posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Windows 8.1 running on Parallels Desktop for Mac. Parallels Upgrades to software that lets Mac users run Windows on OS X have become a yearly occurrence, as Parallels and VMware keep pace with new versions of the Apple and Microsoft desktop operating systems. This year is no exception, with Parallels Desktop 10 becoming available today. Users of the previous two versions can upgrade to version 10 immediately for $49.99. Everyone else can purchase the new software for $79.99 beginning August 26. A student edition will run for $39.99. VMware hasn’t yet announced when the new version of Fusion will come out, but you can probably expect it soon, or at least by the time Apple releases OS X Yosemite this fall. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Adam Carolla at Hollywood's Roxy Theater in 2013. Eric Neitzel Yesterday, news broke that the highest-profile opponent of podcasting, "patent troll" Personal Audio LLC, and podcaster Adam Carolla had reached a settlement. The settlement referred to a court-approved press release, which was finally published (PDF) today on Personal Audio's website. The press release really includes nothing new. Through discovery, Personal Audio simply found out podcasters—even famous ones like Carolla—just don't make that much money, so it isn't interested in suing them. It includes the odd tidbit of naming six big podcasters it won't sue, including Joe Rogan and Marc Maron. The six named podcasters have all been supportive of Carolla, and presumably are in there because Carolla's people insisted they be "immunized" in writing. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Netflix has agreed to a paid interconnection deal with Time Warner Cable (TWC), one of the first ISPs to cry foul over Netflix's attempt to gain direct access to broadband networks without payment. TWC complained about Netflix's Open Connect content delivery network (CDN) back in January 2013, saying the online video company was "seeking unprecedented preferential treatment from ISPs." Netflix at the time was making its highest-quality streams available only to ISPs who agreed to connect directly to the Netflix CDN. Netflix later stopped its policy of withholding "Super HD" and 3D video from ISPs who didn't cooperate, but was able to get free connections from the likes of Cablevision, Virgin Media, British Telecom, RCN, and Google Fiber. By building its own CDN, Netflix was able to avoid paying third-party CDN providers to distribute its traffic, but some ISPs demanded payment. Failed negotiations resulted in traffic being sent through congested links and poor quality for customers for months on end. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Aurich Lawson Ask anyone at Sony, and they're likely to tell you that sales of 10 million PS4s in less than nine months is unvarnished good news. But in an uncharacteristic bit of self-questioning, Sony's head of Worldwide Studios Shuhei Yoshida has expressed some bewilderment and nervousness over the system's quick success. "It's just beyond our imagination. We are so happy. But I for one am a bit nervous because we do not completely understand what's happening," Yoshida told Eurogamer in a recent interview. "You need to understand why your products are selling well so you can plan for the future, right? It defied the conventional thinking. Lots of people thought the dedicated game hardware might not be needed going forward, but still lots of people are very excited." While Yoshida said he thinks the lineup of upcoming exclusive games like The Order and Uncharted 4 explains why gamers are excited for the PS4, he said that it still doesn't completely explain the speed at which the system is selling. "I'm asking journalists who ask [about sales] their opinion," Yoshida said. "I'm asking marketing people to tell us why." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Homer Simpson at Comic-Con. FilmOn founder Alki David, fresh off getting sanctioned $90,000 for broadcasts using the Aereo-like parts of his TV-over-Internet company, is ramping up a new kind of litigation. He said he owns patents related to hologram technology and keeps accusing high-profile hologram performances of intellectual property infringement. The newest lawsuit lawsuit (PDF) is over a hologram of Homer Simpson that was one of the highlights of last month's San Diego Comic-Con. On July 26, The Simpsons creator Matt Groening chatted with Homer for about two minutes. During the video (above), Simpson complains about the Comic-Con registration process. "I don't care. I get my free ticket from the hologram of Tupac Shakur," answered Groening. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Not everyone likes their friendly neighborhood cable behemoth. Media attention and fallout from Comcast’s viral customer service missteps continue to plague the country’s largest Internet service provider. First there was Ryan Block’s ludicrous cancellation call, then Comcast refused to refund invalid fees for Tim Davis until he caught the company in a lie, and then Comcast kept Aaron Spain on hold for three hours, long enough for the customer service lines to close and leave Spain in limbo. Each instance has been met with a swift response from Comcast’s PR group after going viral, but quick, reactionary responses don’t do anything to fix the underlying problems. Leaked documents obtained by The Verge (full PDF) paint a portrait of exactly how broken things are in Comcast call centers throughout the country, and the documents confirm what current and former Comcast employees have been saying for the past few weeks: selling services is a required part of the job, even for employees doing tech support. Comcast did not immediately respond to our request for comment. It’s all part of "4S," a "universal call flow" for Comcast call center employees. Those four letters stand for "start, solve, sell, and summarize." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Howdily doodily, Ars-iarinos! We come bearing a giant slew of discounts this Tuesday, including a variety of discounted BenQ monitors, particularly the 1440p BL3200PT for 37 percent off. Scroll through a few choice Dell laptop deals to find a selection of deeply discounted Lenovo accessories as well, including a wireless headset and wireless mouse that will set you back less than $30 combined. Featured deals: BenQ Sale! BenQ VA LED GW2255 21.5" Screen LED-lit Monitor for $119.99 with free shipping (list price $199.99) BenQ Gaming Monitor RL2455HM 24" Screen LED-lit Monitor for $179.99 with free shipping (list price $299.99) BenQ GW Series GW2760HS 27" Screen LED-lit Monitor for $199.99 plus shipping (list price $399.99) BenQ BL3200PT CAD/CAM WQHD 32" Screen LED-Lit Monitor for $629 with free shipping (list price $999.99) Monitors: Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has announced that he's stepping down from the company's board, effective immediately. With his ownership of the LA Clippers, teaching, and "civic contribution" taking his time, Ballmer wrote that he's now "very busy," and with both a new NBA season and new class of students, it would be "impractical" for him to remain on the board. In announcing his departure, Ballmer expressed confidence in new CEO Satya Nadella's leadership, noting that although there are challenges ahead, there are also great opportunities, and he said that Microsoft's mix of software, hardware, and cloud skills is unmatched in the industry. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Ron Amadeo The HTC One M8 for Windows and the original HTC One M8. 9 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } NEW YORK CITY—HTC has announced the HTC One M8... again. This time, though, it runs Windows Phone and is a Verizon-exclusive called the "HTC One M8 for Windows." HTC is the first OEM to take advantage of changes in Windows Phone 8.1 that allow for OS-agnostic smartphones, allowing (Verizon) customers to pick their hardware first and software—Windows Phone or Android—second. We aren't glossing over any details here, either; the hardware is exactly the same as the Android version. That means you get all the good stuff from the HTC One M8: a 5-inch, 1080p LCD, a 2.36GHz Snapdragon 801, 2GB of RAM, a 2600mAh battery, and massive BoomSound speakers, all wrapped in an aluminum shell. You get the not-so-good stuff from the original One M8, too. The device is huge for something with a 5-inch screen. The speakers add an extra set of bezels to the top and bottom of the device, and along with a strip below the screen dedicated just to the HTC logo, the device is easily the biggest 5-inch phone out there. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
OneNote for Android has been optimized for tablets. Andrew Cunningham Microsoft's OneNote app for Android has just received a significant update that adds a brand-new UI design for tablets and improved handwriting recognition, the company announced on the Office blog today. The previous version of the OneNote app would run on tablets, but its interface made poor use of the extra space. The old OneNote app running on a Nexus 7. You can see very little information at once, and the editing interface isn't much better. Andrew Cunningham The new UI includes Office's trademark ribbon, a revamped UI for navigation, and requires much less zooming and tapping than before. It feels just a little cramped on the 7-inch screen of our Nexus 7, but it still works reasonably well and should be more comfortable on larger 8- and 10-inch Android tablets. The new handwriting feature allows you to draw on the screen with your finger, or with a stylus on Android phones and tablets that include them (Samsung's Note series comes to mind). Andrew Cunningham The new OneNote interface on a Nexus 7. Like many of Google's own apps, the new OneNote makes extensive use of sliding panels for navigation. Swipe from right to left to dismiss these panels and see your content. 2 more images in gallery The phone version of OneNote for Android gets the same panel-based navigation system and handwriting support, though everything has been scaled down to fit better on smaller screens. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The current incarnation of the SmartThings hub, which probably won't look much different once Samsung's acquisition of the company comes to fruition (unless they finally decide that white, clunky plastic is passe). Sam Machkovech On Tuesday, Samsung announced that it would acquire Quietside, a manufacturer of air conditioners, heaters, and other HVAC appliances, for an undisclosed sum. This follows Samsung's purchase of smart home all-in-one solution SmartThings last week, an acquisition that had been hinted at in July, and the combination points to Samsung's desire to take over American homes by controlling their every device. At first blush, the 100 percent acquisition of Quietside appears to merely streamline Samsung's operations, since the company already produces its own line of air conditioners—and has relied on Quietside to distribute those offerings in North America for over 15 years. Yet the Samsung announcement went so far as to hint at more to come: "[Samsung] also plans to unveil an enhanced HVAC product lineup that better reflects the needs of North American customers," it stated, though no timeline was attached to that sentence. We can only assume that such a statement hints at the company's dreams of Samsung device interplay, with phones, watches, alarms, heaters, TVs, and more communicating with each other. As of now, Samsung's home appliance portfolio puts it in better position than its peers to consider taking over every corner of a home's electronics; where Google has Nest, Samsung has ovens and dryers. However, based on Samsung's "only Galaxy devices" compatibility track record, particularly with its Galaxy Gear offerings, we worry that Samsung will devour SmartThings' all-in-one home automation system and kill off compatibility with third-party products and protocols (a feature that, admittedly, was already thin enough when we reviewed the SmartThings hub earlier this year). Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Kevin Spencer A healthcare system spanning 29 states announced on Monday that cybercriminals operating from China stole information on approximately 4.5 million patients, including names, birth dates, and Social Security numbers. Community Health Systems, which comprises 206 facilities in the southern and western states, announced the incident in an 8-K filing submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The data breach likely stems from compromises in April and June of this year, involved sophisticated malware, and is apparently connected to China, the company stated. "The attacker was able to bypass the Company’s security measures and successfully copy and transfer certain data outside the Company," CHS said in its 8-K filing. "Since first learning of this attack, the Company has worked closely with federal law enforcement authorities in connection with their investigation and possible prosecution of those determined to be responsible for this attack." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A New York man who claimed police arrested and strip-searched him after he photographed a stop-and-frisk of three African-American youths has settled his civil rights suit with the New York Police Department for $125,000. The settlement, first reported Monday by the Daily News, comes weeks after the NYPD reminded its officers that it was legal to peacefully record police activity. That department-wide memo followed the videotaped NYPD arrest of a man who died after being subdued by a chokehold last month. The NYPD settled with a man named Dick George, who alleged that while he was sitting in his parked car in Flatbush in 2012, he saw two NYPD officers get out of an unmarked car and perform what is known as a stop-and-frisk of three youths. George said he captured the search on his mobile phone. He claimed he went up to the youths and told them next time that happens to make sure they get the officers' badge numbers. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Watch Dogs is still planned for the Wii U, but it will be Ubisoft's last "mature" game for the system. Nintendo consoles have long been decried by many gamers as "kiddie" systems that don't feature enough games targeted at adults. Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot offered some support and explanation for that state of affairs recently, telling Game Informer that family focused titles are the only ones selling on the Wii U. "It’s very simple. What we see is that Nintendo customers don’t buy Assassin’s Creed," Guillemot said in a recent interview with Game Informer. "Last year, we sold in very small numbers." Apparently, that line of thinking extends past the Assassin's Creed series, as well. While Guillemot said that a long-delayed version of Watch Dogs will still be coming to Wii U, "it will be the only mature game we publish on it." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Tesla has played a significant role in the rapidly growing credibility of the electric car. Yes, electric cars exist within an automotive niche, but so do plenty of other vehicles, and that niche is now a little larger following an announcement yesterday by Saleen Automotive, a noted tuning company. Much of the car world has been gathered south of San Francisco in the Monterey Peninsula for the annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance (a really fancy car show for people who insist on aligning all the screw heads under the hood in the same direction), and it was there that Saleen debuted the Foursixteen, its new performance car built atop a Tesla Model S. Saleen has been in the business of building souped-up versions of other companies’ cars since the 1980s—notably some rather quick Mustangs—as well as its own mid-engined supercars, although these probably had more success on the race track than in the showroom. The Foursixteen, which starts at $152,000 before the various EV tax subsidies are taken into account, looks sportier than the stock Tesla both inside and out, and upgrades to the driveline, suspension, and associated software mean that performance should be able to match the new look. "We have used all the experience and ingenuity in our collective acumen to create a truly exceptional Tesla Model S in our new FOURSIXTEEN," said Saleen Automotive CEO Steve Saleen. "By dramatically improving the aerodynamics, suspension, braking, and drive train we are able to create a car that accelerates quicker with vastly improved handling. It is truly exceptional." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
An eruption pierces the glaciers at the Bárðarbunga volcano. Oddur Sigurdsson, Iceland Geological Survey. The Iceland Meteorological Office has increased the risk level of an eruption at the Bárðarbunga (or Bardarbunga) volcano after hundreds of earthquakes were reported over the weekend. The risk level has been set to orange, which is the fourth-highest rating on a five-level scale. We asked Dave McGarvie, a volcanologist at The Open University, to explain what this means. Should we be worried? We have known for some time that Bárðarbunga was going to do something—we just didn’t know what. Because it is covered in ice, we rely on instruments to reveal its behavior. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
A handful of the full set of screenshots obtained by Android Police. Android Police More details have leaked about Google's upcoming subscription service for YouTube, these in the form of screenshots posted by Android Police on Monday. The service, called YouTube Music Key, will give subscribers ad-free and offline playback of YouTube videos, as well as audio-only material. Per the screenshots, users will be able to play music on their mobile phones "with or without video, in the background, or with your screen off"—all things that the single-tasking YouTube apps could not previously do. Subscribers will also be able to play music via "YouTube Mix," a recently-added feature that works similarly to radio stations on other streaming services. A YouTube Music Key subscription provides access to a 20-million-song catalog, roughly the same size as that of Spotify and Rdio, as well as a collection of material the app refers to as "concerts, covers, and remixes." While YouTube is rife with content beyond artists' official discographies, a lot of it of legally questionable provenance, it's not clear from the screenshots how Google will decide what goes into YouTube Music Key. Subscribers to the service will also be subscribed to "Google Play Music Key" for free, which is likely a rebranded Google Play Music All Access. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Flickr user: Geoff Cordner Kim Goodsell was running along a mountain trail when her left ankle began turning inward, unbidden. A few weeks later she started having trouble lifting her feet properly near the end of her runs, and her toes would scuff the ground. Her back started to ache, and then her joints, too. This was in 2002, and Kim, then 44 years old, was already an accomplished endurance athlete. She cycled, ran, climbed, and skied through the Rockies for hours every day; she was a veteran of Ironman triathlons. She’d always been the strong one in her family. When she was four, she would let her teenage uncles stand on her stomach as a party trick. In high school, she was an accomplished gymnast and an ardent cyclist. By college, she was running the equivalent of a half marathon on most days. It wasn’t that she was much of a competitor, exactly—passing someone in a race felt more deflating than energizing. Mostly Kim just wanted to be moving. So when her limbs started glitching, she did what high-level athletes do, what she had always done: she pushed through. But in the summer of 2010, years of gradually worsening symptoms gave way to weeks of spectacular collapse. Kim was about to head to Lake Superior with her husband, CB. They planned to camp, kayak, and disappear from the world for as long as they could catch enough fish to eat. But in the days before their scheduled departure, she could not grip a pen or a fork, much less a paddle. Kim, a woman for whom extreme sports were everyday pursuits, could no longer cope with everyday pursuits. Instead of a lakeside tent, she found herself at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Read 52 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
