posted 8 days ago on ars technica
A view of the landing site from Philae's CIVA camera. ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA Overnight, the European Space Agency got a clearer picture of what happened during yesterday's landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The news is mixed. Philae is definitely on 67P, but it's not landed flat—only two of its legs are in contact with the comet. It's also landed in the shadow of some of the comet's topography, which limits the amount of solar power it can generate. But perhaps most significantly, we're not entirely sure exactly where Philae sits. Last night, as the initial data from various instruments started to come in, some data suggested that rather than landing, Philae had bounced twice before settling, executing a total of three landings. Today, the ESA has confirmed that there were two bounces, and one of them was rather large. The initial touch-down was within 100 meters of the intended landing site. But the first bounce was large, lasting about two hours and taking the lander roughly a kilometer away. That was followed by a low-velocity bounce (3cm/second) that lasted only seven minutes. Incidentally, we reported that the lander's harpoons had successfully fired yesterday, which could have prevented these bounces. That came up in today's press conference as well. It turns out that sensors had read that the harpoons had read the touchdown signal and responded by starting to wind in the cables, which made it appear they worked as intended. Further checks, however, revealed that the touchdown signal never triggered the firing mechanism. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's domain, Khamenei.ir, will firmly remain in Iranian hands. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei A federal judge in Washington, DC, has ruled that an entire country code Top-Level Domains (ccTLDs) cannot be transferred as part of a civil judgement to collect Iranian state assets in the wake of a terrorism attack "because they are not property subject to attachment under District of Columbia law." In an eight-page memorandum opinion published on Monday, Judge Royce Lamberth agreed with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and found that the ccTLDs of North Korea, Syria, and Iran could not be transferred to the plaintiffs, who had sued as part of a terrorism lawsuit dating back over a decade. Had the judge ruled in the other direction, the plaintiff could have seized all .KP, .SY and .IR domain names. The case, formally known as Rubin et al v. Islamic Republic of Iran et al, goes back to a 1997 suicide bombing that took place in Jerusalem. Four Americans were injured in the attack, for which Hamas claimed responsibility. Given that Iran has supported and continues to support Hamas in its resistance against Israel, the plaintiffs sued the Islamic Republic, arguing that the Iranian government actually was liable. It’s unclear why exactly the plaintiffs also seek the Syrian and North Korean ccTLDs as part of this lawsuit. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
A screenshot included in an FCC petition showing the thwarting of a STARTTLS session. Golden Frog Digital rights advocates are doubling down on their criticism of a US-based ISP suspected of performing encryption downgrade attacks that caused customers' e-mail to remain in plaintext as it passed over the Internet. The attacks, according to researchers, were carried out by AT&T subsidiary Cricket and prevented e-mail from being protected by STARTTLS, a technology that uses the secure sockets layer or transport layer security protocols to encrypt plaintext communications. The attacks worked by removing the STARTTLS flag that causes e-mail to be encrypted as it passes from the sending server to the receiving server. After the tampering came to light late last month it was reported by The Washington Post and TechDirt. "It is important that ISPs immediately stop this unauthorized removal of their customers' security measures," wrote Electronic Frontier Foundation staff technologist Jacob Hoffman-Andrews in a blog post published Tuesday. "ISPs act as trusted gateways to the global Internet, and it is a violation of that trust to intercept or modify client traffic, regardless of what protocol their customers are using. It is a double violation when such modification disables security measures their customers use to protect themselves." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Canadian Pacific It's widely known that the US government is undertaking digital surveillance. Companies are starting to behave in similar ways. But, perhaps most surprisingly, Americans feel mostly powerless to do anything about it. According to a Pew Research study released Wednesday, a substantial portion (87 percent) of over 800 American adults surveyed online have heard at least something about the government's efforts to conduct online spying in the wake of the Edward Snowden leaks. Even more notable is that an even higher percentage (91 percent) of those surveyed also said they agreed or strongly agreed with the sentiment that “consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies.” Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
When it comes to reporting official sales figures for the Xbox One specifically, Microsoft has been silent since April, when it reported over 5 million systems had shipped to retailers worldwide. Microsoft broke that silence today, via a post on Xbox Wire that somewhat vaguely reported "shortly, we will have sold in to retailers more than 10 million Xbox One consoles." That 10 million number represents a major uptick from our most recent estimates that Microsoft had shipped 6.7 to 7.35 million systems through the end of September, based on reports of total Xbox shipments that also included the Xbox 360. It's not impossible for both numbers to be accurate, though. For one, Microsoft's use of the word "shortly" leaves a lot of wiggle room for when, exactly, the 10 million milestone is going to be hit. The current shipment number could be as high as 9.99 million or as low as... anything, really, for Microsoft's statement to be technically true. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
