posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Researchers have made a discovery that raises troubling questions about the trustworthiness of third-party extensions Google makes available for its Chrome browser—a plugin with more than 1.2 million downloads that vacuumed up users' browsing habits and used them for marketing purposes. The extension was known as Webpage Screenshot, and until Tuesday it was available in Google's official Chrome store. It boasted more than 1.2 million downloads and garnered an overall rating of 4.5 stars out of a possible 5. But according to a blog post published Wednesday by researchers at Danish firm Heimdal Security, the Chrome plugin collected users' browsing habits behind the scenes. The snooping was made harder to detect because Webpage Screenshot didn't start collecting the data until a week after the extension was installed. In fairness to the company that produced Webpage Screenshot, the extension's terms of service disclosed that it collected a wealth of potentially sensitive user data. Data that was fair game included IP addresses, operating systems, browser information, URLs visited, data from URLs loaded and pages viewed, search queries entered, social connections, profile properties, contact details, and usage data, along with other behavioral, software and hardware information and unique mobile device identifiers. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Apple has just released the final version of OS X 10.10.3, the latest major update for OS X Yosemite. The update was first available to the public as a beta build back in early March, and it follows a little over three months after OS X 10.10.2. You can view the full release notes on Apple's site here. The star of this update is the new Photos app, an OS X version of the photo viewing and editing app included with iOS. It primarily functions as a replacement for iPhoto, the basic photo app included with the iLife suite for years before becoming available for free for all new Macs. It also replaces Aperture, Apple's pro photo editing app—though it doesn't actually attempt to replicate Aperture's functionality. Neither iPhoto nor Aperture will receive further updates from Apple after today. Photos will be installed automatically when you update to 10.10.3; it appears to be a core part of OS X rather than an optional Mac App Store download. We looked at an early Photos beta back in February and came away mostly impressed by its features and speed, at least relative to iPhoto. Those of you with existing iPhoto and Aperture libraries will be able to import them into Photos after you install OS X 10.10.3. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Back when we first reviewed the Xbox One in 2013, we found it was tough for cord-cutters to run a TV signal through the system without a cable or satellite subscription. Microsoft and Hauppauge are fixing that problem with a new tuner that lets users view over-the-air (OTA) TV signals through the Xbox One and take advantage of the system's TV-centric features. The Hauppauge WinTV-955Q, available for an MSRP of $80 from most major tech retailers, was originally designed to convert antenna or unencrypted cable TV signals into a form that could be sent to a PC via USB. That tuner now works on the Xbox One for users that are part of the Update Preview Program, Microsoft announced today. A $60 version of the device, specifically designed for the system, will be available in the coming months. Hooking OTA TV through the Xbox gives viewers a number of added features that have previously only been available to cable and satellite subscribers in the US and Canada. These include the ability to pause live TV for up to 30 minutes, change channels with Kinect commands, snap TV content to the side of the screen, and stream live TV to SmartGlass-compatible tablets and phones in the same house. In addition to the tuner, cord cutters will also need an HDTV antenna to get a signal through to their Xbox One. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Feast your eyes upon Airlander 10, a massive airship that's currently under construction in a suitably oversized hangar in England. The ginormous blimp was originally going to be deployed by the US Army for long-term surveillance, but in 2012 the project had to be canned due to delays and budgetary issues. That wasn't the end of this airship's story, though: Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAV), the craft's original designer, bought it back from the US in 2013—and now, with grants from the UK government and European Union along with a crowdfunding campaign, the world's largest aircraft will hopefully fly again. The dirigible dream, for better or worse, is one of those technological boondoggles that simply refuses to die. Airships have enough unique advantages over other types of aircraft that someone, somewhere has always been trying to create a blimp that can either be commercialized (for cargo hauling, telecommunications) or militarized (for surveillance and reconnaissance). The Airlander 10, originally dubbed the Long Endurance Multi-intelligence Vehicle (LEMV), was designed by HAV in partnership with Northrop Grumman for the US Army. If everything had gone to plan, there would have been three LEMVs hovering above Afghanistan, acting as communications relays and surveillance platforms. Only one LEMV was built before the US Army canceled the project, however. There was at least one successful test flight in New Jersey in 2012 (video embedded below), but that was it. In September 2013, Hybrid Air Vehicles bought back the LEMV from the US Army for $301,000. Work continues to reassemble the blimp in Hangar 1 at Cardington Airfield in Bedfordshire, England—which, fittingly enough, has been used for various other airship programs over the last 90 years or so. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
A while back, we covered the controversy over a few Kickstarter projects aiming to provide something in increasing demand as of late: a foolproof way to connect any Wi-Fi capable device to the Tor anonymized network. Two such Tor "travel router" projects have since become actual product: InvizBox, from a team in Ireland, and the resurrected Anonabox, which was acquired by the tech holding company Sochule. A third, called the open source PORTAL project, launched by Ryan Lackey and Marc Rogers of CloudFlare and "opsec" champion the grugq, will be getting its bow at the RSA Conference later this month. These devices are, to varying degrees, effective ways to hide from unwanted attention of all sorts. That is, they'll work short of a state actor looking to use a giant datacenter dedicated to performing all manner of de-anonymizing attacks by using the Tor takeover conspiracy model of the week, zero-day malware, or people's own simple mistakes against them. But these routers all follow slightly different approaches. Anonabox is a stunningly hands-off product that has no user interface other than its lengthy Wi-Fi password; InvizBox provides hands-off privacy with the addition of an administrative interface to apply fixes and leverage moderately more complicated Tor capabilities; and PORTAL promises to provide everything—including pluggable protocols for Tor to help it get past the most persistent state-funded nastiness. We don't have PORTAL in hand yet, but we did receive test units of Anonabox and InvizBox. To see just how effective those two pocket privacy contenders are, we ran them through a head-to-head in the most hostile network environment we know of—Ars Technology Lab's network torture chamber (otherwise known as my office... I've had to do a bit of responsible disclosure along the way). Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Tesla Motors has announced a change to its electric-powered Model S line-up: the Model S 60 is out, and the Model S 70D is in. The entry-level Model S sedan now comes equipped with a 70kWh battery (up from 60kWh) and dual motors. The configuration change extends the range of the least-expensive Model S to an EPA-rated 240 miles (about 386km), and also increases the car’s effective power to 329bhp (up from 302bhp for the RWD 60kWh version). "Entry-level" should still be enclosed in quotes, since the pricing is still targeted firmly at the luxury market—the new 70D carries a starting sticker price of $75,000. This is a bump from the 60 kWh version’s starting price of $69,900. In the United States, all of the varieties of Model S remain eligible for the US government’s $7,500 federal tax credit, and many states offer additional electric vehicle incentives on top of that which further reduce the effective costs. The model change comes on the back of a strong first quarter for Tesla Motors, with the electric car maker selling a total of 10,030 cars during the first three months of 2015—although the company still faces strong legislative challenges to its direct sales model in a number of US states (including most lately West Virginia). It also means that all three Model S configurations displayed by default on Tesla’s store page are dual-motor AWD—you can still order a rear-wheel-drive Model S 85, but the option must be manually selected. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Semi-legal video streaming app Popcorn Time is coming to iOS with a new version that can be installed without users needing to jailbreak their phones or tablets—but with all the legal risks and ethical problems of actually using it still in place. Although Popcorn Time already existed for Apple users, it required them to circumvent their devices' protections and then install a third-party alternative to the App Store, both of which voided any warranties with the manufacturer. The 1.2 Beta iOS app avoids these steps entirely. Despite not needing to jailbreak, you still won't find the app on the official iOS App Store listings—there's no way the Apple gatekeepers would ever allow it onto the platform unless it went completely legit, as anime streaming service Crunchyroll did years ago. Instead, you'll need to download a separate installer, connect your iOS device to your computer, and follow some onscreen instructions. You'll have to find out details on how to do that elsewhere—but since it doesn't require modifying your device's firmware, it shouldn't invalidate warranties. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
