posted 11 days ago on ars technica
This Facebook-connectivity update appears to be rolling out to Oculus Rift users in waves as part of the headset PC software's 1.8 update. (credit: Reddit) This week saw the latest Oculus Rift software runtime begin to roll out to PC users, and the 1.8 version includes one new feature in particular: official Facebook integration. The software update is rolling out in waves, so Oculus owners may not yet have this live on their PCs, but once it rolls out, users are told that "Oculus is better with Facebook friends" and are given the option of logging in to a Facebook account. To confirm, this is wholly optional, and the service will still operate normally should users not opt in. And in some ways, this change brings Facebook up to speed with other major online gaming platforms such as Steam, Xbox Live, and PlayStation Network, which all support Facebook-specific features like searching for friends and posting updates. However, Oculus' tie-in to Facebook is different from the others in more aggressively tying FB to a gaming service, according to the Facebook-in-Oculus terms posted to the headset's official Reddit forum. For starters, should you log in to Facebook via the Oculus Rift's PC app, your username will change to your real name. If for any reason you'd rather your Oculus username continue to be your favorite gaming handle, whether for privacy's sake or just because you like the sound of it, you'll have to avoid the login. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A T-shirt design from Newegg while they were involved in litigation with a notorious patent troll. (credit: Newegg.com) If you're in the Bay Area, join us for the filming of our sixth episode of Ars Technica Live, a monthly interview series with fascinating people who work at the intersection of tech, science, and culture. It's coming up next week, Wednesday September 21, in Oakland, California, from 7 to 9pm. Ars editors Annalee Newitz and Joe Mullin will be talking to Lee Cheng, the chief legal officer of Newegg.com, about his lifelong war against patent trolls. Cheng has been the top lawyer at online retailer Newegg since 2005. More than any other corporate lawyer, Cheng has been outspoken about the need to fight “patent trolls”—shadowy entities that exist only to file patent lawsuits. Under his leadership, Newegg adopted a strategy and philosophy of “never settle,” seeing patent troll lawsuits through multi-million dollar trials in tough jurisdictions, even as his competitors paid the trolls to make them go away. Cheng and Newegg have had so much success, the company doesn’t get sued anymore. (Some potential patent trolls have even dropped litigation within a day.) At the event, we’ll be talking about how the American legal system has allowed patent trolls to thrive and what to do if a small company gets hit with a demand letter or lawsuit. Doors are at 7pm, and the live taping is from 7:30 to 8:00pm (be sure to get there early if you want a seat). After, you can stick around for informal discussion at the bar, along with delicious tiki drinks and snacks. Can't make it out to Oakland? Never fear! Episodes will be posted to Ars Technica the week after the live events. We also have a Facebook invite page. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Photo Phiend) Paul Hansmeier, one of the masterminds behind the "porn trolling" scheme known as Prenda Law, has had his license to practice law suspended indefinitely. He can't ask for his license to be reinstated for at least four years. Hansmeier and his colleague John Steele acquired copyrights to porn films and then sued thousands of "John Doe" defendants for allegedly illegal downloads of those films. Prenda Law made several million dollars before unraveling under a barrage of judicial sanctions beginning in 2013. Minnesota's Office of Lawyers Professional Responsibility asked for Hansmeier to be disbarred or suspended last year. An order (PDF) published earlier this week shows that Hansmeier has admitted to the charges and agreed to be disciplined by the Minnesota Supreme Court. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back with a big batch of deals. The top item today is an Inspiron 3650 with a Intel Core i7-6700 processor, 16GB of memory, a 2TB 7200RPM hard drive, and an AMD Radeon HD R9 360 for $579. The one oddity is that it ships with Windows 7 Professional, but you also get a Windows 10 license should you want to upgrade. We've got that and many more deals below. Dell Inspiron 3650 Intel Core i7-6700 SKYLAKE Quad-Core Win7 Pro Desktop (16GB/2TB) + AMD R9 360 GPU for $579 (use code: DELLDT579 - list price $1102.99). Amazon Fire HD6 6" 8GB Tablet (Amazon Certified Refurb w/ 1yr Warranty) for $50.39 (use code: TECHBAR10 - list price $69.99). 60" Vizio 1080p 120Hz LED Smart HDTV + $250 Dell Gift Card for $649.99 (list price $729.99). Pre-order discount! New 2nd Gen Amazon Dot Echo Bluetooth Speaker w/ Alexa Voice & Home Automation Support for $49.99 (Buy 5 Get 1 Free use code: DOT6PACK). 