A DARPA artist's concept of how a flying drone carrier's takeoff and landing pattern might look. DARPA The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) kicked off a program seeking ways to convert existing large aircraft into drone carriers that could launch waves of unmanned aircraft a safe distance from a target to carry out a mission and then recover them—all while in flight. DARPA issued a request for information (RFI) kicking off the program November 7. “We want to find ways to make smaller aircraft more effective, and one promising idea is enabling existing large aircraft, with minimal modification, to become ‘aircraft carriers in the sky’,” Dan Patt, program manager for DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office, said in an official statement issued by the agency. The RFI document says that DARPA is seeking to prove “the feasibility and potential value of the ability to launch and recover volleys of small UAS [unmanned aircraft systems] from one or more existing large platforms (e.g., B-52, B-1, C-130, etc.).” The drones would carry payloads of less than 100 points and would need to be low-cost to be produced in large quantities for the sort of capability DARPA envisions. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
So, you've got a Nexus device and keep hearing about these factory images, but have no idea what to do with them. It's ok—we're here to help. This guide will take you from a locked Nexus device to an unlocked device with the latest Android software on it. First, though, a warning: this will delete everything on your device. Factory images do a full wipe of your data partition, meaning your apps, settings, passwords, game saves, pictures, and everything else will be erased. Back up the stuff you want to keep. Download the SDK and image The windows-only SDK manager. First click here and download the "Eclipse ADT Bundle" from Google. This is the Android SDK. You'll need this to get your computer to talk to your phone, unlock your bootloader and push over the new files. It will work on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
When he was arrested at his Chicago home in 2012 for hacking the website of security think tank Stratfor, the dreadlocked Jeremy Hammond was the FBI's most wanted cybercriminal. Authorities tracked him down with the help of top LulzSec member Hector Xavier Monsegur. But it has never been known how they managed to decrypt the contents of Hammond's hard drive, which the hacker was able to encrypt as agents armed with assault rifles were raiding his home. An Associated Press profile of the 29-year-old's life behind bars provides a possible answer. Hammond's password was "Chewy 123." Hashing algorithms protecting encryption keys are by design extremely slow, making cracking attacks harder to carry out. The more guesses the attacker tries the exponentially longer it will take. As demonstrated in previous Ars articles such as Why passwords have never been weaker—and crackers have never been stronger and Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like “qeadzcwrsfxv1331”, "Chewy 123" would be among the earlier candidates any experienced cracker would try. And assuming agents performed any research on their then suspect, "Chewy 123" would almost certainly have been near the top of the list. "Chewy," it turns out, was the name of Hammond's cat. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Ron Amadeo Hey Nexus owners, it's time to cash in on the best part of owning your device: super fast Android updates. The 2012 Nexus 7 update leaked a little early, but now Google has posted Android 5.0 factory images for most of the current lineup of supported Nexus devices. These aren't normal OTA updates, but full-restore factory images that will wipe out your devices data. An OTA update won't wipe out your device, but they can often take weeks to fully roll out. If you want to dive into Lollipop, here's the list of updated devices: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Google Happy Lollipop day! Google has announced that OTA updates for Android 5.0 are rolling out to most Nexus devices now. The Wi-Fi Nexus 7s, Nexus 5, and Nexus 10 are all going from KitKat to Lollipop. A post on the Nexus help forums laid out the specifics: The over-the-air update for Lollipop is now starting! The update is starting for these devices: Nexus 6: Minor update to address bugs Nexus 9: Minor update to address bugs Nexus 5: Update from KitKat to Lollipop Nexus 7 WiFi (2012 & 2013): Update from KitKat to Lollipop Nexus 10: Update from KitKat to Lollipop It will also be put up on Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Note: The OTA update for 3G/LTE versions of the Nexus 7 2012 and 2013 have not yet started, nor have they started for the Nexus 4! The Nexus 6 and 9 are getting "minor" bugfix updates, too. We're still waiting on OTAs for the Nexus 4 and cellular versions of the Nexus 7. We're also waiting on factory images to be posted on the Nexus Factory Image page. Users can't do much to get an OTA, which can take several weeks to roll out to the entire device user base, but a factory image can be downloaded and applied right way with a little command line know-how. The Android update schedule has been a bit of a surprise this year, as Google's Nexus devices, which are typically the first to update, were beaten by Motorola. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
