posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty | BSIP) The Food and Drug Administration announced its approval Monday for the first digital medicine—a melding of a long-standing drug for schizophrenia—Abilify (aripiprazole tablets)—with an edible sensor that reports when it’s ingested. Together, they make Abilify MyCite. Though the approval is a long time coming, the choice of an antipsychotic medicine for this advance is raising the eyebrows of some experts. The digital ingestion tracking system works by embedding each Abilify tablet with a sensor “the size of a grain of sand,” according to the company behind it, Proteus Digital Health. The ingestible sensor is activated by gastric juices and sends a unique, identifying signal to a wearable patch. That patch automatically logs the date and time of the signal (as well as other basic health information) and can transmit that information via Bluetooth to a paired mobile device. The patient can sign consent forms to allow their doctors and up to four other people to receive the data. But, the app that works with the digital drug system allows patients to revoke access to data at any time. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The OnePlus 5. (credit: Ron Amadeo) A Twitter user by the name "Elliot Alderson"‏ has discovered a root backdoor in OnePlus devices—one that has apparently been shipping for years. OnePlus has been shipping a Qualcomm engineering APK (an Android app file) in its devices, which with a few commands, can root a device. The app—called "EngineerMode"—is partially exposed to users through a secret "*#808#" dialer command, and you can also launch the full app through an Android activity launcher or the command line. The app contains production-line tests for various phone components, a root checker, and lots of information readouts. The important part, though, is a "DiagEnabled" activity with a method called "escalatedUp." If this is set to "true," the app will allow root access over Android Debug Bridge, Android's command-line developer tools. The method for gaining root is password protected, but the password lasted all of three hours once the method was discovered. With the help of David Weinstein and the Now Secure team, the group discovered the magic word is "angela," which is possibly another Mr. Robot reference, just like the "Elliot Alderson" handle. (We swear this is real and not a Mr. Robot AGR.) Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The control center has a new interface for adjusting brightness. Unbeknownst to many, the Bluetooth and Wi-Fi toggles in the Control Center in iOS 11 don't do what you expect. Rather than completely disabling those features, they only partially disable Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. To clear up any confusion, Apple appears to have added explainer pop-up messages when either Bluetooth or Wi-Fi is toggled off, as first detailed in a report by MacRumors. The messages appear in the newest iOS 11.2 beta and they explain that both features will only be temporarily disabled when turned off from their Control Center toggles. The first time a user turns off Bluetooth or Wi-Fi from the Control Center on their device, they'll see a pop-up window that will say "disconnecting nearby Wi-Fi until tomorrow" or "disconnecting Bluetooth accessories until tomorrow." The messages also explain that both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are not totally disconnected in this case, however, they will still function to allow some features and devices to work with that iDevice. Bluetooth will still be available for the Apple Watch, Apple Pencil, Personal Hotspot, and Handoff, while Wi-Fi will still be on for AirDrop, Personal Hotspot, and location accuracy. While the Control Center toggles turn off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi temporarily, there are a few cases detailed in an Apple support document that will turn both features back on automatically. Wi-Fi will turn back on when you connect to a Wi-Fi network via the Settings app; when you walk or drive to a new location; when it's 5am local time; or when you restart your device. Bluetooth is similar: the feature will turn back on when you connect to a Bluetooth device via the Settings app; when it's 5am local time; or when you restart your device. In order to fully disable Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, you'll have to use the dedicated toggles in the Settings app. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Much like this space-defense mission, EA's launch plans for the Star Wars: Battlefront II economy seem to be blowing up. (credit: EA/DICE) Before we deliver a proper verdict for Star Wars: Battlefront II, we want to take a moment to talk about the game's troubling, multilayered economy. The online multiplayer shooter is now officially available for paying EA Access subscribers, which offers a 10-hour trial of the game ahead of its November 16 launch on PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. Fans are already biting into that game-economy burrito, and it sure seems like a seven-layer thing, made up of loot boxes, battle points, credits, crystals, crafting parts, and star cards (which themselves come in two types and four tiers). The whole thing already looks confusing and messy, and fans have pointed out major issues with how the economy debuted in the game's paid EA Access launch this weekend. EA has since responded to fans' most heated complaints, both in ridiculous and seemingly sensible ways. But even EA's best response belies a glaring truth: nothing short of a full rewrite will undo the damage of real money to Battlefront II's gameplay mechanics. Read 32 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Firefox is fast now. (credit: Mozilla) Mozilla is working on a major overhaul of its Firefox browser, and, with the general release of Firefox 57 today, has reached a major milestone. The version of the browser coming out today has a sleek new interface and, under the hood, major performance enhancements, with Mozilla claiming that it's as much as twice as fast as it was a year ago. Not only should it be faster to load and render pages, but its user interface should remain quick and responsive even under heavy load with hundreds of tabs. Collectively, the performance work being done to modernize Firefox is called Project Quantum. We took a closer look at Quantum back when Firefox 57 hit the developer channel in September, but the short version is, Mozilla is rebuilding core parts of the browser, such as how it handles CSS stylesheets, how it draws pages on-screen, and how it uses the GPU. This work is being motivated by a few things. First, the Web has changed since many parts of Firefox were initially designed and developed; pages are more dynamic in structure and applications are richer and more graphically intensive. JavaScript is also more complex and difficult to debug. Second, computers now have many cores and simultaneous threads, giving them much greater scope to work in parallel. And security remains a pressing concern, prompting the use of new techniques to protect against exploitation. Some of the rebuilt portions are even using Mozilla's new Rust programming language, which is designed to offer improved security compared to C++. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Terrafugia / Barcroft Cars / Barcroft Media via Getty Images) One of the most remarkable transformations in the auto industry has been the flourishing of Volvo Cars under the ownership of Chinese parent company Geely. It could be a poster child for the right way to acquire and manage a brand—one simply needs to look at Volvo's tenure under previous owner Ford, or perhaps the fate of Saab under General Motors, to see things don't always turn out well. Geely has been on a little bit of a purchasing spree of late. In May it bought Lotus, giving hope to fans of the lightweight sports cars. And on Monday, it finalized another sale, this time for something a little more left field: Terrafugia. That's right, it's getting into the flying car business. Perhaps you're reading this and already cataloguing the many reasons you think a mass-market flying car will never happen. And right now, such skepticism is probably justified. But it's hard to escape the fact that the idea is being taken increasingly seriously. Boeing just bought Aurora Flight Sciences, which is working with Uber to develop flying car services for Dallas and Dubai. (Uber plans to launch that service in 2020.) Airbus just revealed it intends to test its Vahana VTOL machine by the end of this year. Google's Larry Page has not one but two flying car startups. Right now the only thing missing from this corner of the market is Elon Musk's presence, although he's probably a little preoccupied learning how to mass-produce a non-flying car. "This is a tremendously exciting sector and we believe that Terrafugia is ideally positioned to change mobility as we currently understand it and herald the development of a new industry in doing so," said Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Founder and Chairman Li Shufu. "Our investment in the company reflects our shared belief in their vision and we are committed to extending our full support to Terrafugia, leveraging the synergies provided by our international operations and track record of innovation, to make the flying car a reality." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Jeff Dunn) Even as Bluetooth headphones continue to skyrocket in popularity, the state of wireless exercise headphones remains a bit hairy. Though the benefits of Bluetooth seem perfectly suited for the gym, and while there’s no shortage of demand for an uncompromised set of wireless workout headphones, the ideal pair always appears to be just out of reach. I say this because I’ve spent the past few weeks searching for one pair of workout headphones I could unequivocally recommend to anyone. I called in 18 separate pairs for testing. I then put each one through a variety of workouts, from jogs to burpees to basketball games, to ensure they’d stay in place and not short-circuit when I sweat all over them. And because most people probably don’t want to buy