posted 7 days ago on ars technica
A Perseid meteor is seen entering Earth's atmosphere from the International Space Station. (credit: NASA) Indian officials say a meteorite struck the campus of a private engineering college on Saturday, killing one person. If scientists confirm the explosion was due to a meteorite, it would be the first recorded human fatality due to a falling space rock. According to local reports, a bus driver was killed on Saturday when a meteorite landed in the area where he was walking, damaging the window panes of nearby buses and buildings. Three other people were injured. On Sunday, various Indian publications, including The Hindu, reported that the chief minister of Tamil Nadu, Jayalalithaa, issued a statement confirming the death: "A mishap occurred yesterday when a meteorite fell in the campus of a private engineering college in Vellore district's K Pantharappalli village." Tamil Nadu is located in southern India, and has a population of more than 70 million people. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
Linguist Nick Farmer tells us more about some of his favorite Belter words. (Video edited by Jennifer Hahn) (video link) OAKLAND, Calif.—It all started when Nick Farmer bought George R. R. Martin a drink, but the plot really thickened when the linguist met Martin's then-assistant Ty Franck. Franck was one half of the writing team behind the novels that fuel SyFy's incredible new series, The Expanse. And the author soon discovered that Farmer was a talented polyglot, a master of over two dozen languages who worked as a linguistic sellsword for financial research companies desperate to translate global business news for analysts. Farmer also happened to be just the kind of expert that Franck and his co-author Daniel Abraham needed to bring their novels to the screen. The Expanse series takes place two centuries from now in the Belt, a ring of asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. People who have migrated to the Belt come from all over Earth speaking dozens of languages, and they're often isolated for years at a time on remote mining stations. To communicate, they evolve a creole called Belter, which becomes the lingua franca for what is essentially the solar system's new proletariat. The problem? In the book, Belter could be referenced. But now that The Expanse was coming to television, people would actually have to speak the damn thing. SyFy suddenly needed a linguist who could build a language out of dozens of parts. Luckily, Franck knew a guy. He soon recommended Farmer, who delivered a lot more than they bargained for. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
That Dragon, Cancer is a game about love, hope, and letting go. 9 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } “You have to let me feel this!” Ryan Green is half-shouting, half-sobbing at his wife Amy. They’re fighting over the way that Ryan is dealing with the knowledge that their son’s diagnosis will lead to a future of palliative care and grief. We never see their faces, never get more than that solitary audio clip, but it’s a powerful, poignant moment that ends with us plunging Ryan deeper into an ocean of light. That Dragon, Cancer is not an easy game to experience. It’s a eulogy, an autobiography, a cry into the dark. It’s one family’s endeavour to make sense of a looming tragedy, to press pause on a life that is—was— running out of time. Joel, the tow-headed child at the heart of the whole endeavour, died in March last year. He would have turned seven on the game’s January 12th launch. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Lucy Orr) Would I like to cover Barfest? Why, of course! Even though it seems like some form of alcoholic devolution, considering I was very recently in Germany at Puke-Fest... Oh, sorry, I see—you mean BAHFest, aka the Festival of Bad ad Hoc Hypotheses. I consider myself a layperson when it comes to hard science so, in the best familial tradition, I bully my little sister—a massive nerd and PhD-holding research assistant at Birkbeck Babylab—to assist me in ascertaining how any data might be mishandled. By design, there’s bound to be some bad science here. I've attended my fair share of Uncaged Monkeys shows, and love a good Carl Sagan quote, so I feel privileged to be attending the very first international BAHFest. It's billed as “a celebration of well-argued, and thoroughly researched, but completely incorrect scientific theory.” The festival is running over two days at Imperial College London, where my famous-not-famous particle physicist dad, Robert Orr, studied in the 1960s. I can’t help wondering if I was conceived in a lab nearby. On the first evening, dubbed BAH! London Evolution, six brave speakers (assisted by inexplicably popular Hogwarts' escapee, and AV technician, Lloyd) present their awfully absorbing, and utterly loony theories to a live audience of hollering nerds, and a panel of three judges, some of whom might even have valid science credentials. Read 38 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
A modern human and Neanderthal skull face off. (credit: By hairymuseummatt (original photo), DrMikeBaxter (derivative work) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons) For a long time, archaeologists have suggested that modern humans wiped out Neanderthals because we had greater technological and cultural development, which allowed us to find and exploit resources more readily than Neanderthals did. It’s a plausible explanation, but it leaves us with pressing questions about the details of how this might have happened. For a start, we know that Neanderthals had some culture, so exactly how much more would modern humans have needed to have in order to be more competitive? And modern humans entered Neanderthal territory in smaller numbers than the established Neanderthal population—could technology make up for what they lacked in numbers? These questions highlight a major challenge with this model: there are other plausible explanations for the disappearance of Neanderthals. For example, they could have been wiped out by climate change or an epidemic. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