John Boehner at 2012 CPAC conference. George Skidmore An "Internet Sales Tax" is still far from imminent, despite being passed by a strong majority of the US Senate more than a year ago. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) made his opposition to the measure clear this week in a written statement, published this morning by The Wall Street Journal. "The speaker has made clear in the past he has significant concerns about the bill, and it won’t move forward this year," said a Boehner spokesman. Last year, the Senate passed the Marketplace Fairness Act on a 69-27 bipartisan vote. However, in the House, the bill met with more opposition, including pushback from two key Republicans: Speaker Boehner and Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA). Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Philae, as imaged from Rosetta after separation. In its first press briefing since the touchdown of the Philae lander on comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, ESA scientists announced they weren't entirely sure what happened after what appeared to be a flawless touchdown. With nobody on board to look out the window and tell controllers what's happening, the engineers have to rely on data from various instruments to determine the lander's current status. So far, that data's been somewhat confusing. What is clear is that Philae set down at the expected site on the surface of 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. As the initial data came in, controllers felt that some of the measurements they were seeing indicated that the harpoons that were intended to secure Philae to the surface had succeeded. But further data indicated this could not have been the case. Although it was clear that Philae had touched down, it was less clear whether it stayed down. Some instruments, along with the level of power coming into the solar panels, suggest that Philae was shifting its location and/or orientation. Yet various scientific instruments designed to work at the comet's surface were successfully sending back data. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Wikimedia An iPhone 5S, Samsung Galaxy S5, LG Nexus 5, and Amazon Fire Phone were all hijacked by whitehats on the first day of an annual hacking contest that pays hefty cash prizes for exploits bypassing security sandbox perimeters. Day one of the Mobile Pwn2Own competition at the PacSec conference in Tokyo repeated a theme struck over and over at previous Pwn2Own events. If a device runs software, it can be hacked—regardless of claims made by marketers or fans. Organized by the Hewlett-Packard-owned Zero Day Initiative and sponsored this year by Google and Blackberry, Mobile Pwn2Own awards as much as $150,000 for the most advanced hacks, with a total prize pool of $425,000. In exchange, contestants agree to turn over technical details to the organizer and keep them confidential until the underlying vulnerabilities have been patched. During the first day, according to this HP blog post, the following hacks took place: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Aurich Lawson vs Capcom, FIGHT! The Master Chief Collection launched earlier this week, a collection of classic Halo games that included an array of changes from the originals, such as improved graphics and customized, cross-game playlists. But there was another, more subtle change from the original Halo titles that I think more games should mimic well before being re-released as "remastered" collections. As Sam Machkovech pointed out in his review, "all four full campaigns are unlocked the moment you boot HTMCC, meaning you can skip ahead to a favorite part of Halo 3, then find a friend and pound out a beloved Halo: CE mission in online co-op." It's a design decision that makes us wonder: why wasn't this the case when the Halo games were originally released? For that matter, why do developers "lock" game content in the first place? The idea of locked content, which has to be "unlocked" through some sort of in-game achievement, is a peculiarity that games share with no other mass consumer art form. Books don't require you to read the prologue and author's note before diving in to Chapter 1. DVDs don't confirm that you fully comprehended the first act before letting you jump to your favorite scene in Act 2 (or make you suffer through the bad episodes of a TV show just to watch the good ones). Music albums don't require that you listen to songs in a certain order without the ability to skip around at will. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
"The Innocence of Muslims." A federal appeals court agreed Wednesday to reconsider its February takedown order of the inflammatory YouTube video "The Innocence of Muslims." The move by the San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals comes after digital rights groups and media outlets complained that the court's 2-1 decision "arguably expands the concept of copyright ownership in a manner that could allow the subjects of news coverage to exercise veto power over unflattering broadcasts" (PDF). The flap surrounds an actress in the 2012 video that sparked violent protests throughout the Muslim world. Actress Cindy Lee Garcia convinced the appeals court to remove the video after complaining that she received death threats and was fired from her work. Garcia said she was duped into being in the "hateful anti-Islamic production." The Southern California actress said she believed she would be appearing in an adventure movie, but in the end, she appeared for five seconds and asked: "Is your Muhammad a child molester?" Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
