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An article published today in the People's Liberation Army Daily, the official newspaper of China's military—and reprinted in part by Qiushi, the official magazine of the Chinese Communist Party—calls the Internet "the ideological 'main front' and 'the main battlefield'" upon which China must fight an ideological war upon the West to defend itself from the creeping evils of Western thought. The article calls for greater restrictions on Internet content, and for the People's Liberation Army to "protect ideological and political security on the invisible battleground of the Internet" as it protects the physical security of the country. "It is said that before the 1960s, who took control of the print media, will have the right to speak; before the 1990s, who controlled the television media, will have more right to speak; and after entering the new century, who control Internet, including mobile Internet, will have the greatest right to speak," the unnamed author of the piece wrote. "In the eyes of Western anti-China forces, the Internet is undoubtedly intended to guide public opinion in China," undermining the authority of the government with "unwarranted charges" and by "exaggerating minority conflicts" while presenting democracy as "a cure-all 'recipe for salvation' and presenting the ideas of the Western world as the leading civilized 'universal values'." In the view of the PLA Daily, Western powers and Chinese "ideological traitors" have used the Internet to wage war on the Party: "Their fundamental objective is to confuse us with 'universal values', disturb us with 'constitutional democracy', and eventually overthrow our country through 'color revolution'," the article stated—an allusion to the "Orange Revolution" in Ukraine and other popular uprisings against Communist authoritarian governments in the former Soviet Bloc. "Regime collapse that can occur overnight often starts from long-term ideological erosion." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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On Wednesday, a Canadian 17-year-old plead guilty to 23 charges relating to swatting calls and other false police reports, many of which had targeted his online opponents in the video game League of Legends. According to a lengthy report by Canadian publication Tri-City News, the prosecution's case against the Coquitlam, British Columbia teenager asserted that the teen (whose name wasn't released due to his age) targeted "mostly young, female gamers" who declined or ignored his friend requests on LoL and Twitter. The most notable example was an University of Arizona in Tucson college student who'd dropped out after she and her family members had been victimized by repeated swatting calls (including this nearly simultaneous attack on both the woman and her parents), financial information theft, "text bombs," false cell phone service orders, and intrusions into her e-mail and Twitter accounts. According to prosecutors, the months of attacks against this woman began on September 16 when the teen called Tucson police as if he were at her address, "claiming he had shot his parents with an AR15 rifle, had bombs, and would kill the police if he saw any marked vehicles," the report stated. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An estimated 500 million Android phones don't completely wipe data when their factory reset option is run, a weakness that may allow the recovery of login credentials, text messages, e-mails, and contacts, computer scientists said Thursday. In the first comprehensive study of the effectiveness of the Android feature, Cambridge University researchers found that they were able to recover data on a wide range of devices that had run factory reset. The function, which is built into Google's Android mobile operating system, is considered a crucial means for wiping confidential data off of devices before they're sold, recycled, or otherwise retired. The study found that data could be recovered even when users turned on full-disk encryption. Based on the devices studied, the researchers estimated that 500 million devices may not fully wipe disk partitions where sensitive data is stored and 630 million phones may not wipe internal SD cards where pictures and video are often kept. The findings, published in a research paper titled Security Analysis of Android Factory Resets, are sure to be a wake-up call for individual users and large enterprises alike. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In 2011 and 2012, the NSA and the communications intelligence agencies of its "Five Eyes" allies developed and tested a set of add-ons to their shared Internet surveillance capability that could identify and target communications between mobile devices and popular mobile app stores—including those of Google and Samsung. According to an NSA document published by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the targeting capability could have been used to launch "man-in-the-middle" attacks on mobile app downloads, allowing the NSA and other agencies to install code on targeted devices and gather intelligence on their users. The document—a 2012 National Security Agency presentation obtained from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden—details efforts by the NSA, Canada's Communications Security Establishment (CSE), and the other "Five Eyes" allies to identify