posted 8 days ago on ars technica
ocal There's an undeniable second boom underway in the tech sector, and the consequences, both positive and negative, are rippling throughout the San Francisco Bay Area with special force. Protests that focused on the negative effects of tech companies, most prominently those protests against the buses that bring employees to work, have been held repeatedly in recent months. But the demonstrations are becoming increasingly personal. This morning, protestors who say they're being evicted by a Google lawyer protested in front of the property he owns. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Nine people connected to the "Zeus" malware have been indicted, federal officials announced Friday as they declared the code "one of the most damaging pieces of financial malware that has ever been used." An indictment (PDF) unsealed Friday charges nine people, most of them from the Ukraine. Two defendants—Yuriy Konovalenko, 31, and Yevhen Kulibaba, 36—were extradited to the United States and hauled Friday into Nebraska federal court, where the charges were unsealed. Most of the others remain at large. The authorities said the defendants used Zeus to hijack account numbers, passwords, personal identification numbers, RSA SecureID token codes, and other data needed to illegally log in to online banking accounts, netting the defendants "millions of dollars." Prosecutors said they were responsible for "infecting thousands of business computers with malicious software." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Citing two anonymous sources “familiar with the matter,” Bloomberg News reports that the National Security Agency has known about Heartbleed, the security flaw in the OpenSSL encryption software used by a majority of websites and a multitude of other pieces of Internet infrastructure, for nearly the entire lifetime of the bug—“at least two years.” The sources told Bloomberg that the NSA regularly used the flaw to collect intelligence information, including obtaining usernames and passwords from targeted sites. As Ars reported on April 9, there have been suspicions that the Heartbleed bug had been exploited prior to the disclosure of the vulnerability on April 5. A packet capture provided to Ars by Terrence Koeman, a developer based in the Netherlands, shows malformed Transport Security Layer (TSL) Heartbeat requests that bear the hallmarks of a Heartbleed exploit. Koeman said the capture dates to November of last year. But if the NSA has been exploiting Heartbleed for “at least two years,” the agency would have needed to discover it not long after the code for the TLS Heartbeat Extension was added to OpenSSL 1.0.1, which was released on March 14, 2012. The first “beta” source code wasn’t available until January 3, 2012. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Intel Free Press In a speech delivered Thursday before the United Nations General Assembly, the United States’ ambassador said that she's co-sponsoring a new resolution that would lead to more global restrictions on texting while driving. “Worldwide, six out of seven people have access to cell phones, and more than a billion cars are on the road,” Ambassador Samantha Power said. “In crowded conditions, with narrow roads and poor infrastructure, bicyclists and pedestrians are at particular risk. Too many drivers simply don’t understand the danger of taking their eyes, even briefly, from the road. And while drinking is episodic, the use of handheld devices is chronic. No one should die—or kill—because of a text message.” Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The AGU Earth was still a violent place shortly after life began, with regular impactors arriving from space. For the first time, scientists have modeled the effects of one such violent event—the strike of a giant asteroid. The effects were so catastrophic that, along with the large earthquakes and tsunamis it created, this asteroid may have also set continents into motion. The asteroid to blame for this event would have been at least 37km in diameter, which is roughly four times the size of the asteroid that is alleged to have caused the death of dinosaurs. It would have hit the surface of the Earth at the speed of about 72,000kph and created a 500km-wide crater. At the time of the event, about 3.26 billion years ago, such an impact would have caused 10.8 magnitude earthquakes—roughly 100 times the size of the 2011 Japanese earthquake, which is among the biggest in recent history. The strike would have thrown vaporized rock into the atmosphere, which would have encircled the globe before condensing and falling back to the surface. During the debris re-entry, the temperature of the atmosphere would have increased and the heat wave would have caused the upper oceans to boil. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An Amazon warehouse under construction. bloodymonday Amazon has instituted a new program where it offers its own employees thousands of dollars to leave the company. But it doesn't want them to take the money. According to CEO Jeff Bezos, the offer is a tactic to ensure the company's employees want to work there, but his program differs significantly from the Zappos one it's compared to. In a letter to shareholders issued Thursday, Bezos said that the program is inspired by the Amazon-owned Zappos, which has long offered its employees money to quit in order to weed out the ones who don't value the Zappos mission above a few thousand dollars. Back in 2008, Zappos said 97 percent of its employees did not take the offer to quit. However, Zappos' program differs slightly in that it only offers the money to customer service employees, enticing them to quit with $3,000 after a four-week training program and one week of work. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Another Promise via South China Morning Post Workers in Samsung semiconductor plants who have developed cancer are fighting their former employer—and their government—for compensation. Their fight has become a very public controversy in Korea, where two new movies tell the stories of young female workers who got cancer while working in Samsung chip factories. The workers' families have been trying to use Korean courts to obtain compensation for seven years without success. The story of those workers, and the unprecedented public debate about the dark side of Samsung, is detailed in a feature story published today by Bloomberg Businessweek. As the story notes, many Koreans "revere" Samsung Group, as its companies contribute a stunning 24 percent of their nation’s GDP. In 1961, South Korea was a war-torn country with a GDP less than Sudan or Sierra Leone. Today it’s the world’s 15th-largest economy. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Self-portrait by Weev A federal appeals court Friday reversed and vacated the conviction and sentence of hacker and Internet troll Andrew "weev" Auernheimer. The case against Auernheimer, who has often been in solitary confinement for obtaining and disclosing personal data of about 140,000 iPad owners from a publicly available AT&T website, was seen as a test case on how far the authorities could go under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the same law that federal prosecutors were invoking against Aaron Swartz. But, in the end, the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals didn't squarely address the controversial fraud law and instead said Aeurnheimer was charged in the wrong federal court. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google Chrome 35, released to the beta channel yesterday, has a bunch of new developer features for creating "richer, more compelling web content and apps, especially for mobile devices," Google said yesterday. The new features provide more control over touch and zoom input. Google software engineer Rick Byers explains: The touch-action CSS property offers developers a declarative mechanism to selectively disable touch scrolling, pinch-zooming, or double-tap-zooming on parts of their web content. Use cases include precise control over the dreaded 300ms click delay on mobile, reliable side-swipe UIs, and high-fidelity polyfills of Pointer Events. It’s also a prerequisite for future optimizations to enable scrolling and zooming that never block on the main thread. Also new in this release, web content on desktop computers will now receive mouse scroll wheel events with the ctrlKey modifier set. There are many sites that want to do something more appropriate for the user than trigger browser zoom. For example, when a user holds control and scrolls over a map in Google Maps, they almost certainly want to zoom in on the map, not invoke browser zoom to zoom the page. This change will enable such a use case. Chrome 35 also brings Unprefixed Shadow DOM (document object models), which Google says improves upon the prefixed implementation first made available in Chrome 25. This move was initially controversial because Google announced its intent to ship the feature before all the parts even had a draft specification, much less a stable recommendation. "I'm left with the conclusion that these [features] are entirely undefined. I'm really surprised the Chrome team intends to ship these enabled by default in production," Apple Senior Web Technology Engineer Edward O'Connor wrote in February in a World Wide Web Consortium discussion. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Samsung Samsung loves to pack its phones with tons of software features, but one that customers won't get to see almost anywhere in the US is the new "Download Booster," which combines a user's Wi-Fi and LTE connection to speed up downloads. US carriers aren't overly fond of anything that might increase customers' data usage unless they can charge extra for it, so three out of the four major carriers have removed Download Booster from their devices. Between reports from Android Police and FierceWirelessTech, we have confirmation that AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon have all shipped the S5 without the feature. AT&T was quoted by FierceWirelessTech as saying, "We are evaluating Samsung's download booster feature. We thoroughly test new software, features, and functionality to ensure that it meets our standards for a quality user experience." We've seen many carriers step in to disable features they don't like. The most common example is putting a paywall in between a user and the mobile hotspot feature built into most mobile OSes or disabling video chat over the cellular connection. Still, it's been a while since we've seen an ISP exert such a high amount of control over the devices they sell. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The VAIO Flip 13, a larger version of the laptop that's being recalled. Andrew Cunningham Back in February, Sony announced that it was getting out of the PC game: its spring 2014 VAIO PCs would be the last the company would design and sell. Sony's PC business will be sold to Japan Industrial Partners, which will scale back its global distribution network to focus on the Japanese market. Sony's laptops themselves have apparently decided to go out with a bang, not a whimper. The Wall Street Journal reports that batteries in Sony's Fit 11A convertible laptops "could overheat and catch fire." For now, Sony is telling affected users to "immediately discontinue use" of the laptops and that it will begin a repair-and-replacement program within the next two weeks. The batteries in question were manufactured by Panasonic, which insists that the flaw is unique to the batteries used in the Fit 11A. Panasonic says it creates custom batteries for each OEM that asks for them, and that it hasn't heard complaints from its other customers. What's really striking is just how few of these laptops are out there creating a fire hazard. The figures provided to the Journal indicate that just 25,905 VAIO Fit laptops have been sold to customers since they went on sale in February: "3,600 ... in Japan, 2,000 in China, 7,000 in Europe, 5,600 in Latin America, and 500 in the US." For reference, Gartner says that all PC OEMs combined sold about 76.6 million PCs worldwide in the first quarter of 2014. With sales like that, it's no wonder that Sony is getting out of the business. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Heartbleed.com The software developer who inserted a major security flaw into OpenSSL has said the error was "quite trivial" despite the severity of its impact, according to a new report. The Sydney Morning Herald published an interview today with Robin Seggelmann, who added the flawed code to OpenSSL, the world's most popular library for implementing HTTPS encryption in websites, e-mail servers, and applications. The flaw can expose user passwords and potentially the private key used in a website's cryptographic certificate (whether private keys are at risk is still being determined). The Herald reports: Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Image by Florian Muijres Have you ever felt frustrated after repeated attempts to swat a buzzing insect have failed? You’ve slapped yourself and the table many times, yet the fly continues to taunt you? Flies’ impressive agility inspired a team of scientists from the University of Washington worked with some aerospace engineers at the Delft University of Technology to carefully study the biomechanics of how the insects execute their evasive maneuvers. They discovered that to avoid looming predators or human swatting, fruit flies can rapidly make banked turns, executing them far faster than their regular flight movements. To study fruit fly flying technique, they constructed a test environment with high-speed cameras capable of recording 7,500 frames per second. The testing area was lit with LED lights that could be triggered to create a dark, expanding circle that the flies would interpret as a looming predator. The scientists filmed almost 100 trials in this setup, which included 3,655 individual wing beats. A special vision-tracking system analyzed the images, studying the position of the flies' body and wings separately. It measured flight speed, acceleration, and three angular measurements of body and wing position. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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On April 9, Juniper Networks issued a security advisory for users of version 7 of its Secure Access SSL VPN (IVEOS) because of its vulnerability to the OpenSSL Heartbleed exploit, an attack that could expose user data through malicious use of the Transport Layer Security "Heartbeat" extension. This morning, the company added a number of other VPN and switch products to its  security advisory, including the most recent release of the Junos OS and its Junos Pulse and IVEOS SSL virtual private networks. "We are working around the clock to provide fixed versions of code for our affected products," the company's security team said in the advisory. The affected products are: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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John Taylor, Flickr An attack on Silicon Valley telephone lines and an electric grid that took out transformers and fiber-optic cables remains unsolved a year after the nighttime raid that a federal official has decried as an act of terrorism. The Federal Bureau of Investigation said Thursday it was still probing the April 16 attack, which happened a day after the Boston Marathon bombings. AT&T fiber-optic cables were snipped and sniper bullets destroyed 17 Pacific Gas & Electric transformers, disrupting service to the valley. At the time, the response from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission was haphazard at best. Among other things, the agency released to federal and industry officials a document outlining exact areas where the nation's grid is susceptible to a terrorist attack. The commission's chairwoman Cheryl LaFleur told a congressional hearing on Thursday that it was taking steps so it would not make the same mistake it did following the Silicon Valley attack. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Samsung Galaxy S5 is water and fish proof—we tested. Ron Amadeo Samsung's newest flagship is finally here. With the Galaxy S5, Samsung hopes to break out of the boring spec-bump-style upgrade that the company said hindered sales of the Galaxy S4. While the design is mostly the same (and we might say a little worse), Samsung's solution to consumer indifference is a boatload of extra features. With the S5, Samsung added things like a fingerprint scanner, a heart rate monitor, and water resistance. A spec bump also happened of course—just about every number on the spec sheet is bigger than it was last year. The S5 has a faster Snapdragon 801 processor, a better camera, better Wi-Fi, and a display that is both brighter in sunlight and dimmer in darkness. Design The Galaxy S5 (left) versus the Galaxy S4 (right). The S5 bezels need to go on a diet. Specs at a glance: Samsung Galaxy S5 Screen 1920×1080 5.1"(432 ppi) AMOLED OS Android KitKat 4.4.2 with Touchwiz CPU 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 RAM 2GB GPU Adreno 330 Storage 16GB or 32GB, with MicroSD slot Networking Dual Band 802.11b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS Ports Micro USB 3.0, headphones Camera 16MP rear camera with Phase Detection AF, 2MP front camera, Size 142.0mm x 72.5mm x 8.1mm Weight 145g Battery 2800 mAh Starting price $200 on contract, $649 unlocked Other perks RBG notification LED, IrLED, NFC The Galaxy S5 is actually a little bigger than the S4. It's 5.4mm taller, 2.7mm wider, and 0.2mm thicker. Samsung used this extra space to bump the display up to a 5.1-inch, 1080p AMOLED, slightly larger than the 4.99-inch display in the S4. The screen size increase didn't keep pace with the bigger body though. In a world where bezels are constantly shrinking and OEMs like LG are touting the screen-to-bezel ratio on their devices, Samsung took a step backward. The company made the side bezels thicker and the top and bottom of the device taller. If the image above wasn't labeled, you would think the S4 (the one on the right) was the newer device. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Kim Dotcom living large in happier times. Photograph by Handout Just three days after the Motion Picture Association of America brought a civil lawsuit against Megaupload, the Recording Industry Association of America has jumped in with its own case. In addition to the existing criminal copyright infringement case being prosecuted by the Justice Department in the Eastern District of Virginia, the Thursday lawsuit now brings to three the number of lawsuits filed against Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom and his colleagues. Dotcom and the others were initially arrested in a botched January 2012 raid on his mansion estate in New Zealand. He has since been fighting local authorities to prevent his extradition to the United States—that trial could be held as early as July. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Cisco has issued a security bulletin for customers about the Heartbleed bug in the OpenSSL cryptography code, and it’s not about Web servers. So far, the company has unearthed 11 products and 2 services susceptible to attack through the vulnerability, which can be used to retrieve random bits of content from an attacked device’s memory. Cisco’s IOS XE operating system for network hardware is one of the higher-profile products on the company's list. Cisco has already patched the two services—Cisco’s Registered Envelope Service (CRES) and Webex Messenger Service—that were deemed vulnerable. Most of the remaining products on Cisco's list are connected to the company’s collaboration products, such as its UCS unified messaging platform. They also include IP telephones, communications servers, and messaging systems: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client for iOS Cisco Desktop Collaboration Experience DX650 Cisco Unified 7800 series IP Phones Cisco Unified 8961 IP Phone Cisco Unified 9951 IP Phone Cisco Unified 9971 IP Phone Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server (VCS) Cisco IOS XE Cisco UCS B-Series (Blade) Servers Cisco UCS C-Series (Stand alone Rack) Servers Cisco Unified Communication Manager (UCM) 10.0 Cisco Registered Envelope Service (CRES) Cisco Webex Messenger Service The list isn’t yet complete—the company is still investigating whether over 60 additional products, including other versions of the IOS operating system and other network hardware, are vulnerable. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Startup advocacy group Engine and filmmaker Kirby Ferguson released a new YouTube clip, "Rise of the Patent Troll," asking for support in passing anti-patent-troll legislation. Kirby Ferguson Debate on a bill seeking to curb the worst practices of so-called "patent trolls" has been postponed four times in the past two weeks as Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) seeks to nail down votes in support of the bill. The repeated delays mean that Congress will head home for two weeks without having passed the bill out of committee, a step that reformers were ardently hopeful would come to pass. It's a potentially alarming delay since there are just 39 days left before the Senate's August break. Congress will return to work in September, but with an election campaign in full swing at that point, it's unlikely that any significant legislation will pass. However, late yesterday Leahy's office said that a "manager's amendment"—that is, the chairman's preferred draft of the bill—will be circulated to the committee members the day they return from their two-week break. The committee will consider a bill the first week that Senators are back, which is the week of April 28. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Coming soon to your Kindle library: Bezos Man! Able to leap tall acquisitions in a single, comiXology-related press release! Steve Juretson (original photo) Amazon has purchased comiXology, the company whose self-titled app serves the most digital comic books and graphic novels in the industry. In a press release, Amazon estimated that the acquisition would close during this year's second quarter but did not disclose specific terms. In addition to comics titans Marvel and DC, comiXology serves digital issues made by publishers like IDW, Image, Fantagraphics, and even Archie—in short, most every geeky bastion big and small, with the notable exception of Dark Horse Comics. This stands in stark contrast to the Kindle store's current comic selection, which mostly consists of trade paperback collections—and lacks comiXology's convenient "Guided View" option, which intelligently zooms into each comic's panel for detail's sake. CEO David Steinberger posted his own statement on the official comiXology site, insisting that the company "will retain its identity as an Amazon subsidiary." It's unclear whether that means comiXology will continue to exist as a separate app or become swallowed whole by Kindle's offerings on Android and iOS. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Oh, I'm just hanging out in Road Not Taken with a creepy ghost, an angry wolf, and a forlorn child. Sup witchu? The latest iteration of PAX, formerly the Penny Arcade Expo, will take over the Boston Exhibition and Convention Center this weekend, and with it will come a smattering of public video game debuts. PAX has always been a play-first show, and fans will surely line up to get their hands on unreleased, triple-A games like Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel and The Evil Within. Ahead of the hubbub, which Kyle Orland and Lee Hutchinson will sift through all weekend, I took the opportunity to play a smaller—but just as significant—game getting its public gameplay debut at PAX East. Pardon the cheeky line, but I literally chose the Road Not Taken. The game comes courtesy of Spry Fox, a Seattle-area studio possibly best known for smartphone hit (and frequent cloning victim) Triple Town. Since that game’s launch, the company, founded by ex-Xbox staffers, has toyed with the so-called casual genre’s most exciting and experimental ideas, from the bullet-hell MMO Realm of the Mad God to the trippy, world-building puzzler Leap Day. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Sen. Al Franken on the campaign trail. Aaron Landry It's no surprise that Comcast donates money to members of Congress. Political connections come in handy for a company seeking government approval of mergers, like Comcast's 2011 purchase of NBCUniversal and its proposed acquisition of Time Warner Cable (TWC).  But just how many politicians have accepted money from Comcast's political arm? In the case of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which held the first congressional hearing on the Comcast/TWC merger yesterday, the answer is all of them. Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) led the way with $35,000 from the Comcast federal political action committee (PAC) between 2009 and 2014, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) received $32,500, and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) received $30,000. These figures are the combined contributions from Comcast to the senators' campaign and leadership committees. (Schumer has recused himself from the merger hearings because his brother, a lawyer, worked on the deal.) Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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M. DeFreese/CIMMYT When it comes to projections of future global warming, most people are more interested in concrete impacts than abstract figures like average global temperature. That sort of information is contained in the second section of the latest IPCC report, which was just recently released. Among the things potentially impacted by climate change, the agricultural sector is of obvious relevance to those of us who eat food. (That includes you, Soylent fans.) Given that population growth and economic progress in developing countries is expected to raise the demand for food by about 14 percent each decade, will climate change make it harder for farmers to feed the world? It’s a complicated question with a number of relevant factors to consider. Temperature is the most obvious one. Many crops have problems with temperatures much above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), meaning regions that are already hot may not have much wiggle room. Warming also changes the timing of the spring thaw (but not the seasonal changes in daylight) and expands the growing season in some places. Then there’s precipitation, both in terms of rainfall and the high-elevation snow that can feed rivers in the summer. Together with temperature, changes in precipitation can alter soil moisture, either directly or by affecting sources of irrigation water. Those changes can also mean shifts in the range or prevalence of pests and diseases that plague crops. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google is expanding the Glass Explorer Program for a limited time. Google To date, Google's Glass headset has only been available to people as part of the invite-only Glass Explorer program. Now, the company appears to be expanding that program to a second wave of early adopters. At 9am EDT on April 15th, anyone with a little time and a lot of money will be able to purchase Glass for a limited time. Google has posted a sign-up page here that will send you a reminder when the sale goes live. The news was first broken by The Verge, which uncovered a proposal that outlined the Glass Explorer program expansion. That proposal suggests that Glass will be offered to the general public for "about a day," and one headset with a free frame for lenses will cost you about $1,500. The announcement on Glass' Google+ page indicates that quantities will be limited, so if you're interested, it would probably behoove you to buy early. For now, the offer is only available in the US. Buyers will still be getting the "Explorer Edition" prototype, which has gone through a couple of hardware revisions but is still not indicative of what the final hardware will look like. The consumer edition of Glass is expected at some point this year, and we're expecting to hear more about it at the Google I/O developer conference in late June. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Go Go gadget: Inflight Wi-Fi intercept! Photo by Sam Buchanan A prominent privacy activist has discovered a previously little-known filing with the Federal Communications Commission showing that GoGo, an in-flight Wi-Fi provider, has voluntarily done more to share user data with law enforcement than what is required. While GoGo and its competitors must follow the same wiretap provisions outlined in the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), Chris Soghoian of the American Civil Liberties Union recently found that GoGo takes its information volunteering further. Soghoian tweeted a link to a July 2012 letter submitted from a GoGo attorney to the FCC, which states: The Commission’s ATG [air-to-ground] rules do not require licensees to implement capabilities to support law enforcement beyond those outlined in CALEA. Nevertheless, GoGo worked with federal agencies to reach agreement regarding a set of additional capabilities to accommodate law enforcement interests. GoGo then implemented those functionalities into its system design. GoGo's willingness to go beyond the legal requirements of the CALEA is bolstered by its terms of service, which indicate that activating in-flight Wi-Fi authorizes GoGo to “disclose your Personal Information… if we believe in good faith that such disclosure is necessary” to “comply with relevant laws or to respond to subpoenas or warrants served on us” or to “protect or defend the rights, property, or safety of GoGo, you, other users, or third parties.” Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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