posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Here we go again. (credit: CSPAN) Yesterday, Ars reported on the Reddit thread purported to have been started by Paul Combetta, a systems administrator at Platte River Networks involved in the operation of Hillary Clinton's private mail server. In the thread, a user named "stonetear" asked others on the /r/Exchangeserver subreddit how to strip a "very VIP" person's e-mail address from messages in an existing Exchange .PST e-mail archive. Now, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which has been at the center of much of the ongoing congressional probe into Clinton's e-mails, has subpoenaed those posts. The feds are asking Reddit to preserve them for further investigation. The Hill reports that the committee's Republican majority has issued an order to Reddit to provide the posts and metadata related to them to committee investigators, and Reddit is reportedly cooperating with the order. The Justice Department previously granted Combetta immunity from prosecution for cooperating with the FBI's investigation of the Clinton e-mails. Combetta admitted to accidentally deleting Clinton's e-mail archives in an "oh shit moment" when he realized he had not put new retention policies in place for her mail. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: CSPAN) “The greed is astounding, it’s sickening, it’s disgusting,” said Rep. John Duncan (R-Tenn.) as he summed up his thoughts during the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s hearing to plumb the surging price of life-saving EpiPens. “And I am a very conservative, pro-business republican.” So was the rest of the committee, but the hearing still dragged on for nearly six-and-a-half hours into the late evening Wednesday. Throughout, Congress members on both sides of the aisle grilled and chastised Heather Bresch, CEO of Mylan Inc., maker of EpiPens. With only one small competitor, Mylan holds 90 percent of the market share on epinephrine auto-injectors, which reverse deadly allergic reactions. Since buying the EpiPen in 2007, the company has raised the price 15 times, totaling a 500-percent increase. EpiPens went from roughly $50 each to $608 for a pack of two. Millions of people—mostly children—must constantly have access to a pen. During the hearing, several congress members spoke of the countless teary parents they have spoken with who are struggling to afford the devices they have no choice but to buy. Yet, while consumers were grappling with medical bills, Bresch saw her company’s profits soar, as well as her own salary. Her compensation rose from $2.4 million in 2007 to nearly $19 million in 2015—a point Duncan was happy to clarify after Bresch told the committee that her current salary was around $18 million. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Yelp Inc.) California's top court is agreeing to hear a case in which a lower court has ordered Yelp to remove a bad review. The California Supreme Court did not say when it would hear the case that tests the Communications Decency Act, which San Francisco-based Yelp maintains protects it from having to remove content on its site posted by third parties. The case concerns a June decision by a state appeals court that requires Yelp to remove a defamatory review about a law firm written by an unhappy client. A lower court issued a default judgement for over $500,000 against the reviewer, Ava Bird, for a review that the law firm claimed was defamatory. Bird was sued for defamation but was a no-show in court. Eric Goldman, a Santa Clara University legal scholar, summed up the lower court's decision. "Of course any removal order injures Yelp by usurping Yelp’s editorial policies about its content database. But because of the default judgment on defamation, the court can neatly sidestep that First Amendment injury by claiming that we know this content is beyond First Amendment protection," Goldman wrote. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Based on the new data, nearly every out-of-Africa map available on the web is wrong in some way. This is perhaps the least wrong. (credit: NIH) By now, the big picture of humanity's origins is pretty clear. Modern humans evolved in Africa over 100,000 years ago, but they took tens of thousands of years to leave the continent. Once they did, they rapidly spread across Asia and Australia, mating with some of the pre-modern (read: archaic) humans along the way. But that big picture, often called "Out of Africa," has a number of details missing. For one, our understanding of the genetic diversity within Africa is startlingly bad—so bad that we missed an entirely distinct African Y chromosome lineage for decades. And there have been numerous debates about the number of times humanity has left Africa. Was it a single big migration, or did we depart in waves? A new series of papers has narrowed the scope of the controversy considerably. While there may have been more than one push out of Africa, there's only one that really ended up mattering. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In the security weeds? Yahoo won't yet comment. (credit: Neon Tommy) In August, a dealer in stolen data who goes by the online moniker "Peace"—the person or persons who previously sold data from the accounts of MySpace and LinkedIn users—announced that the results of another "megabreach" was for sale. This time, it's the account information of 200 million Yahoo users. According to a report by Recode's Kara Swisher, Yahoo is preparing to confirm the four-year old breach, potentially creating problems for the company's planned $4.8 billion acquisition by Verizon. A previous examination of a sample of the data obtained by Motherboard was inconclusive. There have been a number of other claimed breaches of Yahoo's account data, including a claim of 40 million Yahoo accounts among a total of 272 million alleged stolen credentials reported in May/ But that data that may have just as easily been stolen from other sources. According to a spokesperson at LeakedSource, however, a small sample file of legitimate Yahoo user data exists. But it's not clear whether it's representative of the rest of the data "Peace" has, because no one has been able to look at the full dump yet—"Peace" has offered to sell it for 3 Bitcoin (about $1,860). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A Cisco modem that's certified to work with Charter Internet service. (credit: Cisco) Charter is trying to convince the Federal Communications Commission to backtrack on a plan that would force cable providers to charge a separate fee for cable modems. Charter is unusual compared to other cable companies in that it doesn’t tack on a cable modem rental fee when offering Internet service. But FCC officials don’t think that’s good for consumers, because the price of Charter Internet service is the same whether a customer uses a Charter modem or buys their own. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s latest proposal for new cable box rules would require companies to list fees for equipment used to access video. The FCC is clearly hoping that Charter will create a separate fee for cable modems and lower the base price of Internet service by a corresponding amount, thus letting customers save money in the long run by purchasing their own modems. (Separately from modems, Charter already charges monthly fees for the use of its TV set-top boxes.) Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Burt Reynolds as JJ McLure, and Dom DeLuise as Victor Prinzim in The Cannonball Run. Alex Roy is neither of these two characters. But it did give our office a chance to reminisce over how much we all loved the movie. (credit: 20th Century Fox) It must be the season for electric vehicles and speed records. Jonny Smith turned a long-forgotten 1970s electric city car into the world's fastest street legal EV. Venturi and The Ohio State University just set a new EV land speed record. And to that list we can now add Alex Roy, Warren Ahner, and Franz Aliquo's cross-country "Cannonball Run," the trio having set a new fastest time for a coast-to-coast dash in a Tesla 90D. An affable chap prone to automotive adventures, Roy first came to notoriety in petrol-fueled Cannonball and Gumball rallies. These days, as editor-at-large for The Drive, he's a big proponent of both electrification and autonomous driving, particularly when the two meet as they do under the shapely metal-and-plastic form of a Tesla. On August 24, Roy, Ahner, and Aliquo settled into the cabin of one such machine—a 90D, note, rather than the ludicrously fast P90D model—in Redondo Beach. Just 55 hours later the trio pulled into the Red Bull Garage in New York City having covered 2,877 miles (4,630km), besting the previous fastest transcontinental EV crossing by two hours and 48 minutes. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(video link) Virtual reality aficionados that want to add hand-tracking to the Oculus Rift may have to pay a pretty penny for the privilege. That's based on a report from Engadget's Nick Summers, who stopped by his local GAME retail outlet and saw a banner advertisement selling Oculus Touch controllers for a recommended retail price of £189.99. Using current exchange rates, that would correspond to a roughly $250 price for the controllers in the US. But the $599 Oculus Rift headset itself currently retails for £549 in the UK, following a seemingly Brexit-induced price hike in August. That international pricing ratio would suggest a price closer to $200 for the US version of the Touch controllers. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Elon Musk prepares to testify at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 5, 2014. (credit: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Elon Musk will deliver this year’s most anticipated aerospace speech on Tuesday at the International Astronautical Conference in Mexico. The talk, “Making Humans a Multiplanetary Species,” marks a singular moment for the man who has upended the global launch industry during the last five years and will now finally peel away some of the layers of his grand vision to colonize Mars—and possibly other places in the Solar System. It was mooted in some aerospace circles that Musk might change the focus of his much-advertised speech at the IAC meeting after the loss of a Falcon 9 rocket earlier this month (the second), the cause of which remains unknown to the public. And while Ars has learned that substantial changes have been made to Musk’s speech, its central theme will remain how to address the challenges of creating a self-sustaining colony on Mars. Indeed, SpaceX recently added a livestream of the talk to its site, complete with a photo of Mars. Clearly, Musk and his company are pressing ahead with their Mars ambitions even as the very difficult, real-world work of assessing an Earth-bound rocket failure continues. After the speech it seems likely that details about Musk’s much-hyped architecture for Mars exploration—the big spacecraft known variously as the Mars Colonial Transporter or Interplanetary Transport System and rocket, the BFR—will capture the most attention. Everyone wants to see these vehicles, which undoubtedly will ooze magnificence. But at Ars we’ll be watching for something much more prosaic, namely, who pays for all this? Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge There are many ways to interpret the beautiful game. Some teams prefer to keep the ball on the turf. Others prefer to launch it into the air. Defending deep in your own half is an option, as is pushing up the pitch towards the opposition. And do you play physically, or cerebrally? As long as you play by the rules, in football, there is no right or wrong approach. PES 2017 continues this tradition. Barcelona, Manchester United, Juventus, and Paris-Saint Germain all play very differently in real life, and that's ably represented in PES. Football is a simple game made complex through myriad approaches it offers players, teams, and mangers. No other game comes as close to replicating those intricacies with a pair of analogue sticks as PES does. Simply put, PES 2017 is the finest football game ever made. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Whether you wanted to or not, you knew about the Apple Watch as soon as it came out last year. And even if you heard "wearble" and immediately thought "fitness," Apple was very intentional about pushing the Watch's non-fitness features as the main reason to buy it. While there are things the Apple Watch can do that are primarily found in smartwatches versus fitness trackers, Apple hasn't yet convinced consumers at large that they need those features—or that they're worth $350, at least. The true value of a smartwatch may still up for debate, but what's undeniable is that people see practical value in connected fitness devices. With the Apple Watch Series 2, Apple has decided to embrace that. The second-generation model of the company's smartwatch builds upon the foundations of the original by adding a built-in GPS, water-resistant design, and swim tracking abilities. It runs watchOS 3 as well, which adds to the fitness features while boosting the performance of the watch and fine-tuning some of those smartwatch characteristics. Read 50 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Whoa. (credit: USA / NBCUniversal) Warning: This piece contains spoilers for this week's episode of Mr. Robot as well as show's entire second season. "Angela's right. We can't beat them, but we don't have to lose to them either. Maybe there's a way to stop them from winning." Last week, Mr. Robot's two-part Season Two (S2) finale began with this monologue from series hero Eliot. At the time, it seemed to be referencing the FBI (hot on fsociety's trails with agent Dom DiPierro following Angela like a hawk) or E-Corp (about to unleash its digital currency on the US to fill the financial sector void created by the 5/9 hack). But based on how the finale turned out, Elliot appears to be on quest to stop himself from winning. It took 11 episodes, but fsociety's follow-up to S1's 5/9 hack has finally come into focus. The mysterious Stage Two proves to be a culmination of prior work. The idea of using temperature to disrupt data storage came out during a Steel Mountain data center attack in S1. Planting a femtocell at the temporary FBI setup stations at E-Corp happened in episode six this season. And blowing crap up was a dark Mr. Robot desire from early in S1 before Elliot fought to include "no killing" as part of the hacking moral code. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Bleach those bits away. (credit: Adina Firestone) A system administrator with Platte River Networks, the company that took over hosting Hillary Clinton's mail server after it was moved out of her basement in Chappaqua, has been the target of a crowdsourced investigation on Reddit into whether he took part in a conspiracy to cover up Clinton's e-mails. Paul Combetta, an employee of Platte River Networks who was granted immunity from prosecution by the Justice Department in exchange for cooperation with the FBI's investigation of Clinton's e-mails, apparently went to Reddit for help with a sticky problem related to the e-mail investigation by the House Select Committee on Benghazi—scrubbing the e-mails of Clinton's personal address. While the post doesn't provide evidence that Clinton herself instructed Combetta to erase her e-mails, it does suggest that his staff wanted to excise her private e-mail address from the archives to be turned over to the State Department—ånd in turn, to the House Select Committee. The later destruction of the e-mails during the continuing investigation was apparently, as Combetta told investigators, an "oh-shit moment." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It's chosen by default, ready to download and install if you're not paying attention. For the first year of Windows 10's availability, the operating system was offered as a free upgrade for anyone running a consumer version of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. To advertise this unusual offer, the company pushed an update known as "Get Windows 10" to users of those operating systems in a move that proved more than a little contentious. The promotion used some shady techniques to trick people into upgrading to Windows 10. The Get Windows 10 software, however, has finally been purged from user systems. Mary Jo Foley spotted that a patch shipped yesterday, KB3184143, which removes the Get Windows 10 promotional software. Broadly speaking, the Get Windows 10 program seems to have been successful. Windows 10's uptake was unprecedented for a Windows release, with more than 350 million people now using the operating system—a number that hasn't been updated for several weeks. We hope to hear more at Microsoft's Ignite conference in Atlanta next week. The manner in which the program was operated, however, became increasingly underhanded; toward the end of the promotion, the ads felt straight-up deceptive, as they performed the upgrade even if you clicked the X to dismiss the window. That 350 million users number undoubtedly includes some number of Windows users who wanted to stick with Windows 7 or 8.1 but were tricked into upgrading. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge A recently fixed security vulnerability that affected both the Firefox and Tor browsers had a highly unusual characteristic that caused it to threaten users only during temporary windows of time that could last anywhere from two days to more than a month. As a result, the cross-platform, malicious code-execution risk most recently visited users of browsers based on the Firefox Extended Release on September 3 and lasted until Tuesday, or a total of 17 days. The same Firefox version was vulnerable for an even longer window last year, starting on July 4 and lasting until August 11. The bug was scheduled to reappear for a few days in November and for five weeks in December and January. Both the Tor Browser and the production version of Firefox were vulnerable during similarly irregular windows of time. While the windows were open, the browsers failed to enforce a security measure known as certificate pinning when automatically installing NoScript and certain other browser extensions. That meant an attacker who had a man-in-the-middle position and a forged certificate impersonating a Mozilla server could surreptitiously install malware on a user's machine. While it can be challenging to hack a certificate authority or trick one into issuing the necessary certificate for addons.mozilla.org, such a capability is well within the means of nation-sponsored attackers, who are precisely the sort of adversaries included in the Tor threat model. Such an attack, however, was only viable at certain periods when Mozilla-supplied "pins" expired. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A screenshot from the newly playable Half-Life mod Threewave shows where the "quad damage" logo was in the original Quake version. It's not every day that we see the playable release of official Valve content for the original 1998 release of Half-Life. Today is apparently one of those days, even if the "official" content here is a port of a two-decade-old Quake mod that was originally canceled in 2001 and leaked through a 13-year-old hack of Valve's servers. Confused? Then you should watch this highly informative Valve News Network video, which lays out the story of the Half-Life version of the Threewave mod. If that name sounds familiar, you were probably a fan of the original Threewave mod for id Software's Quake. That mod, released way back in the Internet prehistory of 1996, helped popularize the standard Capture the Flag mode that's been seen in countless shooters since. Even PC shooter superfans may not remember, however, that a Half-Life version of Threewave was contained in the infamous 2003 hack of Valve's servers—the same hack that revealed an early copy of Half-Life 2 to the world. Buried in a leaked folder called "wmods" (in a subfolder named "3wave") was a level pack for Half-Life's Deathmatch Classic containing replicas of all the official maps from the Quake Threewave mod. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An antenna used by AT&T's Project AirGig. (credit: AT&T) AT&T is developing wireless technology that uses power lines to guide wireless signals to their destination and potentially deliver multi-gigabit Internet speeds. The technology is experimental and not close to commercial deployment, but it could potentially—in a few years—be used to deliver smartphone data or home Internet. Project AirGig from AT&T Labs, announced yesterday, revives the possibility of using power lines for Internet service—but in a surprising way. Signals would not travel inside the power lines, but near the lines. "Low-cost plastic antennas and devices located along the power line" send wireless signals to each other, using the power lines as a guide, AT&T said. “We’re experimenting with multiple ways to send a modulated radio signal around or near medium-voltage power lines,” AT&T’s announcement said. “There’s no direct electrical connection to the power line required, and it has the potential of multi-gigabit speeds in urban, rural, and underserved parts of the world.” Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / We hope Blizzard taps Ars' own Aurich Lawson for graphic-design duties on what we assume will be a new logo for the renamed Battle.net. (credit: Aurich Lawson) If you've touched PC gaming over the last two decades, chances are good that you've logged in to the Battle.net service at least once. Blizzard Entertainment's hugely popular online-gaming network has connected every one of the developer's PC games since 1996, and while the service has expanded and added myriad options over the years, its name has held on—which we at Ars think is awesome, considering "dot net" sounds delightfully dated. Apparently, 1996 called, and it wants its old-sounding domain name back. Blizzard used its World of Warcraft blog to announce the name-change news on Wednesday, where an unnamed representative confirmed that the company's online-matchmaking services will soon be dubbed "Blizzard tech." The company didn't offer a firm date for the name change other than indicating that we can expect the change "over the next several months." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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3,000 hp, two motors, eight battery packs, and 341mph. Venturi 2016 Shivraj Gohil / Spacesuit Media Tesla may have made column inches earlier this month with the announcement that the P100D is one of the fastest-accelerating production cars in the world, but when it comes to sheer electrifying speed, the Musk-mobile has nothing on the Venturi Buckeye Bullet-3. You may remember reading about VBB-3 back in February; it's a land-speed-record car built in a collaboration between Monegasque electric vehicle company Venturi and The Ohio State University. Well, the team has been out on the Bonneville Salt Flats the past few days, and on Monday it set a new land speed record for electric vehicles with a two-way average of 341mph (548km/h)! We spoke to team leader David Cooke last Thursday, when the team was bedding in the car and getting ready for the record attempt. "We're ready to go fast," Cooke told Ars, despite the fact that the condition of the salt was less than ideal. Mechanically, the car was much the same as when we saw it last, following a previous land speed record attempt that had to be shelved due to extreme vibrations caused by poor conditions at Bonneville. "From the beginning we have been fighting the complexity of the powertrain and electronics," Cooke said. In particular, getting the battery packs and the inverters all talking to each other properly had consumed a lot of time. "We're very conservative so reliability has been a big focus; we've redone all the wiring from the ground up, implementing some new techniques and concentrating on the wiring connections," he said. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Software engineer Travis Lerol takes aim with an unloaded Liberator handgun in 2013. (credit: AFP / Getty Images News) A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday against Defense Distributed, the Texas organization that promotes 3D-printed guns, in a lawsuit that it brought last year against the State Department. In a 2-1 decision, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals was not persuaded that Defense Distributed’s right to free speech under the First Amendment outweighs national security concerns. The majority concluded: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When the En-Gedi scrolls were excavated from an ancient synagogue's Holy Ark in the 1970s, it was a bittersweet discovery for archaeologists. Though the texts provided further evidence for an ancient Jewish community in this oasis near the Dead Sea, the scrolls had been reduced to charred lumps by fire. Even the act of moving them to a research facility caused more damage. But decades later, archaeologists have read parts of one scroll for the first time. A team of scientists in Israel and the US used a sophisticated medical scanning technique, coupled with algorithmic analysis, to "unwrap" a parchment that's more than 1,700 years old. (credit: Science Advances) Found in roughly the same area as the Dead Sea Scrolls, the En-Gedi scrolls were used by a Jewish community in the region between the 8th century BCE and 6th century CE. In the year 600 CE, the community and its temple were destroyed by fire. Archaeologists disagree on the exact historical provenance of the En-Gedi scrolls—carbon dating suggests fourth century, but stratigraphic evidence points to a date closer to the second. Either way, these scrolls could provide a kind of missing link between the biblical texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the traditional biblical text of the Tanakh found in the Masoretic Text from roughly the 9th century. As the researchers put it in a paper published in Science Advances: Dating the En-Gedi scroll to the third or fourth century CE falls near the end of the period of the biblical Dead Sea Scrolls (third century BCE to second century CE) and several centuries before the medieval biblical fragments found in the Cairo Genizah, which date from the ninth century CE onward. Hence, the En-Gedi scroll provides an important extension to the evidence of the Dead Sea Scrolls and offers a glimpse into the earliest stages of almost 800 years of near silence in the history of the biblical text. How to read a burned scroll with computers But it wasn't until University of Kentucky computer scientist Brent Seales developed a technique he calls volume cartography that archaeologists actually got that "glimpse." Seales had previously worked on a project to read fire-damaged scrolls from the library of a wealthy Roman whose home in Herculaneum was destroyed in the Pompeii eruption. He suggested that Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Pnina Shor scan the scrolls using X-ray micro-CT, which is essentially a very high-resolution CT scan of exactly the same type you might get in a hospital. Indeed, Shor explained in a press conference that her team used a medical imaging facility to produce digital scans that she sent to Seales to analyze in Kentucky. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The iPhone 6S and 6S Plus and the sixth-generation iPod Touch were all introduced in Q4. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) A non-practicing entity called MobileMedia Ideas LLC won a patent lawsuit against Apple today, with a Delaware federal jury finding that Apple should pay $3 million for infringing MobileMedia's patent RE39,231, which relates to ring-silencing features on mobile phones. MobileMedia is an unusual example of the kind of pure patent-licensing entity often derided as a "patent troll." It is majority-owned by MPEG-LA, a patent pool that licenses common digital video technologies like H-264, MPEG-2, and MPEG-4. Minority stakes in MobileMedia are owned by Sony and Nokia, which both contributed the patents owned by the company. MobileMedia also has the same CEO as MPEG-LA, Larry Horn. The report of the verdict comes from legal newswire Law360. The verdict form wasn't immediately available from PACER, the federal courts database. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / McLaren's HQ in Woking, England. That lake provides water used to cool the wind tunnel. The round building next to the lake is where the F1 team is based; the one to the right is the production center where the company builds road cars. (credit: McLaren) On Wednesday, the Financial Times reported that Apple has been in talks to either buy or invest in McLaren, the UK-based F1 team and supercar maker. The report, which cites three unnamed sources, says that the deal would be worth between $1 billion and $1.5 billion. Apple's possible interest in McLaren is not hard to fathom. Beyond the F1 team and those carbon-fiber sports cars, McLaren has a successful consulting business, a wealth of engineering expertise, and a hefty patent portfolio. What's more, Apple is sitting on quite a lot of cash (although much of it is tied up), and since McLaren is not based in the US, Apple would presumably not need to first repatriate—and therefore pay tax on—those funds. But we're not sure there's any smoke to this fire. According to the FT, "Apple’s interest in the Woking-based company centres on its technology, engineering prowess and patent portfolio, according to people briefed on the talks. However, those people cautioned that it was unclear if a deal would go ahead following a recent shift in Apple’s car strategy." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge If you're the sort of PlayStation owner who likes to pay for the privilege of playing online—and get free games every month to boot—today is a good day to spend some money. That's because, after today, the price of an annual PlayStation Plus subscription is increasing from $50 to $60 (yes, we mentioned this back in August, but some of you may not have marked your calendars). It's not that much of an increase, when it comes down to it. Thanks to inflation, the $50 that Sony originally charged for PlayStation Plus when it launched in 2010 is equivalent to just over $55 in 2016 dollars. And the new $60 price matches what Microsoft has been charging for the highly similar Xbox Live Gold since 2010. Still, there's no reason you should pay for the increase before you have to. If you purchase an additional year's subscription today (which stacks on top of any current subscription time), you can lock in the current $50 price until the next time you have to renew. That's $10 you can put toward one of the many interesting indie games on the PS4. Or, um, toward a couple of cups of coffee, I guess? Look, you use your fungible savings however you want, OK? Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Enlarge / This is how we used to mess with the results of elections. The Internet has made it a lot easier. (credit: US Air Force photo) Even if the Russian government was behind the hack of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and various other political organizations and figures, the US government's options under international law are extremely limited, according to Jack Goldsmith, a Harvard law professor and former US assistant attorney general. Goldsmith, who served at the Justice Department during the administration of George W. Bush and resigned after a dispute over the legal justifications for "enhanced interrogation" techniques, spoke on Tuesday about the DNC hack yesterday on a Yale University panel. "Assuming that the attribution is accurate," Goldsmith said, "the US has very little basis for a principled objection." In regard to the theft of data from the DNC and others, Goldsmith said that "it's hard to say that it violates international law, and the US acknowledges that it engages in the theft of foreign political data all the time." Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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