the "fingerprints" of communications between mobile devices and app stores. The capabilities were developed during two collaborative workshops: one in November 2011 hosted by the Australian Signals Directorate, and the other hosted by Canada's CSE in February 2012. The February workshop was attended by analysts from all of the Five Eyes communications intelligence agencies, the NSA slides joked, as "everyone wanted to experience a Canadian winter!" These fingerprints were turned into "mini-plugins" for XKeyscore, the NSA's worldwide distributed Internet surveillance system. XKeyscore can apply these plugin rules to search through streams of Internet traffic for matching data. It has been used as a targeting system for various types of network exploitation attacks—including the "Quantum" man-in-the-middle attacks that allow the agencies to hijack or modify traffic between a computer or device of interest and various Web services to decrypt it, insert malware into the stream, or present altered versions of the content. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The full House has now passed a new America COMPETES Act, which sets funding priorities for scientific research at several government agencies. While ostensibly intended to make US research more globally competitive, the bill would take some budgeting decisions out of the hands of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and instead allow Congress to set its research priorities. In keeping with previous Congressional attacks on research, this one would target the social sciences at the NSF, cutting its budget by nearly half. Also targeted are the Earth sciences, which would take a 12 percent hit (a separate bill is contemplating even more drastic cuts to geoscience research at NASA). Environmental research at the Department of Energy would take a 10 percent cut, as would the Advanced Research Projects Agency‐Energy, a high-risk research body modeled on DARPA. A Nature News report on the passage also notes some unusual provisions. All federal agencies would be prohibited from using DOE research on fossil fuels to set government regulations, undermining the ability of the government to generate an evidence-based foundation for action. And the bill singles out climate change when calling for agencies to avoid funding research that overlaps with any done by other departments. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It wouldn't be a Grand Theft Auto-related movie without some controversy, but the BBC's upcoming dramatic, 90-minute retelling of the series' genesis has come under fire not from Jack Thompson but from the game's parent company. A Thursday announcement confirmed that Take Two Interactive, the parent company of Rockstar Games, has filed a lawsuit against the BBC over its still-in-production TV movie Game Changer. The announcement, originally reported by IGN, described Take Two's filing against the BBC as a "trademark infringement" lawsuit over the Grand Theft Auto franchise and insisted that neither Take Two nor Rockstar had anything to do with the film's creation. "Our goal is to ensure that our trademarks are not misused in the BBC's pursuit of an unofficial depiction of purported events related to Rockstar Games," the statement said. "We have attempted multiple times to resolve this matter with the BBC without any meaningful resolution. It is our obligation to protect our intellectual property, and unfortunately in this case litigation was necessary." The statement did not clarify where the suit was filed, nor what specific trademarks may have been violated to make the British TV movie production worth filing suit against. We have reached out to Rockstar Games and Take Two with questions about those questions, and we will update this report if we receive a response. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Comcast has signed an interconnection agreement with Internet backbone operator Level 3 with just a few weeks to go until the Federal Communications Commission starts taking complaints under its new net neutrality regime. Comcast and Level 3 fought as early as 2010 over the amount of Netflix traffic that Level 3 was sending into Comcast's network. Level 3 agreed to pay Comcast for network interconnection at the time "under protest." Level 3 and Comcast announced another agreement in 2013 in a brief press release containing no details, but there was apparently still some tension between the companies. Netflix traffic isn't a problem for Level 3 and Comcast anymore since Netflix last year began paying Comcast for a direct network connection to improve video quality. But network operators like Level 3 and Cogent have threatened to complain to the FCC about Internet service providers demanding money for upgrades needed to ensure good quality for other Internet services. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google I/O will be here in mere days, and that means it's time for the 2015 edition of our Google Tracker. If you're new to the series, Google Tracker is a running list of all the projects going on at Google HQ. We do bi-annual installments—one at the beginning of the year and one just before I/O—making this the fourth edition on Ars. The benefit of a pre-I/O Tracker? A lot of these projects will probably launch! We at least have the Google I/O schedule to work from, and we try to tie what we're talking about into that as much as possible. While we're not guaranteeing everything on here will be released at the big show, this is a definite list of possibilities, and we'll mention what ranks high on the "plausibility" scale. So if you're not glued to Google news 24/7, this is a great way to catch up on everything you missed. Table of Contents Android M Better privacy with selectable app permissions A Fingerprint API ecosystem Android Pay Google Hangouts gets smarter Google Calendar makes your agenda for you Android as a car infotainment OS Android as a virtual reality OS A theme engine? Multi-windows and split screen support More Voice commands Google Now API Try an app without the hassle of downloading and installing Better notification controls An Android for Work update Android gets kid friendly Chromecast 2 The Google Play Store comes to China Google Glass reboot The $1,400 Google/Intel/Tag Heuer smartwatch Android Wear for iPhones? A replacement for passwords Polymer brings Material Design to the Web Google (not Google+) Photos YouTube's Twitch.tv killer Google's Smart Home Division is still kicking... "Brillo," an Android-based Internet of Things OS Project Ara and ATAP Google's SkyBox shows us a realtime view of earth Tune in for all the action on May 28 Android M Read 99 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In another key step toward the return of experiments to the Large Hadron Collider, the machine's operators ran the first collisions at its new top energy: 13 Tera-electronVolts. This is the planned energy for all experiments in the coming year, and it's a level that's 60 percent higher than any previous collisions performed there. These collisions were an accidental byproduct of work meant to test out the LHC's hardware, specifically devices called collimators. Collimators are pieces of metal that extend to the outside edges of the beams of protons that circulate through the LHC. They shave off any protons that have strayed from the main line of the beam, keeping them from hitting and possibly damaging the equipment. To fully test the hardware, the people running the LHC had to check whether the collimators performed properly while the proton beams were operating in collision mode. A necessary byproduct of these were actual collisions. And if you're reading this, it appears nothing bad happened at the new energies. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Hurricanes, and tropical cyclones more generally, are dangerous forces of nature that damage even the most well-developed societies. In the US, the devastation caused by hurricanes can last for years. When it comes to the conditions required for hurricanes to develop, some scientists are concerned that an increase in ocean warmth caused by climate change could have unforeseen consequences. But there has been debate over precisely what those consequences will be. Fewer or more hurricanes? Greater hurricane strength? A team of scientists has performed a new exploration of the global tropical cyclone response to ocean warming. This study specifically examines the frequency, intensity, and activity of cyclones with a lifetime-maximum wind speed exceeding 17 m/s (about 37 mph—well below the 75 mph threshold for a category 1 hurricane). The scientists analyzed the influence of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), which indicates naturally fluctuating ocean temperatures in the equatorial pacific (El Niño), as well as the overall sea surface temperature (SST), which indicates global ocean warmth. Overall, the global mean SST has increased by 0.3°C over the past 30 years. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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"There comes a time in the history of nations when fear and complacency allow power to accumulate and liberty and privacy to suffer," said Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) as he began speaking on the Senate floor at 1:18pm Eastern time yesterday. "That time is now, and I will not let the Patriot Act, the most unpatriotic of acts, go unchallenged." Paul held the floor for more than 10 hours, preventing any votes from being held. Paul was ultimately joined by a group of 10 other Senators, seven of them Democrats, including Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). While the speeches caused a delay of any other business, it technically wasn't a "filibuster" of the Patriot Act reauthorization, since that bill wasn't on the Senate floor. The Associated Press called the series of speeches a "lengthy Senate talk," with no clear outcome. A vote on a trade bill scheduled for this morning was not delayed, since the speeches ended just before midnight last night. The question of what the "filibuster" did is fundamentally unknown because it would require reading the mind of Rand's fellow Kentuckian, Republican Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. If McConnell was going to push for a quick vote on his bill for a "clean" reauthorization of the Patriot Act, then Paul gummed up the works. But that probably wouldn't have happened anyway, since the House is departing for the holiday weekend at 3:00pm today. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Information is back with more Google news before I/O. The outlet claims that Google is developing another operating system, this time for low-power "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices. The OS is codenamed "Brillo," and the publication claims Google "is likely to release the software under the Android brand, as the group developing the software is linked to the company’s Android unit." We're going to take that to mean "it's based on Android." The report says Brillo will be aimed at ultra low-power devices with as little as 64 or 32MB of RAM. With the abundance of smart home technology like connected light bulbs, door locks, sensors, and whatever other crazy connected objects the IoT crowd dreams up on Kickstarter, Google clearly sees an opportunity. Such devices need to boot up, use an SoC, handle input and output, and communicate over a network—all things the Linux-based Android OS is great at; it's just a little heavy right now. As was the case when Android entered the market, right now it's up to the hardware vendors themselves to create the IoT operating system. The Information says Google wants to move in and clean up the fragmented mess by offering Brillo for free to OEMs. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In a turn of events that isn’t terribly surprising, a bill to allow Tesla Motors to sell cars directly to consumers in Texas has failed to make it to the floor, with various state representatives offering excuses about not wanting to "piss off all the auto dealers." The Lone Star State’s notoriously anti-Tesla stance—one of the strongest in the nation—is in many ways the direct legacy of powerful lawmaker-turned-lobbyist Gene Fondren, who spent much of his life ensuring that the Texas Automobile Dealers Association’s wishes were railroaded through the Texas legislature. That legacy is alive and well, with Texas lawmakers refusing to pass bills in 2013 and again in 2015 to allow Tesla to sell to consumers. Per the state’s franchise laws, auto manufacturers like Tesla are only allowed to sell cars to independent third-party dealers. These laws were originally intended to protect consumers against the possibility of automakers colluding on pricing; today, though, they function as protectionist shields for the entrenched political interests of car dealers and their powerful state- and nationwide lobbyist organizations. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When Facebook bought Oculus VR back in March of 2014, many wondered exactly what the social network was going to do with it—let's face it, many of us are still wondering. But there are some interesting bits of tech starting to emerge from the now Facebook-owned Oculus that hint at what the future might hold for the Rift outside gaming. One such piece of tech—a "facial performance" tracking system—adds a vital element of social interaction to VR usage: facial expressions. Researchers at University of Southern California (with help from Facebook) have devised a system that tracks a user's facial expressions and translates them onto an avatar in the VR world. It works by using an off-the-shelf Intel RealSense 3D Camera bolted to the front of an Oculus Rift DK2 in order to capture facial movements for the lower half of the face. The really clever part, though, is how it captures movements for the top half of the face, which is obviously covered up. The researchers mounted eight strain gauges inside the foam liner of the Rift and developed software based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) often used by animators to integrate the data from the depth-sensing camera, strain gauges, and the Rift itself. The result is an eerily accurate representation of the user's facial expressions, down to the smallest of movements. Even better, latency was generally low, with the researchers measuring 3ms for facial feature detection, 5ms for blend shape optimisation, and 3ms for the mapping in software. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google may have lost Twitch.tv to Amazon, but it still wants in on the live-streaming gaming market. The company has announced that YouTube live streaming now supports 60 FPS 1080p and 720p video streams. This brings YouTube streaming up to parity with Twitch, but YouTube one-ups Amazon's streaming service with HTML5 playback—Twitch still uses Flash. We've heard rumors of YouTube moving into the live stream gaming market, and this is the strongest sign yet that Google is planning to take on Twitch. 60 FPS content is primarily video games, and the post touts the feature as great for "silky smooth playback for gaming." The company has even worked with popular game-streaming software companies, like Elgato and XSplit, on getting 60 FPS YouTube support up and running. YouTube also says that "any app using our live streaming API can add a new high frame rate flag to enable 60fps streaming." The HTML5 player will not only save users from the CPU and battery-eating Flash player, but will also enable variable speed playback, allowing users to "skip backward in a stream while it’s live and watch at 1.5x or 2x speed to catch back up." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Comic artist Jeph Jacques was so amused when the .horse top level domain was created he decided to make a new website: walmart.horse. The site portrayed an unexplainably funny picture of a horse in front of a Walmart store (above). Walmart didn't get the joke. In March, they sent Jacques a cease-and-desist letter telling him that the site infringed their trademark. Jacques responded, saying his site was fair use because the horsey site was an "obvious parody." If Walmart had other animals it wanted to add to the website, he added cheekily, "I would happily comply!" Two months later, Walmart had enough of this horsing around. The company didn't drop the issue, instead filing papers with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and initiating a domain name dispute. It's a procedure that's meant to knock out cybersquatters. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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As companies continue to beat the Internet of Things drum, promoting a world when every device is smart, and anything electronic is network connected, we have some news that shows just what a horrible idea this really is. A security firm has found that a Linux kernel driver called NetUSB contains an amateurish error that can be exploited by hackers to remotely compromise any device running the driver. The driver is commonly found in home routers, and while some offer the ability to disable it, others do not appear to do so. NetUSB is developed by Taiwanese company KCodes. The purpose of the driver is to allow PCs and Macs to connect to USB devices over a network, so that these devices can be shared just by plugging them into a Wi-Fi router or similar. To do this, a driver is needed at each end; a client driver on the PC or Mac, and a server driver on the router itself. This router-side driver listens to connections on TCP port 20005, and it's this driver that contains a major security flaw. SEC Consult Vulnerability Lab, which publicised the problem, discovered that the Linux driver contains a simple buffer overflow. As part of the communication between client and server, the client sends the name of the client computer; if this name is longer than 64 bytes, the buffer overflows. The company says that this overflow can be exploited to enable both denial of service (crashing the router), and remote code execution. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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First came the lawsuit from a rural New York man with a sketchy past who claimed Facebook CEO and cofounder Mark Zuckerberg promised him half of Facebook when Zuck was an 18-year-old Harvard University student. Then came the parade of attorneys, one after the other, representing plaintiff-turned-fugitive Paul Ceglia in his suit against Zuckerberg. The lawyer turnstile churned before, during and after a whirlwind of he-said-she-said allegations and even after a forensics examination (PDF) paid for by Zuckerberg showed that the purported contract (PDF) between Zuckerberg and Ceglia was a forgery. Next came a federal judge's order labeling the contract at issue a fake (PDF) and Ceglia's lawsuit was dismissed. Then prosecutors brought criminal charges (PDF) against Ceglia. Then out of nowhere, Zuckerberg sued many of the lawyers who represented Ceglia, alleging they knew Ceglia's lawsuit was based on "an implausible story and obviously forged documents." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Game developer and tech diversity advocate Brianna Wu has been complaining about the lack of action by a prosecuting attorney in response to a death threat voicemail she said she received. On Tuesday, she posted a copy of the voicemail. Wu's op-ed article at feminist pop-culture site The Mary Sue raised new questions about whether local or national law enforcement agencies were adequately responding to a wave of anonymous threats she and other women in the game industry have recently faced. The article included a recording of a voicemail left on Wu's personal phone that called her a "little fucking whore" and threatened to "slit [her] throat." Ars was sent a copy of the voicemail with its originating Columbus, Ohio phone number attached, along with call records indicating that the threat was left on Wu's voicemail on May 12. Wu said that she received more threatening calls from the same number on Wednesday. She has not called the offending number back as per advice from her legal counsel. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Late last night, luxury bus startup Leap issued a statement on its Facebook page noting that the company would be temporarily suspending its San Francisco service, citing regulatory issues with the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). The commission issued Leap a cease-and-desist letter last week (PDF), saying that Leap Transit did not have a permit to operate in the city. The company has proved devisive in the Bay Area, where public transportation suffers from a litany of problems, and Leap buses are seen as a way for the wealthy to create a “two-tiered” transportation system. A ride on a Leap bus costs $6 and offers charging ports, free Wi-Fi, and a guaranteed seat. By contrast, a ride on Muni, San Francisco's municipal public transportation system, costs only $2.25 but the buses are unreliable, packed to the gills, and employ not a single on-board bus manager to bring you coconut water. Leap so far only operates one bus line in the city, which goes from the Marina neighborhood to the Financial District. The company applied for a state permit from the CPUC in 2013, which would have afforded the company “the potential for less oversight and fewer rules,” according to the San Francisco Chronicle. But the city of San Francisco said that it ought to be able to regulate Leap, as SF municipal services would experience the greatest toll from competition from Leap. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Analysis of a widely-publicised Science paper has found evidence that the data used the in the research was faked (PDF). The study, by researchers Michael J. LaCour and Donald P. Green, claimed that a short conversation with a gay canvasser could persuade people in favour of gay marriage, significantly more than a conversation with a straight canvasser. The paper reported that the effect was found to last in 3-week, 6-week, and 9-month follow-ups, and could be passed on to other people living in the same household. While working to replicate and extend the original research, David Broockman and Joshua Kalla uncovered problems with the data used by LaCour and Green. They were initially surprised at how high the response and re-interview rates were in the original paper’s data, and launched a small test run of their planned extension study. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Federal Trade Commission's fight against the infamous "Rachel from Cardholder Services" robocalls has produced a court order to give $1.7 million in refunds to defrauded consumers. The case dates to November 2012, involving defendants including Universal Processing Services of Wisconsin, a payment processor, and telemarketer Hal Smith and his HES Merchant Services Company, the FTC said today. Per an order from US District Court for the Middle District of Florida, Universal Processing Services and HES will have to pay $1,734,972, which the FTC said "will be used to provide refunds to defrauded consumers." "The court held Smith and HES liable for 11 violations of the FTC Act and the Commission’s Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR), based on their participation in a deceptive telemarketing scheme purporting to be a credit card interest rate reduction service that used robocalls to solicit consumers," the FTC said. "The defendants failed to disclose the identity of the person(s) responsible for placing the robocalls and unlawfully calling numbers that had been registered on the FTC’s Do Not Call Registry." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A new Windows 10 build is now available for Fast Ring users. Build 10122 should be available to download, but Microsoft is advising that users with AMD video cards pass on it for the time being. That's because there's currently a crashing issue in the Edge browser (still named "Project Spartan" in this release). Microsoft is working with AMD to update its drivers to address the issue, but until an update is available, AMD users are advised to switch to the Slow Ring. The new build makes Windows 10 look the way it looked when Microsoft demonstrated it at its Build and Ignite conferences earlier this month. This has two major parts; the Start menu has been reorganized to group Explorer, Settings, Power, and All Apps together, and the Start screen now puts more focus on new, larger tiles, putting the menu-like parts (including the aforementioned grouped icons) together in a hamburger menu. Similarly, Edge now includes the new tab screen shown off at Build. This is strongly reminiscent of iGoogle, including a search bar, popular links, news, and weather. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It looks like Apple could be shaking up its typefaces again. A report from 9to5Mac indicates that the forthcoming releases of iOS and OS X will use the Apple Watch's "San Francisco" as the system typeface, moving away from the Helvetica Neue typeface introduced in iOS 7 and OS X Yosemite. The typeface, available for registered Apple developers to download here, is "designed specifically for legibility on small screens." We've included a comparison of the "ultralight" weight of both typefaces above. Two things are immediately apparent—first, San Francisco is just a shade heavier than Helvetica Neue at the same size and weight. Second, San Francisco is narrower horizontally, which is doubtless helpful when you're working with a screen as small as the one on the Apple Watch. It's harder to say how the typeface would work with the wide variety of screen sizes (and the Retina and non-Retina displays) available across all iOS and OS X product lines, though 9to5Mac has some mockups and other screenshots that give you a rough idea. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Most mass-copyright lawsuits today are filed over pornographic material. One movie studio, Voltage Pictures, has tread its own path, combining a knack for making critically acclaimed mainstream films with a strong interest in suing online movie pirates. Voltage sued thousands of John Doe defendants it says downloaded The Hurt Locker and more recently sued hundreds for downloading the Academy Award-winning Dallas Buyers Club. Now, the Japanese company that owns intellectual property rights to Godzilla says that it's Voltage that has blown off copyright laws. In a lawsuit (PDF) filed yesterday, Toho Co. says that Voltage is promoting a new Godzilla film, starring Anne Hathaway, without its permission. Voltage has been promoting the new film, called Colossal, at the recent Cannes Film Festival. It sent out a promotional e-mail that includes a publicity image from the 2014 movie Godzilla, which, unlike Colossal, acquired Toho's permission to use the character. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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