There are two main ways to make a living making games. You can sign up with an existing game developer, earning a salary or freelance rate to provide some small part of the art, code, or design that goes into a larger product. Or you can go the indie route, creating a game by yourself (maybe with a few people to help) and selling it directly to the consumers (maybe with the help of a publisher). Artist Bryan Shannon seems to have hit on a third path to a successful living making games, via his unique Patreon campaign. Right now, 233 members of the Cities: Skylines community are paying him to create new content for the game, to the tune of $735 per building created. He's not working for a developer, and he's not working for himself; instead, he's working for a small subset of devoted Cities: Skylines players that want to share his work with the world. In a way, Shannon's situation isn't too different from other mod makers who have built their game development careers quite literally on top of existing games. To make a living, though, those modders have traditionally had to sell their efforts directly to interested players or use freely distributed mods to get noticed and hired by an established developer. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
A Chicago man has filed a proposed class-action lawsuit against Facebook, alleging that the social networking giant is in violation of an Illinois state law that requires users to expressly consent to instances where their biometric information being used. Plaintiff Carlo Licata argues that he and countless other Illinois residents have had their rights violated under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) by Facebook's "Tag Suggestions" feature. That feature is powered by facial recognition technology, and operates without the consent of those being tagged. Licata wants the Cook County court to declare that Facebook is in violation of BIPA, ordering it to halt its practice, and to award statutory damages to the class, which has yet to be certified. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
A small town police department just outside of Boston finally agreed to pay a $500 ransom to regain access to a police server that it had been locked out of after being infected with CryptoLocker ransomware. As the name suggests, once the malware infects a computer, it encrypts the drive and can only be unlocked once the private key is entered—for which the criminals demand a ransom payment. The Tewksbury Police Department chief told its local newspaper, the Tewksbury Town Crier that those who infected the computers in early December 2014 were "terrorists." "Nobody wants to negotiate with terrorists. Nobody wants to pay terrorists," said Chief Timothy Sheehan. "We did everything we possibly could. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Picture a rock slowly orbiting the newborn star. The rock isn’t alone; its orbital path is also home to other rocks, and to plenty of gas and dust. Nothing much happens as it proceeds in its orbit. But every now and then, the rock collides with another one. When it does, the two may stick together due to gravity. It takes over a hundred thousand years of the rock drifting along its course, occasionally colliding or pulling in smaller rocks, before it can manage to double its mass. But when it reaches a tipping point, things start to happen quickly. Once the "rock" grows to a body with ten times the mass of the Earth, it starts to look a lot more attractive to the gas particles in its orbital path. It begins greedily gobbling them up and quickly growing in mass. Finally, its orbital path is cleared out, and we’re left with a gigantic sphere of gas with a rocky core. That’s how the planet Jupiter (and other gas giants) formed, according to the leading model. There is, however, a problem with that model. As the rocky mass travels through the gas in its orbital path, the gas exerts a torque on the nascent planet, theoretically causing it to lose kinetic energy. The loss sends it falling in towards its host star. And it falls faster than it can grow, potentially ending the formation of the planet altogether as the rock falls away from its supply of matter, possibly on a spiral that sends it into the host star. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Windows 10 isn't even done yet, but of course, Microsoft's planning and development process looks beyond the operating system's release to manufacturing date. A couple of reports today give a little information about what's coming after the software is released later this year. First, Neowin reports that 2016's Windows updates are codenamed "Redstone." This is, I'm told, a reference to the popular game Minecraft that Microsoft now owns after its 2014 purchase of studio Mojang. Mary Jo Foley continued with news that Windows 10 will receive an update this fall after its summer release. This fall releases still uses the codename "Threshold" that was used to refer to Windows 10 before it came to be known as Windows 10. "Redstone," reports Foley, will similarly refer to a pair of releases planned for 2016, and again, one of these will be in summer, the other fall. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Crazy Hairy Rob Lowe might need help shaving off those arm hair curtains, but he doesn't need to upgrade from cable to DirecTV, advertising industry self-regulators have ruled. Rob Lowe stars in a series of DirecTV ads that compare the standard, suave version of the actor with cable-subscribing alter egos that suffer from substantial personal problems. Super Creepy, Crazy Hairy, Painfully Awkward, and Scrawny Arms Rob Lowe all have cable; the not-creepy, mostly hairless, not-awkward, and strong arms Rob Lowe has DirecTV. Each ad ends with the better version of Rob Lowe saying, “Don’t be like this me. Get rid of cable and upgrade to DirecTV." Super Creepy Rob Lowe. Comcast didn't like the ads and lodged a complaint with the advertising industry's self-regulatory body. Comcast challenged DirecTV's claims regarding signal reliability, picture quality, customer satisfaction, and sports programming, and took issue with Rob Lowe's "Don't be like this me" statement. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
In February, Microsoft quietly applied for licensing to be a money transmitter in all 50 states as well as an assortment of current and former US territories. Banking consultant Faisal Kahn recently found an application (PDF) submitted by Microsoft at the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) to be a Money Services Business (MSB), suggesting that the company is taking next steps to develop its own mobile payments platform akin to Google Wallet (or Android Pay), Apple Pay, and the yet-to-be launched Samsung Pay. Kahn confirmed that Idaho was one of the first states to grant Microsoft a license to be a money transmitter, as listed on the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System (NMLS) registry. NMLS does not publish information on applications not yet approved by the state. In March, Microsoft announced that its forthcoming Windows 10 for phones and small tablets (a.k.a. "Windows Mobile"), would support Host Card Emulation (HCE). HCE is a method of transmitting credit card information without relying on a Secure Element embedded in a SIM. Newer Android phones use HCE to transmit NFC signals to terminals, and the benefits of the scheme mean that third-party developers can build NFC functions into their apps. The elimination of the Secure Element requirement makes the payment platform SIM-independent, and hence carrier agnostic. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), under approval from the top echelons of the Department of Justice, ran a secret, extensive phone metadata bulk collection program for over two decades, amassing billions of records, according to a new report published Tuesday in USA Today. This database had previously been revealed to a lesser extent earlier this year, but neither its operational details nor its scope had been revealed until now. The newspaper wrote: Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Not only is the FBI actively attempting to stop the public from knowing about stingrays, it has also forced local law enforcement agencies to stay quiet even in court and during public hearings, too. An FBI agreement, published for the first time in unredacted form on Tuesday, clearly demonstrates the full extent of the agency’s attempt to quash public disclosure of information about stingrays. The most egregious example of this is language showing that the FBI would rather have a criminal case be dropped to protect secrecy surrounding the stingray. Relatively little is known about how, exactly, stingrays, known more generically as cell-site simulators, are used by law enforcement agencies nationwide, although new documents have recently been released showing how they have been purchased and used in some limited instances. Worse still, cops have lied to courts about their use. Not only can stingrays be used to determine location by spoofing a cell tower, they can also be used to intercept calls and text messages. Typically, police deploy them without first obtaining a search warrant. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) announced his intent to run for United States President in 2016 on Tuesday, although the video of the announcement is currently offline due to a copyright claim filed on behalf of the song it used. In the meantime, supporters can access an online store full of Rand-branded merch. There, next to political-support knickknacks like yard signs and bumper stickers, shoppers can find a heretofore uncommon accessory in the political-fundraiser category: a "webcam blocker." Or, more specifically, an "NSA spy cam blocker," which retails for $15 and comes with a giant "RAND" logo. "That little front-facing camera on your laptop or tablet can be a window for the world to see you—whether you know it or not!" the listing's description reads. The 