50% off NordVPN VPN 1-Year Service for $48 (Use code: GEEK50 - list price $96). PCMag Editor's choice for VPN. Panama based VPN server with 500 servers worldwide. No logs policy, double-encryption and ultra-fast servers for video streaming. Apple iPhone 7 Pre-orders - Ships starting 9/16: Trade-in an iPhone 6/Plus 6s/Plus and get a iPhone 7 32GB for $0. T-Mobile: Pre-order here: Discount on iPhone 7 Plus with Trade-in. Verizon: Pre-order here AT&T Wireless: Pre-Order here Sprint: Pre-order here: Waived Activation Fee For more Smartphone Computer deals, visit the TechBargains site. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images News) According to officials tasked with keeping the US homeland safe, tape should be the first supply atop everybody's safety list. Tape made its modern-day US security debut in February 2003, when the George W. Bush administration raised the terror alert level to "orange." The Department of Homeland Security soon urged Americans to have plenty of duct tape and plastic sheeting on hand to seal their windows in the event a "dirty bomb" was discharged. Today, that leftover tape can now help us stave off a webcam hack—at least an attack that secretly films unsuspecting computer users. That's what James Comey, the Federal Bureau of Investigation director, said Wednesday. In April, he told Americans that he puts tape on his webcam. Now it's your turn. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Microsoft) In June, Microsoft started to make aggressive claims about the battery life of its Edge browser, especially in streaming media scenarios. Opera fought back, claiming that its battery saver mode pushed it ahead of Microsoft's browser. With the release of Chrome 53, Google is claiming substantial improvements in battery life, too. Microsoft isn't willing to drop the battery life issue, however, and the company has published new scores that show the latest version of Edge in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update maintains a considerable advantage, at least in the company's Netflix-based streaming media test. Playing a video repeatedly, Edge lasted 527 minutes, compared to 429 minutes in Opera with battery saver, 365 in Chrome 53, and a measly 312 in Firefox 48. The testing also suggested that the Windows 10 Anniversary Update itself may be helping computers use less power. The difference wasn't great, but Opera 39 on the Anniversary Update beat Opera 38 on the 2015 Fall Update, suggesting that the operating system is being more frugal. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) The two Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission have refused to give Congress documents needed to complete an investigation into the FCC's net neutrality rulemaking process, according to a lawmaker. "Your refusal to cooperate with the Committee's request is unacceptable, it obstructs our investigation, and it prevents the Committee from having a complete or accurate understanding of the circumstances surrounding this rulemaking," US Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Maryland) wrote in a letter to FCC Commissioners Ajit Pai and Michael O'Rielly yesterday. There are "serious questions" about "Pai's efforts to organize opposition to the proposed rule with outside parties," Cummings' office said in a related press release. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Social media, via China Daily) China's Mid-Autumn Festival started today, as much of the world now knows due to a runaway inflatable moon incident reported yesterday (as seen below). Celebrated on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—corresponding to the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox—the holiday is commemorated in Chinese culture through the exchange and sharing of moon cakes. That escaped moon, blown loose by typhoon winds in Fuzhou. The cakes are round pastries filled with lotus seed paste or red bean paste and occasionally the salted yolk of a duck egg surrounded by a thin crust. They are traditionally given as presents by businesses and are in huge demand in much of China and in Chinese communities around the world leading up to the festival. And that's likely what drove four employees of the Chinese e-commerce site Alibaba to exploit a weakness in an internal company website offering discounted mooncakes to company staff. Alibaba offered its employees one free mooncake each—complete with a plush Alibaba mascot hidden inside, rather than the traditional duck yolk. Additional cakes were sold at cost to employees for friends and family through an internal e-commerce page. But as China Daily reports, the four employees—software engineers at the company—were able to surreptitiously insert additional software into the website, directing extra mooncakes to themselves. Alibaba's internal security team detected the hack and found that the four were "cheating using technology" to amass 124 boxes of the cakes (with four cakes per box). All four employees were dismissed. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / An artist’s impression shows the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the image between the planet and Proxima itself. (credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser) As of last month, we're pretty certain there's an Earth-mass planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to Earth. This raises a rather obvious question: can it support life? The planet, Proxima Centauri b, orbits within its star’s habitable zone, the distance at which water might exist in liquid form. Whether there is any liquid present depends in part on whether the planet supports an atmosphere, and that is a hard question to answer. If Proxima Centauri b had formed near its present orbit, it might have seen its early atmosphere blown away during one of its host star’s more active phases. But researchers know frustratingly little about the evolution of red dwarf stars like Proxima Centauri. Furthermore, the planet might have formed further out and migrated inwards later, in which case the star's activity wouldn't matter. Since we can't reason out whether there's an atmosphere, the alternative is to look for one. This isn’t as easy as it sounds. Despite being the closest star, it’s still about 4.25 light-years away, far enough to be an observational challenge. According to a manuscript posted to the arXiv however, we’re set to launch the tool we'd need in 2018: the James Webb Space Telescope. Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Congresswoman Robin Kelly) The "organic versus conventional farming" debate that runs in hipster circles often ignores a hugely important aspect of agriculture: how either method impacts crop yields. It's pretty easy to rail against the evils of synthetic pesticides when the biggest ramification of your views is having to walk half a block out of your way or spend an extra $1.50 for an all-organic, non-GMO, shade grown, free-range, kale smoothie instead of a regular one. But it's not quite as simple when trying to grow enough calories to sustain our planet’s growing population on a shrinking number of arable acres. A radical new venture, undertaken in rural China in 2009, has helped maximize crop yields, getting them within a hair of their theoretical maximum. And it didn't rely on any fancy new chemicals or technologies. Rather, it “deployed several time-honored education-extension methods coupled with innovative outreach mechanisms.” In other words, scientists moved in with and tutored the farmers. In 2009, professors and graduate students from China Agricultural University went to live in farming communities in Quzhou County, about 300 miles south of Beijing. In order to determine why crop yields were so much lower than they could be, the scientists devised a clever experimental design: they asked the farmers. It turns out the farmers were not planting the best seed varieties for their local soil, they were not planting them at the optimal densities, and they were not applying fertilizers properly. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
On Tuesday, Mobileye revealed that it ended its relationship with Tesla because the company because "it was pushing the envelope in terms of safety." Mobileye's CTO and co-founder Amnon Shashua told Reuters that the electric vehicle maker was using his company's machine vision sensor system in applications for which it had not been designed. "No matter how you spin it, (Autopilot) is not designed for that. It is a driver assistance system and not a driverless system," Shashua said. In a statement to Reuters, Tesla said that it has "continuously educated customers on the use of the features, reminding them that they’re responsible to keep their hands on the wheel and remain alert and present when using Autopilot" and that the system has never been described as autonomous or self-driving. (This statement appears to be at odds with statements made by Musk at shareholder meetings.) Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A Standard Missile 6 launches to engage an over-the-horizon threat as part of the US Navy’s first live fire demonstration to successfully test the integration of the F-35 with existing Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air (NIFC-CA) architecture on September 12. (credit: US Army) In a test at the White Sands Missile Range this week, an unmodified Marine Corps F-35B fighter successfully acted as an airborne spotter for the Navy's Aegis Weapon System, locking onto and passing targeting information for an "over the horizon" threat to a Standard 6 missile. The missile, launched by the USS Desert Ship—a Navy ground facility at White Sands that emulates an Aegis-equipped cruiser or guided missile destroyer—"successfully detected and engaged the target," according to a statement issued by the Navy's Program Executive Office-Integrated Warfare Systems. The test showed that all F-35 fighters can connect into the Navy's current version of the Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air (NIFC-CA) network architecture. What that means is that the radar systems aboard the F-35s now making their way out to the Marine Corps and Navy will be able to act as extensions of Navy ships, allowing them to pass targeting data on incoming aircraft, drones, and cruise or ballistic missiles to Ticonderoga-class cruisers