posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Badware purveyors trying to capitalize on the ongoing Pokémon Go frenzy have achieved an important milestone by sneaking their fake wares into the official Google Play marketplace, security researchers said Friday. Researchers from antivirus provider Eset report finding at least three such apps in the Google-hosted marketplace. Of the three, the one titled "Pokemon Go Ultimate" posed the biggest threat because it deliberately locks the screen of devices immediately after being installed. In many cases, restarting an infected phone isn't enough to unlock the screen. Infected phones can ultimately be unlocked either by removing the battery or by using the Android Device Manager. Once the screen has been unlocked and the device has restarted, the app—which by now has the title PI Network—is removed from the device's app menu. Still, it continues to run in the background and surreptitiously clicks on ads in an attempt to generate revenue for its creators. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Killer C-C-C-Cuts! (credit: iam8bit) You'd be forgiven for scoffing at limited-edition vinyl album releases, whether because you mock them as the stuff of snooty hipsters or because you take issue with their supposed sound-reproduction superiority. But I will defend to the death anybody who lovingly manufactures gatefold-sleeve albums—or, at least, the ones that are dedicated to retro video game soundtracks. This new niche genre of gaming product actually didn't kick off until late last year, when British company Data Discs began publishing remastered vinyl soundtracks of classic Sega games. Gaming-merch company iam8bit has also gotten in on the fun with its own line of albums. Ars doesn't typically write about album launches, but we're making an exception for Killer Cuts: the Killer Instinct soundtrack. Why? Because the soundtrack for the original 1995 arcade game was a veritable soup of genres and sound samples, which makes it one of the most interesting candidates for iam8bit's remastering process. The soundtrack won't start shipping in its vinyl edition until October, but preorders kicked off Friday as a promotion linked to this weekend's hugely popular EVO fighting game tournament. The vinyl will come in one of three covers, each with the record colored to match the character on its front. This weekend only, interested fighting-music fans can score KI's green-vinyl Fulgore edition with metallic paper. Also, pre-order customers are automatically entered to win a pretty cool-looking Fulgore figurine. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Windows 10 runs on many different kinds of hardware, from the giant Surface Hubs down to itty bitty IoT things. As part of its pitch to developers, Microsoft said that it was aiming to have 1 billion devices—PCs, tablets, phones, Xboxes, HoloLenses, and whatever else can run the operating system—within the first two to three years of its availability. That target is now off the table, reports Mary Jo Foley. In a statement, the company said: Windows 10 is off to the hottest start in history with over 350M monthly active devices, with record customer satisfaction and engagement. We're pleased with our progress to date, but due to the focusing of our phone hardware business, it will take longer than FY18 for us to reach our goal of 1 billion monthly active devices. In the year ahead, we are excited about usage growth coming from commercial deployments and new devices—and increasing customer delight with Windows. The issue is mobile. At the time of the prediction, Microsoft was counting on selling 50 million Windows phones a year. These were an important part of the 1 billion devices, because one of the key selling points of Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform is the way it enables developers to easily adapt their software for the many different form factors that Windows supports. Phones were expected to be the largest of the non-PC form factors, but a series of missteps has seen Microsoft's phone sales collapse. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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SpaceX's last mission, Eutelsat/ABS, launched on June 15, 2016. (credit: SpaceX) One of the most persistent criticisms of SpaceX has been the rocket company's inability to meet its launch commitments. Talk to any of Elon Musk's competitors in the rocket and spacecraft business, and they will all say the same thing—SpaceX isn't meeting the demands of its customers. Too much pizzazz, too little substance, and so on. To some extent, this jealousy-tinged criticism is valid. In 2014, the company had about a dozen missions on its books, and it launched six times. Last year the company had as many as 17 launches planned, but an accident on June 28, 2015 forced it to stand down for nearly the entire second half of the year. SpaceX ended up making six successful launches in 2015. However, this year the company is off to a good start with six successful missions completed so far and a seventh launch planned for 12:45am ET Monday (5:45am BST) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This flight of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket seeks to deliver the Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station with its payload of 1.7 tons of supplies as well as an International Docking Adapter. This adapter will allow crewed versions of the Dragon Spacecraft and Boeing's Starliner to perform automated rendezvous and docking maneuvers with the station beginning in late 2017 or early 2018. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In an alternate universe, 30-somethings have nostalgic memories of playing this game on the SNES-CD The fabled SNES-CD peripheral may have never actually made it to market in the mid-'90s as planned. But that hasn't stopped homebrew developers from utilizing the magic of emulation to make software designed to run on the near-mythical "Nintendo PlayStation." It's been a long and weird road to get to this surprising point in emulation history. After a seemingly one-of-a-kind "SFX-100" prototype of the SNES-CD was found and disassembled last year, an apparent working version of the system's BIOS found its way to the Internet in March. Armed with that BIOS file (and some additional sleuthing on components, memory, and IO mapping for the CD-ROM add-on), the latest version of low-level SNES emulator no$sns is actually able to simulate how games would have run on the SNES-CD prototype. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Comcast) Comcast's Internet Essentials program that provides $10-per-month Internet service to low-income families has been expanded to make about 1.3 million additional households eligible. Comcast created Internet Essentials in order to secure approval of its acquisition of NBCUniversal in 2011 and has decided to continue it indefinitely even though the requirement expired in 2014. Comcast says the 10Mbps plan has connected more than 600,000 low-income families since 2011, for a total of 2.4 million adults and children, and provided 47,000 subsidized computers for less than $150 each. Advocates for the poor have complained that the Internet Essentials service is too hard to sign up for, in part because of problems with the application process but also because it's usually only available to families with kids in school. That latter issue is what Comcast addressed today, announcing that "adults without a child eligible for the National School Lunch Program will be eligible to apply for Internet Essentials." Previously, pilot programs gave access to some low-income seniors and low-income community college students, but this is the first time that Internet Essentials will be available to adults without children nationwide. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Chuck Grimmett) There may finally be some clarity to the long hazy debate on exactly how much marijuana is in an average, pre-rolled joint. The answer, according to two researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, is 0.32 grams. That number is far lower than some reports, which have been as high as a gram. But the number generally falls within the range of the many estimates that have come before it, which is typically between 0.30 and 0.75 grams. Nailing down the average amount in a pre-rolled joint may not seem all that important to some, as many users now use vaporizers. But Penn drug policy expert Greg Ridgeway, one of the researchers behind the new estimate, argues it is. "It turns out to be a critical number in estimating how much marijuana is being consumed [nationwide], how much drug-trafficking organizations are putting on the market, and how much states might expect in revenue post-legalization," he said in a news release. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Universal Pictures) It’s a common perception that less-educated people have more children. The idea causes much hand-wringing and gnashing of teeth over the possibility that human populations might become stupider over the course of generations. But it’s actually pretty difficult to confirm whether there really is a reproductive trend that would change the genetic makeup of the human population overall. Jonathan Beauchamp, a “genoeconomist” at Harvard, is interested in questions at the intersection of genetics and economics. He published a paper in PNAS this week that provides some of the first evidence of evolution at the genetic level in a reasonably contemporary human population. One of his main findings is slight evolutionary selection for lower education—but it’s really slight, just 1.5 months less of education per generation. Given that the last century has seen vastly increased education across the globe, and around two years extra per generation in the same time period as Beauchamp’s study, this genetic selection is easily outweighed by cultural factors. There are other important caveats to the finding, most notably that Beauchamp only looks at a very small segment of the global population: US citizens of European descent, born between 1931 and 1953. This means that we can’t generalize the results to, say, China or Ghana, or even US citizens of non-European descent. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton checks her Blackberry phone alongside Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan (R) as she attends the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, Korea, November 30, 2011. Clinton used the uncleared, personal device throughout her four years at the State Department in conjunction with a private mail server in her home. (credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images) Hillary Clinton, former secretary of state and presumptive Democratic nominee for the presidency, is facing a massive backlash after an FBI investigation found her to have been "extremely careless" in the handling of classified information. The scandal surrounding her use of a private e-mail server has only grown since the Justice Department's decision not to pursue criminal charges. Polls show that a majority of Americans believe she should have been indicted, and more recent polls place Clinton in a dead heat with the presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. Clinton led by a significant margin just weeks ago. Regardless of the political games being played, the facts of Clinton's use of a private e-mail server and the related potential exposure of Top Secret information—including the names of covert intelligence personnel overseas and at home—are worth knowing and nailing down. At the core, these details raise a much broader question surrounding how national secrets are kept and shared and how broken the information infrastructure of the United States government really is. In order to have an intelligent conversation about Clinton’s e-mails, here is a technical analysis of the evidence as it has been presented (think of it like a print version of Congressional hearings, minus screaming, finger-pointing, and grandstanding). A clearer picture has started emerging based on the testimony given by FBI Director James Comey and the Inspectors General of the State Department and the Intelligence Community (OIG), plus a portion of the 30,000-plus e-mails released thus far through FOIA requests by the State Department and other agencies. That picture, based on our assessment, is not a very pretty one. Read 42 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The second half of Magic: The Gathering’s return to Innistrad, Eldritch Moon (EMN), will be released on July 22—but we've been lucky enough to play with the set already. Read on for our review of the newest addition to the Magic line, as the mystery of the madness infecting Innistrad is revealed... Surprise! It was Emrakul who had been hiding out in Innistrad and was causing some, er, issues. Emrakul, the Promised End. Moving on from the brooding sense of horror in Shadows over Innistrad (SOI), EMN is the big reveal, with the last Eldrazi titan—Emrakul—arriving on the plane to wreak havoc. For people who missed our other Magic reviews, Emrakul is one of three giant reality-warping creatures with clear Lovecraftian influences, and her tentacled touch is what’s behind the events in SOI. From a game mechanics sense, this means the end of Investigate from the first set, as the mystery is solved, and the addition of several new mechanics—Emerge, Meld, and Escalate—to represent things going from bad to worse. In general, follow-up sets in Magic can be a little more experimental, as players now have had some time to get the grasp with the foundations, and EMN really delivers on the “new and weird” front. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we've got a bunch of deals from Dell's Black Friday in July sale. One of the best of them is a bundle deal: you can get a Vizio P-Series 50-inch 4K LED home theater display with a $250 Dell gift card and a 6-inch tablet remote for $999. The display alone is worth $999, so you're essentially getting the remote and the $250 gift card for free. There are also great savings on Skylake-powered desktops, powerful laptops, monitors, and much more, so grab those hot-ticket items before they're sold out. Check out the full list of Dell's Black Friday in July deals below. Featured Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Texas Congressman Lamar Smith has had an eventful run as chair of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology so far. And his most colorful highlights revolve around climate science. Smith, who rejects the central conclusions of climate scientists, has been demanding the e-mails of NOAA scientists, whom he has accused of manipulating data for a 2015 study published in the journal Science, even though that work is publicly available, independently replicated, and scientifically uncontroversial. Recently, he has turned his focus to several state attorneys general who are pursuing investigations of Exxon Mobil. Some recent media reports revealed that Exxon’s own climate research in the 1970s and '80s concluded that climate change was human-caused. But the company later reversed course and campaigned to block any climate policies. Several investigations are now looking at whether, in doing so, Exxon misled its shareholders. The investigations are modeled after the cases brought against tobacco companies in the 1990s. In May, Smith subpoenaed 17 attorneys general and eight environmental groups for any communications related to these investigations, describing them as “a coordinated attempt to attack the First Amendment rights of American citizens.” Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / This handy graphic breaks down the times and games of Evo, and tells you which Twitch channel is covering what. Fighting game competitors and fans from around the globe are gathering this weekend in Las Vegas for the Evolution Championship Series (more commonly known as Evo), the world's largest fighting game event. We detailed exactly what attending Evo is like back in 2013. This year, the tournament features the following nine games, with the number of player entries noted after each game: Street Fighter V (5107)Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 (782)Mortal Kombat X (713)Guilty Gear Xrd: Revelator (910)Pokkén Tournament (1180)Killer Instinct (546)Super Smash Bros. Melee (2372)Super Smash Bros. for WiiU (2662)Tekken 7: Fated Retribution (549) There's something for everyone, from the more casual and accessible games like Smash Bros. and Pokkén Tournament, to the more hardcore stylings of anime fighter Guilty Gear Xrd and arcade-only Tekken 7: Fated Retribution, but Street Fighter V is the big story, with registration more than doubling last year's entries for Street Fighter IV. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Columbia Pictures Ecto-1, back in action. 9 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The original Ghostbusters came out around the same time as Real Genius, Weird Science, and Revenge of the Nerds. Those ‘80s films happened to share a theme: geek underdogs triumph over bullies and idiots while inventing bizarre contraptions. In 2016, of course, geeks who started a small tech company in a tiny loft space would be showered with venture capital rather than scorn. So it's a good thing that the new Ghostbusters film remixes the idea of geeks in tan jumpsuits hunting down poltergeists. Rather than try to recapture the exact glory of the original Ghostbusters, this new movie reflects how geek culture—and our relationship with the paranormal—has changed. That in turn is what makes it worthy to bear the name Ghostbusters. I'll admit that I was apprehensive about the idea of a new Ghostbusters film. It's a "reboot" of one of the all-time great science fiction/fantasy comedies, up there with Back to the Future, so it had a lot to live up to. The trailers didn't look great, and I know I’m not the only one fatigued by Hollywood's compulsion to remake everything, from RoboCop to Total Recall. Plus Spy, the previous collaboration between Ghostbusters director Paul Feig and star Melissa McCarthy, didn't wow me, even though I liked their other films, Bridesmaids and The Heat. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Martin Shkreli, chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, exits federal court in New York, US, on Thursday, December 17, 2015. Shkreli was arrested on alleged securities fraud related to Retrophin Inc., a biotech firm he founded in 2011. (credit: Louis Lanzano/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Today, Martin Shkreli, the reviled former pharmaceutical CEO best known for price-gouging a life-saving drug, running an alleged Ponzi-like scheme, and smirking, had the date for his trial on securities fraud charges set to June 26, 2017 in New York. Shkreli, 33, has been indicted on eight charges in connection with the alleged Ponzi-like scheme, in which he swindled his former pharmaceutical company, Retrophin, out of $11 million in order to cover and hide losses from two hedge funds he managed. He was arrested back in December along with his former counsel, Evan Greebel. Both have pled not guilty to all charges and Shkreli was released on $5 million bail that he posted with an E-trade account worth $45 million at the time. Since then, the pair have had their court proceedings delayed after Shkreli fired his legal team and federal prosecutors added additional charges. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Megan Geuss) On Wednesday, lawmakers in Utah voted to approve a bill that would make it legal for firefighters or law enforcement to shoot down, spoof, or otherwise disable drones found flying over airspace that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) puts under temporary restriction due to wildfire. The bill was passed after a small drone flying over a fire 300 miles south of Salt Lake City forced firefighters to ground aircraft. Utah’s governor, Gary Herbert, has said that the fire expanded and became more expensive to control after the drone incident. Herbert is expected to sign the bill in the coming days. Evan Vickers, the Utah senator that co-sponsored the bill, said that firefighters and police would be allowed to shoot a drone down, but he added that they’d probably use technology to jam signals sent to a drone and bring it down that way. (You can see a video of that kind of solution here.) "The redneck in me [says] to shoot the damn thing," the Republican senator said to the Salt Lake Tribune. “But there are much more humane ways to do that,” he added. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Chex Quest HD is a real thing. Get ready to shoot lasers at booger-shaped aliens in crisp 1080p before long. (credit: Charles Jacobi) Even if you're not an avid video gamer, you've probably noticed a significant uptick in "HD remakes" of older, popular video games. Everyone's doing them, and the remaster pool includes everything from redrawn, cartoony games like Capcom's DuckTales to gritty war simulations like Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. You might argue that some of these aren't necessary, whether because they're "remasters" of games that are only a few years old or because the source material isn't a cultural cornerstone. And you may be tempted to lump Chex Quest, a 1996 CD-ROM game packed into boxes of cereal in which players must save a race of square-shaped "Chex people" from booger-shaped monsters, into the latter category. But even that game's coming in HD—and apparently, some people really want it. Chex Quest has enjoyed quite the cult following since its unique mid-'90s launch, perhaps because it was a free, kid-friendly re-skin of Doom and was therefore many kids' first taste of the first-person shooter phenomenon. As such, gaming site Zam reached out to one of the game's co-creators, lead artist Charles Jacobi, to talk about the weird game's genesis and development in light of its 20th anniversary this year—and in the interview, the artist let slip that he's currently working on an HD remaster of the original. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Stanley Sagov) Rep. Jackie Speier (D-San Francisco) formally introduced a new bill in Congress on Thursday that would seek to make involuntary, or “revenge” pornography, a federal crime, punishable with a maximum penalty of five years in prison. The bill, which is known as the Intimate Privacy Protection Act of 2016, states: Whoever knowingly uses the mail, any interactive computer service or electronic communication service or electronic communication system of interstate commerce, or any other facility of interstate or foreign commerce to distribute a visual depiction of a person who is identifiable from the image itself or information displayed in connection with the image and who is engaging in sexually explicit conduct, or of the naked genitals or post-pubescent female nipple of a person, with reckless disregard for the person’s lack of consent to the distribution, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both. Until now, there has been no such federal bill introduced—but 34 states, including California, have already created similar legislation. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Eduardo Woo) We've read about all kinds of weird things happening to people playing Pokémon Go on their mobile phones—including players being the victims of muggings, participants being accused of trespassing or getting lost, and even app-related divorce. (credit: Hancock County Sheriff's Office) The story of an Indiana man, however, takes the cake. The case of 42-year-old Randy Zuick comes in as our top vote for Dumbest Criminal of the Month, and it also gets our top vote for the Strangest Pokémon Go Story we've heard following the mobile app's debut last week. Zuick is a registered child sex offender. In April he pleaded guilty to a felony charge of fondling a child under 14 and was placed on sex-offender probation for four years. The terms include him not interacting with children, local media reported. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This is the only controller you'll need for PlayStation VR. If you're thinking about buying Sony's PlayStation VR when it launches this October, you should know that you don't absolutely need a pair of hand-tracking PlayStation Move controllers to go with the headset. Sony recently confirmed to Eurogamer that "all PlayStation VR titles will support DualShock 4 controllers. However, some game experiences will be enhanced with the use of peripherals such as Move or the recently announced Aim controller." On the one hand, this makes PlayStation VR that much more accessible to the existing PlayStation 4 audience, which is already guaranteed to have a DualShock 4 controller to use with the $399 headset. VR users will still need to add a $50 PlayStation Camera accessory to enable positional head-tracking (provided they don't already own one), but they won't have to invest in the full $500 bundle that includes two Move controllers. On the other hand, the DualShock support requirement means PSVR games like Job Simulator and Fantastic Contraption, which were originally designed for the HTC Vive's hand-tracking controllers, will likely have to be redesigned to support a standard handheld controller as well. That could lead to some awkward, button-and-joystick control schemes being grafted on to games that were made with true hand-tracking in mind. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: John Palmer) As if people didn't already have cause to distrust the security of Juniper products, the networking gear maker just disclosed a vulnerability that allowed attackers to eavesdrop on sensitive communications traveling through customers' virtual private networks. In an advisory posted Wednesday, Juniper officials said they just fixed a bug in the company's Junos operating system that allowed adversaries to masquerade as trusted parties. The impersonation could be carried out by presenting a forged cryptographic certificate that was signed by the attacker rather than by a trusted certificate authority that normally vets the identity of the credential holder. "When a peer device presents a self-signed certificate as its end entity certificate with its issuer name matching one of the valid CA certificates enrolled in Junos, the peer certificate validation is skipped and the peer certificate is treated as valid," Wednesday's advisory stated. "This may allow an attacker to generate a specially crafted self-signed certificate and bypass certificate validation." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Getty Images | Yuri_Arcurs) Two votes taken by the Federal Communications Commission today could have big implications for the transition to faster mobile networks and the discontinuance of old landline networks. The two votes aren't directly related, but they each prepare for a future that could rely more on wireless technologies for voice and Internet service. In one item, the FCC voted to open up high-frequency spectrum to help carriers create 5G networks that would be faster than existing 4G ones. The second vote will make it easier for carriers to turn off old landline phone networks as long as they replace them with either wired or wireless equivalents. Copper landlines can be replaced with fiber or wireless technology if they offer the same performance, reliability, coverage, access to 911, and compatibility with systems including medical monitoring devices. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: various brennemans) Kids who got teased for sucking their thumbs or biting their nails may, after all, get the last laugh. It turns out that repeatedly sticking grimy digits into your pie-hole as a youngster may help strengthen your immune system and prevent the development of allergies later in life, researchers report in the August issue of Pediatrics. The finding is certainly a score for the underdogs of the schoolyard, but it also lends more support to the “hygiene hypothesis.” This decades-old hypothesis generally suggests that exposure to germs and harmless microbes in childhood can help develop a healthy, tolerant immune system—that is, one not prone to autoimmune diseases and hypersensitive responses such as allergies. “Although we do not suggest that children should be encouraged to take up these oral habits, the findings suggest that thumb-sucking and nail-biting reduce the risk for developing sensitization to common aeroallergens,” the study authors conclude. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The site Exposed.su published the birthdays, addresses, phone numbers, and Social Security numbers of dozens of celebrities and public officials, including the heads of the FBI and CIA. (credit: krebonsecurity.com) A 22-year-old hacker has been handed a two-year prison sentence for his role in doxing and swatting politicians, celebrities, prosecutors, the first lady, and security journalist Brian Krebs. While cooperating with the FBI after his 2012 arrest on unrelated charges, Mir Islam doxed and swatted as many as 50 people, authorities said. Those who were doxed had their information appear on a website Islam ran called "Exposed." Victims included First Lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. Those who were swatted include Stephen P. Heymann, the Massachusetts federal prosecutor that handled the Aaron Swartz prosecution; security journalist Brian Krebs; Wayne LaPierre, the CEO of the National Rifle Association; and Mike Rogers, a former GOP representative from Michigan and a key supporter of the Stop Online Piracy Act. Islam also orchestrated a phony threat of an active shooter at the University of Arizona. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The new additions enable all kinds of different occupations for emoji women of many colors. (credit: Google) The Unicode Consortium announced plans (PDF) to support new emoji aimed at promoting gender equality—11 new "professional" emoji will depict both men and women performing different jobs, and there will be both male and female versions of 33 existing emoji that currently depict either a man or a woman but not both. The plan is based largely on a proposal from Google, a prominent member of the Unicode Consortium, back in May (PDF). The new professions include, in the Unicode Consortium's words: a farmer, welder, mechanic, health worker, scientist, coder, business worker, chef, student, teacher, and rockstar. To avoid the normally lengthy wait time associated with new emoji—Unicode 9.0 was just finalized in June, and version 10.0 won't be finalized until June of 2017—Unicode is using combinations of existing emoji to create the new ones. The process is similar to, though not exactly the same as, the system for changing skin tones. A special character called a "zero-width joiner" (ZWJ) can be placed between two or more emoji, and operating systems that support it know to put out a different composite emoji rather than a series of separate emoji. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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