posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / US President Donald Trump. (credit: Getty Images | Win McNamee ) President Donald Trump today suggested that the Federal Communications Commission should challenge an NBC license because of "fake news." "With all of the Fake News coming out of NBC and the Networks, at what point is it appropriate to challenge their License? Bad for country!" Trump tweeted. FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel offered a brief response to Trump, saying that's "not how it works" and linking to a manual that discusses the FCC's regulation of broadcast radio and TV licenses. (We asked Rosenworcel to expand on her thoughts but haven't heard back yet.) Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Bing blog) Bing users in search of their next Netflix binge may now have an easier time finding the perfect show. Microsoft announced a few updates to its search engine through a blog post, with one of them being entertainment search results showing content options from streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. The update makes Bing smarter and better able to give you suggestions based on entertainment-related searches. Bing will show up-to-date information about trending search topics like “fall 2017 TV premieres,” as well as service-specific topics like “trending movies on Netflix.” Results show up in a carousel at the top of the results page, separated from webpage links, much like visual results in Google’s search engine. An image in the blog post shows that you can further filter search results by year, genre, and show rating. Bing now also has a new “My Saves” section where you can save images and videos for later reference. To save media to your Saves section, you’ll only need to hover over the image or video and press the small plus icon that appears. Saves appears to be similar to a media-specific bookmark collection, with the option to make specific folders based on the types of media you want access to quickly (one folder in an image on the Bing blog is entirely dedicated to “favorite cat videos”). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Kaspersky Lab) The rapidly evolving story about Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab's involvement in helping Russian government hackers steal sensitive National Security Agency materials has taken yet another turn, as The Wall Street Journal reports that the assistance could have come only with the company's knowledge. Wednesday's report, citing unnamed current and former US officials, said the help came in the form of modifications made to the Kaspersky antivirus software that's used by more than 400 million people around the world. Normally, the programs scan computer files for malware. "But in an adjustment to its normal operations that the officials say could only have been made with the company's knowledge, the program searched for terms as broad as 'top secret,' which may be written on classified government documents, as well as the classified code names of US government programs, these people said." The report is the latest to detail a 2015 event in which an NSA worker—described as a contractor by the WSJ and an employee in articles from The Washington Post—sneaked classified materials out of the agency and onto an Internet-connected computer that had Kaspersky AV installed on it. The WSJ, WaPo, and The New York Times have all reported that hackers working for the Russian government were able to home in on the documents with the help of the Kaspersky software. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Gary Whitta co-wrote Rogue One and has written screenplays for movies starring Will Smith and Denzel Washington. Plus he writes comics and novels! (credit: Gary Whitta) What’s it like to work as a professional geek in Hollywood? Find out from Gary Whitta, who started as a humble gamer and become the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Along the way, he worked on movies with Will Smith and Denzel Washington and helped create the Walking Dead game. He’ll discuss his experiences writing movies, as well as what it's like to tell new stories set in a beloved fan-favorite franchise. Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz in conversation with Gary Whitta at the next Ars Technica Live on October 18 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland. Gary is the former Editor-in-Chief of PC Gamer magazine and now an award-winning screenwriter and author, best known as the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. He also wrote the post-apocalyptic thriller The Book of Eli starring Denzel Washington, co-wrote the Will Smith sci-fi adventure After Earth, and served as writer and story consultant on Telltale Games’ adaptation of The Walking Dead, for which he was the co-recipient of a BAFTA award for Best Story. Gary has written multiple episodes of Disney XD’s animated series Star Wars Rebels. Most recently, he wrote the feature film adaptation of the Eisner award-winning comic-book series Mouse Guard for 20th Century Fox. His first novel, Abomination, was recently published to critical acclaim. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Mark Zuckerberg shows off the "infinite screens" you can get on the Oculus Rift. SAN JOSE—At the Oculus Connect conference today, Facebook head of VR Hugo Barra announced that the Rift and Touch controller bundle would be permanently reduced to $399, following a temporary drop to that price during the Summer of Rift promotion in July and August. Barra said that promotion was a "huge success" that saw the Rift community "grow a lot," through he did not share specific sales numbers. The Rift/Touch combo was being sold for $799 as recently as February, before dropping to $598 in March. That cost doesn't include the PC needed to power the hardware, which has also been dropping in price throughout the year. The permanent price drop comes on top of the announcement of Oculus Go, a standalone, $199 wireless headset being billed as a "sweet spot" between mobile and tethered PC VR, due early next year. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: The City of Toronto) The Internet Archive is an online library known for pushing the boundaries of copyright law to promote public access to obscure works, including classic video games and historic images. Now the organization is taking advantage of a little-noticed provision of the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act to publish complete copies of out-of-print books published between 1923 and 1941. The organization has cheekily named this the "Sonny Bono Memorial Collection." The group hopes that the move will inspire other libraries to follow its lead, making hundreds of thousands of books from the mid-20th Century available for download. Congress passed the controversial law in 1998 under heavy lobbying from major content holders. The law is the reason Mickey Mouse, Batman, and Gone with the Wind haven't fallen into the public domain—all had copyrights that were due to expire between 1999 and 2017—until Congress intervened. The 1998 law was championed by big companies and the estates of famous authors and artists. But critics pointed out that it would needlessly limit public access to more obscure works—works that were out of print and therefore not generating any income for the authors or their heirs. And Congress was passing the law just as digitization technology and the Internet were making it possible to give these works a second life as free downloads. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Mark Zuckerberg at Oculus Connect 4 in San Jose, California. (credit: Sam Machkovech) SAN JOSE, Calif.—On stage at the Oculus Connect 4 conference, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg took the wraps off of Oculus Go, the company's first "sweet spot" standalone headset. Zuckerberg announced it would launch "early next year" at a price of $199. The announcement followed Zuckerberg's statement that Oculus wants to get one billion people using its virtual reality products. (Yes, that was a B, as in boy.) He admitted how lofty that goal is, saying, "If we're going to get a billion people in VR, we have to work on both affordability and quality. We have to find the sweet spot in the middle. The high quality experience that doesn't tether anybody to a PC." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Pasieka) Cable Internet with download and upload speeds of 10Gbps may eventually come to American homes thanks to a new specification for higher-speed, symmetrical data transmissions. The industry's R&D consortium, CableLabs, today announced that it has completed the Full Duplex Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification, an update to DOCSIS 3.1. The completion of the 10Gbps full duplex spec comes 18 months after the project was unveiled. The completion of the spec doesn't mean you'll suddenly be getting multi-gigabit uploads and downloads, as commercial deployments may be at least a couple of years away and may not initially provide the maximum speeds allowed by the spec.  Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Nissan A few years back, I wrote a feature titled "Why you’ll never drive your car with a joystick." Today, I learned I spoke too soon (and that Ars' Creative Director Aurich Lawson is prophetic). Over in the UK, Nissan and a company called JLB Design have finally done it. Courtesy of Carbuyer, I learned of a tie-in with the soon-to-be-released Gran Turismo Sport, wherein JLB converted a Nissan GT-R to be controlled by a DualShock 4 controller rather than the normal steering wheel and pedals. What's more, it's a completely remote-controlled GT-R—renamed the GT-R/C—as demonstrated by Nissan racing driver Jann Mardenborough, who drove the car around the Silverstone racing circuit from the passenger seat of a helicopter circling above. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge Jony Ive, Apple's chief design officer, might want to take a lesson in creativity from Apple's lawyers. The iPhone is beautiful, and we all know that. But Apple's response to an App Store antitrust lawsuit brought by consumers may take your breath away. Cupertino argues that it should not have to face a class-action lawsuit that accuses the iPhone maker of overcharging consumers for iOS apps in the Apple App Store (a monopolistic environment, the suit claims). The core argument in Apple's defense is so creative that the Supreme Court on Tuesday asked President Donald Trump's administration for its views on whether Apple's position before the Supreme Court is correct. The antitrust ABCs But before we get to how Ive is being one-upped on the creativity scale by others on Apple's payroll, we first must start with a basic understanding of the nuanced legal framework of antitrust law. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Because not all water can come from the Britta or fridge filter, after all. (credit: Wodicka/ullstein bild via Getty Images) Detecting the agents of disease is often really hard. Imagine that you live in a village in a developing country. You may not have electricity, and your water comes via a well of unknown quality. Is the lining in that well sufficient to keep shallow, polluted groundwater from seeping in? No matter how good your well-building skills are, you still need to regularly test drinking water to ensure that it is safe. A new development in detecting bacterial nasties has scientists saying there's a solution, one that looks like high-tech litmus paper. But I'm not so sure it's all it's cracked up to be. Testing your water I have a brother who runs a non-governmental organization devoted to water safety and sanitation. On his last visit, he entertained my kids by testing the water from the local canal. Essentially, you put a sample of water in a test tube and put another on a plate with some bacteria food. The plate and test tube are left in a nice warm place for 24 hours. In the absence of electricity, this involves taping the samples in your armpit. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Looks relatively easy to build with common household items... One of my favorite Onion articles ever is about a down-on-his-luck man who tried to build a PlayStation 2 in his home workshop as a Christmas present for his game-loving son. I bring that up because Oculus has released open source plans and files for its second Rift Development Kit on Github under a Creative Commons Attribution license. The release comes more than three years after the DK2 started selling for $350 (or what ended up being much more on the second-hand market). The CAD drawings, firmware files, and electrical schematics technically provide everything you need to know to build the early, 960x1080 Rift prototype from a recovered Galaxy Note 3 screen assembly. There are plans for the tracking sensor, multi-part USB cable, and even the original packaging. That said, Oculus engineer Nirav Patel warns in a blog post that "some of the components of DK2 are challenging or impossible to source today, so it may not be possible for an individual to build a full headset from the provided files." That said, "we hope that parts of this release are useful though as learnings if nothing else!" In that same blog post, Patel also mentions cancelled plans for a "DKHD" dev kit that was "smaller and lighter than DK1 and had a fantastic pixel density." Those spec improvements were scuttled in the follow-up dev kit in favor of improved pixel persistence, refresh rates, latency, and tracking for what would become the DK2. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Kinda striking, don't you think? (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: Logitech Craft Colour Grey, aluminium Dimensions 32mm x 430mm x 149mm Weight 960g Connectivity Logitech Unifying 2.4GHz, Bluetooth Low Energy Software Support Mac OS 10.11 and above and Windows 7 and above Features USB Type-C charging, backlight, digital crown, 10m wireless range, Easy Switch Price £179/$199 The Surface Dial, a hockey-puck-sized controller designed for use with Microsoft's Surface Studio desktop computer, is the palette to the Surface's pen. It clicks, double clicks and rotates, adding contextual menus and smooth navigation to apps such as Maps and Adobe Photoshop without the need to reach for a mouse. Unfortunately—despite some third-party alternatives—there's nothing as slick as a Surface Dial available to creative types at home on a Mac. That's where the Logitech Craft comes in. Priced at a substantial £179, the Logitech Craft is a premium keyboard armed with a "crown," that allows for the same clicks, double clicks and twists that make the Surface Dial so compelling, without the need to splash out on a Surface Desktop to go with it. While there are some odd limitations to the crown's functionality, at least at launch, it's a compelling companion to the keyboard and mouse. It helps that the Craft is beautifully made. The main body is constructed from a sturdy matte grey plastic, while a heavy aluminium bar at the top adds weight, a comfortable tilt (although it's sadly not adjustable), and the crown itself, which sits just above the escape key to the left of the keyboard. The Craft is a heavy thing with solid rubber feet that, once placed down on a desk, reassuringly stays put. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / UTUADO, PUERTO RICO - OCTOBER 06: Jose Javier Santana holds a Puerto Rican flag he found on the ground after Hurricane Maria passed through. (credit: Getty | Joe Raedle ) After Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico on September 20, the nation’s drug supply and hospitals should brace for their own beating in the next two to three weeks, head of the US Food and Drug Administration Scott Gottlieb warned in an interview with Reuters Tuesday. With more than four dozen FDA-approved pharmaceutical plants, Puerto Rico manufactures 10 percent of drugs prescribed in the US. The list of drugs made there includes 13 of the world’s top-selling brand-name drugs, such as Humira, the rheumatoid arthritis drug, and Xarelto, a blood thinner for stroke prevention, the New York Times reported. Some of the medicines made there are made nowhere else. “Some of these products are critical to Americans,” Scott Gottlieb told a congressional panel last week. “A loss of access could have significant public health consequences.” Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Falcon 9 first stage being used Wednesday first flew in February, 2017, on a the CRS-10 space station supply mission. (credit: SpaceX) Fresh off a successful launch on Monday from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base, SpaceX will go for a second mission in three days on Wednesday from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. With a two-hour launch window that opens at 6:53pm ET, SpaceX will attempt to launch the EchoStar 105/SES-11 communications satellite to geostationary transfer orbit. Weather conditions in Florida look fine this evening The highlight of Wednesday's mission is the company's re-use of a previously flown first stage booster. This rocket first flew in February, when it launched a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station and subsequently returned to a landing zone along the Florida coast. This is only the third time SpaceX has launched what it terms a "flight proven" booster. Luxembourg-based satellite operator SES has been one of SpaceX's most faithful customers, having previously employed a used booster. SES has repeatedly demonstrated confidence in the rocket company's ability to make reusable launch technology safe. And with three successful reuse flights, it will probably become easier for SpaceX to find customers for future "flight proven" rockets. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - APRIL 22: Electric car from Car2Go fleet charges batteries near Dam Square on April 22, 2017 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. As of 31 December 2016, there were 113,636 highway legal light-duty plug-in electric vehicles registered in the Netherlands. (Photo by Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images) On Tuesday, the fractured Dutch government announced a coalition of several leading parties and put forward a roadmap for the Netherlands’ future. Besides reaffirming country's support of the EU and offering tax and immigration plans, the coalition said that it wanted all new cars to be zero-emissions vehicles by 2030. The coalition also called for more aggressive emissions goals in general—specifically, a 49 percent reduction in the country’s CO2 emissions compared to 1990 levels by 2030, according to EU Observer. The Netherlands is hardly the first country to float a fossil-fuel-burning vehicle ban. France has said it wants to ban the sale of gas and diesel vehicles by 2040, and China and the UK have followed suit (although China has not yet articulated a timeline for its ban). California’s governor has also floated the idea of a zero-emissions mandate for cars sold in the state. The Netherlands, like France, also called for the closure of all coal plants within the country by 2030 and for increased use of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to help the country reach its 49 percent CO2 reductions goals. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(video link) Welcome to the first episode of our new anthropology video series, Ancient People Did Stuff. We thought of naming this series something portentous like Amazing Origins or Ancient Wonders, but the fact is that our real, scientifically-verifiable history is pretty mundane. Most of the time, humans were doing ordinary things like hunting, farming, building houses, and, well, using the toilet. That's why we called the series Ancient People Did Stuff. It's a humble title, slightly goofy, and a reminder that our distant ancestors were mostly just puttering around. More importantly, it's a nod to the realities of science, because the vast majority of what archaeologists excavate is debris from everyday life. And that's what the series is about: what regular people were doing during the long, strange history of our species from the Pleistocene to the present. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Still looks Kindle-ish. (credit: Amazon) Amazon launched a revamped version of its Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday. The new device will remain the highest-end model in Amazon’s popular Kindle series, but it comes with a host of tweaks compared to the previous Oasis, which launched in early 2016. The reader now has a 7-inch e-ink display, a full inch larger than its predecessor. Amazon says that display will still sport 300 pixels per inch, so text should be just as sharp as before. Perhaps the most welcome news for Kindle diehards is that the new Oasis is waterproof. Amazon says the device is IPX8 rated, which means it should survive being dunked in more than two meters of water for up to 60 minutes. Though it’s lamentable that such waterproofing is still limited to Amazon’s priciest Kindle, the addition is long overdue; competing manufacturers like Kobo have sold waterproof e-readers for years now. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) Here at Ars, I've made no secret of my love for wagons or my regard for the current generation of Chevrolet Corvette. Now, thanks to the clever people at Callaway Cars, it's possible to get both of those in one carbon-fiber package: the Callaway AeroWagen. The AeroWagen is the latest product from a company that has been tuning Corvettes—with GM's blessing and warranty—for the past three decades. The coolest bit is that the carbon fiber AeroWagen hatch is a straight swap for the stock rear hatch of the current C7 Corvette. The modification will bump the 'Vette's cargo capacity by a couple of cubic feet, but perhaps more importantly, it transforms what was already one of the best-looking front-engined sports cars on the market into that rare automotive beast, the shooting brake. Jonathan Gitlin Callawho? It is easy to forget just how far American performance cars have come in the past couple of decades. The latest-generation Corvette is an extremely good sports car, whether you opt for the regular 'Vette, hotter Grand Sport, or Z06. And the recently deceased Dodge Viper ACR remains one of the fastest road-legal ways around a race track, up to and including the Green Hell. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: GM) General Motors has acquired Strobe, a lidar startup that could give the giant automaker a leg up in the race to make self-driving cars a mainstream technology. Kyle Vogt, founder of the self-driving car startup Cruise (which GM acquired last year), announced the acquisition in a Monday blog post. Lidar—short for light radar—is widely seen as a key sensor technology for self-driving cars. By sending out laser pulses and measuring how long it takes for them to bounce back, lidar builds a detailed 3-D map of a car's surroundings. The first generation of automotive lidar sits on top of the car, spinning around to collect a panoramic 360-degree view of the vehicle's surroundings. These mechanical systems have worked well enough for building self-driving car prototypes, but their complexity makes it hard to achieve the low cost and durability required for the mass market. Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Signage at Sulphur Bay, Rotorua, New Zealand. (credit: David Davies/PA Images via Getty Images) In Rotorua, New Zealand, the evidence of geothermal activity is everywhere. Often, the grates covering street drains will steam. Every now and again, a homeowner will wake up to find that their backyard has been replaced by a steaming hole in the ground. But all of this was nearly lost in my youth thanks to humanity's attempts to tap into it. Geothermal fields cannot be endlessly plundered, it turns out. But this is a good-news story. Geothermal activity, in 2017, supplies some 17-18 percent of New Zealand's electricity. But there are many places in the world that have volcanoes, and many of them are more active than New Zealand's. In New Zealand, geothermal fields cover sleeping volcanoes, not the restless, ready-to-throw rocks volcanoes. Which raises the obvious question of why the islands' sleeping volcanoes can be tapped so effectively. Finding out answers raises a couple more general questions: what does it take to have a good geothermal energy supply, and is tapping it really as simple as sticking a pipe in the ground? Read 48 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Protesters set a Trump t-shirt on fire in the street as they make themselves heard following the inauguration of President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) A local judge in Washington, DC has ruled largely in favor of DreamHost, saying that the Department of Justice overstepped when it initially sought 1.3 million IP addresses that were logged at a website that helped organizes nationwide protests against President Donald Trump on his inauguration day earlier this year. Federal authorities had initially obtained a warrant against DreamHost, the host of the disruptj20.org site, as part of its investigation into rioting and other violence on January 20, 2017. The Tuesday ruling comes less than two months after government lawyers told the court it didn’t mean to seek so many IP addresses after all. Under new guidelines, DreamHost will not have to provide IP addresses, or any other identifying information unless the government can show that a particular person was involved in alleged criminal behavior. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Only two base stations? P'shaw. Next year, SteamVR will let developers do way more with four. (credit: Valve) Every major virtual reality platform has its pros and cons at this point, but one of SteamVR's clear leads is space. Right now, owners of the HTC Vive can set up two of its infrared-powered "base stations" and move, dance, shoot, sculpt, and adventure around a maximum of 132 square feet—assuming you have that much to spare in your den or basement, anyway. But as more commercial groups (from arcades to industrial design firms) bite on VR's most extreme use possibilities, Steam's VR design side has clearly been working to give them more extreme floor space to work with. On Tuesday, the company hinted at an eventual SteamVR 2.0 product by announcing quite a leap in scope: nearly 10 times the square footage. The catch is that the entire SteamVR pipeline must be upgraded to take advantage of this jump, including new "SteamVR Tracking 2.0" base stations that will begin rolling out to developers at the start of 2018. Developers will need to test these tracking boxes with head-mounted displays (HMDs) that are compatible with the new trackers' standard, dubbed TS4321—meaning, not the HTC Vive currently on store shelves. These tracking boxes work the same as the original infrared-crazy base stations, and they add support for "modulated light carrier input." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The Google Home Mini. It's listening, even sometimes when it's not supposed to. (credit: Google) The Google Home Mini isn't out yet, but Google is already dealing with an issue related to it. Artem Russakovskii, the founder of Android Police, tells the harrowing tale of a Google Home Mini gone rogue. Russakovskii's pre-release unit, which he picked up from Google's October 4 event for the tech press, has apparently recorded "thousands of times a day" and attempted to respond to random noises. After swapping the device with Google, Google engineers determined that Russakovskii's Home Mini had a defective touch panel that was registering "phantom" touch events. The Mini has a touch-sensitive surface, and, to issue a command, you can either say "OK Google" or long press on the top. Russakovskii's unit was apparently registering touches at random, so it would randomly start recording audio of his home and storing it on Google's servers. Google acknowledged the issue on a support page, saying, "The Google Home team is aware of an issue impacting a small number of Google Home Mini devices that could cause the touch-control mechanism to behave incorrectly. We immediately rolled out a software update on October 7 to mitigate the issue." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Mikhail Deynekin) Last week, The Wall Street Journal dropped a bombshell when it reported that Russian government hackers located confidential National Security Agency material improperly stored on an employee's home computer with help from Kaspersky antivirus, which happened to be installed. On Tuesday, The New York Times and The Washington Post provided another shocker: the Russian hackers were caught in the act by spies from Israel, who were burrowed deep inside Kaspersky's corporate network around the time of the theft. Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab disclosed the intrusion into its network in mid-2015. Kaspersky released a detailed report that said some of the attack code shared digital fingerprints first found in the Stuxnet worm that sabotaged Iran's nuclear program. When combined with other clues—including the attackers' targeting of entities located in the US, which is off limits to the NSA—most analysts concluded that the 2014 hack was carried out by Israel. At the time, Kaspersky Lab researchers said that the hackers appeared most interested in data the company had amassed on nation-sponsored hackers. The NYT, citing unnamed people, said on Tuesday that Israeli spies indeed carried out the attack. More revealing still, the report said, that during the course of the hack, the spies watched in real time as Russian government hackers turned Kaspersky antivirus software used by 400 million people worldwide into an improvised search tool that scoured computers for code names of US intelligence programs. The NYT likened to a "sort of Google search for sensitive information." The Israeli spies, in turn, reported their findings to their counterparts in the US. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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