posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is here with a big list of deals for your consideration. The featured item this week is a PS4 bundle. It comes with the 500GB PS4, The Last of Us Remastered, a $100 Dell gift card, and Sony's Silver Playstation Headset. Why is Dell selling PS4s? We really have no idea. Featured Sony Playstation 4 Bundle with $100 Dell Gift Card, Last of Us Remastered & Sony Silver Headset for $399.99 (list price $509). Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
The Department of Justice isn't the only federal agency that appears to be skeptical of a merger of the nation's two largest cable companies. The Federal Communications Commission is reportedly close to a procedural move that would make it difficult for Comcast's purchase of Time Warner Cable to be approved. According to The Wall Street Journal, FCC staff has decided that the commission should issue a hearing designation order. "In effect, that would put the $45.2 billion merger in the hands of an administrative law judge, and would be seen as a strong sign the FCC doesn’t believe the deal is in the public interest," the Journal wrote, attributing the information to anonymous sources. "A hearing could be a drawn-out process, and some regulatory experts describe the procedure as a deal-killer, though Comcast would be entitled to make its case for the tie-up." The FCC hasn't announced its intentions for the Comcast/TWC deal. A commission spokesperson declined to comment when contacted by Ars, saying the merger is still under review. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
A Tennessee father who followed his eight-year-old daughter to school with a drone has now decided to ground it in the wake of the attention his flight has garnered. According to WVLT, a Knoxville, Tennessee television station, Chris Early decided to launch a drone to monitor his child's walk to school after she requested that she be allowed to walk on her own. The move got some local media attention earlier this week, and other news sites picked up on it; Time magazine even dubbed him the “World's Most Embarrassing Dad.” Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Archive.org/Ron Amadeo A gallery of YouTube's homepage design over the years. This homepage from 2005 kind of looks like Google. YouTube put search front and center with featured videos listed below. 10 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);YouTube, the Web's de-facto video service, is turning 10 this year. The site has become so indispensable that it feels like a basic part of the Internet itself rather than a service that lives on top of it. YouTube is just the place to put videos, and it's used by everyone from individuals to billion-dollar companies. It's obvious to say, but YouTube revolutionized Web video. It made video uploading and playback almost as easy as uploading a picture, handled all the bandwidth costs, and it allowed anyone to embed those videos onto other sites. The scale of YouTube gets more breathtaking every year. It has a billion users in 61 languages, and 12 days of video are uploaded to the site every minute—that's almost 50 years of video every day. The site just continues growing. The number of hours watched on YouTube is up 50 percent from last year. It's easy to forget YouTube almost didn't make it. Survival for the site was a near-constant battle in the early days. The company not only fought the bandwidth monster, but it faced an army of lawyers from various media companies that all wanted to shut the video service down. But thanks to cash backing from Google, the site was able to fend off the lawyers. And by staying at the forefront of Web and server technology, YouTube managed to serve videos to the entire Internet without being bankrupted by bandwidth bills. Read 40 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
If we were to draw a schematic cartoon diagram of a subduction zone, it would include a diving oceanic plate, represented by a uniform slab. As the plate dove deeper, water driven off by the increasing heat might be shown with a blue arrow. And, of course, that water will create some blobs of red magma in the mantle between the two tectonic plates, as adding water lowers the melting point of the rock. But in reality, the subducting plate is not a uniform slab. An oceanic plate can be divided into a number of layers. On the top, there’s the ocean mud that slowly accumulated as the plate traveled from the mid-ocean ridge toward the subduction zone. Beneath that, you’ve got the basalt (and basalt’s larger-crystalled sibling, gabbro) that makes up the oceanic crust. At the bottom, there’s a layer of mantle rock that stuck to the plate as it slowly cooled over the course its long life beneath an ocean of water. Water is everywhere in this process; it soaks into the sediment and fills cracks in the rock, and it also works its way into the minerals themselves, becoming a part of them chemically. When an oceanic plate is subducting, the gradual warming as it sinks deeper into the hot Earth can drive off the water within the sediments and fractures, but the minerals can transform and give up their store of water as well. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Original creator of the Assassin’s Creed series and ex-Ubisoft creative director Patrice Désilets has unveiled Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey, the first project to emerge from his indie studio Panache Digital Games. According to the studio’s website, Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey will be a third-person action and adventure game with survival elements. As is becoming increasingly common, the game will also be released in an episodic format. Each episode promises to “relive the greatest moments of mankind with a documentary twist.” While few other details have been revealed, Désilets did show a brief teaser trailer during his talk at the Reboot Develop 2015 conference in Dubrovnik. The trailer (embedded below), runs through key moments in the evolution of mankind, from the present day to the dawn of civilization, including what appears to be the harnessing of fire and the creation of the first tools. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