and Arleigh Burke class destroyers, who can then in turn push a button and launch an SM6 (also known as the RIM-174 Standard Extended Range Active Missile)—a missile with an effective range of up to 250 nautical miles (460 kilometers, 290 miles)—to take out the threat. Additionally, the same integration could allow the F-35 to target ships and other surface targets for missile strikes from an Aegis ship. Aegis is the weapon system first deployed in the 1980s aboard the USS Ticonderoga. It is the backbone of the surface Navy's air and missile defense capabilities, originally developed to work with the giant SPY-1 phased-array radar systems deployed aboard the Ticonderoga and its sister ships. But Aegis's software has been gradually extended to take in targeting information from a broad collection of other sources and has even been adapted for ballistic missile defense, including a current land-based Aegis system in Romania and a future "Aegis Ashore" ballistic missile defense site in Poland. Ars will be taking a deeper look at Aegis and ballistic missile defense in an upcoming feature. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The different Broken Isles have their own stories, and characters to encounter. World of Warcraft’s Legion expansion goes out of its way to make you—the nameless, wandering hero who's nearly identical to 8 million other death knights, priests, paladins, and the like—feel like you are special. Even before the expansion launched, it softened the field for this idea, through the deaths of heroes who had household names in Azeroth. Tirion Fordring, Vol'jin, and Varian Wrynn: poof, all gone in a flurry of green fire and (in at least two cases) horrible screaming. There's no time to mourn the dead, however, because you're in charge now. You, yes you. The leader of the warriors, mages, hunters, rogues, or whatever other class you selected as far back as 11 years ago. Me? I'm the leader of the all the monks of Azeroth. The shamans, too, since I rolled a second character sometime in the many, many hours I've spent with Legion over the past few weeks. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: sikeri) The US Supreme Court says the online ads portal Backpage.com will have to comply with a subpoena and produce documents as part of the Senate's investigation into sex ads and human trafficking. The development comes days after Chief Justice John Roberts had temporarily blocked an appellate decision ordering Backpage to comply with the investigation that demands information about the site's editorial practices as they relate to reviewing ads posted by third parties. The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations maintains that the site is a launchpad for the exploitation of children. The eight-member high court did not comment about why it lifted its stay (PDF) other than to say that Justice Samuel Alito did not participate. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A schematic showing the Tiangong-2 space station, along with its launch vehicle and the crewed spacecraft that will visit it later this year. (credit: Xinhua) China will take its next step toward a large space station on Thursday, when it intends to launch the Tiangong-2 laboratory into orbit. The 8.5-ton, 10.4-meter-long facility will launch from the Jiuquan launch center in the Gobi Desert, aboard a Long March 2-F rocket. The launch is set for 10:04am ET (15:04pm BST) Thursday, and live video may be available at this link. This space station, "Heavenly Palace 2," will be China's second after it launched the similarly sized Tiangong-1 laboratory in 2011. Following this week's launch, China plans to send two taikonauts to Tiangong-2 in four to six weeks aboard a Shenzhou-11 spacecraft. They will live there for about a month, testing out the lab's life support systems and performing scientific research. According to China's official news service, Xinhua, those experiments will involve areas of medicine, physics, and biology, as well as quantum key transmission, space atomic clock, and solar storm research. As part of its robust space plan, China intends to scale up to a full-size space station during the next decade. To help lay the groundwork for that station, Chinese space officials have said they will launch the country's first robotic resupply mission, Tianzhou-1 ("Heavenly vessel"), in 2017, to the Tiangong-2 lab. The larger, modular station China is planning may have a mass of about 60 tons. That would be considerably larger than the Tiangdong laboratories but still moderately sized compared to the 420-ton International Space Station. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
