posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Dolores can't abide a drop in HBO's quality. (credit: HBO) AT&T has been the proud owner of HBO for less than a month, and it is already considering an overhaul that would see HBO produce more video that can compete for the attention of smartphone users. AT&T wants to boost revenue both in advertising and subscriptions, even if that means upending HBO's longtime strategy of producing a relatively small number of high-quality shows. John Stankey, an AT&T executive who is now CEO of the company's WarnerMedia division, formed after last month's acquisition of Time Warner Inc., described his vision in an hourlong "town hall meeting" with 150 employees. Audio of the meeting was obtained by The New York Times. "It's going to be a tough year," Stankey said, according to the Times article. "It's going to be a lot of work to alter and change direction a little bit." Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Y-shaped Navy Precision Optical Interferometer in northern Arizona can function like a telescope with a mirror 400 meters wide. (credit: Google Maps) If Lowell Observatory’s Gerard van Belle gets his way, someday soon you’ll be watching an exoplanet cross the face of its star, hundreds of light-years from the Earth. He can’t show you that right now, but he should be able to when the new mirrors are installed at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer in northern Arizona. They're arriving now, and should soon start collecting starlight—and making it the highest-resolution optical telescope in the world. Van Belle recently showed Ars around the gigantic instrument, which bears almost no resemblance to what a non-astronomer pictures when they hear the word “telescope." There are a couple of more traditional telescopes in dome-topped silos on site, including one built in 1920s in Ohio, where it spent the first few decades of its life. Going big The best way to improve imagery on these traditional scopes is to increase the diameter of the mirror catching light. But this has its limits—perfect mirrors can only be built so large. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Russia's President Vladimir Putin and former Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin shake hands during a meeting at the Konstantin Palace. (credit: Mikhail MetzelTASS via Getty Images) These are not the best of times for the Russian space industry. Due to budgetary reasons, Roscosmos has reduced the number of cosmonauts on the International Space Station from three to two. Because of technical problems with its rockets and cost pressure from SpaceX, the country's once-lucrative commercial launch industry is fading. And soon, conditions may worsen. As soon as next year, the United States plans to stop paying hundreds of millions of dollars a year to Russia for Soyuz seats, because it is developing its own transport to the space station. And the European Space Agency has signaled that it will stop launching Russian Soyuz rockets from its French Guiana-based spaceport in the early 2020s. A Russian space editor, Andrei Borisov, has captured the fading zeitgeist of the Russian space program in a lengthy article on the new leader of Roscosmos, Dmitry Rogozin, and the changes he has proposed. "The 'Russian Space' Rogozin is trying to create reminds one of the Dark Ages in Europe," Borisov writes on Lenta.Ru, where he serves as editor of science and technology. "In it, there is no place for modernization, there is only the mission of survival." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A lot has changed since 1918. But whether it's a literal (like the City of London School athletics' U12 event) or figurative (AI chip development) race, participants still very much want to win. (credit: A. R. Coster/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images) For years, the semiconductor world seemed to have settled into a quiet balance: Intel vanquished virtually all of the RISC processors in the server world, save IBM’s POWER line. Elsewhere AMD had self-destructed, making it pretty much an x86 world. And Nvidia, a late starter in the GPU space, previously mowed down all of it many competitors in the 1990s. Suddenly only ATI, now a part of AMD, remained. It boasted just half of Nvidia’s prior market share. On the newer mobile front, it looked to be a similar near-monopolistic story: ARM ruled the world. Intel tried mightily with the Atom processor, but the company met repeated rejection before finally giving up in 2015. Then just like that, everything changed. AMD resurfaced as a viable x86 competitor; the advent of field gate programmable array (FPGA) processors for specialized tasks like Big Data created a new niche. But really, the colossal shift in the chip world came with the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). With these emerging technologies, a flood of new processors has arrived—and they are coming from unlikely sources. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Scuba divers in Thailand have already rescued four of the 12 boys who have been stranded, along with their coach, in a flooded cave. And they are hoping to rescue the rest in the next couple of days. But in the meantime, Elon Musk has continued working on alternative strategies divers could use if conventional diving proves too difficult the remaining boys. On Saturday, Musk settled on the idea of building "a tiny, kid-size submarine using the liquid oxygen transfer tube of Falcon rocket as hull." He ordered SpaceX engineers to begin building the device, saying that it could be ready by the end of the day on Saturday. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
