posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images) Telcos could be forced to block porn sites if a stealth government amendment to the draft Digital Economy Bill is waved through by parliamentarians. The report stage and third reading of the proposed legislation, which seeks to regulate a hunk of areas from Internet infrastructure to intellectual property, will be debated by MPs next Monday (November 28). Age verification for access to online porn also forms part of the government's shopping list. Brits wanting to access fruity material via websites or apps will be subjected to checks to confirm that they are aged 18 or over. And the bill already makes it clear that the government wants to go after "infringing sites" by choking their access to payment providers such as Visa and PayPal, and threatening fines of up to £250,000 or five percent of a person's "qualifying turnover (if any)." Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge Nearly 18 months after it was first announced as a feature, Oculus Rift owners will soon be able to stream Xbox One games directly to their virtual reality headsets. The feature arrives as a free update to the Oculus Rift PC app on December 12. The feature won't turn Xbox One games into VR experiences, but instead lets you play them in front of a huge virtual display inside the headset, similar to how Netflix currently works. Naturally, you need an Xbox One and a stack of games to get started, as well as an Oculus Rift headset connected to a Windows 10 PC. Minimum network requirements aren't stated, but it's fair to say that the best experience will likely be over Ethernet rather than Wi-Fi. Users will also have the choice of viewing their virtual screen in one of three different environments:"Citadel," "Retreat," and "Dome." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / You're not gonna do better than a PS4 Slim with three games for $250 at Best Buy (the Xbox One deal shown above is available elsewhere, though) Once again, Black Friday is a bonanza for gamers this year, offering some rare discounts on gaming hardware and especially good prices on in-demand software. As in years past, we've sifted through all the advertisements and retailer offers to pick out the best deals available on the day after Thanksgiving (though many of these deals will start on Thanksgiving day itself and/or last into the weekend. Check your local store's hours before you head out). 0 PlayStation 4 hardware The general going rate for a PS4 Slim packaged with a 500GB hard drive and Uncharted 4 this Black Friday season is $250, down from the usual $300. Pretty much every major retailer will have the system at this price, but there are a few stores that are throwing in a few extras with the bundle as well. Here are the best bonuses we could find: Best Buy: The Last of Us & Ratchet & Clank GameStop: The Last of Us OR Ratchet & Clank Walmart: $30 gift card Meijer: $25 gift card Fred Meyer: $20 gift card If you need extra controllers more than extra games, Costco has its own Uncharted 4 bundle with a second DualShock 4 for $280. If you want to pick up controllers a la carte, they'll be going for $40 at Target, Walmart, Kohl's, and Toys R Us on Black Friday. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / System76's Oryx Pro: Not small, quite powerful. (credit: Scott Gilbertson) Laptops preloaded with Linux aren't as rare as they used to be. In fact, big name hardware companies like Dell have whole lines of laptops that ship with Ubuntu installed, and if you want to stretch things a bit you could argue that a Chromebook is a kind of Linux machine (though it takes a bit of tinkering to get actual Linux installed). Still, there's no question the Linux user of today has a wealth of options compared with the dark ages of just a few years ago when "I use Linux" was code for "I spend all my time looking for hardware drivers." Today, what remains unusual even in the midst of this growing interest in PCs shipping with Linux is a company that sells nothing else. There are a handful of organization that do just this, however, and they have done so for some time. These entities range from longtime Linux supporters like System76 to newer efforts from the likes of Purism, which began life with an impressive crowdfunding campaign that raised more than a $1 million to create a line of sleek, Apple-inspired but completely free-software laptops. If Purism is any indicator, the Linux-based hardware businesses might have an actual future in a world increasingly dissatisfied with the proprietary OSes being offered. After all, if you're a developer looking to get a laptop with more than 16GB of RAM, Apple's no longer an option. That company recently updated its Macbook Pro line but still caps RAM at 16GB. So, you can either get a PC and live with Windows 10 or you can try installing Linux and hope it works. Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Megan Geuss DURHAM, NC—On a crisp morning in October, Audi hosted a coterie of journalists at an unassuming brick building near Durham’s downtown. The building was a “culinary incubator”—essentially a temporary restaurant space for concept dining startups and events. Speaking over coffee and various breakfast foods, Audi executives tried to tie the building’s startup ethos into an overview of Audi’s own strategy for the coming year. Part of that strategy involves the new Audi S3, a premium sedan in the A3 family that we journalists were about to drive for the first time. Make new customers, but keep the old The 2017 S3 is little changed from its earlier version, but it’s still an important car for Audi. Audi is VW Group’s most profitable brand, and it’s a critical part of the German automaker’s strategy to retain VW owners who are ready to “graduate” to a luxury brand. And, after a bruising year of dealing with the legal fallout from VW Group’s “dieselgate” scandal, Audi is no doubt hoping to capture even more of those former VW owners. Audi hopes this despite its involvement in the scandal, on the assumption that the Audi brand is not associated with the scandal as strongly (although Audi allegedly played a key part in VW’s diesel scandal and the brand may be facing its own legal issues with recent revelations of falsified CO2 numbers). Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Margaret H. Hamilton received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama on Tuesday, November 22. (credit: White House) On Tuesday, President Barack Obama awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom to several luminaries in the arts, sports, and sciences. Of those, the class of 2016 included two women who played crucial roles in American computer science in the 20th century: Margaret H. Hamilton and Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, who was given the award posthumously. Here’s how the White House described the pair: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) For the past several years, a few corners of the Internet have sporadically lit up with excitement about a new propulsion system, which I'll call the WTF-thruster. The zombie incarnation of the EM-drive has all the best features of a new technology: it generally violates well-established physical principles, there is a badly outlined suggestion for how it might work, and the data that ostensibly demonstrates that it does work is both sparse and inadequately explained. The buzz returned this week, as the group behind the EM-drive has published a paper describing tests of its operation. Before getting into the paper, let me step back a bit to set the scene. I am not automatically rejecting the authors' results. I am not even rejecting the possibility that this study may hint at a new physics. I am saying that before I will take that possibility seriously, I have to be convinced that the data cannot be explained by the current laws of physics. And currently, I am not convinced. In fact I am very frustrated by the lack of detail. Read 29 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A screenshot showing an exploit that takes full control of a fully updated version of Fedora. (credit: Chris Evans) Recently released exploit code makes people running fully patched versions of Fedora and other Linux distributions vulnerable to drive-by attacks that can install keyloggers, backdoors, and other types of malware, a security researcher says. One of the exploits—which targets a memory corruption vulnerability in the GStreamer framework that by default ships with many mainstream Linux distributions—is also noteworthy for its elegance. To wit: it uses a rarely seen approach to defeat address space layout randomization and data execution prevention, which are two of the security protections built in to Linux to make software exploits harder to carry out. ASLR randomizes the locations in computer memory where software loads specific chunks of code. As a result, code that exploits existing flaws often results in a simple computer crash rather than a catastrophic system compromise. Meanwhile, DEP, which is often referred to as NX or No-Execute, blocks the execution of code that such exploits load into memory. Unlike most ASLR and DEP bypasses, the one folded into the GStreamer exploit doesn't rely on code to manipulate the memory layout or other environmental variables. Instead, it painstakingly arranges the bytes of code in a way that completely disables the protections. And by eliminating the need for JavaScript or other memory-massaging code to execute on a targeted computer, it's possible to carry out attacks that otherwise wouldn't be possible. Chris Evans, the security researcher who developed the exploit, describes the challenge as "a real beast." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / How does it feel to have written the programs that cause you to experience emotional pain? Not that great, actually. (credit: HBO) This week's Westworld, "Trace Decay," finally made me a believer in all the fan theories. (Spoilers ahead.) Yes, there are multiple timelines. Yes, at this point, anyone could be a robot. The only thing left to do is play this show like a game and test every theory until it's proven wrong. My guest this week, game developer Jane McGonigal, agrees. McGonigal is the author of two books, Reality Is Broken and SuperBetter, which are about how gaming can improve our real lives. And she has a lot of thoughts about the gameworld of Westworld, plus a theory you've probably never heard before. Topics discussed: why the MIB is really looking for the maze (he wants a game with consequences), what makes the gameplay in Westworld so unsatisfying (there's no Minecraft element to it), Jane's so-crazy-it-just-might-work theory about who the MIB really is (and what the maze really is, too!), how many timelines are floating around inside Dolores' head (yes, we are finally coming around to the multiple timeline idea), whether it's cheating on your partner if you have sex with a robot (it's more complicated than you might think), how many people are actually robots (it could be everybody), Maeve's incredible new story-changing abilities (she's the ultimate gamer now), the tragedy of loops (and the horror of memory), how Westworld invites viewers to interact with the series like it's a game (and stay up late reading theories on Reddit), and whether there's something inherently limiting about the Western story (maybe we're about to see Futureworld soon?). Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Nexus 5X and 6P, which will receive Android 7.1 next month. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Google has released the second and final developer preview build of Android 7.1.1 to select Nexus and Pixel phones and tablets today—this is the update's last stop before the final version is released to the company's older hardware in early December. Like the first preview in October, this one supports the Nexus 5X and 6P as well as the Pixel C, and Google has added support for the Nexus 9 as well—you can enroll any of these devices in the beta program here to download over-the-air updates. The final version will add support for the Nexus 6 and the Nexus Player. The Pixel phones are already running Android 7.1, though they'll presumably receive an update to 7.1.1 at around the same time with any applicable fixes and enhancements. There aren't major feature updates in the new beta, and Google's post is mostly targeted toward developers who are getting their apps ready for the newest version of Nougat. Android Studio 2.2.2 includes support for the new API level 25, and the Android emulator images included with the developer tools have also been updated. And Google has provided tools to help developers create round icons for their apps and support Android 7.1's new iOS-style app shortcuts. As we've covered previously, Android 7.1 won't bring all of the features of Google's new Pixel phones to older Nexus and Pixel devices. Most significantly, you'll have to do without the Google Assistant or the new Pixel Launcher, but you won't get Daydream VR support or the full benefits of Nougat's "seamless update" mechanism, either. Going forward, it's not clear whether Pixel phones will receive new Android versions ahead of supported Nexus phones, whether those older devices can eventually expect to support the Pixel Launcher or Google Assistant, or whether even more Pixel-exclusive features will be added to the operating system. Nexus owners are still getting better and faster updates than most other Android phones, but it's clear that Pixel is the future. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
NASA A half-year has passed since astronauts aboard the International Space Station successfully inflated a new habitat, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM. On Tuesday, the space agency provided an update on the commercial module's performance one-quarter of the way through a two-year experiment: so far, so good. "BEAM is the first of its kind, so we’re learning as we go, and this data will improve our structural and thermal models and analyses going forward," said Steve Munday, NASA's manager for the program. "Through the NASA sensor suites on board, our teams on the ground, and astronaut support on station, we’re gaining extremely valuable data about the performance of expandable structures and habitats in space." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Sausage chain (credit: Getty | Bloomberg) As the potential of blockchains rattle beyond the financial realm, Walmart is the latest to try out the technology in the hopes that it can track food through the supply chain and pick out and recall tainted products. As Ars has reported before, blockchain technology is essentially a ledger of data chunks—blocks—that link together using validation codes. Each block’s code references that of the one before it, creating an unbroken, sequential chain. Thus, all the blocks are preserved forever in the order in which they were added, providing a sort of built-in validation system—or as Ars previously described it, as a “souped-up audit trail”—locked from tampering. Better still, the chain doesn’t need to be stored in a master location but can instead be distributed among multiple computers still creating a linked record. The technology was initially applied to secure money transactions, underwriting the rise of Bitcoin. But recently, there’s been a push to use it in other industries. In February, Ars reported that IBM was offering blockchain-as-a-service for businesses, particularly ones involving logistics, such as those in food supply. The idea is that food products could be tracked as they move from farms and factories to store shelves. Using tags and sensors, a product’s location, temperature, and other statistics could be recorded in a blockchain ledger at each step of the way. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge Business isn't good at a Chicago tech company that was outed last month for its practice of buying social media data and re-selling it to police. Last month, the American Civil Liberties Union revealed that Geofeedia had been given special access to data by Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter in order to build software products for police that the ACLU called "surveillance tools." Facebook and Instagram took action to limit Geofeedia's access in September, and Twitter cut the company off after reviewing the ACLU report. Losing access to those social media data feeds seems to have had a big impact on Geofeedia's business. A Geofeedia spokesperson today told the Chicago Tribune that it laid off 31 employees out of about 60 total. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / President-elect Donald Trump. (credit: Getty Images | Drew Angerer) President-elect Donald Trump has appointed two outspoken opponents of net neutrality rules to oversee the Federal Communications Commission's transition from Democratic to Republican control. The appointees announced yesterday are Jeffrey Eisenach and Mark Jamison. Eisenach is director of the Center for Internet, Communications, and Technology Policy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), while Jamison is a visiting fellow at the same institution. Eisenach previously worked on behalf of Verizon and other telecoms as a consultant, and Jamison used to manage regulatory policy at Sprint. Eisenach and Jamison aren't necessarily candidates for FCC chairman, but they will help set the commission's direction and could help Trump choose FCC leadership. Their views on net neutrality match those of Trump, who opposed the net neutrality rules passed under current Chairman Tom Wheeler. Those rules prohibit ISPs from blocking or throttling lawful Internet traffic or giving priority to Web services in exchange for payment. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Hey, a quadcopter! Sick. Too bad it's still annoying to enjoy this doohickey with friends in the game's online modes. Watch Dogs 2 has a mighty fine single-player mode, and that fact has proved increasingly important in the week since the game launched on Xbox One and PlayStation 4 consoles. The game's creator, Ubisoft Montreal, disconnected the game's "seamless" multiplayer modes because of game-breaking bugs discovered during the pre-release review period. That means most of the game's players have yet to test some of the game's most intriguing content. Ubisoft announced on Tuesday, a full week after the game's retail launch, that online services had returned to the PS4 version, and that it "anticipated" the same happening for the XB1 version by "evening Eastern time." However, Ubisoft's phrasing is a little disingenuous, because while certain online content has returned, the game's promise of "seamless" online interaction has yet to come true. The problem is that Watch Dogs 2, like Ubisoft's The Division before it, is still struggling with a major piece of online infrastructure: auto-matchmaking. At full capacity, the game is meant to have online players appear in each other's single-player gaming sessions, much like in Destiny. For example, you may be completing a single-player mission, and then another real-life player who is completing content in the same part of virtual town will conveniently appear in your game world. Tap a button and you're instantly paired up for co-op goodness. Other times, a dynamic event will launch in your part of the game world, as noted in the game's mini-map, and other real-life players will appear in your world so that you can join them for the quick, fun event. (PC gamers of old may remember this type of mission as one of the best aspects of the old Warhammer MMO). Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we have a number of new deals leading up to Black Friday. Dell has a bunch of good ones, including nearly $200 off a 24-inch Dell UltraSharp IPS monitor, a Latitude 14 7000 business laptop with a Core i5 processor for $799, and a Samsung 55-inch 4K smart TV plus a $150 gift card for just $599. There are also a number of other deals from Amazon on Kindles, tablets, monitors, and more. Check out the full list of deals below. Featured Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Aurich Lawson) AT&T is disputing the Federal Communications Commission's allegation that it may be violating net neutrality rules by exempting DirecTV from wireless Internet data caps. AT&T purchased DirecTV in July 2015 and in September of this year started exempting DirecTV's online streaming from the data caps. When other companies want to bypass data caps imposed on AT&T customers, they have to pay AT&T directly for an exemption. The FCC has mostly allowed such zero-rating schemes to proceed, but this month the commission's wireless telecommunications bureau told AT&T that it may be violating net neutrality rules and asked the carrier to respond to the concerns. AT&T argued yesterday in a letter to the FCC and an attached legal analysis that the data cap exemption benefits consumers and is not a violation. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Pokémon Uranium is one of the Nintendo-themed fan games that is no longer being considered for The Game Awards. A pair of fan-made games based on popular Nintendo properties have apparently had their nominations for the upcoming Game Awards show revoked. Both Pokémon Uranium and Another Metroid 2 Remake (AM2R) were initially listed as nominees in the award show's "Best Fan Creation" category. Those titles have now been removed from the nominees list on The Game Awards website, leaving only Brutal Doom 64 and Enderal: The Shards of Orde to contest the category (here's the original nominee listing, courtesy of Polygon). Nintendo told Ars we could "get in touch with the folks at The Game Awards" for comment, and representatives from the awards haven't responded to a request for comment. But Nintendo has taken action against these fan creations in the past. Both AM2R and Pokémon Uranium were forced offline by legal threats from Nintendo earlier this year, as were with hundreds of simplistic fan games on Web portal Game Jolt. Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime also sits on the advisory board for The Game Awards. Nintendo takes a particularly hardline stance on the use of its properties in fan-created media, from strict limits on monetization of its games on YouTube to exerted authority over use of its titles in public tournaments. Nintendo has also issued takedown requests for dozens of fan games in the last few years, including an intriguing HD remake of Super Mario 64. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Amazon) If you live in the UK, you've had access to Amazon Tickets since 2015. The service is similar to Ticketmaster in that you can purchase tickets to UK-based shows including "The Lion King" and "Wicked" and concerts of artists like Blink-182 and Drake. Now Amazon appears to be looking into expanding the program: the company has a number of job listings for Amazon Tickets positions based in Seattle, Washington on its employment website. "Following our debut in London’s West End with every ticket to every show, we are rapidly expanding our selection across the UK," one of the job listings states. "As with any growing Amazon business, we are always looking for opportunities to expand into more categories and geographies." Another Tickets job posting states that Amazon isn't just looking to offer a wide variety of tickets to shows and concerts but also to "disrupt the entire live entertainment experience, including what happens before, during and after the show." Most of the job postings harp on the idea that ticket-buying can be a frustrating experience when the prices are too high or if you miss your favorite artist because you didn't know they were performing in your town. While there are no details on how Amazon wants to fix those problems, it's clear that the company wants to set itself apart from the Ticketmasters—and possibly the StubHubs and SeatGeeks—of the world by creating a better ticket-buying experience. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Mission Impossible) The Tor Project recently announced the release of its prototype for a Tor-enabled smartphone—an Android phone beefed up with privacy and security in mind, and intended as equal parts opsec kung fu and a gauntlet to Google. The new phone, designed by Tor developer Mike Perry, is based on Copperhead OS, the hardened Android distribution profiled first by Ars earlier this year. "The prototype is meant to show a possible direction for Tor on mobile," Perry wrote in a blog post. "We are trying to demonstrate that it is possible to build a phone that respects user choice and freedom, vastly reduces vulnerability surface, and sets a direction for the ecosystem with respect to how to meet the needs of high-security users." Read 28 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
(credit: NFL) Amazon apparently never stops thinking about possible perks it could add to its annual $99 Prime membership, and the next feature could be live sports. A report from The Wall Street Journal suggests that Amazon is in talks with professional sport organizations including Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, and the National Football League to negotiate the rights to stream live games and events. According to the report, Amazon is looking at creating a premium sports package that it could include in Amazon Prime memberships. If it comes to fruition, a sports package could draw a lot of new customers to Prime, which already offers free two-day shipping, Amazon Video streaming of TV shows and movies, music streaming with Prime Music, the Prime Reading library of free e-books, and more. It would also be a big way for Prime to stand out among other streaming services, particularly Netflix, which has steered clear of sports since most people don't want to watch a football game after it's over. Not only does Amazon want to continue to beef up Prime, but it's also trying to compete with other companies making deals for sports content. Twitter signed a deal with the NFL to stream 10 Thursday Night Football games during the 2016 season, and Facebook live-streamed the National Women's Soccer League opener back in August. In a time when streaming services are incredibly popular, live sports is a major reason people still pay for pricey cable packages. A good example is DirecTV, which saw a big subscriber bump when it began offering the premium NFL Sunday Ticket package. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty | Bloomberg) Oh, Chipotle. In 2015 and early 2016, the Colorado-based restaurant chain made headlines for serving up several food-borne illness outbreaks that dramatically emptied its customer’s gastrointestinal tracts. Now, the chain is making headlines for dramatically filling customers up. In a lawsuit (PDF), filed November 16 in the Superior Court of Los Angeles, three nutrition-conscious patrons claim they were tricked into eating high-calorie Chorizo burritos after seeing Chipotle advertisements that suggested the swaddled meals were merely 300 calories. One plaintiff, David Desmond, realized he had been duped when he felt “excessively full” after eating the burrito, according to the lawsuit. Along with the other two plaintiffs, Edward Gurevich and Young Hoon Kim, Desmond is seeking unspecified damages and a class action-status for the complaint. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: HTC 10 Evo (Bolt) Screen 5.5 inch, Quad HD (2560x1440, 534 pixels per inch) Super LCD 3 with Gorilla Glass 5 OS Android 7 Nougat with HTC Sense CPU Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 (octa-core up to 2.0GHz) RAM 3GB GPU Qualcomm Adreno 430 Storage 32GB or 64GB, plus micro SD expansion Networking 802.11 Wi-Fi a/b/g/n/ac (2.4 & 5 GHz) Ports USB 2.0 Type-C Camera 16MP camera, OIS, PDAF, and f/2.0 lens. 8MP selfie camera. Size 153.59mm x 77.3mm x 8.09mm Weight 147g Battery 3200mAh Network Bands 2G: 850/900/1800/1900MHz; 3G: 850/900/1900/2100MHz; 4G: FDD bands 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 20, 28; TDD bands 38, 40, 41 Other perks Quick Charge 0.0 support, 24-bit DSP and DAC Price Between £450-£500 ($599 in US) According to HTC, the HTC 10 Evo—known as the HTC Bolt and sold exclusively by Sprint in the US—is the ideal phone for the lucrative £450-£500 smartphone market (its exact price is TBC). It's a market dominated by companies that sell last-generation flagships which once sold for upwards of £600 at cut-down prices, it says, and phones from the likes of Huawei and ZTE that contain own-brand chipsets rather than full-blown Qualcomm Snapdragons. The HTC 10 Evo, with its full-metal body, large 1440p display, and Snapdragon SoC should, on paper at least, cover that segment nicely. Except I don't know why anyone in their right mind would buy one. The HTC 10 Evo is powered by a Snapdragon 810, an octa-core SoC that first made an appearance in 2014, and was used in HTC's M9 during 2015. Which is not to say that the 810 makes the Evo slow. Indeed, performance under Android 7.0 Nougat was fine during a brief hands-on. But a brand new, unlocked 32GB HTC 10—which Ars named one of the best Android smartphones released this year—costs less than £500 from numerous online stores. This is a phone that packs the latest (or near-enough latest) Snapdragon 820, 4GB of RAM, and a 3,000mAh battery inside a slick metal chassis. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Orange Is The New Black, Netflix) Netflix 4K streaming is coming to Windows PCs later this week—but only for the lucky few using seventh generation Kaby Lake processors from Intel. Netflix launched 4K streaming in 2014 on a select number of TVs before rolling it out to dedicated streaming boxes like the Amazon Fire TV, Roku, and Nvidia Shield. 4K streaming on PC was notably missing from the rollout, due in part to piracy and DRM concerns from Hollywood studios and TV networks. In an effort to placate the studios, Microsoft introduced "PlayReady 3.0" with the Windows 10 Anniversary update. PlayReady 3.0 is a hardware-based DRM (digital rights management) system that requires dedicated decoding hardware, either on the CPU or on the graphics card, preventing the video stream from being captured in software or via an external capture device. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Transition 2017) US president-elect Donald Trump has confirmed that the US will pull out of the Trans-Pracific Partnership (TPP)—a trade deal involving 12 Pacific rim nations—"on day one" of his presidency. Trump, in a YouTube video outlining plans for his first 100 days in office, said: "I'm going to issue our notification of intent to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a potential disaster for our country." He added: "Instead, we will negotiate fair, bilateral trade deals that bring jobs and industry back on to American shores." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...