a second pair of headphones just for working out, I tested each pair’s sound quality and battery life, cycling them through a set playlist of songs designed to evaluate how well they’d handle certain audio qualities. I used both an iPhone SE and a Galaxy S8 to do all of this. Read 33 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Do not mess with Burnham, you Klingon supremacist scum. (credit: CBS) A white-knuckle cliffhanger ended the first half of Star Trek: Discovery's first season. Frenetic, fascinating, and sometimes shocking, "Into the Forest I Go" raised more questions than it answered. There are conspiracies wrapped in conspiracies, and we've got the entire mid-season break to mull them over. Spoilers ahead! Yes, I mean it! If you read past these sentences and complain about spoilers in the comments, you will be turned into a newt. Algorithms in spaaaaaaaaace! I'm starting to feel like every episode of DISCO has to have a Fringe-like element of mad science. Last week we had the Avatar-esque sparkleplanet, with the (sentient?) antenna rising inexplicably out of its inexplicable ecosystem. This week, we got a mission to build an algorithm that will allow Star Fleet to calculate the location of cloaked Klingon vessels. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, gestures from the balcony of Ecuador's embassy in London. (credit: Jack Taylor/Getty Images) As part of its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, Congress received a cache of Twitter direct messages between Donald Trump Jr. and WikiLeaks—at least some of those messages have now been leaked to The Atlantic. When Ars asked Twitter whether some users' DMs had been turned over to Congressional investigators or the Office of Special Counsel, which is also investigating possible Russian government efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, Emily Horne, a Twitter spokeswoman, declined comment. In July 2016, WikiLeaks published 20,000 internal e-mails from the Democratic National Committee, a hack that likely originated from Russia. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Members of the Texas Army National Guard move through flooded Houston streets as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey continue to rise on August 28, 2017. More than 12,000 members of the Texas National Guard have been called out to support local authorities in response to the storm. (credit: Zachary Wes) Hurricanes strike the US with regularity, but there's nothing on record that is at all like Hurricane Harvey's pummeling of Houston. Understanding the risk of that kind of wind and rainfall happening again is critical if we intend to rebuild infrastructure that's going to survive to its expected expiration date. But freakish storms like Harvey make risk calculations challenging. These storms have no historic precedent, so we have no idea how often they occur; and the underlying probability of these events is shifting as our planet grows warmer. An MIT professor named Kerry Emanuel, however, has helped develop a system that analyzes hurricane frequency in a warming world. Using it, he has found that Harvey-sized rainfall could go from being extremely rare to having an 18-percent chance of happening in any given year by the end of this century. “Biblical” rainfall Rainfall experiences a lot of local variations, and sites within a few miles of each other can often see very different numbers. To get a clearer picture of a storm's damage, the research community has settled on a figure called the "area integrated rainfall." By that measure, Harvey is the largest storm on record, having dumped 850 millimeters on the Houston area. That's extreme, but there are other storms of similar magnitude. Texas saw more than 500mm of rain from the remnants of hurricane Patricia just two years earlier. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / DFJ Partner Steve Jurvetson speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2017 at Pier 48 on September 18, 2017 in San Francisco, California. (credit: Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch) Steve Jurvetson, a partner at a major Silicon Valley venture capital firm that bears his name—Draper Fisher Jurvetson—has left the company amid accusations of sexual harassment. However, he is still listed as a "partner" on the DFJ website. Jurvetson currently serves on the boards of Tesla and SpaceX, but he has taken a leave as a result of these allegations, according to CNBC. In a tweet on Monday afternoon, Jurvetson wrote that he would be pursuing "legal action," but he did not respond to Ars' query as to when or where such action would be taking place. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Andrzej Barabasz) A new cryptocurrency called Bitcoin Gold is now live on the Internet. It aims to correct what its backers see as a serious flaw in the design of the original Bitcoin. There are hundreds of cryptocurrencies on the Internet, and many of them are derived from Bitcoin in one way or another. But Bitcoin Gold—like Bitcoin Cash, another Bitcoin spinoff that was created in August—is different in two important ways. Bitcoin Cash is branding itself as a version of Bitcoin rather than merely new platforms derived from Bitcoin's source code. It has also chosen to retain Bitcoin's transaction history, which means that, if you owned bitcoins before the fork, you now own an equal amount of "gold" bitcoins. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Google Play Store) Google is cracking down on apps that use Android's accessibility API. Even though the APIs have been around for years without any kind of rules about usage, Google has now started telling developers that using the accessibility API for anything other than helping users with disabilities will result in a ban from the Play Store. As first reported by Android Police, a number of app developers have receiving an email from Google in regards to their accessibility app. According to the email, Google's new rules require that "Apps requesting accessibility services should only be used to help users with disabilities use Android devices and apps." The email says that developers "must explain to users how your app is using the 'android.permission.BIND_ACCESSIBILITY_SERVICE' to help users with disabilities use Android devices and apps." Google says that if developers don't comply with the new policy within 30 days, their app will be removed from the Play Store. Google's new policy will hurt a large swath of power-user apps. Android accessibility APIs are meant for alternative input devices and alternative output methods, but they are also a powerful set of controls that have been co-opted by the Android tweaking community to give users more control over their devices. If you want to write a powerful Android app and don't want to modify your phone for root access, tapping into the accessibility API is the next best thing. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai being interviewed at Fox Studios on November 10, 2017 in New York City. (credit: Getty Images | John Lamparski) Two Democratic lawmakers today called for an investigation into whether Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai "has taken actions to improperly benefit Sinclair Broadcast Group." The FCC has made several decision that benefit Sinclair, a broadcast station owner with a right-wing tilt. Among other things, the FCC rolled back broadcast TV station ownership limits, which could help Sinclair complete an acquisition of Tribune Media Company and, in the process, reach 72 percent of TV-owning households in the US. According to two representatives, Pai hasn't sufficiently answered questions about his relationship with Sinclair. Those congressmen are Energy and Commerce ranking member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-N.J.) and Oversight and Government Reform ranking member Elijah Cummings (D-MD.), who said as much in a letter to FCC Inspector General David Hunt. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / These two wander around for a long time. (credit: New Line Cinema) Amazon has acquired the global television rights to The Lord of the Rings, and the Internet giant has already committed to a multi-season TV series rooted in author J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth setting. Both Amazon's own press release title ("Amazon to Adapt J.R.R. Tolkien's Globally Renowned Fantasy Novels... ") and earlier rumors suggested that the series would be a direct adaptation of the books, but that is now confirmed not to be the case. Rather, the series will introduce new stories that are set before The Fellowship of the Ring, the first book in the trilogy. Tolkien estate and HarperCollins representative Matt Galsor said the series will "bring to the screen previously unexplored stories based on J.R.R. Tolkien's original writings." To Tolkien fans, it's unclear what that means exactly. Will characters and situations be based on unpublished Tolkien works? Many of those exist, but the author's son Christopher Tolkien has been editing and completing key works in those categories as published books for several years now. It's unclear what remains. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: EPA) Researchers studying state-level climate policy in the US confirm what high school teachers already know: if you make an assignment voluntary and offer no incentives for completing it, no one’s gonna do it. In an assessment of 17 climate and energy policies enacted by US states between 1990 and 2014, researchers from Emory University found that mandatory policies usually had a positive effect on emissions reduction while voluntary policies always had negligible or no effect. What may be more interesting, however, is to look at which policies worked best. Such an analysis has growing practical implications. This year, the Trump administration reversed many of the Obama administration’s federal emissions-reducing guidelines, rules, and regulations, meaning states that want to curb emissions are left to their own devices. Legislators who are serious about crafting good environmental policy would do well to look at what has worked for others before making proposals. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Bkav) Security researchers say they used a $150 mask to break the Face ID facial recognition that locks Apple's new iPhone X. The work may be a significant, it may be little more a stunt with few real-world consequences, or it could possibly be something in the middle. So far, it's impossible to know because the researchers have evaded key questions about how they went about breaking into the device. The supposed hack was carried out by researchers from Vietnamese security firm Bkav, which in 2009 demonstrated a way to bypass face-based authentication in Toshiba and Lenovo laptops. On Friday, company researchers published a video showing them unlocking an iPhone X by presenting it with a custom-made mask instead of the live human face that Apple says has repeatedly insisted is the only thing that can satisfy requirements of the facial recognition system. How Bkav tricked iPhone X's Face ID with a mask The researchers said they designed their mask using 2D and 3D printers and that an artist made the nose by hand using silicone materials. Other features of the mask used 2D images and "special processing on the cheeks and around the face, where there are large skin areas" in a successful attempt to defeat the artificial intelligence Face ID uses to distinguish real faces from images, videos, or masks. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Global Carbon Project 2017) For the last few years, global carbon dioxide emissions have done something surprising—they haven’t really gone up. The most optimistic among us may have felt there was a change in the wind, but it was too early to call this the peak of our emissions. And in fact it wasn't, as the preliminary analysis for 2017 shows that emissions will once again tick upward. Every year, a huge group of researchers publishes an analysis of the global carbon cycle, projecting the final tally for human emissions for the year based on data through September. At the same time, they make any necessary revisions to the numbers for previous years, based on new data or improved estimates. The team estimates not just the emissions from burning fossil fuels and other industrial activities, but from the other terms in the global equation, too. That includes the emissions caused by human land use changes (like deforestation) and the carbon absorbed and released by Earth’s land ecosystems and oceans. Last year’s global human emissions projection for 2016, an increase of just 0.2 percent, held up when the final numbers came in. But the projection for 2017 shows an increase of 2.0 percent—a disappointing bump. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | ullstein bild) Your next romp with a paramour may blow your mind, but it’s unlikely to stop your heart, according to research presented this weekend at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017 in Anaheim, California. That’s the good news. The bad news is that if you do suffer cardiac arrest from an amorous encounter, there’s a decent chance your partner will just let you croak. In an analysis of 4,557 adult cases of cardiac arrest in a Northwestern US community between 2002 and 2015, only 34 of them occurred during or within an hour of sexual intercourse. Of those, 32 were in men. That means that sex is linked to only about one in a hundred cases of cardiac arrest in men. For women, the rate is around one in a thousand. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Last week, Broadcom made an unsolicited offer to buy Qualcomm, one of the biggest SoC and cellular modem manufacturers for smartphones. Qualcomm officially rejected the initial bid today, which was for $105 billion (it was originally reported to be around $130 billion). When reports first surfaced about the offer, it was known that Qualcomm wasn't happy with the deal. In a statement released today, Qualcomm's board say the offer "significantly undervalues" the company. "No company is better positioned in mobile, IoT, automotive, edge computing and networking within the semiconductor industry," Qualcomm's Chief Executive Officer Steve Mollenkopf said in the statement. "We are confident in our ability to create significant additional value for our stockholders as we continue our growth in these attractive segments and lead the transition to 5G." Broadcom "remains fully committed" to the acquisition and said in its own statement that combining the two companies would create "a strong, global company with an impressive portfolio of industry-leading technologies and products." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A Soyuz rocket launches from Baikonur, Kazakhstan. (credit: NASA) As recently as 2013, Russia's venerable fleet of rockets commanded nearly half of the global share of the commercial launch market. Since then, the emergence of other players, most notably SpaceX, has considerably shrunk the once-dominant Russian position. This year, although Russia has made 17 successful orbital launches, only about a third of them have flown for paying customers other than the Russian government or the International Space Station. By contrast, SpaceX has made 16 launches this year, 11 of which have been for commercial customers. A SpaceX projection for 2018 suggests that disparity will continue to grow if the company continues to increase the flight rate of its Falcon 9 rocket. Recognizing its dimming market position, the Russian rocket corporation, Energia, has fast-tracked development of a new medium-class launch vehicle that it is calling Soyuz-5. This rocket could replace the existing Soyuz rocket that carries cosmonauts and astronauts into space while competing with SpaceX for commercial payloads. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Commodore International declared itself insolvent on April 29, 1994 under Chapter 7 of US bankruptcy law. Ordinarily, this would have been followed immediately by an auction of all the company’s assets. However, Commodore’s Byzantine organizational structure—designed to serve as a tax shelter for financier Irving Gould—made this process far more lengthy and complicated than it should have been. During this time, Commodore UK, Ltd. continued to operate. It had been the strongest of all the subsidiary companies, and it always had a positive cash flow. As the other subsidiaries went under, Commodore UK purchased all of their remaining inventory and continued to sell Amigas to British customers. The head of Commodore UK, David Pleasance, hatched a plan to purchase the mother company’s assets at auction. His idea was to raise enough money not only to buy Commodore International but to fund the new company as an ongoing concern, including the continuation of research and development projects. The business plan was to continue to sell Amiga 1200 and 4000 computers and CD32 consoles while slowly transitioning to next-generation hardware based on Dave Haynie’s Hombre RISC architecture. Read 58 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / SoftBank Group Corp Chairman and CEO Masayoshi Son attends a news conference in Tokyo, Japan, February 8, 2017. Son has spearheaded the new round of investment in Uber. On Sunday, Uber’s board of directors formalized a new arrangement that enables SoftBank and the Dragoneer Investment Group to purchase at least 14 percent of the ride-hailing startup. The move expands upon negotiations and related moves that took place over a month ago. Notably, Benchmark, a venture capital firm that had sued former CEO Travis Kalanick won't pursue its lawsuit for now so that the SoftBank deal can go forward, per the Wall Street Journal. Back in August, Benchmark, which holds about 13 percent of the company's stock sued former CEO Travis Kalanick in August 2017, accusing him of "gross mismanagement and misconduct" during his tenure at chief executive. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Thomas Trutschel / Getty Images News) One bitcoin is now worth less than $5,900, down 25 percent from Wednesday's high above $7,800. Meanwhile, the currency of a rival, spinoff network called Bitcoin Cash has doubled to more than $1,500 over the same four-day period. This is good news for one side in Bitcoin's ongoing civil war—the side that sees an urgent need to boost the network's capacity to deal with growing congestion and rising transaction fees. People in this camp have been flocking to Bitcoin Cash after a plan to expand the capacity of the main Bitcoin network fell apart on Wednesday. "Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010," tweeted Gavin Andresen on Saturday. "A store of value AND means of exchange." It was a pointed dig to the mainstream Bitcoin network, where slow transactions and rising fees have made it an increasingly unappealing way to make everyday payments. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
US Army’s 249th Power Division works on a distribution line in the northeast part of Puerto Rico, Oct. 30. (Photo by Jeff Miller) (credit: Western Area Power) Since Puerto Rico was struck by Hurricane Maria in late September, the island has struggled to repair power lines, water pumps, cell phone towers, roads, and bridges. The electrical system has come under the most scrutiny. The commonwealth’s power provider—Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority or PREPA—was bankrupt going into the disaster, and has faced scandal after scandal in recent weeks. After reconnecting more than 40 percent of its customers early last week, a major power line failed on Thursday, reducing the number of reconnected PREPA customers to 18 percent. Although the line was quickly fixed, currently only 47 percent of PREPA’s customers have power now, according to statistics from the Puerto Rican government. That means that more than 50 percent of previously-connected Puerto Ricans have been living off generators or solar panels for nearly 7 weeks, or they live without power. On Thursday, Governor Ricardo Rosselló demanded that his entire cabinet submit undated letters of resignation to his office, according to the New York Times. Rosselló said he hoped to cut cabinet members to form a more nimble government. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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