AMD wants to be a "one-stop shop" for PC components, though RAM and SSDs are all totally standard commodity parts that rarely have compatibility trouble. AMD PC builders mostly think of CPUs and GPUs when they think of AMD, but today the company announced that it's getting into the SSD business. AMD will be partnering with Toshiba-owned OCZ to launch three Radeon R7-branded solid-state drives in 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB capacities. The drives use OCZ's Barefoot 3 controller and Toshiba's A19nm NAND chips, have four-year warranties, and include 3.5-inch drive adapters for desktops and disk cloning software from Acronis to aid with data migration. Additional information and specifications are laid out in the slides below. AMD The Radeon drives share many characteristics with other OCZ SSDs. 3 more images in gallery The drives start at $99 for the 120GB model, well south of the $1-per-GB line, and the competitive SSD landscape usually pushes prices down a bit from the MSRP (the 240GB and 480GB models go for $164 and $299, respectively). However, AMD's drives will face strong competition from other entrenched competitors. Looking at Amazon shows well-regarded Samsung drives below that price point ($89 for a 120GB Samsung 840 EVO), and prices of older drives from value players like Kingston go even lower ($55 for a 120GB SSDNow V300 drive, $95 for a 240GB model). That's before you consider newer value-focused drives like the Crucial MX100, recently dubbed the best SSD for most people by the Wirecutter, or OCZ's own ARC 100, which uses the same controller and NAND as the Radeon drives although it has a shorter warranty and lower transfer speeds. Like the AMD-branded RAM the company introduced a few years back, there's nothing particularly special about these SSDs. They use controllers from an established company and share most of their specifications with other unbranded drives in OCZ's product lineup. OCZ said that the drive uses "a very different firmware that was engineered specifically for this drive," though it's not clear what differences buyers can actually expect to notice. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
The Roku TVs announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in January will finally make their way into stores in the next few weeks, according to releases from TCL and Hisense Monday. The TVs range in size from 32 to 55 inches and are close in price to their dumb-TV counterparts with an operating system that's meant to be an antidote to the average TV interface. The Roku setup of content "channels" like Netflix, YouTube, and Rdio as well as the customizable home screen remain largely unchanged in the new sets. Since the TVs have to handle other inputs, the interface also treats other connected devices (a cable set-top box or a console, for instance) as selectable "channels" on the home screen. If the connected devices are powered on, the TV can show a live preview of what is currently playing within the selected channel box. The Roku TVs will be packaged with a Roku-style remote, which eliminates most of the interface-tweaking buttons found on a standard TV remote. Instead, there are directional buttons that handle menus, which are curated so that the most commonly-tweaked settings get the best placement, according to Roku's research. If users dig deeper, they can find the more granular display settings and other features that TV remotes usually let viewers access with a button press. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Gordon Smith, president and CEO of the National Association of Broadcasters, and a former US senator from Oregon. Center for the Study of Ethics On Monday the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) filed a petition asking a federal court to object to the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) rules for an upcoming auction of TV airwaves to cellular providers. Although lawsuits challenging FCC actions are relatively common, if the court sides with the NAB, the 2015 spectrum auction could be delayed and promises of improvements to cellular networks could prove illusory. The auction, which was mandated by Congress two years ago, is the first of its kind, and it has TV broadcasters bristling. The FCC has been asking TV stations to give up their airwaves in exchange for a cut of the auction proceeds, at which point participating stations can either go out of business or “channel share,” an arrangement where two stations occupy the same airwaves. Still, vigorous lobbying on behalf of the broadcast industry ensured that all participation in the auction would be voluntary. In the NAB's lawsuit today, the industry group said that it was unhappy with the protections the FCC had put in place for those TV stations that chose not to participate in the auction. In 2012, Congress ordered that after participating TV stations had relinquished their rights to their airwaves, the commission would reorder the spectrum, being careful to preserve the remaining broadcasters' coverage areas as much as possible. At the time of the congressional order, the FCC had relied on a specific methodology to determine a broadcaster's coverage area, but in June of this year, the FCC switched to another methodology, which the NAB says is unacceptable. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Carolla doing his podcast, earlier this month. Adam Carolla After more than a year of litigation, podcaster and comedian Adam Carolla has reached a cease-fire with the well-known "patent troll" claiming to hold a patent that covers podcasting. Carolla was sued for patent infringement in January 2013. He responded by fighting back, raising almost $500,000 in a crowd-funded campaign. The parties had a trial set for next month in East Texas. Personal Audio LLC, the patent company, also sued TV networks CBS, NBC, and Fox over some of their Internet video-on-demand offerings, since it believes its patent covers some types of Internet "episodic content." The TV companies are continuing to litigate. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Sprint announced new family plans today that provide 20GB of shared data for $100, calling it "double the high-speed data at a lower price than AT&T and Verizon Wireless." New pricing options have been expected since last week when newly appointed Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure told employees that "When you have a great network, you don’t have to compete on price," according to Light Reading. But, "when your network is behind, unfortunately you have to compete on value and price." AT&T and Verizon have the fastest and most reliable cellular networks in the US, according to a nationwide test conducted in late 2013. Sprint's network was the slowest among the four major carriers, but it ranked third in reliability, ahead of T-Mobile. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ewan McIntosh As the protests in Ferguson, Missouri over police fatally shooting 19-year-old Mike Brown have raged through the past several nights, more than a few people have noticed how relatively quiet Facebook news feeds have been on the matter. While #Ferguson is a trending hashtag, Zeynep Tufekci pointed out at Medium that news about the violence was, as best, slow to percolate through her own feed, despite people posting liberally about it. While I've been seeing the same political trending tags, my feed is mundane as usual: a couple is expecting a baby. A recreational softball team won a league championship. A few broader feel-good posts about actor Chris Pratt’s ice-bucket challenge to raise awareness and money for ALS, another friend’s ice-bucket challenge, another friend’s ice-bucket challenge… in fact, way more about ice bucket challenges than Ferguson or any other news-making event. In my news feed organized by top stories over the last day, I get one post about Ferguson. If I set it to organize by "most recent," there are five posts in the last five hours. Zach Seward of Quartz noted, also anecdotally, that Facebook seems more likely to show videos of of people dumping cold water on their heads in high summer than police officers shooting tear gas at protesters and members of the media. And rightfully so in Facebook’s warped version of reality: people on Facebook may not be so interested in seeing the latter. At least, not if Facebook can’t show them the right angle. But Facebook’s algorithmic approach and the involvement of content sources is starting to come together such that it may soon be able to do exactly that. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A red giant star really is quite gigantic compared to our Sun. NASA Radioactive decay is a powerful tool. The predictable decay of radioactive isotopes can be used for far more than just dating old rocks. Scientists have used radioactive isotopes to determine the age of the Earth and the age of the Solar System itself. Now, a team of scientists has used radioactive dating to study the pre-history of the Solar System more accurately than before, in the process reconciling data that had seemed to be contradictory. The contradiction came in the form of data from two different isotopes. The radioactive elements iodine-129 and hafnium-182 are found throughout meteoroids in the Solar System. The abundance of those elements, in relation to the abundance of their non-radioactive counterparts, should give estimates of the time when those elements were produced. The problem is that the date calculated from the iodine (~72 million years prior to the Sun’s formation) does not match the date from the hafnium (~15 million years). Since the two elements should have been produced in the same event (typically a supernova), this was quite a problem. Both these isotopes are produced via a neutron-capture process. Under certain conditions, an atomic nucleus can pick up a loose neutron. While it remains the same element, it ends up being a different isotope with a different atomic weight. There are two known types of neutron-capture processes: the s-process and the r-process. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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