For many science journalists, a week would not be complete without one or more trips to the Eurekalert website. Put together by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Eurekalert is one-stop-shopping for press releases about the latest scientific findings, aggregating material provided by scientific journals, research institutions, and more. If you're an established science journalist, you can also sign up for access to news before it's news. Log in with the right credentials, and you can see press releases and, in many cases, entire research papers up to a week before they're unleashed on the public. You just have to agree to never publish anything about the work until a specific date and time—the information is under an embargo until then. Late Tuesday night, however, access to the site vanished, replaced by a notice that the site had been hacked and that the hackers had started leaking embargoed press releases. Only two releases made it out before access was pulled, and if those are anything to go on, the hackers have absolutely no sense of what makes for cutting-edge science. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) After trying something new with the Blaze pseudo-smartwatch, Fitbit's most recent endeavor is an upgrade to one of its most popular devices. The Charge 2 has already booted the Charge HR from Fitbit's website, and rightly so since it's essentially a refined version of the original tracker. Launched with the new style-conscious Flex 2, the $150 Charge 2 lies smack in the middle of Fitbit's family in terms of price and features. It does everything the Charge HR did, with a larger display and new swappable band options, and it can now also track estimated VO2 max and guide you through interval training exercises. But are those new features enough to persuade current Charge HR users to upgrade? Should new users give Fitbit a try with this device? Design: Familiar, with more choices With its 1.5-inch OLED display and attached band, the Charge 2 looks much like a stretched-out Fitbit Alta. Unlike the Charge HR, the Charge 2 has interchangeable bands so you can detach both sides of the band from the center module and replace them with differently colored and textured options. While it doesn't have the ostentatious jewelry options that the Flex 2 has, you can get the Charge 2 in black, purple, blue, and teal, as well as two "special edition" options, one with rose gold accents on the module and a lavender band and one with black module accents and a black textured band. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A LinkNYC user making a phone call on the kiosk's tablet. (credit: LinkNYC) The operators of free Internet kiosks in New York City plan to disable Web browsing on publicly available tablets after reports of "lewd acts," such as people watching porn and masturbating. LinkNYC kiosks have been replacing New York pay phones, offering free Wi-Fi access and a tablet that can be used by anyone who doesn't have their own mobile device. But LinkNYC announced today that it "will be removing Web browsing on all Link tablets while we work with the City and community to explore potential solutions, like time limits." The tablets will still offer free phone calls, maps, and access to emergency services. New Yorkers can also continue to connect their own devices to LinkNYC Wi-Fi hotspots. But browsing on the publicly accessible tablets is being restricted after some disturbing reports. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Add former Secretary of State Colin Powell to the list of high-ranking Washington insiders whose leaked e-mails are rankling their peers with just weeks to go before the US presidential election. DC Leaks, a site that researchers at security firm ThreatConnect have linked to the Russian government, has published 26 months of Powell's e-mails, spanning from June 2014 to last month, news organizations reported Wednesday. The trove, which contains highly candid comments lambasting presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, are part of a new batch that's separate from Powell e-mails leaked a few years ago. Powell aides reportedly confirmed the new compromise, telling The New York Times that the leaked messages "are his e-mails." In the e-mails, Powell describes Trump as a "national disgrace" and portrays the candidate as someone who is unfit to be president. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Pluto's moon Charon (colors enhanced). (credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI) Last year’s close-up photos of Pluto from the New Horizons probe were a revelation, but don’t forget the dwarf planet’s proportionally sizable moon Charon. The surface of that world presented its own puzzles of geology and history. For starters, Charon sported a dark and dusty red cap at its illuminated northern pole. A later image taken looking back at the moon's dark southern pole, dimly lit by “Pluto-shine,” showed that the pole was also darker—perhaps due to a similar reddish cap. The early hypothesis was that, similar to dark regions of Pluto’s surface, this cap was a thin residue that solid organic compounds formed from reactions of gases catalyzed by incoming solar radiation and charged particles. There's just one problem with this idea: Pluto is the one with the gases, not Charon… Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Yuri_Arcurs) US Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) yesterday proposed legislation that would allow cities and towns to build their own Internet services even in states that have laws restricting municipal