1.5 mm-thick item, which is "made with high-grade plastic," is advertised as ideal for your laptop, smart TV, and Xbox Kinect, and it includes a plastic slider so that users can temporarily get Paul's face out of the way for a Facetime call. However, it doesn't include any accessories to dampen or block your device's microphone; perhaps Ted Cruz can fill that fundraising-tchotchke gap in the near future. Paul's Tuesday announcement included criticism of the current administration's "warrantless searches of Americans' phones and computer records," and he told a Louisville, Kentucky crowd that he would "immediately end this unconstitutional surveillance" on his first day if elected President—in spite of criticizing President Obama's use of executive actions in the same breath. Paul may not get that chance should the Patriot Act provision enabling such surveillance not be renewed by June 1. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The FBI is advising people responsible for WordPress websites to be on the lookout for attacks carried out by individuals sympathetic to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Shams terrorist group, which is also known as the Islamic State in the Levant. The mostly unskilled attackers are exploiting known vulnerabilities that have already been patched by developers of the widely used content management system and widely used plugins—but individual Web masters have failed to install them. "Successful exploitation of the vulnerabilities could result in an attacker gaining unauthorized access, bypassing security restrictions, injecting scripts, and stealing cookies from computer systems or network servers," a public service announcement the FBI published Tuesday warned. "An attacker could install malicious software; manipulate data; or create new accounts with full user privileges for future Web site exploitation." The steady stream of vulnerabilities found in WordPress plugins, and to a lesser extent WordPress itself, make defacements and other types of website compromises largely a cut-and-paste exercise. Earlier Tuesday one such vulnerability came to light in a WordPress plugin with one million active installations. Relatively unskilled miscreants are seizing on sites that fall behind applying patches. The PSA went on to say: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The five protesters arrested after they snuck a camera into the Supreme Court and disrupted a high court session face a year in jail. It's a dramatically stiffer penalty than the one given to previous protesters who were recently prosecuted for the same offense. The 99Rise protesters are getting hit with more serious charges in a move signaling the high court's disdain over being disrupted with camera-wielding protesters twice this year. Most of the eight protesters arrested for a similar outburst in January got a day in jail and faced a maximum 60-day term. Although cameras are barred from Supreme Court sessions and onlookers must undergo a security screening, the group on April 1 managed to capture some video and uploaded it to YouTube. The group's members are protesting the high court's decisions ending political spending limits on unions and corporations. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A team of palaeontologists is claiming to have “resurrected” Brontosaurus, the famous long-necked, pot-belled dinosaur. No, they haven’t conducted some mad DNA cloning experiment. They have built a big new family tree of long-necked dinosaurs and argue that Brontosaurus is distinctive enough to be classified separately from its closest relatives. Confused? I don’t blame you. Brontosaurus is of course an iconic dinosaur. If you could only name a few dinosaurs, you would probably come up with Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, and Brontosaurus. Ever since 1903, however, you would have been mistaken in naming the last one. That was the year that palaeontologists determined that Brontosaurus was nearly identical to a dinosaur called Apatosaurus that had been discovered earlier; thus, the latter was the appropriate name to use. Needless to say, this never filtered down to pop culture. You have never needed to look far to see Brontosaurus name-dropped in films, books, postage stamps and wherever else. We scientists would sometimes secretly scoff at friends and family who used the name—a sure sign of those uninitiated to our fossil fraternity. But now it looks as though pop culture had it right all along. After all these years, Brontosaurus may now cease to be a dirty word among palaeontologists. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A lot has changed in the twenty months (has it been that long?!) since I went on my Soylent adventure in 2013, eating nothing but the packages of powdered engineered food product for five days. We weren’t the first outlet to do a multi-day Soylent binge, but as far as I know we were the only outlet to devote so many column inches to talking about how Soylent reacted to our bowels—which, let’s be honest, is what everyone really wanted to know anyway, right? In the intervening months, Soylent founder Rob Rhinehart has continued to update Soylent’s formula, tweaking the contents and altering the micro- and macronutrient blend in response to user feedback and also actual science and lab-work. The latest change, to "version 1.4," is the most significant since the product’s launch: in addition to ditching the often leaky bottles of oil, the amount of soluble fiber has been greatly reduced, from 10g per pouch to 3.9g; the total amount of fiber has been reduced from 30g to 16g per pouch. Less fiber seems to go against conventional wisdom, but reducing the bulk of soluble fiber is aimed at cutting down on Soylent’s one truly unfortunate side effect: what we called "horse-killing farts" in our last go-round. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Lithium batteries are the reigning champion in a key category of performance: energy density. This density is why they've dominated applications like portable devices and electric vehicles, where size or weight matter. But there are reasonable doubts about how much energy density can be increased using lithium, so researchers have continued to look into alternative chemistries for batteries. One of the more promising alternatives is aluminum. It's abundant, cheap, and lightweight, and each atom has the potential to liberate up to three electrons during charge/discharge cycles. Lithium can manage only one. But the batteries themselves have been disappointing so far, with performance dropping radically after a few cycles. So it's big news that researchers have now managed to craft an aluminum battery that is stable out to over 7,000 cycles—plus it's flexible and poses no fire risk. But the battery doesn't take advantage of some of aluminum's more appealing properties, so there is clearly more work to be done. One of lithium's limitations is that on its own, as a pure metal, it makes a lousy battery material. Lithium metal electrodes have a tendency to deform and/or short-circuit over charge/discharge cycles, which is why we use lithium ion batteries—the lithium is complexed with other elements, keeping the metal from causing trouble. That requirement means you need to have a distinct material for the electrodes, which adds to the weight and complexity. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
As many as a million websites could be imperiled by a critical vulnerability recently discovered in WP-Super-Cache, a WordPress plugin that generates static HTML files from dynamic WordPress blogs. The persistent cross-site scripting bug allows attackers to insert malicious code into WordPress-published pages that use the extension, according to a blog post published Tuesday by security firm Sucuri. Anyone who relies on the plug in should immediately upgrade to version 1.4.4, which has fixes for that bug and several others. Sucuri researcher Marc-Alexandre Montpas wrote: Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back with a bunch of deals for your consideration. The top item today is a Dell Inspiron 15 7000 for $599.99—and it comes with a free Dell Venue 8 Pro Tablet! Just add both to your cart and you should see the discounts at checkout. The Dell Inspiron 15 7000 has a fourth-generation Intel Core i5-4210U CPU, 6GB of RAM, a 1TB hard drive, and it runs Windows 8.1 on a 15.6-inch 1080p display. The Dell Venue 8 Pro Tablet also runs Windows 8.1 and has an Intel Atom Z3735 CPU, 1GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and an 8-inch 1280×800 display. Featured Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Anyone that plays online games has to accept the fact that the servers for those games will probably eventually be shut down by the centralized publisher that operates them (games with player-controlled server support notwithstanding). What most players probably don't expect is for their single-player game saves to become permanently unusable because an online server somewhere goes down. That's what has been happening to players of NBA2K14 this past week, though. As Polygon reports, since a planned online server shutdown for the game on March 31, previously created save files in the MyCareer and MyGM modes can no longer pass a built-in server check on the PS4 and Xbox One versions of the game. That means those files are simply unusable, and all that single player progress has effectively been lost. "This means that if you had created a MyCareer or a MyGM online save file that was once connected to our servers it too sadly has retired and is no longer available for use and it would be necessary to re-create these files as offline saves," 2K Support writes in a message to affected users, obtained by Polygon. "Sadly this may come as an inconvenience to some of you and if so we truly do understand and can feel for how upsetting this may seem as there always is a special bond that occurs between a player and their MyCareer save but all good things must come to an end and rest assured your MyCareer or MyGM went out while on top!" Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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