For several weeks, rumors have been circulating that a research group in China had performed the first targeted editing of DNA in human embryos. Today, the rumors were confirmed by the appearance of a paper in the journal Protein & Cell, describing genome editing performed at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. The paper shows that while the technique can work, it doesn't work very efficiently, suggesting there are a lot of hurdles between existing techniques and widespread genetic engineering of humanity. To avoid potential ethical issues, the researchers performed their experiments with embryos that had been fertilized by more than one sperm. While these are regular occurrences in in vitro fertilization procedures, the embryos are inviable and normally discarded. This prevented any chance that an edited embryo could somehow produce a viable, adult human. The work relied on the CRISPR-Cas9 system. This allows the researchers to inject DNA that encodes an enzyme and targeting RNA into a cell, which then cuts a specific DNA sequence (see the sidebar for details). The cut then typically gets repaired using DNA that looks similar. If researchers supply engineered DNA with regions of similarity at the same time as the enzyme, then the edited DNA can be used for repair, integrating it into the genome. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
It looks like Microsoft is delivering its promised more regular Windows builds. The company just pushed out a new build to Fast Track users of the Windows 10 Technical Preview: build number 10061. Highlights of the new build are new Mail and Calendar apps, based on the same Universal Apps as the Windows 10 for phones apps released a couple of weeks ago, and more configurability of the operating system's appearance, including a new dark theme. The Continuum experience, used in tablet and hybrid devices, should also be improved. As with the other Technical Preview builds of Windows 10, this isn't yet ready as a daily driver operating system, and Microsoft describes a number of known issues in its release notes. Perhaps most substantial is that traditional Win32 desktop applications cannot currently be launched from the Start menu. They can be launched from icons pinned on the taskbar, or from search, but not from the menu itself. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Google just announced Project Fi, its new MVNO wireless service for the Nexus 6. Google hopes to shake up the industry with its control of the hardware, software, and network. It's sort of the Google Fiber approach: move into a market with a new pricing scheme and new technology and hope the pressure of competition makes the internet better for everyone. Project Fi (Wi-Fi + Sprint + T-Mobile ) Google Fi combines Sprint, T-Mobile, and Wi-Fi into a single network. This isn't Sprint or T-Mobile; it's Sprint and T-Mobile. You phone is subscribed to both networks and jumps between them, which means the Nexus 6 will be hopping from Wi-Fi to CDMA to GSM to LTE as the situation dictates. Calls, texts, and data can seamlessly switch between T-Mo, Sprint, and Wi-Fi, and calls and texts can be routed to any secondary devices that have Hangouts installed. You're allowed to tether, and your data plans work in over 120 countries, but only at 3G speeds. Google says they have "millions" of high-speed Wi-Fi hotspots across the country, and your connection to them is encrypted. The biggest downside is device selection: for now it only works on the Nexus 6. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Defunct startup Aereo fought a long legal battle against TV broadcasters, who argued that its scheme to use tiny antennas to broadcast TV over the Internet violated copyright laws. Last year, Aereo lost at the Supreme Court, where a majority of justices found that the company should be regulated like a cable system. That decision led to Aereo shutting down its business and later to Chapter 11 bankruptcy. All that's left is dividing up the company's meager assets, and that task is drawing to a close. Bloomberg reports that Aereo has agreed to pay $950,000 to the TV broadcasters that sued it, which include CBS, ABC, and Fox. That's about one percent of the $99 million the broadcasters believed they were entitled to, according to bankruptcy filings. Aereo wasn't worth anywhere near that much. Its assets were sold off in February for less than $2 million. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
In an e-mail today to the Open Source Software Security (oss-security) mailing list, the maintainer of wireless network client code used by Android, the Linux and BSD Unix operating systems, and Windows Wi-Fi device drivers sent an urgent fix to a flaw that could allow attackers to crash devices or even potentially inject malicious software into their memory. The flaw could allow these sorts of attacks via a malicious wireless peer-to-peer network name. The vulnerability was discovered by the security team at Alibaba and reported to wpa_supplicant maintainer Jouni Malinen by the Google security team. The problem, Malinen wrote, is in how wpa_supplicant "uses SSID information parsed from management frames that create or update P2P peer entries" in the list of available networks. The vulnerability is similar in some ways to the Heartbleed vulnerability in that it doesn't properly check the length of transmitted data. But unlike Heartbleed, which let an attacker read contents out of memory from beyond what OpenSSL was supposed to allow, the wpa_supplicant vulnerability works both ways: it could expose contents of memory to an attacker, or allow the attacker to write new data to memory. That's because the code fails to check the length of incoming SSID information and writes information beyond the valid 32 octets of data to memory beyond the range it was allocated. SSID information "is transmitted in an element that has a 8-bit length field and potential maximum payload length of 255 octets," Malinen wrote, and the code "was not sufficiently verifying the payload length on one of the code paths using the SSID received from a peer device. This can result in copying arbitrary data from an attacker to a fixed length buffer of 32 bytes (i.e., a possible overflow of up to 223 bytes). The overflow can override a couple of variables in the struct, including a pointer that gets freed. In addition, about 150 bytes (the exact length depending on architecture) can be written beyond the end of the heap allocation." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