broadband. Eshoo's Community Broadband Act of 2016 comes a month after the states of North Carolina and Tennessee won a federal appeals court ruling preserving laws preventing municipal broadband providers from expanding outside their territories. The Federal Communications Commission had tried to overturn the laws, which remain in place in about 20 states. “I’m disappointed that a recent court ruling blocked the FCC’s efforts to allow local communities to decide for themselves how best to ensure that their residents have broadband access,” Eshoo said in an announcement. “Rather than restricting local communities in need of broadband, we should be empowering them to make the decisions they determine are in the best interests of their constituents. Too many Americans still lack access to quality, affordable broadband and community broadband projects are an important way to bring this critical service to more citizens.” Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Sean Gallagher) Traditional desktop Windows applications can now be distributed and sold through the Windows Store, with note-taking application Evernote being one of the first to use this new capability. Until now, applications built for and sold through the Windows Store in Windows 10 have been built for the Universal Windows Platform (UWP), the common set of APIs that spans Windows 10 across all the many devices it supports. This has left one major category of application, the traditional desktop application built using the Win32 API, behind. Announced at Build 2015, codename Project Centennial—now officially titled the Desktop App Converter—is Microsoft's solution to this problem. It allows developers to repackage existing Win32 applications with few or no changes and sell them through the store. Applications packaged this way aren't subject to all the sandbox restrictions that UWP applications are, ensuring that most will work unmodified. But they are also given the same kind of clean installation, upgrading, and uninstallation that we've all come to expect from Store-delivered software. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: The Advance Guard) New York City officials yesterday notified Verizon that the company is in default of an agreement to bring fiber connections to all households in the city and could file a lawsuit against the company.   The road to a potential lawsuit has been a long one. In June 2015, New York released an audit that found Verizon failed to meet a commitment to extend FiOS to every household in the five boroughs by June 2014. City officials and Verizon have been trying to resolve the matter since then with no success, as Verizon says that it hasn't actually broken the agreement. The default letter (full text) sent yesterday by the city Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications (DoITT) says Verizon has failed to pass all residential buildings in the city with fiber. As of October 2015, there were at least 38,551 addresses where Verizon hadn't fulfilled installation service requests that were more than a year old, the letter said. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Just some of the smartwatches that will be getting Pokémon Go soon if recent reports are accurate. The Apple Watch version of Pokémon Go announced last week likely won't be the only smartwatch-powered version of the game. Recent reports suggest the hit mobile game will be coming to Android Wear as well in the near future. The digital excavators at Pokémon Go Hub unearthed evidence of an in-progress Android Wear version of the game in a decompiled copy of the latest Android smartphone update. Those source files include multiple references to Google's Android Wear utility services and code to send data from smartphone to smartwatch via AES encryption. The code even contains functions to adjust the experience based on the smartwatch's capabilities to account for the wide range of Android Wear products available. Then, just yesterday, Niantic CEO John Hanke put some more weight behind the uncovered code, telling a TechCrunch Disrupt audience that an Android Wear version of the game is "pretty likely." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars plays Pac-Man Championship Edition 2. (video link) Long after arcades faded from the height of pop culture, but well before cheap apps and microtransactions ruled the gaming world, there was a pretty amazing transitional period for cheap, quick-blast gaming: the world of Xbox Live Arcade. Microsoft's service launched on the Xbox 360 with low-priced apps and a reliance on arcade classics, and shortly after its debut, Pac-Man proved it out as a great place for new, arcade-inspired experiences. Pac-Man Championship Edition garnered praise and sales in equal measure in 2007 for putting a lovely "modern-retro" spin on the series, and in 2010, that game's tweaks got their own tweaks in a "DX" update of the game. Six years later, Namco has returned with one more pass in the form of Tuesday's Pac-Man Championship Edition 2. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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