CJ Wilson Racing The Cayman GT4 Clubsport on Daytona's famous banking. 7 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } When we last met CJ Wilson Racing, the team had just won the 2015 Street Tuner championship in the Continental Tires Sportscar Challenge. For 2016, this racing team led by the Major League Baseball star of the same name has stepped up to Grand Sport, the top class in the Continental series. And it's doing so with a brand-new race car—the Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport. With the Cayman GT4, Porsche finally did something most of us have been waiting for; it built a track-focused Cayman. The company has always said that the 911 is the flagship, and until the GT4, it was fairly obvious that Weissach did not want to cannibalize sales of track-biased 911s by letting its mid-engined younger brother upstage things. But Porsche has a habit of making a stripped out version of models that have reached their end of life—The Cayman (and Boxster) are now part of the 718 family, and from here on out they will use turbocharged 4-cylinder engines. The naturally aspirated 6-cylinder Cayman GT4 is a prime example of the breed. Those who've driven the road car have come away breathless and delighted, and if you want one be prepared to pay a big premium over msrp. A racing version showed up at November's LA Auto Show, complete with 911 GT3 front suspension and a PDK gearbox in place of the road car's conventional six speed manual. Even though the team is in its early days with the new car, Wilson seemed impressed. "It's amazing how capable this car was out of the box," he told Ars. "We slapped Continental tires on it, put it at the right ride height, changed some springs around and went out and whacked it on the track. We put up some good times. We have have two really good drivers but Porsche did everything they needed to do." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Wizards of the Coast) Dungeons & Dragons just celebrated its 42nd birthday—an auspicious number, to be sure—some 16 months after the release of its 5th edition. Since D&D’s latest release in August of 2014, many players and Dungeon Masters have rolled their polyhedrals in approval, and publisher Wizards of the Coast has grown its support for the world’s most popular role-playing game in ways you might not have expected. No matter your edition or specific RPG of choice, today D&D continues to be the measuring stick by which other pen-and-paper games are judged, be it on sales, popularity, or even complexity. For many gamers over the course of the game's existence, D&D has been the entry point into role-playing which sparks a lifetime of storytelling and adventure. So, with more than a year behind it, how does the newest edition of D&D hold up for newbies and hardcore fans alike? Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
I’m a stalker. Not a virtual stalker, a real life stalker. The good news is that Douglas Coupland—author of Microserfs and Generation X—doesn’t seem to mind. Snatching my camera, Coupland reassures me in his smooth Canadian brogue that “electrons are free, one of these has to be OK,” before firing off 20 selfies, while I stand here in shock. Text Butt 2015 by Olaf Breuning (credit: Lucy Orr) This may be somewhat at odds with the art that he's here to promote at the hot new Whitechapel Gallery exhibition, Electronic Superhighway (2016-1966), which has just opened to the public in London. Coupland's large mixed media pieces are black and white photos with Piet Mondrian-like coloured cubes, or black and white stripes stuck over them. Titled Deep Face, the images (see gallery below) represent a critique of Facebook’s face recognition software. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
(credit: NURV.com) A South Carolina teenager has sued a Colorado television station over allegations the station broadcasted a picture of his erect penis taken from a cell phone video uploaded to YouTube. The case, known as Holden v. KOAA, asks for $1 million in damages and accuses the station, its reporter, its parent companies (NBC and Comcast), and other defendants of violating federal child pornography laws, invasion of privacy and negligence, and other allegations. According to the lawsuit, the teen was 14 years old and living in Colorado at the time of the incident. (The incident occurred two years ago, but Ars will not name the individual as he is still a minor.) The cell phone video had been taken of the teen and put online as a way to blackmail him. His father’s girlfriend, Heather Richardson, soon contacted the KOAA TV station to let them know about the situation. KOAA sent a local reporter, Matthew Prichard, to the family’s home in Pueblo, Colorado, where Prichard interviewed the boy and filmed the offending material. The suit claims that the boy’s father specifically told Prichard to keep his son’s name out of the report. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam. (credit: Fortune Live Media) Verizon Wireless is testing the limits of the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules after announcing that it will exempt its own video service from mobile data caps—while counting data from competitors such as YouTube and Netflix against customers' caps. The only way for companies to deliver data to Verizon customers without counting against their data caps is to pay the carrier, something no major rival video service has chosen to do. While data cap exemptions are not specifically outlawed by the FCC's net neutrality rules, the FCC is examining these arrangements to determine whether they should be stopped under the commission's so-called "general conduct standard." The FCC is already looking into data cap exemptions—also known as zero-rating—implemented by Comcast, AT&T, and T-Mobile USA. Verizon last month announced its new "FreeBee Data 360" program in which content providers can pay to send zero-rated data to customers. Verizon has also been pushing its new "Go90" streaming video service, and yesterday it added a perk to Go90's mobile app: free data. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
