145 x 54.1mm) WEIGHT 1.2 lbs 1.46 lbs 1.46 lbs WARRANTY 1 year PRICE $179.99 $319.99 $449.99 OTHER PERKS Kensington lock slot HP's Stream Mini and Pavilion Mini desktops are for everyone who was excited about Intel's NUC until they saw the price. While we definitely like the NUC and think it's a good value for what you get, the fact of the matter is a lot of people don't need all the stuff it's offering: fast-but-expensive PCI Express storage, a brand new Ultrabook-class CPU with a premium integrated GPU, and a build-it-yourself philosophy that your average computer buyer won't want to deal with. By contrast, the Stream and Pavilion Mini are inexpensive fully-equipped systems that are ready to work out of the box. They use lower-end processors and have lower specs all around, but they include a Windows license and even a keyboard and a mouse. If you or someone you know has a years-old mini-tower on or under their desk, these systems are attractive, inexpensive drop-in replacements. Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
On Sunday, the Federal Aviation Administration released a proposed set of rules for regulating drones that weigh less than 55 pounds. The proposed rules, which apply to commercial drones, state that the aircraft must stay in a visual line-of-sight of the operator, yield to other aircraft, not drop objects, not operate in the nighttime, have aircraft markings, and not exceed 100 mph or an altitude of 500 feet. The FAA also proposes that a person may not act as an operator or visual observer for more than one aircraft at a time and that the drone may not fly over a person not involved with the operation of the aircraft. The rules exclude model aircraft. The FAA is also considering more flexible rules for tiny drones (under 4.4 pounds). Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The chairman of the istederal Communications Commission announced recently he would seek to reclassify broadband Internet as a common carrier service so the government could enforce net neutrality rules, something that President Obama supports. Some telecom executives and Republicans in Congress are calling this an “extreme” and “backwards” proposal, and they’re investigating the President’s role in pushing for it. But we’ve only reached this pivotal moment in the net neutrality debate because of past efforts by corporate lobbyists and their political allies to weaken the government’s ability to protect the open Internet. Without the telecommunications industry’s massive power to design policies in its favor, the government would most likely already have the authority it needs to ensure net neutrality. In the early 2000s, back when Gmail was still for Garfield fans only, policymakers were facing important questions about the nature of broadband Internet and how it should be treated by regulators. The last major telecommunications bill was passed by Congress in 1996 and since then the technology had advanced rapidly, with two different services, cable Internet and digital subscriber line (DSL), becoming widely available. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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