posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Raspberry Pi Foundation The Raspberry Pi, a tiny computer for hobbyists and developers, has been generally unchanged in the two-plus years since it launched, but today a new piece of hardware goes on sale. The updated "B+" model has the same Broadcom BCM2835 processor as the original and still has 512MB RAM, but it uses less power, has more connectivity options, and features other upgrades over the previous Raspberry Pi Model B. Here are the key improvements, as described by Raspberry Pi creator Eben Upton in today's announcement: More GPIO. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model B. More USB. We now have 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour. Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version. Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W. Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply. Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes. "This isn’t a 'Raspberry Pi 2' but rather the final evolution of the original Raspberry Pi," Upton wrote. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
By your command. Sean Gallagher Earlier this month, I spent a day working in the throwback world of DOS. More specifically, it was FreeDOS version 1.1, the open source version of the long-defunct Microsoft MS-DOS operating system. It's a platform that in the minds of many should've died a long time ago. But after 20 years, a few dozen core developers and a broader, much larger contributor community continue furthering the FreeDOS project by gradually adding utilities, accessories, compilers, and open-source applications. All this labor of love begs one question: why? What is it about a single-tasking command-line driven operating system—one that is barely up to the most basic of network-driven tasks—that has kept people’s talents engaged for two decades? Haven't most developers abandoned it for Windows (or, tragically, for IBM OS/2)? Who still uses DOS, and for what? To find out, Ars reached out to two members of the FreeDOS core development team to learn more about who was behind this seemingly quixotic quest. These devs choose to keep an open-source DOS alive rather than working on something similar but more modern—like Linux. So, needless to say, the answers we got weren’t necessarily expected. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Surprise! Strong Bad, it's me! Homestar Runner! From school! homestarrunner.com Homestar Runner co-creator Matt Chapman made a bunch of 20- and 30-somethings happy when he said earlier this week that the cartoon could be making a comeback later this year following a successful experiment on April Fools' Day. If you watched the cartoons during their heyday, the news probably sent you down a nostalgic rabbit hole where you spent two hours re-watching all of your favorite episodes. If you happened to miss out on Homestar during its peak, here's what you need to know: creators Matt and Mike Chapman made a lot of different Flash cartoons for the site, but the most popular were Strong Bad E-mails, also called "sbemails." Every week, Strong Bad (the luchador-looking guy in the picture above) picked a different fan-submitted e-mail to answer, and hilarity ensued. The site was updated regularly throughout the early 2000s before becoming more irregular later in the decade, and updates mostly ceased in 2009 as the Chapman brothers moved on to other projects. We've combed through the archive and assembled 10 Strong Bad e-mails that do a pretty good job of showing what this odd Internet cartoon could be at its best. It's impossible to call out all of the good ones, but if these hook you the complete collection is still available here. Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
NASA Astronomers may be the world champions at giving fantastically dull names to spectacular objects. Over the years, catchy monickers like GRB 130606A and SDSS J150243.09+111557.3 have graced our pages. That trend has carried over into the naming of exoplanets, which picked up names like KOI 784.02 (where KOI is just short for "Kepler object of interest"). That's led at least one company to try to fill the void by letting people pay for the right to (completely unofficially) name a planet. At the time the naming program first hit the news, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) made a statement that reminded everyone that the names would have no official weight. However, the IAU also recognized that the public was excited about the prospect and suggested it might do something about the situation. Unfortunately, the IAU's definition of "do something" involved kicking the problem to a committee, which is often where large organizations send ideas to die. Yet the Public Naming of Planets and Planetary Satellites Working Group has come through. About a year ago, it determined that exoplanet names should follow the rules that govern the naming of minor planets in the Solar System. And it suggested that any group that wanted to run a non-commercial naming campaign (meaning, you can't charge to name a planet) should get in touch. A year later, the IAU is announcing its first naming campaign, run in collaboration with the citizen science site Zooniverse. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Mary Anne Grady-Flores, a 58-year-old Ithaca, NY grandmother of three, faces a one-year county jail sentence after being charged with second-degree criminal contempt. The punishment comes after her repeated participation in peaceful anti-drone protests at the Hancock Air Base in DeWitt, NY (located in Central New York near Syracuse). In October 2012, Grady-Flores was taken into custody after a drone protest. According to the Syracuse Post-Standard, 16 people from the Upstate Coalition to Ground the Drones and End the Wars (UCGDEW) blocked three gates at the New York National Guard Hancock Field during the demonstration. They were taken into custody to be charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct, and a protection order was eventually issued to prevent Grady-Flores from going near Col. Earl Evans, the mission support group commander at the 174th Attack Wing of the New York Air National Guard. Boing Boing notes protection orders are at times given to non-violent stalkers, and this one was valid for one year according to the paper. Timing was not on Grady-Flores' side. In February 2013, Grady-Flores and 11 other UCGDEW members were being sentenced (this time to 15 days at a local penitentiary following new disorderly conduct charges; trespassing charged were dismissed). According an account Ellen Grady (Grady-Flores' sister) gave the Post-Standard, Grady-Flores was in attendance at the base to photograph the events this time rather than protest herself. But in the initial sentencing hearing, DeWitt Town Justice David Gideon said her intent was "completely irrelevant" to her additional criminal contempt charge since Grady-Flores admitted to being on base property. Grady told the Post-Standard that Grady-Flores was "was not a threat to Evans and... unaware that her actions in February violated the protection order." Grady-Flores eventually went to trial for criminal contempt in May and was found guilty. Her sentencing took place this week. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Flickr user: Dierk Schaefer Two teams creating devices that stimulate the brain to restore memory function have been granted $37.5 million by DARPA to develop the technology. Both will initially work with people with epilepsy who have been given implants to locate where their seizures originate. The researchers will reuse the data gathered during this process to monitor other brain activity, such as the patterns that occur when the brain stores and retrieves memories. One team will then attempt to map these patterns by recording the brain activity of epilepsy sufferers with mild memory problems while they play a computer game about remembering things. The pattern differences between the best and worst scores among these patents will be used to develop an algorithm for a personalized stimulation pattern to keep the brain performing at an optimal level. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The OnePlus One may be giant in most hands, but perhaps less so in a T-Rex's! Sam Machkovech Specs at a glance: OnePlus One Screen 1920×1080 5.5"(401 ppi) IPS OS Cyanogenmod 11S (based on Android KitKat 4.4.2) CPU 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 330 Storage 16GB or 64GB, no MicroSD slot Networking GSM 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz, LTE bands 1/3/4/7/17/38/40, Dual Band 802.11b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS Ports MicroUSB 2.0, headphones Camera 13MP rear camera, 5MP front camera Size 152.9 mm x 75.9 mm x 8.9 mm Weight 162g Battery 3100 mAh Starting price $300 unlocked Other perks RBG notification LED, NFC In our time using the new OnePlus One smartphone, we tried our best to ignore its cost. We wanted to focus on its remarkable traits—its quality 5.5-inch screen, magnificent battery life, Cyanogenmod functionality, quad-core processor, 13MP backward-facing camera, unnecessarily nice front-facing camera, handsome design—and judge them in a vacuum. "Focus solely on how it stacked up to the best-selling modern Android sets"—that was our mantra. But it's hard to ignore the magical, mystical fact that we actually had a OnePlus One in hand. Months after the phone’s public reveal, and at the beginnings of its odd, invite-only shopping process, the notoriously hard-to-buy phone arrived. And once the price came up, all bias was completely overtaken: $300 for the 16GB model, $350 for 64GB, completely unlocked, no contract necessary. Google and LG's Nexus 5 is the only other smartphone that comes close to matching OnePlus’ smartphone-to-price ratio, and OnePlus is hitting this price without the benefit of Google's deep pockets. It’s tempting to pin that detail as the headline of any review. Yet the truly remarkable “how’d they do that” part of this phone isn’t its cost, but its quality. Read 36 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A series of redacted emails and other documents obtained by the Associated Press shows that contrary to the assertions of the White House, intelligence officials had knowledge beforehand of  British intelligence officials’ efforts to destroy data in the possession of the UK newspaper The Guardian. The emails show that former National Security Agency director Gen. Kenneth Alexander was briefed on the plans days before GCHQ analysts oversaw the destruction of a laptop at The Guardian’s offices in London. On July 19, 2013, as British officials were stepping up pressure on The Guardian to turn over the data—including threats of a police raid and prosecution under the UK’s Official Secrets Act—Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger consented to the destruction of the data and the laptop it was stored on rather than turning the data itself over to GCHQ.  The documents obtained by the Associated Press from the NSA under the Freedom of Information Act show thatRichard Ledgett, then director of NSA’s Threat Operations Center and a member of NSA’s “Media Leaks Task Force,” sent an email within hours of Rusbriger’s assent to the destruction to Gen. Alexander entitled, “Guardian data being destroyed.”  “Good news, at least on this front,” Ledgett wrote, forwarding an email from a redacted source. Alexander forwarded the news to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper—“Jim- Here is the report I got.” On July 20,  a few hours after the destruction of the Guardian laptop was complete, Clapper was verbally briefed by Gen. Alexander on the destruction. He sent a thank-you email to  Alexander for the “conversation” as a reply to the original email thread. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Hope you guys like Hulu, because that's what you're going to be using to watch South Park from here on. Since 2008, fans of the Comedy Central cartoon South Park have been able to stream the show’s entire library (minus a few permanently redacted episodes) from the South Park Studios site. But according to a new post on the show's official blog, this fan-friendly unlimited streaming arrangement will soon be ending: South Park is moving to Hulu. Folks who want to watch more than a limited selection of old South Park episodes will either have to resort to physical media or begin paying $7.99 per month to subscribe to Hulu Plus. Under what the blog post describes as an "exclusive, multi-year" agreement, the current offering of streamable South Park episodes will remain available until September 24 at both the show’s official site and also on Hulu. After September 24—the start of the show’s 18th season—new episodes will be available to both standard Hulu and Hulu Plus customers the day after they air (Variety’s writeup says that the official South Park Studios site will also have next-day streaming, but that isn’t mentioned in the blog post). The big change is the paywalling of past episodes. After September 24, free Hulu users and visitors to the show’s official site will only be able to watch "a revolving selection of free episodes." Unlimited access—which today is free—will only be available for Hulu Plus users. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The U.S. Department of Justice announced late Friday that a Chinese businessman has been charged with hacking into the computer systems of Boeing, Lockheed Martin and other aerospace companies. The alleged hacker, Su Bin, is accused of helping unidentified co-conspirators to identify what to steal from the companies' networks—including data on the F-22 and F-35 fighter aircraft and the C-17 cargo plane program. Su, also known as Stephen Su, an executive for a Chinese aerospace company with offices in Canada, was arrested by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in British Columbia on June 28, in cooperation with the FBI. According to the Justice Department, Su and the unknown hackers based in China started to collect data in 2009, and continued until 2013. The Justice Department claims that the group "gained remote access from China to information residing on the computer systems of U.S. companies including cleared defense contractors.”  In an email Su sent, he said the aircraft data would help Chinese aircraft designers “stand easily on the giant’s shoulders,” and ""allow us to rapidly catch up with U.S. levels," NBC reported. Ars will update this report with more details as they become available. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Prolific leaker evleaks, whose stock in trade is smartphone-related rumors, has said that Microsoft is going to produce a Lumia phone running Android, branded "Nokia by Microsoft." This isn't the first time that this kind of rumor has been floated, with both Windows and Windows Phone talked of as candidates for running Android apps. The logic is very simple: developers aren't writing apps for Windows's Metro environment or Windows Phone. They are writing apps for Android. Put those apps on Windows and Windows Phone and the app problem is instantly solved. Of course, the downsides of this approach are quite clear. If Windows Phone or Windows can run Android apps, why should developers looking at Microsoft's platform bother writing Windows Phone and Windows apps? Might as well just write Android apps and have an app that works both on Microsoft's platform and beyond. This logic applies even to those developers who have taken the plunge and created Windows or Windows Phone apps; why bother maintaining them when an Android app could target the very same users plus many more? Read 44 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Last month, the French parliament took a strong stand in favor of small book retailers. The governing body voted in favor of a proposed law to ban major online book retailers—including Amazon and the French retailer FNAC—from offering free delivery on book orders. The logic here is evident: hit consumers in the pocketbook, and they'll be more inclined to shop local. English language French-news site France 24 reported at the time that the country had "one of the highest number of traditional book shops in the world—with a total of 3,500, of which around 800 are single independent businesses" (that's compared to about 1,000 total in the UK). Amazon, at least, has not taken this situation lying down. The free delivery law took effect on July 8, and France 24 reported this week that the digital retail behemoth has found a workaround (at least for the shipping—a five percent discount on book orders has been removed). "We are unfortunately no longer allowed to offer free deliveries for book orders," Amazon.fr's FAQ (Google Translate) reads. "We have therefore fixed delivery costs at one centime per order [$0.01 Euros, or a single penny] containing books and dispatched by Amazon to systematically guarantee the lowest price for your book orders." This is by no means the first time France has tried to put a damper on major US tech companies dabbling in books or other reading materials. In 2011, the country updated an old law related to printed books that then allowed published to impose set e-book pricing on Apple and others. And in 2012, there was the very public dispute between French lawmakers and Google over the country's desire to see French media outlets paid for having their content pop up in search results. At least for now with this most recent situation, an online giant has found a relatively quick and easy way to regain the upperhand. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Any market tips in there? Flickr user: Richard LeBlanc In the financial world, some shares have new owners every second. Today, much of the buying and selling is done by computers, but many trades still rely on human intuition—the gut feeling of the experienced trader. “Nobody can predict the market, but traders are expected to,” Richard Taffler, professor of finance at the University of Warwick, said. “This creates anxiety.” Anxiety is just one of the emotions that play an important role in driving financial markets. Understanding what happens in the brains of traders as prices move up and down could possibly tell us something about a market’s future developments. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Alec Smith at the California Institute of Technology and his colleagues conducted group-behavior experiments. They had between 11 and 23 students play multiple rounds of a game that simulated a market situation. For every round of the game, three of the participants were inside a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine, which identified parts of the brain that have increased or decreased activity during the trading. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
John Tregoning Seattle’s publicly-owned electrical utility, City Light, is now demanding a refund for the $17,500 that it paid to Brand.com in a botched effort to boost the online reputation of its highly-paid chief executive, Jorge Carrasco. The project was concocted by the CEO’s chief of staff, Sephir Hamilton. In an interview with Ars, Hamilton said that the agency may even file a lawsuit to enforce this refund. "We're leaving our options open,” he said. “I hope that they'll see that what we signed up for was not the service that they delivered. We were sold one bill of goods and we were given another.” Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Stack Exchange This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites. Mathew Foscarini asks: I'm in the middle of developing a new programming language to solve some business requirements, and this language is targeted at novice users. So there is no support for exception handling in the language, and I wouldn't expect them to use it even if I added it. Read 28 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
"Flat" has become very popular. This particular design trend found its footing in Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 design. It was all big, buttons and bright colors with no extraneous texture or ornamentation—ideas that later spread to Windows 8, iOS 7, OS X Yosemite, the Android L release, and many apps running on those platforms. Software is no longer focused on making onscreen content look like real-world objects. Our screens aren't made of felt or paper, so why should they look that way? That said, there are plenty of things about older designs that new designs haven't figured out. We put our collective heads together and came up with the following list of modern UI design trends that get our blood boiling. We're sure there are more things that could make this list, but we're trying to keep our blood pressure down. If you've got some hate to spread around, kindly deposit it in the comments section. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The US military has been testing in-flight guidance for .50-caliber bullets, turning the projectiles into miniature homing missiles. DARPA's Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance (EXACTO) bullets have the ability to maneuver in flight to hit targets that they're not precisely aimed at, compensating for factors like weather, wind, and target movement. DARPA explains on its website: "For military snipers, acquiring moving targets in unfavorable conditions, such as high winds and dusty terrain commonly found in Afghanistan, is extremely challenging with current technology. It is critical that snipers be able to engage targets faster, and with better accuracy, since any shot that doesn't hit a target also risks the safety of troops by indicating their presence and potentially exposing their location." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The Major League Baseball iPhone app was one of several accused of infringing a patent held by Emblaze. A jury ruled against Emblaze's claims on Friday. Zach Chisholm Following a two-week trial in San Jose, California, a jury reached a verdict (PDF) Friday afternoon finding that Apple doesn't infringe a patent own by Emblaze, an Israeli company that sued Apple back in 2010. While the outcome is a clear victory for Apple, the jury declined to invalidate US Patent No. 6,389,473, titled "Network Media Streaming," which Emblaze said was infringed by Apple's HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) protocol. That protocol has been built into Apple products, including iPhones and iPads, since iOS 3.0 was released in 2009. Emblaze accused several HLS-powered streams in Apple devices, including streaming video used by ABC News, ESPN, and sports services like the Professional Golf Association, Major League Baseball, and National Football League. The company also accused Apple Keynotes and the iTunes Festival. The jury didn't find any of the services infringed. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The White House sidestepped questions about Tesla's desire to sell cars directly to consumers in more states. Lee Hutchinson Last June, a petition filed on the White House's "We The People" site about direct-to-consumer car sales took less than a month to reach 100,000 signatures, the threshold required for a response from the Obama administration. "State legislators are trying to unfairly protect automobile dealers in their states from competition," the petition read, and it made no bones about Tesla's direct-sales efforts standing out from the standard dealership sales model found throughout the United States. Late Friday afternoon, more than a year after the petition's filing, White House spokesperson Dan Utech's response went live. After praising Tesla's efforts in "innovation" and helping America "reduce our dependence on oil," Utech (perhaps unsurprisingly) passed the buck: "Laws regulating auto sales are issues that have traditionally sat with lawmakers at the state level." Utech continued by reaffirming the administration's "goal of improving consumer choice for American families," but then frankly stated that any federal attempt to interfere with current auto sales state laws "would require an act of Congress." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