On Monday, Audi announced that next month in Munich it will be teaming up with Amazon and German logistics company DHL to run a pilot program to make parcel deliveries to an Audi owner's car trunk. The idea behind the program is that if a delivery person tries to leave a package at a person's home, there's a good chance the recipient won't be there and the package will have to go back to the processing facility. If the delivery person tries to take a package to a person's car, he or she can use keyless access to that trunk to leave it there securely. Theoretically, the way it works is this: an Audi owner orders a package and gets a specific delivery time frame from Amazon. The car owner then gives an approximate location for the car during the delivery window and agrees to let the Audi be tracked during that specific time frame. The DHL delivery person receives a digital code to access the trunk of that vehicle, which Audi says “can be used one time only for a specific period of time and expires as soon as the luggage compartment has been closed again.” The DHL delivery person finds the car, opens the trunk, puts the parcel in the trunk, and then can't open the trunk again. The pilot program is only open to people who live in Munich, have Audis, and are Amazon Prime members, so the target demographic is very small. If you're lucky enough to answer yes to all three of those qualifications, just make sure you don't order a sweet, delicious gallon of Tuscan Whole Milk. Unless you also order a sick cooler to keep your milk nice and cold, too. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Donald Eugene Gates served 27 years in prison for armed murder and rape, seven years past the length of his minimum sentence. He was sent to prison in part due to the testimony of informants and in part due to forensic analysis of hair associated with the case. In 2009, however, DNA evidence indicated that he was not guilty of the crime. On Monday, the FBI released what was almost certainly a painful admission: this case was not unusual. The vast majority of the agents that it had sent to court to testify about a specific forensic analysis had submitted erroneous statements to the court. In its preliminary review of relevant cases, at least 90 percent of them were problematic. The technique in question is hair analysis, in which forensic specialists attempt to match features of hairs associated with a crime to either a suspect or a victim. Prior to the advent of widespread DNA testing in the '90s, this technique was used in thousands of cases as evidence tying a suspect to a specific crime; the Bureau discontinued its reliance on it in 1996. But the issue was revived in 2009, when the National Academies of Science performed a systematic review of the forensic sciences. That review set in motion a process that is just now bearing fruit. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
I have great respect for medical professionals. Their training allows them to guess the identity of an affliction based on a set of vaguely expressed symptoms, and I'm amazed they do better than random chance. Unfortunately, diagnosis is only half the job. Treatment is sometimes an exercise in frustration, especially for psychiatric problems. Issues like depression and schizophrenia, seem (to me) to be so poorly understood that the best doctors can do is to treat the symptoms and hope for the best. Combine that with the placebo effect and you have a recipe that tells us that as long as the doctor does something, things might get better. This idea has now been shown (again) in a study published in PLOS One. In this clever study, doctors worked with a group of women suffering from depression (they were all either going through menopause or were post-menopausal). At the beginning of the trial, all of the women spent an hour or so in the company of the prescribing doctor, discussing their personal life and their symptoms and getting a thorough assessment of their mental state. The women were then randomly divided into three groups: one received a drug treatment while the other two were given placebos. At the beginning of the trial, four weeks in, and at the end (six weeks), all of the women were given a full battery of tests to quantify their depression. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