The trailer for McKellen: Playing The Part McKellen: Playing The Part, a new documentary focused on the life of beloved actor Sir Ian McKellen, covers dense topics like acting, activism, and aging. And the nearly 80-year-old McKellen seems to have thoughtful perspectives on all of it, drawing upon his dedication to live theater, his groundbreaking advocacy work for LGBTQA rights in the UK, and his now generation-spanning appeal. With so much to work with, the film manages to stay interesting even when it’s not perfect. Things go chronologically, and McKellen’s pre-university days feel slow compared to his later life. Director Joe Stephenson also made the unorthodox decision to rely solely on an extended McKellen interview, which delivers great insight but occasionally leaves audiences wanting a broader perspective on important moments (like the actor’s high-profile opposition to a 1988 anti-LGBTQA UK policy proposal called Section 28 or his embrace of big US blockbuster film franchises). Still, for fans of those blockbuster roles in particular, the final third alone likely justifies a trip to the theater (or an eventual VOD rental). That’s when McKellen finally offers direct insight on X-Men’s Magneto and Lord of the Rings’ Gandalf. And by this point in the documentary, it’s clear each role felt like a logical extension of specific experiences in the actor's life. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 12 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / So long, red chili pepper of hotness. This week, Buzzfeed reported that RateMyProfessors.com was dropping its "hotness" rating for professors after an outcry from female professors who said that the rating was sexist. RateMyProfessors was right to do so; professorial competence and perceived attractiveness have nothing to do with one another. The rating also disadvantages women, who are too often pressured to conform to absurd beauty standards, even in a professional setting where men wouldn't feel the same pressure. But this week's news really baffled me, not because I fail to understand how sexism works, but because until this week I thought that "hotness" referred to how exciting a particular class was. Throughout my college years, I used RateMyProfessors.com to choose undergrad classes, all the while thinking a professor with a chili pepper gave... invigorating lectures. (I promise, that's not a euphemism.) I mean, you're rating professors with chili peppers! Chili peppers mean spiciness and excitement, not sex appeal! Right?! Right, guys? Back me up here! Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / SpaceX CEO Elon Musk speaks at the International Astronautical Congress on September 29, 2017 in Adelaide, Australia. (credit: Mark Brake/Getty Images) Elon Musk tweeted on Saturday that a team of SpaceX engineers is hours away from completing work on a "tiny kid-sized submarine" that could be used to extract 12 teenagers and preteens who are stranded with their soccer coach in a flooded cave in Thailand. Musk has had a team of engineers working on the problem for the last couple of days and has been keeping the world updated on the work via Twitter. On Thursday night, Musk tweeted about an idea to use an inflatable nylon tube to help the kids escape. By Friday afternoon, Musk's thinking had evolved. He tweeted that his team was working on building "double-layer Kevlar pressure pods with Teflon coating to slip by rocks." A mid-day tweet on Saturday provided another update: Got more great feedback from Thailand. Primary path is basically a tiny, kid-size submarine using the liquid oxygen transfer tube of Falcon rocket as hull. Light enough to be carried by 2 divers, small enough to get through narrow gaps. Extremely robust. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 7, 2018 And this isn't just a theory: Musk says that his team is building the contraption now. "Construction complete in about 8 hours, then 17 hour flight to Thailand," Musk tweeted just before noon, California time. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
The most popular feature request for Microsoft's Outlook.com has been to add a dark/night theme that replaces the eye-searing white with a calming dark grey, making it less visually traumatic to check your e-mail after dark. Microsoft has now announced that this is coming soon, as spotted by The Verge. The new theme will be based on a special dark theme that was offered last Halloween. Since then, it's apparently been "redesigned multiple times" and the company claims that it will be "the best Dark Mode of any leading e-mail client." The https://t.co/0b8YLi7Qx0 Halloween theme is quite something pic.twitter.com/JIMc3ZSlPS — Tom Warren (@tomwarren) October 27, 2017 But as exciting as this is (along with Microsoft's dark mode work in Explorer) I can't help but feel it's all a little old hat. A dark mode? On a website? Why, we've been doing this at Ars for years. Click that little hamburger menu up at the top of each page, and you can switch between conventional dark-on-light text and the eyeball-friendly light-on-dark. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Jonathan Gitlin If one anecdote can sum up how good the current Mazda MX-5 Miata is, consider the following. Thanks to this job, I drive a lot of press fleet cars–between two and four a month depending on my travel schedule. And during the course of the last year, the little MX-5 has been the only one I've just driven around for hours with no other objective than enjoying the experience—supercars included. What makes it even more remarkable is that Mazda hit on this formula 29 years ago. Evolutionary outlier Three decades is a long time, even in car years. When the first MX-5 (the NA model) went on sale in 1989, it was a remarkable thing, combining the brio of sporty rear-wheel drive European roadsters from the 1960s with something those cars struggled with: reliability. It was small, light, and not very powerful. A 1.6L four-cylinder engine made just 115hp (86kW) and 100ft-lbs (136Nm), and the car ran on 14-inch wheels. But that was more than enough to put a smile on your face the instant you found a corner. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 13 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Loch Ness, seen from Fort Augustus in Scotland. (credit: Getty Images (Jeff J Mitchell)) A company called Intelligent Land Investments (ILI) is proposing a huge 2.4 gigawatt-hour pumped hydroelectric project right next to the shores of Loch Ness in Scotland. The project, called "Red John" after the Scottish name for a source pool in the area, could deliver up to 400 megawatts of power for six hours—a feat that Wired UK says could double Scotland's already-considerable wind capacity. Pumped hydro is an old concept, and such systems have been used to store energy long before utility-scale chemical batteries were economically feasible. Pumped hydro projects need a lower reservoir as well as a higher reservoir. When electricity is plentiful, pumps work to lift water from the lower reservoir to the higher reservoir; when electricity is scarce, operators use gravity to send water from the higher reservoir through a turbine and back down to the lower reservoir, generating greenhouse-gas-free electricity. A diagram of the Red John project. (credit: Intelligent Land Investments) The advantage of pumped hydro is that it's disbatchable. While wind turbines and solar panels require the wind and sun to make electricity, energy from pumped hydro is ready whenever we want it. Scotland in particular has been aggressive about adding offshore wind to its energy mix, but you can only build out so many wind turbines before you need to add energy storage or develop massive transmission projects, because if the wind slacks in one region, power has to be added to the grid to maintain a constant frequency. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Even at the biggest Marvel Comics-related museum exhibit in the world, currently running in Seattle, WA, Steve Ditko's presence is limited by his famously reclusive nature. (credit: Sam Machkovech) New York police confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter on Friday that one of Marvel Comics' most legendary staffers, Steve Ditko, was found dead in his apartment this week. Ditko was 90. The creator of Dr. Strange and original artist (plus "co-creator," according to Stan Lee) of Spider-Man had been found days earlier, on June 29, and police told THR that they believed he had been dead for two days when he was found. Reports indicate Ditko left behind no family or survivors. Ditko's impact on Marvel Comics may only be rivaled by his reclusive nature in later years. After creating and developing Spider-Man with Lee in 1961, Ditko premiered lasting hero Dr. Strange in 1963, whose stories Ditko would continue to write and draw for Marvel until 1966. Disputes over money and friction with Lee reportedly drove Ditko to leave Marvel in 1966, and Ditko shunned the public spotlight shortly thereafter, giving his last formal interview in 1968, though he continued contributing comics to other publishers. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Sonos One, a Sonos smart speaker that launched with Amazon's Alexa voice assistant. (credit: Jeff Dunn) Smart audio company Sonos has filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission to go public. In doing so, the company warned investors of potential risk factors, such as Sonos' dependence on competitors like Amazon, and US President Donald Trump's trade tariffs, which might increase costs for companies like Sonos that depend on imports from China. However, Sonos made some impressive claims about user satisfaction and loyalty, and it positioned itself as an attractive alternative to the walled gardens that competitors have built. Sonos has not been profitable in the past, but the filing points out that it has closed the gap more with each passing year. The company claims that while this fiscal year is not complete, it has achieved profitability over the past several months. The filing lays out the numbers: Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Google results sent to remote servers. (credit: Robert Heaton) Google, Mozilla, and Opera have pulled a browser extension with more than two million downloads after it was caught tracking every website its users visited—and sending the data to a remote server. The Stylish extension allowed users to customize the look and feel of websites in a variety of ways. Among other things, it could remove clutter such as Facebook or Twitter news feeds, change normal pictures to black-and-white manga images, and change black-on-white site themes to white-on-black themes. Starting this year, Stylish started performing these useful functions at a high price: according to software engineer Robert Heaton, the extension started sending users’ complete browsing activity back to its servers by default, along with a unique identifier that in many cases could be used to correlate email addresses or other Internet attributes belonging to those users. An updated Stylish privacy policy disclosed that the extension collected browsing histories. The version published in May, for instance, said that the information included “standard web server log information (i.e., web request) as well as data sent in response to that request, such as URL used, Internet Protocol address (trimmed and hashed for anonymization), HTTP referrer, and user agent.” Various articles from January also noted the tracking but, citing a new owner of the extension, these articles said it would be anonymous. (This despite the fact that many URLs, particularly when stored in large quantities over a long period of time, can make it painfully obvious which individual is viewing them.) Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Fox News is one of three top news websites that are not encrypting content. In February, Emily Schechter, the Chrome Security Product Manager at Google, announced in a blog post that beginning with the release of Chrome version 68, "Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as 'not secure'." This means that Chrome users will see a visible warning next to the Web address for sites using unencrypted HTTP to serve up pages—a warning that Google has been rolling out slowly over the past few months, starting with pages that have forms requesting information. Chrome 68 ships this month, so the deadline to avoid its "badge of shame" is looming. Some major sites are pressing to beat the deadline—the BBC recently made the move to HTTPS by default for its websites, as BBC News principal software engineer James Donohue recounted in a Medium post on July 6. But other major news sites—including Fox News, Time, and Newsweek—still leave their traffic unencrypted. As a result, they leave their Web content vulnerable to code insertion by Internet service providers or by malicious third parties that manage to place themselves between sites and their readers. Admittedly, it's not easy for major sites to switch to secure HTTP. Ars Technica went to HTTPS by default in January 2017, after a major engineering effort. Accommodating our own static and dynamic content systems, as well as third-party content (including advertisements and content from other Condé Nast sites) complicated the task. For sites with the amount of content and traffic that Fox News, Time, and Newsweek handle, it's a big task. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge A recently discovered hole in Valve's API allowed observers to generate extremely precise and publicly accessible data for the total number of players for thousands of Steam games. While Valve has now closed this inadvertent data leak, Ars can still provide the data it revealed as a historical record of the aggregate popularity of a large portion of the Steam library. The new data derivation method, as ably explained in a Medium post from The End Is Nigh developer Tyler Glaiel, centers on the percentage of players who have accomplished developer-defined Achievements associated with many games on the service. On the Steam web site, that data appears rounded to two decimal places. In the Steam API, however, the Achievement percentages were, until recently, provided to an extremely precise 16 decimal places. This added precision means that many Achievement percentages can only be factored into specific whole numbers. (This is useful since each game's player count must be a whole number.) With multiple Achievements to check against, it's possible to find a common denominator that works for all the percentages with high reliability. This process allows for extremely accurate reverse engineering of the denominator representing the total player base for an Achievement percentage. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Original Statue of Liberty is on the left. Robert Davidson's Las Vegas replica is on the right. (credit: Charles E. Rotkin/CORBIS/VCG via Getty Images, George Rose/Getty Images) A sculptor who created a replica of the Statue of Liberty for a Las Vegas casino was awarded $3.5 million in damages last week after the US Postal Service (USPS) accidentally used a photo of his statue—rather than a photo of the original statue in New York harbor—on one of its most common stamps. If you bought a "forever" stamp between 2011 and 2014, there's a good chance that it showed the face of the Statue of Liberty replica that sculptor Robert Davidson constructed for the New York-New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The Post Office licensed a photo of Davidson's from the image service Getty for $1,500, initially believing it was a photograph of the original statue. The stamp with the resulting image was released to the public in December 2010; it took four months before anyone pointed out the mistake to the Post Office. In March 2011, a spokesperson said that the USPS "still loves the stamp design and would have selected this photograph anyway." The Post Office continued using the photo for almost three years before retiring it in January 2014. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | amesy) User reviews on Netflix will soon become a thing of the past. According to a CNET report, Netflix will remove user reviews from its service this summer. The removal rollout will happen in stages: by July 30, you won't be able to write new reviews for shows and movies on the streaming service. By mid-August, you won't even be able to read existing user reviews. According to a company email, user reviews saw "declining usage over time." Netflix is therefore canceling the written reviews, and the company said it has "notified members who have used the feature recently." User reviews—both the ability to write them and to read them—have been limited to the desktop version of Netflix. Reviews for individual shows and movies didn't appear in any of Netflix's apps, but users could rate programs on the Netflix website and then add written comments. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Kayenta, AZ - 25 July 2016: Poor rural housing estate of Native Americans at the Navajo reservation (Navajo Nation) in the Arizona desert. (credit: Bloomberg | Erik Tham) The Federal Communications Commission is refusing to reverse a decision that will take a broadband subsidy away from many American Indians. Under Chairman Ajit Pai's leadership, the FCC voted 3-2 in November 2017 to make it much harder for Tribal residents to obtain a $25-per-month Lifeline subsidy that reduces the cost of Internet or phone service. The changes could take effect as early as October 2018, depending on when they are approved by the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Small wireless carriers and Tribal organizations sued the FCC in the United States Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. They also filed a petition asking the FCC to stay its decision pending the outcome of the appeal. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Headquarters of car-sharing technology company Uber in the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood of San Francisco, California, October 13, 2017. (credit: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images) In early May 2018, a California Supreme Court ruled that it is now harder for employers to formally classify their workers as independent contractors rather than employees. The court's opinion in Dynamex v. Superior Court of Los Angeles County could have a profound impact on many tech companies like Uber, Lyft, Instacart, and others that provide on-demand services. Dynamex is a courier and delivery company based in Kent, Washington. As Ars has reported, the overwhelming majority of gig economy companies' workers are not employees, and so they do not get any health, retirement, unemployment, or other benefits that typically come with full-time employment. Uber, for example, uses the euphemism "driver partners" when referring to its non-employee drivers, who constitute the backbone of the company's service. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Elon Musk. (credit: Tesla Club Belgium) Elon Musk is sending a team of engineers to Thailand to see if they can help authorities racing to save a dozen boys and their coach who are stranded in a cave there. "SpaceX & Boring Co engineers headed to Thailand tomorrow to see if we can be helpful to govt," Musk tweeted just after midnight, California time, on Thursday night. "There are probably many complexities that are hard to appreciate without being there in person." "Boring Co has advanced ground penetrating radar & is pretty good at digging holes," Musk wrote in an earlier tweet on Thursday. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Marvel Studios) For some fans, 2015's Ant-Man was a breath of fresh air after the save-the-world insanity of many other Marvel Studios films. But that comic series' small-suit, big-screen debut was still glued to Avengers plot lines, which arguably dragged its momentum and fun. (This fact may have caused a rift between Marvel and the film's original director, Edgar Wright, who was rumored to have a sillier, more standalone film in mind before leaving Ant-Man.) A few years later, the Avengers side of things is even more insane. Ant-Man was noticeably absent from Infinity War, and this week's Ant-Man and the Wasp explains why: to give Infinity War haters a silly, one-off antidote. Basically, Wright's reported vision has finally emerged, one film later. Everything good about Ant-Man—its heart, its humor, and its brisk take on smaller-scale superhero action—is back and better. By focusing on its best characters, Ant-Man and the Wasp makes room for convincing relationships and character-building; it makes viewers give a crap about its cast... and forgive the film's few imperfections. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 14 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / We need your help to produce a new newsletter to chronicle the dynamic launch industry. (credit: Aurich Lawson/background image United Launch Alliance) Welcome to Edition 1.07 of the Rocket Report! This week there's a lot of news from the small booster side of the things, as well as some interesting comments from the NASA administrator about the future of the Space Launch System rocket. As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below. Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar. Relativity Space eyes military contracts. Relativity, which intends to 3-D print both its rocket engines and the boosters themselves, hopes to win both commercial and military contracts. The company's chief executive, Tim Ellis, told SpaceNews, the Pentagon favors nimble suppliers that can manufacture products fast. He said, “They need the ability to reconstitute constellations quickly. This is super important based on conversations we’re hearing at the government level.” Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt. (credit: Getty Images) On Thursday, President Trump tweeted that Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt had submitted his resignation. Pruitt had been considered among the most loyal of Trump's appointees but the former Oklahoma Attorney General made headlines over the past several months with repeated scandals over extravagant spending. Pruitt reportedly used agency funds to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of tactical pants and other security-related items. He also used agency resources to help his wife find a job, and even to help him purchase a used Trump hotel mattress. Questions about who Pruitt promoted and how raises were doled out also caused significant damage to Pruitt's public image. 13 different federal investigations had been opened up into the Administrator's conduct. Trump's tweet mentioned none of this Thursday afternoon, however. "I have accepted the resignation of Scott Pruitt as the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency," the President tweeted. "Within the Agency Scott has done an outstanding job, and I will always be thankful to him for this. The Senate confirmed Deputy at EPA, Andrew Wheeler, will..." Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 15 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Jonathan / Flickr) After a couple decades of dramatic economic growth, China (with its population of almost 1.4 billion) is now emitting more greenhouses gas that any other single nation. That means that China’s emission trends are incredibly important to watch if you care about the future of climate change. After China signed onto the Paris Agreement in 2015 and pledged to ensure its emissions would stop increasing by 2030, a surprising thing happened: it became apparent that China’s emissions had already dropped. So what’s going on? Has China met its pledge 15 years early or is this just a bump in an otherwise rising road caused by a temporary economic downturn? Much has been made of this question, and a team of researchers led by Dabo Guan and Jing Meng added a new analysis to the discussion this week. The team’s first step is to update annual emissions totals (through 2016). A number of different groups have produced estimates, and this updated version comes in at the low end. It also makes 2013 stand out as a slightly stronger peak, with 2014-2016 clearly lower. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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