A federal judge has granted a nutritional supplement firm's request to help it learn the identities of those who allegedly left "phony negative" reviews of its products on Amazon.com. The decision means that Ubervita may issue subpoena's to Amazon.com and Cragslist to cough up the identities of those behind a "campaign of dirty tricks against Ubervita in a wrongful effort to put Ubervita at a competitive disadvantage in the marketplace." (PDF). According to a lawsuit by the maker of testosterone boosters, multivitamins and weight loss supplements, unknown commenters had placed fraudulent orders "to disrupt Ubervita's inventory," posted a Craigslist ad "to offer cash for favorable reviews of Ubervita products," and posed "as dissatisfied Ubervita customers in posting phony negative reviews of Ubervita products, in part based on the false claim that Ubervita pays for positive reviews." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Alfredo Mendez Facing the weight of the New York Attorney General, Lyft now says it will delay its planned Friday evening launch in the Big Apple. Earlier in the day, the Empire State’s prosecutor asked the New York Supreme Court to grant a temporary restraining order (TRO), hours before the company’s scheduled debut. According to the Attorney General’s office, an injunction was issued on Friday—a fact that Lyft disputes. Lyft is a San Francisco-based startup that allows its users to book rides from drivers via its smartphone app, effectively acting just like a taxi service. Earlier this year, as Lyft has expanded in various cities across America, the firm has faced fines and citations from numerous jurisdictions for not complying with local taxi law. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Warning: This video contains disturbing imagery. "This is not just jabs, they are hooks. Those are lights-out punches. Those aren’t like taps. You see it, you heard it. It was like ‘thump, thump, thump’ and then you see her head bouncing ‘bam, bam’ on the concrete. Then you hear her screaming, ‘No, don’t, stop.’ Then you even—at the end where she has her hands up like this—when it’s clear there is no more resistance, he takes another four or five shots." That's how motorist David Diaz described the incident he recorded with his phone of a homeless African American woman being beaten by a white California Highway Patrol (CHP) officer alongside a Southern California highway. The two-minute recording—which has generated millions of hits on YouTube and elsewhere—has prompted protests seeking justice, politicians demanding a federal inquiry, threats of lawsuits, and outrage against the CHP. The reaction virtually aligns with what happened in the immediate aftermath of the taped beating of Rodney King in 1991, when King's attack by Los Angeles Police Department officers went viral via a different means: the television. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The Federal Communications Commission voted today to devote an extra $5 billion over the next five years toward expanding Wi-Fi networks in schools and libraries. "The effort will potentially provide a 75 percent increase in Wi-Fi funding for rural schools over the next five years and a 60 percent increase for urban schools, delivering Wi-Fi to an additional 10 million students in 2015 alone," the commission said in an announcement. Wi-Fi networks are needed to deliver wireless Internet access to the tablets and laptops students increasingly use in classrooms. The $5 billion over five years is in addition to E-rate's annual budget of $2.4 billion. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Martin Lewison Security analysts have detected a new strain of malware based heavily on the Gameover ZeuS, which infected users’ computers and joined them up to a massive botnet. That botnet, in turn, specifically was designed to steal banking passwords on Windows machines. The revival comes just six weeks after American authorities announced a global takedown of the botnet earlier this year. Prosecutors say Gameover ZeuS’ masterminds have stolen more than $100 million as a result. In a sneaky move similar to its predecessor, the new strain uses a “Domain Generation Algorithm” (DGA), where the infected computer attempts to contact a list of gibberish domain names. In this case, the analysts at the security firm Malcovery determined that it was able to successfully connect to the domain cfs50p1je5ljdfs3p7n17odtuw.biz. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The TROL Act would target patent-holding entities that send demand letters to businesses. ashley rose Less than two months after Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) killed a comprehensive anti-patent-troll bill which had been passed by the House of Representatives, a much more modest bill taking aim at trolls has passed through a key subcommittee. The TROL (Targeting Roguexe and Opaque Letters) Act of 2014 (PDF), which passed by a 13-6 vote yesterday, is modest in scope. It only targets patent trolls that send out "demand letters" that some believe are misleading. The bill would make the act of sending a patent demand letter "in bad faith" punishable as an "unfair or deceptive act" under the FTC Act. Sending a letter would only be a crime if the letter met certain conditions, such as attempting to assert an invalid patent. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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