After months of trickling information, YouTube's subscription service for its videos and music has finally started to take shape. Dubbed YouTube Music Key, the service will launch next week as an invite-only beta to access high quality audio and ad-free videos. Leaks earlier this year suggested that YouTube Music Key would give access to a 20-million-song database, a radio-style streaming service called YouTube Mix, and ad-free, offline playback of music videos. "Starting today, you’ll see a new home just for music on your YouTube app for Android, iOS and on YouTube.com that shows your favorite music videos, recommended music playlists based on what you’re into and playlists of trending music across YouTube," states Google's blog post on the subject. Consistent with the rumors, subscriptions to YouTube Music key will also give customers access to the entire Google Play Music database, which includes 30 million songs. In addition to allowing ad-free offline play, YouTube Music Key subscribers will also be able to play videos on a mobile phone even if they lock the screen or start using another app, actions that normally kill playback. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: Google Nexus 6 Screen 2560×1440 5.96" (493 ppi) AMOLED OS Android 5.0, Lollipop CPU 2.7GHz quad-core Snapdragon 805 RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 420 Storage 32GB or 64GB Networking 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.1 Cellular Bands Americas SKUGSM: 850/900/1800/1900 MHzCDMA: 0/1/10WCDMA: 1/2/4/5/8LTE: 2/3/4/5/7/12/13/17/25/26/29/41CA DL: B2-B13, B2-B17, B2-29, B4-B5, B4-B13, B4-B17, B4-B29Rest of world SKU GSM: 850/900/1800/1900 MHzCDMA: not supportedWCDMA: 1/2/4/5/6/8/9/19LTE: 1/3/5/7/8/9/19/20/28/41CA DL: B3-B5, B3-B8 Ports Micro USB 2.0, headphones Camera 13MP rear camera with OIS, 2MP front camera Size 6.27" × 3.27" × 0.4" (159.26 x 82.98 x 10.06mm) Weight 6.2 oz. (176g) Battery 3220 mAh Starting price $249 with two-year contract, $649 unlocked Other perks NFC, wireless charging, "turbo" charging, Ambient notifications, always-on voice commands Another year, another Nexus phone. Google's flagship devices are the fast track for the newest software, but they've typically been devices of compromise. A bad camera, no LTE, or a poor battery—there's always something. The compromises were usually easy to forgive thanks to the incredible—probably subsidized—pricing scheme that Google has used in the past. This year, Google has tapped the newly Lenovo owned Motorola to build a massive, 6-inch monster of a phone with a 1440p screen. It has nearly doubled the price up from $350 for the Nexus 5 to a whopping $650 for an unlocked Nexus 6. Google says they're aiming for more "premium" devices this year, and the company is working with all four big US carriers to offer the phone with a two-year contract. The price is well into the range of flagship devices from other companies, and it makes us less forgiving of any faults we might come across. The Nexus 6 is still not really expensive for what it is, though. Consider that an unlocked Galaxy Note 4 costs around $800 and has a smaller screen, and you're still getting a deal on Google's giant phablet. Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Android updates don't matter anymore—or at least that's what many people think. Back-to-back-to-back Jelly Bean releases and a KitKat release seemed to only polish what already existed. When Google took the wraps off of "Android L" at Google I/O, though, it was clear that this release was different. Android 5.0, Lollipop is at least the biggest update since Android 4.0, and it's probably the biggest Android release ever. The update brings a complete visual overhaul of every app, with a beautiful new design language called "Material Design." Animations are everywhere, and you'd be hard-pressed to find a single pixel from 4.4 that was carried over into 5.0—Google even revamped the fonts. 5.0 also brings a ton of new features. Notifications are finally on the lockscreen, the functionality of Recent Apps has been revamped to make multitasking a lot easier, and the voice recognition works everywhere—even when the screen is off. The under-the-hood renovations are just as extensive, including a completely new camera API with support for RAW images, a system-wide focus on battery life, and a new runtime—ART—that replaces the aging Dalvik virtual machine. Read 171 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
billy kerr The Justice Department says it's perfectly legal for the Federal Bureau of Investigation to cut Internet access of hotel rooms, pose as repairmen, and gather evidence of illegal activity—without a court warrant. The government said in a court filing late Monday that the Caesars Palace occupants—who called the hotel desk to fix the problem—invited the undercover agents into their Las Vegas rooms, which is enough consent where a warrant is not needed. "Law enforcement has long been permitted to obtain consent by posing as a confederate, business associate, or service provider. In fact, the government uses ruses every day in its undercover operations, and consent obtained by such ruses is valid unless the deceit leaves the occupant with no choice but to consent to an entry. In this case, the ruse—which involved a brief interruption of DSL service for which no Fourth Amendment intrusion was necessary, and which did not interfere with the occupants' other means of Internet access—was not coercive," federal prosecutors wrote [PDF] in defense of the tactic. This initiative preceded the arrest of an alleged leader of a well-known Chinese crime syndicate and other associates. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson. AT&T AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said today that his company will "pause" investments in fiber networks until the net neutrality debate is over. The statement came two days after President Obama urged the Federal Communications Commission to reclassify broadband as a utility and impose bans on blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. "We can't go out and invest that kind of money deploying fiber to 100 cities not knowing under what rules those investments will be governed," Stephenson told investors, according to Reuters. "We think it is prudent to just pause and make sure we have line of sight and understanding as to what those rules would look like." Stephenson was speaking at a Wells Fargo event. AT&T said in April that it would "expand its ultra-fast fiber network to up to 100 candidate cities and municipalities nationwide," but it never promised to build in all of them. Buildouts were dependent on local officials cooperating with the company. AT&T has also claimed that it will bring fiber to "two million additional locations" if the federal government approves its purchase of DirecTV. But AT&T has never said how many customers will get AT&T fiber if the deal isn't approved, making it impossible to judge whether the potential investment would be an increase over existing plans. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Lockheed Martin A United Nations commission is meeting in Geneva, Switzerland today to begin discussions on placing controls on the development of weapons systems that can target and kill without the intervention of humans, the New York Times reports. The discussions come a year after a UN Human Rights Council report called for a ban on “Lethal autonomous robotics” and as some scientists express concerns that artificially intelligent weapons could potentially make the wrong decisions about who to kill. SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk recently called artificial intelligence potentially more dangerous than nuclear weapons. Peter Asaro, the cofounder of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRAC), told the Times, “Our concern is with how the targets are determined, and more importantly, who determines them—are these human-designated targets? Or are these systems automatically deciding what is a target?” Intelligent weapons systems are intended to reduce the risk to both innocent bystanders and friendly troops, focusing their lethality on carefully—albeit artificially—chosen targets. The technology in development now could allow unmanned aircraft and missile systems to avoid and evade detection, identify a specific target from among a clutter of others, and destroy it without communicating with the humans who launched them. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Yesterday, during an official visit to China, President Obama joined with Chinese President Xi Jinping to announce an agreement to control future carbon emissions. Previously, the US committed to cutting its carbon emissions by 17 percent relative to 2005 levels; those cuts were expected to be reached by 2020. The new goal would give the US until 2025, but it involves significantly deeper cuts: at least 26 percent. China hadn't previously set specific targets, although it has raced to establish itself as a renewable energy powerhouse. The country has the largest installed wind capacity and trails only Germany in photovoltaics. Now, Beijing has agreed to work toward having its emissions peak in 2030, a goal that will almost certainly see the country retiring some coal generating capacity before its full lifetime. As a major manufacturer of renewable energy generating equipment, China clearly has an economic interest in pushing for its expansion. The severity of its pollution problems also provides an impetus to move away from coal for its power generation. In the US, the move away from coal has largely been economic, driven by the availability of cheap natural gas. The impetus for further cuts in emissions, however, may come from EPA rules that are being developed under the auspices of the Clean Air Act. These rules, however, have drawn harsh criticism from Congressional Republicans, who now have majorities in both chambers. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
NEW YORK—The next versions of Visual Studio and .NET were given their official names today—Visual Studio 2015 and .NET 2015—along with a first preview release using this name. Visual Studio 2015 will also take the next step along Microsoft's path of making Visual Studio into a cross-platform development tool. Visual Studio 2013 took strides in this direction with its preview support for HTML5/Cordova apps, and with Xamarin, .NET developers can reach multiple platforms. In Visual Studio 2015, that cross-platform reach is going to include C++ too. Microsoft's development environment will include support for the Clang compiler and LLVM infrastructure for targeting Android and, in a later iteration, iOS. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
NEW YORK—Earlier this year, Microsoft open sourced a big chunk of .NET, publishing its new compiler, Roslyn, and many .NET libraries under the Apache license. Today, the company took that same open sourcing effort a great deal further. Microsoft announced that its full server .NET stack, including the just-in-time compiler and runtime and the core class libraries that all .NET software depends on, will all be open sourced. The code will be hosted on GitHub and published under a permissive MIT-style license. With this release, Microsoft wants to make sure that the .NET stack is fully functional and production quality on both Linux and OS X. The company is working with the Mono community to make sure that this platform is "enterprise-ready." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 9 days ago on ars technica
President Obama announces the nomination of Rep. Melvin Watt, left, as Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) and Tom Wheeler, right, as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), on May 1, 2013. White House Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler is not convinced that the FCC should treat consumer broadband service as a utility despite President Obama urging him to do so. A report last night in The Washington Post says Wheeler met Monday with Web companies including Google, Yahoo, and Etsy and told them that he wants to find a compromise that addresses the concerns of Internet service providers such as Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and AT&T. Wheeler was formerly a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industries. “What you want is what everyone wants: an open Internet that doesn’t affect your business,” Wheeler told attendees of the meeting, according to the Post's sources. “What I’ve got to figure out is how to split the baby.” Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...