posted 12 days ago on ars technica
In the wake of the demonstration of a vulnerability in the "connected car" software used in a large number of Chrysler and Dodge vehicles in the United States, Fiat Chrysler NV announced today that it was recalling approximately 1.4 million vehicles for emergency security patches. The company has already issued a patch on its website for drivers, and on Thursday it performed an over-the-air update of some vehicles to block unauthorized remote access, Bloomberg Business reports. The vulnerability, revealed in a report by Wired earlier this week, allowed security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek to take remote control of a Jeep Cherokee's onboard computer and entertainment system, remotely controlling the throttle of the vehicle while a Wired reporter was driving it at 70mph on a St. Louis-area interstate highway. Miller and Valasek also demonstrated that they could take control of the vehicle's brakes and (in some cases) even its steering, as well as the vehicle's windshield wipers, navigation, and entertainment systems. The vehicles covered by the recall include the 2015 model year Dodge Ram pickup, Dodge's Challenger and Viper, and the Jeep Cherokee and Grand Cherokee SUVs. While Fiat Chrysler officials said that there was no known real-world use of the vulnerablity (outside Miller's and Valasek's proof of concept), they were taking the recall step out of "an abundance of caution." Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);He is jumping—literally jumping—with joy, bouncing up and down with clasped hands and wide eyes. This pogo stick of a man next to me in line is obviously excited to play the Doom multiplayer demo at this year's QuakeCon. And by the looks of the dozen other fans before us with mice and controllers already in hand, he's not alone. With over a decade since the last major Doom release in 2004, this franchise reboot has to clear a pretty high bar of fan expectations. Based on some hands-on time with the game at QuakeCon this week, fans probably won't be disappointed—and neither will newcomers. The demo shows off a game that carries an understanding of what it means to blend the memories of yesteryear with modern sensibilities. The first thing you do in the demo, in fact, is establish your loadouts, picking one of three presets (Assault, Sniper, or Ambusher) or customizing your own with two weapons and a piece of equipment. Your armaments are mostly familiarly retro—rocket launchers, plasma guns and, of course, Super Shotguns—but then you also have new equipment like grenades and a teleporter device. This last addition is pretty great: drop it down, then hit the equipment button again to warp back to that spot, getting you out of a sticky situation and potentially telefragging an unsuspecting enemy to boot. Though you can change loadouts between deaths, it probably won’t be long before you realize you just want rockets forever. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A Los Angeles Police Department 18-year-veteran was handed a three-year jail term Thursday, six weeks after being found guilty of striking a handcuffed female suspect in the crotch and throat. Much of the 2012 incident was captured on a police cruiser's dashcam. Officer Mary O'Callaghan, was convicted of felony assault under the color of authority. The 35-year-old victim, Alesia Thomas, died later that July evening. The medical examiner concluded that cocaine intoxication was a "major factor" in the death of the Los Angeles mother of two, so the officer was not charged in connection to the woman's death. The sentencing comes in the wake of high-profile police beatings nationwide, prompting both police departments and the public to call for officers to be outfitted with body cams and to have dash cams inside patrol vehicles. In this instance, O'Callaghan's conviction underscored the cameras' value of providing the public a level of accountability that likely would not have existed without the surveillance technology. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The process of hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”) shales to extract oil and natural gas has lowered prices and displaced some coal with cleaner-burning natural gas in the US. However, some of the methane we're extracting also escapes from oil and gas wells and heads straight to the atmosphere, where it is a potent greenhouse gas. That leakage is harmful to the climate, a wasted resource, and lost profit for natural gas producers, so researchers are working hard to find out just how much is leaking. If enough of it gets loose, natural gas can even lose its carbon emissions advantage over coal, despite its cleaner-burning nature. Many different natural gas fields have been investigated using different methods. Some estimates are “top-down,” using measurements from aircraft circling well fields to estimate how much is coming out of wells and pipelines. Other estimates are “bottom-up,” relying on measurements on the ground at individual sites and scaling them up to the total number of sites. Top-down techniques often yield larger estimates, and leakage rates can vary widely from one gas field to another. It’s complicated. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Comcast is negotiating with a few online publishers in an attempt to increase its holdings in the news business, The Wall Street Journal reported last night. "The company has engaged in preliminary discussions with several online publishers including Vice Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider and has discussed increasing its roughly 14% stake in Vox Media, according to people familiar with the matter," the Journal reported. "The talks are all at an early stage and it isn’t clear which, if any, of the deals might come to fruition." A few different arrangements are reportedly being discussed, with the focus being on investments rather than outright ownership. For example, Comcast could "take an equity stake in Vice as part of a deal that would turn one of the networks in its NBCUniversal cable division into a Vice channel." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Cribbing from the George W. Bush school of celebrations, huh, Tembo? 9 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The high-speed, creative 2D platforming genre owes everything to Sonic The Hedgehog—in more ways than one. Originally, of course, 1991's bluest mascot succeeded because he kicked so many of his era's slow, plodding Mario-likes in the jimmies. But Sega's creation might also deserve credit for spurring a new generation of game makers into action. Today, the actual Sonic franchise sucks—gosh, it has sucked for decades at this point—but there are plenty of indie developers filling in his spiky-haired void. Action Henk might be the best recent game to scratch that speedy, 2D-platforming itch, and other significant platformers of the past five years—Super Meat Boy, Risk of Rain, and Mark of the Ninja, to name a few—have drawn obvious inspiration from Sonic's formula of tricky obstacles, hidden tidbits, and a pressing need to finish levels quickly. Those are all well and good—really good, in fact—but what about a new game that feels precisely like Sonic? After a long time, a lot of awful 3D Sonic games, and the so-so Sonic The Hedgehog 4 reboot, Sega of all companies has come forward with something that might do the trick. Say hello to Tembo, the so-called "badass" elephant who relies on speed, body slams, and a trunk uppercut to tear through tricky vertical levels full of collectibles. Sounds like a beloved early '90s game, doesn't it? Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Half Life running on Android Wear. While traditional Internet wisdom tells us that no gadget is worth its salt unless it can run Doom—see the likes of the TI-85 calculator, the Commodore 64, and an ancient Kodak digital camera—time and technology moves on. These days, Doom is barely a challenge. With that in mind, an enterprising modder has instead got Valve's seminal first-person-shooter classic Half-Life, which features far more demanding 3D graphics, on an Android-powered LG G Watch. Yes, instead of playing Half-Life with a comfy keyboard and mouse, you can now fumble around with tiny touch-screen buttons, and squint at a 1.65-inch screen on your wrist. Hooray! OK, so playing Half-Life on a smartwatch is more proof of concept than something you'd actually want to do, but it just goes to show how quickly wearable tech is evolving. To get the game running on the LG G Watch, modder Dave Bennett used the SDLash app, which is able to emulate the GoldSource game engine used in Half-Life. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
A new industry group called HEVC Advance is threatening to demand royalties for the new HEVC video codec that could halve the bandwidth required for streaming online video, or offer higher resolutions with the same bandwidth usage. The organization is promising to demand a royalty of 0.5 percent of revenue from any broadcaster that uses the codec. This move could re-ignite the arguments surrounding video codecs on the Web, and may well jeopardize services such as Netflix's year old 4K streaming service. H.264, the de facto standard for video compression in online streaming video, has long had a shadow cast over its existence due to its patents and the royalties that must be paid for their licensing. A consortium called MPEG LA, representing many of the different patent holders that have intellectual property relevant to H.264 including Apple, Samsung, and Fujitsu, collects royalties on H.264 encoder and decoder hardware and software. However, to ensure that H.264 remained attractive and viable to online streaming services such as YouTube and Netflix, MPEG LA has committed to not charging any kind of a content-based royalty. This situation wasn't perfect, in particular presenting a problem for open source software decoders. Mozilla for a long time refused to support H.264 in Firefox, as it had no good way of paying the royalties that an integrated decoder would incur, and further felt that the Web should not settle on a patent-encumbered specification. After a long period of reflection, and in particular the growing realization that H.264 was far and away the market share leader, Mozilla eventually relented. First it built support for hardware-based playback—a workaround, of sorts, as the hardware manufacturers had already paid the licensing fees—and this was later followed by a donated software decoder from Cisco, with the networking company footing the bill. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Car infotainment systems suck. Using the touchscreen in a modern vehicle usually feels more like interacting with an ATM or a stubborn inkjet printer than using a well-designed, consumer-focused product. These crude, emotionless operating systems might feel right at home on an industrial factory robot, but in the wider world—where people are used to smartphone OSes that are continually refined—these barely designed systems fall flat. Infotainment systems are actually the worst part of a modern car. In fact, a study by Nielsen and SBD Consultancy found the systems in new cars to be the biggest cause of customer complaints. Much like during the beginnings of the modern smartphone, the car infotainment trend takes a bunch of manufacturers that traditionally have only made hardware and asks them to create software. It should be no surprise that they are terrible at it. (And that says nothing of their typical sloth-ish product cycles.) Smartphone companies are coming to save car infotainment, though. Google and Apple are both working to bring their market-leading smartphone OSes to the car, which will finally bring large app ecosystems, decent voice recognition, smooth scrolling and animations, and beautiful design to your car's dashboard. By combining the strengths of the smartphone with car hardware, the hope is for an easier, safer, and more user-friendly way to do your car computing needs on the go. Read 79 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
One of the more recent discoveries resulting from the breach two weeks ago of malware-as-a-service provider Hacking Team is sure to interest Android enthusiasts. To wit, it's the source code to a fully featured malware suite that had the ability of infecting devices even when they were running newer versions of the Google-developed mobile operating system. The leak of the code base for RCSAndroid—short for Remote Control System Android—is a mixed blessing. On the one hand, it provides the blueprints to a sophisticated, real-world surveillance program that can help Google and others better defend the Android platform against malware attacks. On the other, it provides even unskilled hackers with all the raw materials they need to deploy what's arguably one of the world's more advanced Android surveillance suites. "The RCSAndroid code can be considered one of the most professionally developed and sophisticated Android malware [titles] ever exposed," researchers from security firm McAfee wrote in a recently published blog post. "The leak of its code provides cybercriminals with a new weaponized resource for enhancing their surveillance operations." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
id Software's annual Quakecon gathering in Dallas, which kicked off on Thursday, has grown to encompass more than games like Doom and Quake, thanks to parent company Bethesda's involvement. As a result, announcements for other Bethesda series have become common, and in this year's case, that means the announcement of a new Fallout Anthology. The $49.99 RPG series compendium will launch on September 29 in North America and October 2 in Europe, exclusively for PC, and it will contain thin DVD sleeves for each prior game in the series tucked into a "mini-nuke" case that makes bomb sounds when a button is pressed. Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas will come as their final, DLC-loaded versions ("Game of the Year" and "Ultimate," respectively), while the rest of the package is rounded out with Fallout, Fallout 2, and Fallout Tactics. This set is clearly being targeted at fans awaiting November's Fallout 4, as it will contain a slot for fans to tuck that game's physical edition into the nuke. Should gaming fans want to catch up by buying all five games right now, Bethesda's Quakecon sale on Steam is selling all five games combined for $41.75—meaning the packaging will essentially tack $8.25 onto the digital-only cost (though fans will likely already own at least a few of the prior games, if not all of them). Pre-orders for the physical set have yet to go live. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Facebook does not have legal standing to challenge search warrants on behalf of its users, a New York appeals court has ruled in what was the biggest batch of warrants the social-media site said it ever received at one time. Facebook was served with 381 warrants in 2013 from Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. The warrants sought photos, private messages, and other information as part of a wide-ranging disability fraud investigation. As many as 134 people have been accused of disability fraud as part of the ongoing probe. Facebook objected to handing over the data and challenged it. The site was even threatened with contempt of court over the fight, so it reluctantly coughed up the data. Facebook was allowed to continue the challenge on appeal in a failed bid to set legal precedent for its users. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Patent trolls are so prolific these days that you don't really need to be successful to draw lawsuits. Case in point, a recently formed California company called TZU Technologies is demanding cash from six different players in the "virtual sex" industry—which barely even exists. TZU is using US Patent No. 6,368,268 to sue six companies working in the touch-over-Internet arena: Comingle, Holland Haptics, Vibease, Internet Service, Frixion, and Winzz. The patent was invented by Warren Sandvick, president of a Texas company called HasSex, which has an extremely trollish website and licensed the patent several times. Filed in 1998, and granted in 2002, the patent lays broad claim to a remotely controlled sexual "stimulation system," one version of which involved a "second user interface" located remotely from the first. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
An aspiring California rapper's online lyrical rant targeting two rape victims has landed him in legal hot water in a prosecution testing whether his threatening lyrics were protected speech or a criminal act. Anthony Murillo. YouTube The case comes at a time of uncertainty over what constitutes a threat in the online world. For example, in June, the Supreme Court overturned a 44-month sentence of a Pennsylvania man whose Facebook rap lyrics threatened attacks on an elementary school, his estranged wife, and a FBI agent.  A Supreme Court majority, analyzing a federal threats statute, said the government must prove first whether the lyrics he posted online were produced with a mental state having a "subjective intent to threaten." Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that if you accidentally call someone and don't take reasonable steps to prevent it, you don’t have an expectation of privacy if that person listens in. Kentucky executive James Huff accidentally called his assistant for over 90 minutes—and she listened in on an in-person conversation he was having. In this case, the court specifically found that Huff could not sue the assistant for violating a federal wiretap law. This was largely because Huff was aware of steps that he could have taken to prevent a pocket dial, such as locking the phone. "James Huff did not employ any of these measures," the court concluded earlier this week. "He is no different from the person who exposes in-home activities by leaving drapes open or a webcam on and therefore has not exhibited an expectation of privacy." Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Seems that non-Xbox owners might not have to wait that long to play the "timed exclusive" Rise of the Tomb Raider after its planned November 10 launch on Xbox 360 and Xbox One. Today, Square Enix announced that a PS4 version of the game will be released in "holiday 2016," and a PC version is planned for "early 2016." Square Enix and Microsoft made quite a splash when they initially announced Rise of the Tomb Raider as an Xbox exclusive last August. Days later, Microsoft's Phil Spencer clarified that the deal was actually a timed exclusive. "I didn't buy the IP in perpetuity," he said. Today was the first indication of just how long that exclusive timing might last. Despite the announcement, Rise of the Tomb Raider could still act as a major attractor for the Xbox One during this year's holiday sales race; 2013's Tomb Raider reboot sold over six million copies across a number of platforms. Rise will also likely be the largest big-budget action-adventure available this holiday season now that PlayStation 4 exclusive Uncharted 4 isn't coming until early 2016. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Since its launch in 2009, the $600 million Kepler Space Telescope has been scanning the cosmos in search of exoplanets—planets outside our Solar System. To date, the planet-hunting telescope has identified over 4,000 potential planets, of which nearly 1,000 have been confirmed. Faulty reaction wheels (used to maintain the telescope’s orientation in space) resulted in the termination of Kepler’s primary mission in 2013. But thanks to some out-of-the-box thinking, scientists were able to harness photons from the Sun to act as a third reaction wheel, stabilizing and allowing the telescope to carry on. Data from the first mission is still being analyzed, and the latest results to come out of it include a dozen planetary candidates that are similar to Earth in size and orbit within the habitable zone of their stars. As of today, one of these has been confirmed to be an actual planet. Of the roughly 1,030 confirmed exoplanets that Kepler has detected, again, only a dozen are close in size to the Earth. This time last year, Kepler identified its first Earth-sized planet in a habitable zone: Kepler-186f. The habitable zone, sometimes referred to as the “Goldilocks Zone,” is the region around a star that has just the right conditions to find liquid water on a planet’s surface. And liquid water is a key ingredient in the search for life. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Richard Stallman, the founder of the Free Software Foundation and the GNU Project known by many in the open source worlds as rms, is not the sort of person you'd expect to endorse a product. But Stallman and the FSF have formed a partnership of sorts with Crowd Supply, a crowdfunding company that has been largely focused on open source hardware and software projects. Crowd Supply is best known for launching the Librem laptop (a privacy-focused computer built by Purism) and the Novena (an open-hardware "laptop"  designed by Andrew "bunnie" Huang and Sean "xobs" Cross). Based in Portland, Oregon, the company was founded by Joshua Lifton, a Ph.D. alumnus of MIT Media Lab and the former head of engineering at Puppet Labs. In addition to providing product designers with a crowdfunding platform, Crowd Source also provides them with long-term sales, marketing, and fulfillment services. The partnership with FSF was a natural fit, Lifton said in a statement on the arrangement. "The lines between hardware and software are blurring," Lifton explained. "It only makes sense to consider them jointly rather than separately.” Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Journalism is prone to hyperbole, but on July 23, 1985 technology genuinely changed forever. At New York's Lincoln Center, as a full orchestra scored the evening and all its employees appeared in tuxedos, Commodore unveiled the work of its newly acquired Amiga subsidiary for the first time. The world finally saw a real Amiga 1000 and all its features. A baboon's face at 640x400 resolution felt life-changing, and icons like Blondie's Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol came onstage to demo state-of-the-art technology like a paint program. Today, Amiga—specifically its initial Amiga 1000 computer—officially turns 30. The Computer History Museum (CHM) in Mountain View, CA will commemorate the event this weekend (July 25 and 26) with firsthand hardware exhibits, speakers, and a banquet where the Viva Amiga documentary will be shown. It's merely the most high-profile event among dozens of Amiga commemorative ceremonies across the world, from Australia to Germany to Cleveland. What's the big deal? While things like the Apple II and TRS-80 Model 100 preceded it, the Amiga 1000 was the first true PC for creatives. As the CHM describes it, the Amiga 1000 was "a radical multimedia machine from a group of thinkers, tinkerers, and visionaries which delivered affordable graphics, animation, music, and multitasking interaction the personal computer world hadn’t even dreamt of." It pioneered desktop video and introduced PCs to countless new users, rocketing Amiga and Commodore to the top for a brief moment in the sun. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
2011's The Binding of Isaac has remained an Ars Technica favorite for some time, especially due to the "Zelda roguelike" game receiving robust upgrades and improvements in a 2014 semi-sequel. But for years, the gross, religiously charged adventure had one glaring issue: its absence from Nintendo systems. That situation changed on Thursday with The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth's launch on both the Wii U and new 3DS systems, along with the Xbox One—a fact we point out because of how long its creators have been trying to get the game on a Nintendo console. "We just kept pushing them and working on the [new Nintendo] version," game creator Edmund McMillen told Ars in a Skype interview. He credited internal staffers who were fans of the game, including former Nintendo indie-games chief Dan Adelman, who had pushed for a change in policy that would allow the game to be launched on his company's devices. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Researchers at an HP security division have publicly detailed four code-execution vulnerabilities that can be used to hijack end-user machines running the latest versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser. The disclosures earlier this week came more than six months after researchers from HP-owned TippingPoint first privately reported the bugs to Microsoft security engineers. According to the advisories published here, here, here, and here, Microsoft officials acknowledged the bugs and in each case asked for an extension beyond the four months TippingPoint officials normally wait before publicly disclosing vulnerabilities. All four of the extensions expired Sunday, leading to the public disclosure of the bugs. It remains unclear why Microsoft hasn't issued fixes. TippingPoint alerted Microsoft to three of the vulnerabilities in January and one of them last November. A Microsoft spokesman told Ars he was looking in to the matter. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back with a whole bunch of deals to help get you through your Thursday. Today's featured items are all about gaming. We've got a Playstation 4 Arkham Knight bundle for $369.99—that's $80 off, a years worth of PlayStation Plus for $39.99—that's $10 off, and for you PC gamers, an Alienware Tactx Laser Gaming Mouse with a $25 dell gift card for $44.99. Featured Gaming Deals Sony PlayStation Plus 12-Month Subscription for $39.99 (list price $49.99). Sony Playstation 4 Batman: Arkham Knight Bundle for $369.99 (list price $449.99). [Rebranded Logitech G9X] Alienware Tactx 5000dpi Laser Gaming Mouse + $25 Dell Gift Card for $44.99 (list price $79 - use 10% code 8$4T4X5Q4435VN). Desktops & Monitors Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
eSports are already rivaling traditional sports in viewership ratings, and pro game players are seeing career-ending injuries in the style of their more athletic counterparts. Now, numerous eSports leagues are once again mimicking the world of physical sports in preparing to crack down on the use of performance-enhancing drugs at tournaments. Widespread use of attention-focusing drugs like Adderall has been something of an open secret in the eSports community for a while; eSports consultant Bjoern Franzen publicly warned of rampant eSports pill-popping last year and an excellent Eurogamer exposé on the problem from April included many anonymous players admitting to widespread drug use. But the issue really came to a head earlier this month when Kory "Semphis" Friesen, a former member of high-profile pro gaming team Cloud9 who was recently let go for poor performance, admitted in a video interview that "we were all on Adderall" during Electronic Sports League (ESL) tournaments. "It's pretty obvious if you listen to the comms," Friesen said, referring to the frenetic, hectic back-and-forth on in-game chat channels. The interview seems to have been a wake-up call for some eSports leagues to tighten up their drug enforcement. "The integrity of our sport is and always will be our biggest concern," ESL Head of Communications Anna Rozwandowicz told Wired UK. "When we first saw [Friesen's comments], we focused immediately on kickstarting a policy-making process and adjusting the rules." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Compared to deeper cosmological mysteries like the identity of dark matter and dark energy or what’s going on inside black holes, there are other unknowns that appear more mundane, their solutions seemingly within reach. But despite appearing to be a tractable problem, one mystery has managed to persist for almost the entirety of the past century, making it one of the longest-standing problems in astronomy. About a century ago, researchers observed the telltale signs of absorption of light by unknown molecules that reside in the thinly spread material in the space between stars (the interstellar medium). The gas and dust of the interstellar medium absorb certain wavelengths of light, preventing those wavelengths from arriving here and leaving gaps (or lines) in the spectrum we record when we look at other stars. Researchers can find out what substance, or "carrier," is responsible for the lines by identifying molecules that absorb the specific wavelengths that are missing from the observed spectrum. Combining this lab research with theoretical modeling and more astronomical observations has allowed us to figure out what’s lurking in interstellar space. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Canada's large incumbent Internet service providers must now make their fiber networks available to competitors under a new requirement designed to boost broadband competition. "Following an extensive review, the CRTC [Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission] found that the large incumbent companies continue to possess market power in the provision of wholesale high-speed access services and is requiring that they make these services available to competitors," the CRTC said in an announcement yesterday. "In addition, the demand by Canadians for higher speed services will only increase in the coming years to support their growing Internet needs and usage. Large incumbent companies will now have to make their fibre facilities available to their competitors. This measure will ensure that Canadians have more choice for high-speed Internet services and are able to fully leverage the benefits of the broadband home or business." The CRTC has a framework setting out the rates, terms, and conditions under which the providers must offer wholesale access. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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