posted 10 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Can Facebook's AIs travel back in time to help with this boiler explosion? Probably. Eventually. (credit: Courtesy of De Forest Douglas Diver Railroad Photographs, ca. 1870-1948/Cornell University Library) Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has just published a 5,700 word "letter" on his profile, where he asserts that Facebook represents one of history's "great leaps." Though he covers a number of topics, what's most interesting is how he positions Facebook as a force for political change in the coming years. His goals are lofty, sometimes even grandiose. That's not the problem. The problem is a fundamental contradiction built into the way he hopes to create what he calls a "global community" by essentially gerrymandering the Internet. Facebook for politicians Zuckerberg begins by claiming we're in an historic moment similar to "our great leaps from tribes to cities to nations." Then he adds that we need social media to "reach the next level." That next level is some kind of ill-defined global community which will come into being by using Facebook as a platform. In recent years, he says, the ideal of global community has become controversial. Though he never uses the word "nationalism," that's clearly what's on his mind. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / David Plouffe (credit: Warren Little/Getty Images) Chicago's Board of Ethics is handing a former Uber executive a $90,000 fine for illegally lobbying the city's mayor over ride-sharing privileges at the city's two airports. On Thursday, the ethics panel voted 5-0 to levy the fine on David Plouffe, who was Barack Obama's former campaign manager. The fine came because Plouffe was not registered with the city as a lobbyist when he e-mailed Mayor Rahm Emanuel's personal account. Plouffe received an immediate reply to his e-mail from Emanuel, even though the mayor was overseas at the time. Lobbyists must disclose their activities. But the lobbying by Plouffe came to light in December as part of open-records lawsuits. In response to those suits, the mayor released hundreds of personal e-mails connected to his public position. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Andrew Cunningham Sometimes it feels like PC makers develop products by adding adjectives. Why would you sell an all-in-one desktop when you could sell a gigantic, ultra-wide premium curved all-in-one desktop? That seems to be the design theory behind HP’s curved Envy desktop, a desk-devouring, 34-inch all-in-one. The Envy is in the same market as the Retina iMacs and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft’s artist-oriented Surface Studio. It’s a machine that makes an immediate impression, both for its size and for the number of features it offers. But how well does it work once that awe has worn off? Is it a practical machine? And is it worth the at-least-$1,700 you’ll pay for the privilege of using it? Read 44 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Riot Games) Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com—and let us know what you think. Determining the best "MOBA"-style video game in the genre is a tough call—and, weirdly, so is deciding which one pumps out the craziest merchandise. These games each contain dozens of characters—which teammates must pick and choose from before engaging in five-on-five online combat—and they offer all kinds of merchandise options. It's not just figurines, dolls, and T-shirts, which typically focus on a single, favorite hero; characters also team up in, for example, comic books or virtual reality showcases. In the case of League of Legends, one of the most popular video games in the world, the characters go one bigger by teaming up for a freaking board game. Read 31 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Mike Masnick in 2012. (credit: Joel Sage / flickr) Michael Masnick, who founded the popular Techdirt blog, filed a motion (PDF) today asking for a defamation lawsuit against him to be thrown out. Masnick was sued last month by Shiva Ayyadurai, a scientist and entrepreneur who claims to have invented e-mail in 1978 at a medical college in New Jersey. In his motion, Masnick claims that Ayyadurai "is seeking to use the muzzle of a defamation action to silence those who question his claim to historical fame." He continues: The 14 articles and 84 allegedly defamatory statements catalogued in the complaint all say essentially the same thing: that Defendants believe that because the critical elements of electronic mail were developed long before Ayyadurai's 1978 computer program, his claim to be the "inventor of e-mail" is false. The motion holds that Techdirt's allegedly defamatory statements are actually constitutionally protected opinion. "This lawsuit is a misbegotten effort to stifle historical debate, silence criticism, and chill others from continuing to question Ayyadurai's grandiose claims," write Masnick's lawyers. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An array of Bolt EVs (credit: Martin Klimek for Chevrolet) On Friday afternoon, Reuters reported that two sources familiar with GM’s plans said the automaker would deploy thousands of Chevrolet Bolts equipped with self-driving equipment in 2018. The move would be in partnership with ride-hailing service Lyft. GM has said it won’t sell autonomous vehicles to individuals. Instead, the automotive giant is targeting fleets for private companies and ride-hailing companies. The American automaker partnered with Lyft a year ago to work on driverless autos, and it even purchased a Lyft and Uber rival called Sidecar after that startup closed down. GM announced yesterday that its in-house car-sharing service, called Maven, would launch 100 Bolts for rental in the city of Los Angeles. Those electric vehicles won’t be autonomous, but Lyft drivers will be able to take advantage of the Maven cars and use them as their work vehicle for a fee. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Trevor Mahlmann NASA built two main launch pads during the Apollo program, 39A and 39B. The former was used for every crewed Apollo launch, except for Apollo 10, and most of the space shuttle missions. After the final space shuttle flight in 2011, NASA decided it needed just one of the pads for its future operations. So it leased Launch Complex 39A to SpaceX. The company had intended to use Launch Complex 39A primarily for launches of its new Falcon Heavy rocket and commercial crew missions. However, on September 1, 2016, a static fire test accident at SpaceX's other Florida launch pad, Launch Complex 40, caused severe damage to facilities there (repairs may be complete later this summer, according to company president Gwynne Shotwell). This pushed SpaceX to expedite its refurbishment of Launch Complex 39A and to expand its use for all launches from the East Coast. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: ccPixs.com) Last week, Marathon Pharmaceuticals announced that it would start selling an old steroid drug that treats Duchenne muscular dystrophy for a whopping $89,000 per year of treatment. That’s a steep increase from the $1,200-per-year generic version that families could import from other countries. The standard reactions ensued: patient groups were outraged, health experts fretted, and lawmakers made blustery statements before sending strongly worded letters. The reaction was, sadly, exactly what we’ve seen each time drug makers outrageously price drugs that should be affordable. But one thing was different this time: Marathon’s eye-popping price tag landed on the heels of an industry-wide effort to distance itself from price gouging. Now, Marathon’s industry partners are joining in the outrage, and Marathon has hit “pause” on the drug’s release. Marathon’s standing within the industry may even be in question, according to the pharmaceutical trade group PhRMA, which currently counts Marathon as a member. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Next month, the US Food and Drug Administration will hold a public hearing to gather consumers’ thoughts, suggestions, and hopes for food allowed to be labeled “healthy.” The agency made this announcement Thursday. The hearing is the latest step in the FDA’s months-long effort to modernize and redefine the term. They hope to come up with a fresh, science-backed definition that will help consumers make smart choices at the grocery store. That effort was spurred in late 2015 by critics who argued that the current definition is out of date and that food industry interests had tainted it. But one bit of this story that might give readers pause: the criticism was spearheaded by a member of the food industry, which, of course, has its own interests for redefining the term. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Flickr: Rego Korosi ) If you watch any amount of videos on YouTube, you're probably accustomed to waiting five seconds before hitting that "skip ad" button. You're probably well aware of just how annoying it is when that button never appears and you're forced to sit through 30 seconds of a car commercial even though you live in New York City and don't even have a driver's license. Well, there's good news: Google is scrapping 30-second unskippable ads on its video site, reports Campaign (via Neowin). Recognizing that they're not tremendously popular, especially among data-capped mobile users, the company is pushing shorter formats to advertisers, such as the six-second unskippable ad that it launched last year. Unfortunately, the change won't take effect immediately; YouTube users will have to wait until 2018 for the longer ads to go away. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: PewDiePie via YouTube) This week started with controversial PewDiePie news—and that's how it's going to end, too. The YouTube megastar, whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, posted a response video today addressing The Wall Street Journal's report about alleged anti-Semitic comments. Those comments cost him both a lucrative contract with Disney and his deal with YouTube Red. In his response, Kjellberg apologized for jokes that "went too far" and acknowledged that he offended people. But he also claimed that "old-school media" (in this case the Journal) attacked him personally for being a YouTube personality who makes a substantial living off the online video platform. Let's recap the controversy: The Wall Street Journal produced a video and an article earlier this week about PewDiePie's alleged anti-Semitism, citing clips from recent videos in which he is shown watching a Hitler speech, making a Hitler salute, and paying two men to hold up a sign saying "Death to all Jews." After fielding an inquiry from the Journal about the videos, Disney cut ties with PewDiePie, who had been running the Disney YouTube network, Revelmode. Shortly thereafter, YouTube announced it was canceling PewDiePie's YouTube Red show, Scare PewDiePie, and it removed the YouTube star from its Google Preferred ad network. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! The President's Day Weekend is upon us, and, courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we have a new batch of deals for you. The featured item this week is a Dell Inspiron 15 5000 laptop for $549. This 15.6-inch laptop has an Intel Core i7-6500U processor, 8GB of RAM, an AMD Radeon R5 M335 video card, and a 1TB hard drive. It was originally $845.85, so you're saving almost $300 when you use the coupon code. We have that and a ton of other President's Day deals below. For even more savings, check out TechBargains. Dell Inspiron 15 5000 Intel Core i7-6500U 15.6" 1080p Laptop for $549.00 (Use Code: EXTRA190 - list price $845.85). Extra $50 price drop! New Dell Inspiron 15 Gaming 7000 Intel Core i5 Quad-Core Kaby Lake 15.6" 1080p Gaming Laptop w/ 4GB GTX 1050ti for $799.99 (use code: SAVE50 - list price $899.99). Dell XPS 13 Intel Core i5-7200U KABY LAKE 13.3" 1080p Laptop (8GB/256GB SSD) for $899.99 (use code: TENOFF - list price $1099.99). Samsung UN55KU6300 55" 4K HDR LED HDTV+ $250 Dell Gift Card for $799.99 Vizio P55-C1 55" 4K 120Hz HDR Full-Array LED Home Theater Display w/ 126 Dimming Zones + $400 Dell Gift Card for $1099.99 4-Pack Cable Management 20" Sleeve for $10.87 (use code: DPGKMMSY - list price $15.99). WEme Mini Displayport/Thunderbolt 2 to DVI Adapter for $3.96 (use code: QD5RL8F7 - list price $9.99). iClever BoostCube 4.8A 24W Dual USB Wall Charger w/ Foldable Plug $5.39 code: for $5.39 (Use code: ICWB21CG - list price $8.99). Today Only! Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Intel Core i7 2560x1440 14" Laptop (16GB/256GB) for $1149.99 (list price $1699). Netgear Orbi Home WiFi System w/ 1.4Gbps DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem for $379.99 Udemy $10 Online Courses: Learn to Code by Making Games, iOS or Android Apps, Project Management, Network Certifications and more. 1-Year NordVPN Anonymous VPN Service (PCmag Editor's Choice) for $48 (use code: GEEK50 - list price ). Laptop & Desktop Computers Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 20: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President Donald Trump's nominee to head the Environmental Protection Agency, arrives for the Inaugural Luncheon in the US Capitol January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump is attending the luncheon along with other dignitaries after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States. (credit: Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images) On Friday, the Republican-controlled senate voted 52-to-46 to confirm Oklahoma Attorney General (AG) Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), despite fierce opposition from many Democrats and environmental groups. Two Democrats from fossil fuel-rich states broke with their party to vote for Pruitt: Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Joe Manchin III of West Virginia. One Republican, Susan Collins of Maine, voted against Pruitt. Democrat Joe Donnelly from Indiana and Republican John McCain from Arizona didn’t vote. Pruitt is a controversial choice to head the agency tasked with protecting the environment. He’s previously expressed doubt regarding the science behind climate change and has sued the EPA 14 times in his tenure as AG of Oklahoma (a state which has, incidentally, suffered a string of earthquakes thanks to the oil industry). He also drew fire after a New York Times article discovered that Pruitt had copied wholesale a letter drafted by oil and gas company Devon Energy and sent it to regulators in Washington as his own, with only a few minor changes. The Times wrote that Pruitt had done this several times in letters he sent to the EPA, the Office of Management and Budget, and President Obama. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Some connected car apps may be like leaving owners' keys on the dash for malware to steal. In a presentation at this week's RSA security conference in San Francisco, researchers from Kaspersky Labs revealed more bad news for the Internet of drivable things—connected cars. Malware researchers Victor Chebyshev and Mikhail Kuzin examined seven Android apps for connected vehicles and found that the apps were ripe for malicious exploitation. Six of the applications had unencrypted user credentials, and all of them had little in the way of protection against reverse-engineering or the insertion of malware into apps. The security vulnerabilities of connected cars have been a hot topic at security conferences for the past few years—particularly after researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek demonstrated that they could control many of the functions of a Jeep Grand Cherokee (including its brakes and steering) remotely through the vehicle's built-in cellular data connection. There have also been repeated demonstrations of vulnerabilities in how the mobile applications from various connected vehicle services connect to vehicles, such as Sammy Kamkar's demonstration of intercepting data from the mobile app for GM's OnStar. The vulnerabilities looked at by the Kaspersky researchers focused not on vehicle communication, but on the Android apps associated with the services and the potential for their credentials to be hijacked by malware if a car owner's smartphone is compromised. Chebyshev and Kuzin wrote: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Juno, shown here in an artist's concept image, arrived in the Jupiter system on July 4, 2016. (credit: NASA) When NASA sent a series of commands to the Juno spacecraft’s main engine last October, the spacecraft did not respond properly: two helium check valves that play an important role in its firing opened sluggishly. Those commands had been sent in preparation for a burn of the spacecraft’s Leros 1b engine, which would have brought Juno—a $1.1 billion mission to glean insights about Jupiter—into a significantly shorter orbital period around the gas giant. Due to concerns about the engine, NASA held off on a “period reduction maneuver” that would shorten Juno’s orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days. When the next chance to do so came in December, again NASA held off. Now the space agency has made it official—Juno will remain in a longer, looping orbit around Jupiter for the extent of its lifetime observing the gas giant. “During a thorough review, we looked at multiple scenarios that would place Juno in a shorter-period orbit, but there was concern that another main engine burn could result in a less-than-desirable orbit,” said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “The bottom line is a burn represented a risk to completion of Juno’s science objectives.” Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Lucasfilm) When news broke last month that Episode VIII would be called Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the response was... predictable. That's right, hundreds of online arguments spawned by that ambiguous title. After all, "Jedi" can be both singular and plural. Did this mean Luke Skywalker was "the last Jedi" all on his own? Now we wonder no more. There will be more than one Jedi, so fan theories that we'll see Luke train a new crop of force-wielders are starting to look good. Foreign-language titles have started appearing for the movie ahead of its December 2017 release, and there's nothing ambiguous about it in French, German, or Spanish: Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This video shows the now-patched bug that caused character hitboxes to sometimes go significantly out of sync with character models in Team Fortress 2. These days, we're all used to games getting important post-launch patches that fix bugs and change gameplay balance issues that were present in the initial release. Usually, though, it doesn't take an entire decade for a major bug to be noticed and fixed in a popular game. That is what seems to have happened this week in Team Fortress 2, though. Over on Reddit, user sigsegv__ lays out how the game would often get confused when a player switched between certain sets of characters in the middle of a match. Apparently, after switching from the soldier/pyro/demo/engineer/medic/spy to the scout/heavy/sniper (or vice versa), the character hitbox (that polygonal mesh that determines what area can be hit by a bullet) would start moving significantly out of sync with the visual character model that opponents could see on the server. This video illustrates the problem pretty clearly, showing character and hitbox animations that are well out of step. The problem itself stems from a pretty arcane bit of code having to do with the differing orders that "pose parameters" are stored for these sets of character classes. Once identified, the fix involved changing only a single line of code, though as sigsegv__ notes, "knowing which one line of code is missing, and where, is the difficult part, you might say." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Judge hammer and money (credit: Getty Images) A federal judge has ordered (PDF) Cox Communications to pay a bruising $8 million in legal fees to BMG Rights Management after the ISP lost a landmark case over Internet piracy. The legal case began in 2014, when music publishers BMG and Round Hill Music took the long-threatened step of actually suing a major Internet provider for its users' infringement, saying that Cox didn't do enough to stop the piracy. BMG and Round Hill were both clients of Rightscorp, an anti-piracy outfit that produces millions of e-mail notices to consumers alleged to have infringed its clients' copyrights by using BitTorrent software. Rightscorp warns ISPs that if they don't forward the notices to subscribers, they're risking a massive lawsuit. Turns out, in this case, the threat was real. After a year of litigation, the case went to trial in December 2015. Before the trial, the judge had already ruled that Cox unlawfully blew off key provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and so wasn't protected by its "safe harbor" against litigation. The jury found against Cox and ordered the cable company to pay $25 million. That result is now on appeal, but in the meantime, US District Judge Liam O'Grady considered various post-trial motions, including one in which BMG requested legal fees. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Look, Sasquatch is real, okay? Here's a picture of him, working in his current gig for Jack Link's jerky. Case closed. (credit: Dave Mangels / Getty) Washington State loves its official symbols. It has a state grass (bluebunch wheatgrass), a state song ("Washington, My Home"), a state gem (petrified wood), a state dance (the square dance), a state fossil (Columbian mammoth), and even a state tartan. But it doesn't have a state cryptid. And that's a shame because, as loyal Ars readers know, we love cryptids (and their gravesites), even if the subject does lead to occasional dubious claims. So imagine our delight at finding out that Washington state might soon elevate the "Forest Yeti" to a noble place in its pantheon of official state symbols. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Charter Communications lost 105,000 TV subscribers in former Time Warner Cable territory in Q4 2016, the second straight quarter of video customer losses since acquiring TWC. The loss of 105,000 video subscribers in TWC territory is in sharp contrast to TWC's premerger performance in Q4 2015, when it gained 54,000 video subscribers, according to Charter's earnings report released yesterday. Charter gained 20,000 video subscribers in its premerger territory in Q4 2016, and gained another 34,000 video subscribers in the former territory of Bright House Networks, which it also acquired last year. That left Charter with a quarterly loss of 51,000 video subscribers, while a year ago the three premerger companies gained a total of 118,000 in the same period. (credit: Charter) While Charter added Internet subscribers in former TWC territory, the company said the video losses and an overall decline in customer growth "was primarily driven by elevated churn on historical products in legacy TWC markets." Charter has been pushing out new pricing and packages to the acquired territories, and former TWC customers have reportedly seen big bill increases when their promotional prices expire. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / THE EXPANSE -- "Godspeed" Episode 204 -- Pictured: Thomas Jane as Detective Joe Miller -- (Photo by: Rafy/Syfy) (credit: Rafy/Syfy) Detective Miller's plan started to take shape in this week's episode of The Expanse. We also find out that he had never been on a spacewalk before, despite not having been born down a gravity well. "I'm a city belter," he tells Diogo as they get to work on Eros' docks. On Earth, Errinwright—Jules-Pierre Mao's man inside the UN—appears to be completely out of his depth. And who couldn't admire the irony of Holden getting Holdened by the captain of the Marasamus, who threatened to broadcast Holden's actions to the entire system; shades of the Canterbury. We also got treated to some lovely visuals in this week's episode. The aerial shots of Mao's estate for example: acres of manicured lawns and wide open spaces, with the dense sprawl from horizon to horizon just the other side of the wall. Or how about the generation ship Nauvoo firing into life? I adored the way we see its construction scaffold glow red and then yellow-hot as it's caught in the huge spacecraft's engine plume. On this week's podcast, I'm joined by author Kameron Hurley, and we talk about the show, space opera in general, the depiction of biotech in science fiction, and some of the politics of the Expanse. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: National Park Service) The Bering land bridge plays a central role in our picture of how humans reached the Americas. When much more of the world’s water was locked up in ice, and the land between Asia and North America was exposed, people followed the bridge to migrate out of Asia, into Alaska, and from there into the rest of the Americas. This picture tends to portray the bridge as purely a route to the new continents. In fact, the word ‘bridge’ definitely conjures up the wrong image. It was a geographic region, often called Beringia, and people lived there for so long that it probably would have been ludicrous to them that we could think of their home as transient. Current estimates suggest that people lived there for between 5,000 and 8,000 years, starting about 23,000 years ago. That is a long enough time for natural selection to have had an effect on the genome of people who lived there, according to a paper in PNAS this week. The Beringians would have faced distinct diseases, food constraints, and climate conditions, and natural selection would have helped those with the right genetic adaptations to thrive in that environment. According to the new paper, we can see evidence of that natural selection in modern Native American populations. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Alex M. Hayward) According to the White House Office of the Press Secretary, a recent Executive Order on Border Security and Immigration Enforcement was intended to address the issue of “significant increase in violent crime” due to immigration driven by “transnational criminal organizations.” These claims directly contradict the results of academic work on immigration and crime, and a recent study published in the Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice reinforces that. It shows that immigration is not linked to increases in crime—in fact, this study suggests it's linked to reductions in certain types of crimes. This study builds on previous findings on arrests and criminal offenses. That previous data showed that foreign-born residents of the US were less likely to commit crimes than native-born Americans. The new study looked at 200 major metropolitan areas as defined by the US Census Bureau. The researchers then used Census data and FBI crime reporting data from 1970-2010 to look at trends for these regions. The authors were interested in increases in crimes that might be attributable to an influx of immigrants who decreased economic opportunities or ended up in jobs that might otherwise have gone to local-born residents. To that end, they looked at violent crimes and property crimes, including rates of murder, non-negligent manslaughter, aggravated assault, robbery, burglary, and larceny. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Remember the USB Killer stick that indiscriminately and immediately fries about 95 percent of devices? Well, now the company has released a new version that is even more lethal! And you can also buy an adaptor pack, which lets you kill test devices with USB-C, Micro USB, and Lightning ports. Yay. If you haven't heard of the USB Killer before, it's essentially a USB stick with a bunch of capacitors hidden within. When you plug it into a host device (a smartphone, a PC, an in-car or in-plane entertainment system), those capacitors charge up—and then a split second later, the stick dumps a huge surge of electricity into the host device, at least frying the port, but usually disabling the whole thing. For more information on its technical operation, read our original USB Killer explainer. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge With increased competition from the likes of the (mostly) free-to-use Unity, Epic's Unreal Engine isn't as ubiquitous as it once was. But the particle-heavy, real-time lighting-infused version 4 has powered its fair share of games since launch in 2005, from indie darlings like Abzû through to triple-A titles like Gears of War 4. If you're a hardware company, getting baked-in support for your platform in Unreal's developer tools remains important, which is why the latest UE update is good news for Nintendo. UE 4.15 includes support for the upcoming Nintendo Switch, making it it easier for developers to port games to the system. The Switch's unloved predecessor, the Wii U, was never officially supported by UE4. While developers could create ports for Wii U without Epic's tools, the time and investment required to do so didn't jibe with the system's lacklustre sales. Support for the Switch in UE4 is currently described by Epic as "experimental," but the company plans for it to be in a "shippable state" come the next update. Given the Switch is based on hardware from graphics card gurus Nvidia—hardware that is already supported in UE4 for devices like Nvidia's Shield—full support is expected to arrive quickly. Indeed, one of the first UE4 games to launch on Switch will be Snake Pass, a quirky puzzle-platformer from Sumo Digital due for release in "early 2017." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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