A key group pushing for change to the US patent system has come out today against a reform bill called the TROL Act, saying the bill "falls far short" of its stated goal of fighting misleading patent demand letters. United for Patent Reform (UFPR), the main coalition of businesses seeking patent reform, laid out its position in a letter (PDF) sent this morning to the chairs and ranking members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, as well as the relevant subcommittee, which marked up the bill this morning. The letter says that UFPR can't support the bill as it's currently written, pointing to language that could allow so-called "patent trolls" to continue sending out scores of misleading patent demand letters. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Google has just launched the site for "Project Fi," its heavily rumored MVNO service. The service combines Sprint and T-Mobile along with Wi-Fi and will seamlessly switch between the networks. Google has an interactive coverage map here. The up-front pricing seems pretty standard. It requires a "Fi Basics" plan, which is $20 a month for unlimited talk and texting, plus taxes. Data is an additional $10 per gigabyte a month. So a $20 basics plan plus 3GB a month would be $50, $5 more than Straight Talk charges for the same thing—but that's only if you actually use the data. The unique aspect of the billing is that you "never pay for unused data." Your account gets credited, in money, for data you don't use. The example shows an unused 0.6GB of data gets you $6 back, so credits aren't limited to 1GB increments; overages work the same way, with no extra fees. The data works in "120+ countries," and it still costs the same $10 per gigabyte that it does in the US. The catch is that you're limited to 256Kbps, or about 3G speeds. International texts are unlimited, and international calls cost 20 cents per minute. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
There's a bug in Apple's iOS 8 that allows nearby attackers to send apps—and in some cases the iPhone or iPad they run on—into an endless reboot cycle that temporarily renders the devices useless, according to researchers who demonstrated the attack Tuesday. The exploit uses a standard Wi-Fi network that generates a specially designed secure sockets layer (SSL) certificate to exploit the bug, according to the researchers, who work for Israel-based Skycure. The encrypted communication causes whatever apps happen to be connected to the booby-trapped Wi-Fi network to crash. The vulnerability was introduced in version 8 of the Apple mobile operating system. After sustained connections to the malicious signal, the OS itself will crash, in some cases in a way that causes the devices it runs on to spiral into a repeatable reboot cycle. Making the attack particularly vexing, even if users know the endless crashes are generated by the Wi-Fi network they're connected to, they can't disconnect because the repeated restarts make it impossible to access the device's user settings, as demonstrated in the following video: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
The legal authority enabling the National Security Agency's bulk telephone metadata collection program that Edward Snowden exposed two years ago is set to expire June 1. But not if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others have their way. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kent.). US Senate The Republican from Kentucky introduced the legislation (PDF) late Tuesday that would allow the once-secret program, authorized by Section 215 of the Patriot Act, to continue through 2020. McConnell invoked a rule that bypasses the usual committee vetting process, enabling the bill to go directly to the Senate floor, where a vote has not been scheduled. The measure, which immediately drew criticism from privacy advocates and some members of Congress, allows the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to essentially rubber-stamp government requests for so-called "business records" held by just about any institution, including the phone companies. Interpreted to require the telcos to cough up millions upon millions of calling records about their customers, it requires them to provide the National Security Agency with the phone numbers of both parties in a call, calling card numbers, the length and time of the calls, and the international mobile subscriber identity (ISMI) number for mobile callers. The NSA keeps a running database of that information, saying that it runs queries solely to combat terrorism. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Video-sharing site YouTube has come a long way since co-founder Jawed Karim uploaded the site's first video exactly 10 years ago tomorrow. The unremarkable-turned-remarkable clip focuses on elephants. "The cool thing about these guys is that they have really, really long trunks. And that's pretty much all there is to say," says Karim. The footage lasts 19 seconds; today, "Me at the zoo" boasts a million views for every one of those seconds. In retrospect, Karim's throwaway video sparked a true watershed moment, the beginning of a technological and cultural phenomena that nobody could have envisioned. YouTube, which debuted publicly days after that first upload, has since evolved (or devolved) to host everything from cat videos to movies to music videos. DIY videos, news clips, and political statements are made by both professionals and amateurs alike—and all are available on a global scale. The site famously has more than a billion users and adds 300 hours of new video every minute. Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
The Department of Justice review of Comcast's proposed acquisition of Time Warner Cable is examining whether Comcast lived up to promises it made the government when it purchased NBCUniversal in 2011. To gain government approval for the NBC merger, Comcast agreed to relinquish any control over the management of Hulu, an online video streaming service co-owned by NBC, Fox, and the Disney-ABC Television Group. Yet in 2013, "executives from Walt Disney Co., 21st Century Fox and Comcast Corp. met to discuss the future of Hulu, the online video service the media companies co-own that was up for sale," a Wall Street Journal story on the merger review said last night. Although Comcast was not supposed to influence or participate in the governance or management of Hulu, "Comcast’s assurances at the Sun Valley meeting played a significant role in how its co-owners evaluated the sale process, people familiar with the other owners’ thinking said," the Journal reported. "Comcast told its partners it would help make Hulu the nationwide streaming video platform for the cable TV industry, which would boost the site’s growth and make it a stronger rival to Netflix. That influenced Disney and Fox’s decision to call off the sale when the conference was ending, people familiar with those companies’ thinking said. Among the top bidders for Hulu were Comcast rivals DirecTV and AT&T Inc." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: Intel Compute Stick STCK1A32WFC OS Windows 8.1 with Bing 32-bit CPU 1.33GHz quad-core Intel Atom Z3735F (Turbo Boost up to 1.83GHz) RAM 2GB 1333MHz DDR3 (non upgradeable) GPU Intel HD Graphics (integrated) HDD 32GB eMMC SSD Networking 2.4GHz 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0 Ports 1x USB 2.0, microSD, micro USB (for power) Size 4.06” x 1.46” x 0.47” (103 x 37 x 12mm) Other perks Lock slot Warranty 1 year Price ~$150, ~$110 for Ubuntu Linux version with 1GB of RAM and 8GB of storage Our appreciation of mini desktop PCs is well-documented at this point. In the age of the smartphone and the two-pound laptop, the desktop PC is perhaps the least exciting of computing devices, but there are still plenty of hulking desktop towers out there, and many of them can be replaced by something you can hold in the palm of your hand. Intel’s new Compute Stick, available for about $150 with Windows 8.1 and $110 with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, takes the mini desktop concept about as far as it can go. The Stick isn’t even really a “desktop” in the traditional sense, since it’s an HDMI dongle that hangs off the back of your monitor instead of sitting on your desk. It’s not very powerful, but the Compute Stick is one of the smallest Windows desktops you can buy right now. Let's take a quick look at what it’s capable of. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Developers eager to get their hands on the Valve-supported HTC Vive can now sign up to be considered for a free developer kit. As we were the first to report last month, Vive developer kits will be available free of charge to approved developers, ahead of the availability of commercial units "at a later date this year" (those customers should "expect a higher price point" according to HTC). This is in stark contrast to the likes of Oculus, which has sold tens of thousands of $300 to $350 Rift developer kits since mid-2013 to anyone who wants them. Those hoping to set up shop as a one-person "developer" to scam their way into some free early access may want to think again. Valve's application form asks for a company name, URL, team size, and a detailed description of the VR project you hope to make with the Vive dev kit. All that information will factor into Valve's selection process, and while Valve hasn't detailed exactly what it's looking for out of submissions, spokesperson Doug Lombardi told Ars that "all interested developers, big and small" should feel welcome to apply. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
A local programmer and prolific public records requester has been hired by the Seattle Police Department (SPD) to work on redacting and automating data release to the public. According to The Stranger, Tim Clemans is set to begin early next month and will be paid $22.60 per hour to manage the SPD’s YouTube channel and improve its video redaction, with the goal of maximizing the amount of material that is released. After being hired, Clemans apparently withdrew his pending public records requests, including one filed in February 2015 that asked for nearly every Washington state government e-mail ever. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 11 days ago on ars technica
Hollywood actor Bill Paxton, who has played leading roles in blockbuster films such as Aliens, True Lies, and Titanic, is to star alongside Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe in an upcoming factual BBC drama about the development of controversial video game series Grand Theft Auto. Black Mirror and Misfits director Owen Harris is set to direct. The drama, currently going under the working title "Game Changer," will see Radcliffe taking on the role of Rockstar Games co-founder and GTA developer Sam Houser, while Paxton will take on the role of disbarred lawyer and famed anti-GTA crusader Jack Thompson. While the BBC’s blurb about the drama doesn’t specifically mention which version of GTA will be chronicled, the inclusion of Thompson and Houser suggests that it will focus only on the 3D editions of the game, from GTA III onward. According the BBC’s synopsis, the 90-minute drama will focus on the game's origins under Houser, which it describes as "the greatest British coding success story since Bletchley Park," while also delving into the intense controversy surrounding GTA’s violent content and its impressive commercial success. To put that success into perspective, GTA V—the latest release in the series—had sold over 45 million copies as of February this year, raking in billions of dollars for publisher Take-Two Interactive. It also remains the best-selling game of all time in the UK, overtaking previous record holder Call of Duty: Black Ops. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Android 5.1 is only about a month old, but Google is already pushing out a new release to the public AOSP repository. Android 5.1.1, as the name would suggest, consists of a bunch of bugfixes. If you're wondering exactly what bugfixes, our friends at Android Police have compiled a list of the new commits. It's a small release, with only 34 merged changes. The biggest fixes are for the Nexus 5 and 6 camera failing to launch in some circumstances, along with a few PNG security holes (CVE-2014-9495), which were probably the catalyst for this release. There isn't too much else. While the fresh code is in AOSP, when phones will get it is another story. The first device to get the update—believe it or not—is the Nexus Player. The Android TV set-top-box already has an image up on Google's Nexus System Image page. For everyone else—um—wait? Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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