This week the James Webb Space Telescope team used a robotic am to install the last of the telescope's 18 mirrors onto the telescope structure. (credit: NASA) After years of delays and cost overruns, the James Webb Space Telescope is finally coming together. This week the 18th and final primary mirror segment of the telescope was installed onto the support structure at Goddard Space Flight Center. From here, additional optics must be installed, and the telescope requires testing to ensure it can withstand the forces of a rocket launch anticipated in late 2018. Each of the hexagon-shaped mirrors weighs 40 kg and spans 1.3 meters. After launch, the telescope will be flown to the second Lagrange point of the Earth-Sun system, about 1.5 million kilometers from Earth. From there, it will begin observations. When deployed in space, the telescope will have a 6.5-meter diameter. "Completing the assembly of the primary mirror is a very significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of design, manufacturing, testing, and now assembly of the primary mirror system," said Lee Feinberg, optical telescope element manager at Goddard. "There is a huge team across the country who contributed to this achievement." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Tim Deering/Flickr) In an effort to offer healthier menu items, McDonald’s has unveiled a new salad with a “nutrient-rich lettuce blend with baby kale,” shaved parmesan, and chicken (grilled or fried). Like many fast-food salads, it may seem like a healthy option at first, but it’s not. The salad, when paired with the restaurant’s Asiago Caesar Dressing, packs more fat, calories, and salt than a double Big Mac—that’s a sandwich with four beef patties. (credit: McDonald's) While the nutrition check on a McDonald’s item may not come as a shock, the unhealthy salad option falls into a bigger trend of restaurant meals—fast food or not, eating out is hard on your waistline and health. (credit: McDonald's) In one recent study, researchers found that 92 percent of large-chain, local-chain, and mom-and-pop restaurants served meals that exceeded the calorie intake for a healthy meal. The study included 364 meals from restaurants in three cities: Boston, San Francisco, and Little Rock, Arkansas. The meals covered American, Chinese, Greek, Indian, Italian, Japanese, Mexican, Thai, and Vietnamese-style cuisine. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
The Bennet sisters stash swords under their gowns for a reason. (credit: Jay Maidment/Sony) This review contains minor spoilers to the film Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. There are a few reasons a person might decide to watch the film Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. You might be a fan of Jane Austen and absorb anything to do with the 19th-Century author. You might be a fan of zombie films—even the bad ones—and will sign up to see any brains eaten by the undead. Or, maybe you want to watch Games of Thrones’ Lena Headey fight zombies while sporting an eyepatch throughout an entire film. These are all valid reasons to walk into a theater to see a parody film based on a parody book based on an essential book. But while Pride and Prejudice and Zombies does include some awesomely bloody zombie fight scenes—we can confirm, Headey is definitely some kind of zombie warrior—it’s not a very good film. In fact, that’s being generous. This film is a mess. It takes the main characters and the rough outline of the plot from Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, mixes in some zombies, and then develops a whole new weird plot about zombie rights. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: nerissa's ring) BPA-free labels, blazoned on baby toys and beverage holders, are supposed to allay fears about the notorious chemical, previously used in sturdy plastics and epoxy resins. After all, bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to impersonate hormones such as estrogen, and it is associated—though not definitely linked—to a broad range of health problems, including cancers and cardiovascular disease. But the "BPA-free" label may simply be a meaningless marketing ploy. A growing number of studies suggest that manufactures are swapping BPA for chemical cousins that have the same troubling activities in humans and animals. In a new study in Endocrinology, for instance, researchers found that a common BPA stand-in, bisphenol S (BPS), has nearly identical hormone-mimicking effects as BPA in zebrafish, a model organism used to study genetics and development. In the study, researchers found that BPS, like BPA, altered nerve cell development, changed the activity level of genes involved in developing the reproductive system, and caused early hatching (the fish equivalent of premature birth). Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
It sounds like a scene from an absurdist play or a companion to the old tale of dogs and cats living together in harmony, but it has now been confirmed. Servers distributing the notorious Dridex banking trojan were instead circulating clean copies of the freely available Avira antivirus program. Avira researchers still don't know how the mixup happened, but their chief theory is that a whitehat hacker compromised some of the Dridex distribution channels and replaced the normal malicious executables with a digitally signed Avira installer. As a result, when targets opened attachments contained in spam e-mails sent by Dridex servers, the would-be marks were instead prompted to run a program designed to protect computers from the very likes of the Dridex threat. "We still don't know exactly who is doing this with our installer and why—but we have some theories," a blog post published Friday quoted Avira malware expert Moritz Kroll saying. "This is certainly not something we are doing ourselves." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Staff at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) received an unpleasant e-mail when they came to work Thursday morning, one that outlined some specifics of long-awaited restructuring plans. The gist of the message? You've done such a good job, we have to let you go. CSIRO’s CEO Larry Marshall's lengthy message stated, “Our climate models are among the best in the world and our measurements honed those models to prove global climate change. That question has been answered, and the new question is what do we do about it, and how can we find solutions for the climate we will be living with?” The Sydney Morning Herald reported that about 110 of the 135 people in CSIRO’s Oceans and Atmosphere division will be cut, and there will be a similar reduction in the Land and Water division. Smaller cuts are also planned for the Manufacturing and Data61 digital technology divisions. The remaining positions in Oceans and Atmosphere will be shifted away from climate science and toward mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
T-Mobile USA CEO John Legere. (credit: T-Mobile) A T-Mobile USA executive yesterday urged the Federal Communications Commission not to take any action against the carrier's "Binge On" program, which throttles nearly all video content and exempts certain video services from data caps. "I think the commission has to tread lightly—and certainly more lightly than it would in the wired world—in the wireless space when there is so much experimentation happening, so much differentiation happening, and a lot of it customers responding to," T-Mobile Senior VP of Government Affairs Kathleen Ham said at an event in Washington, DC. "We do have to be transparent about it, we do have to make sure that the customer has choices, but I think it's wise to tread lightly in this environment when there's so much going on that I think customers are benefiting from." Yesterday's event on zero-rating and net neutrality was hosted by the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute (see video here). The Hill also has a report on the panel discussion. Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Christopher Paul) A new study says the obvious: suspects' brains are briefly scrambled when they are on the receiving end of a Taser stun gun and its 50,000-volt delivery. But the study, "TASER Exposure and Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Valid Miranda Waivers and the Timing of Police Custodial Interrogations," (PDF) questions whether suspects who were just shocked have the mental capacity to validly waive their Miranda rights and submit to police questioning. "TASER-exposed participants resembled patients with mild cognitive impairment, which suggests that not only might our participants be more likely to waive their Miranda rights directly after TASER exposure, but also they would be more likely to give inaccurate information to investigators," reads the study, which appears in the journal Criminology & Public Policy. "Thus, part of our findings implicates a suspect’s ability to issue a valid waiver, whereas another part implicates the accuracy of information he or she might give investigators during a custodial interrogation (e.g., false confessions or statements)." The paper said that police departments might want to wait to question a suspect for about an hour, the amount of time for brain functioning to return to normal after a suspect is shocked. The Drexel University and Arizona State University researchers said innocent suspects may not appear so innocent right after being shocked: Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
On Friday, Volkswagen Group said it would be delaying its annual earnings meeting, originally scheduled for March 10, due to "remaining open questions… relating to the diesel emissions issue.” The annual general meeting of shareholders, scheduled for April, will also be postponed. The New York Times calls the move “highly unusual” but understandable given that the German automaker could potentially owe “tens of billions” in fines, not including the cost of fixing or buying back the nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles in the US alone that were equipped with emissions-system-cheating software. Worldwide, the number of diesel Volkswagens with so-called “defeat device” software rises to about 11 million. According to a press release from the company, Volkswagen decided to delay the financial meetings to achieve a "transparent and reliable outcome for its shareholders and stakeholders.” It promised to release the new scheduled meeting dates as soon as possible. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
iRobot The iRobot 710 Kobra. This is the company's biggest military bot. With a gripper arm attachment like this, it can lift 330 pounds. 8 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } iRobot is most famous for its Roomba robotic vacuum line, but the company also has a sizable "Defense and Security" division, which makes robots for the US Armed Forces and various police forces. Or at least it used to—iRobot has announced that the military division will be sold off and formed into a separate company. The press release says that Arlington Capital Partners will buy the division for "up to $45 million in total consideration." The new company will be fully dedicated to military and police robots, and it will be led by the existing Defense and Security management team. There's no name for the new company yet—that will be saved for when the transaction closes in the next 90 days. iRobot's military robots all followed the same basic formula. They're driven by a pair of continuous tracks with a second set of tracks attached to the front. The front tracks could be actuated, lifting up off the ground and allowing the robot to climb obstacles like stairs and rocks. The body of the robots were platforms that iRobot outfitted with various capabilities, usually robotic arms with cameras or gripper arms. That basic design came in a few different sizes, ranging from something you could throw through a window to a robot that would fit in a backpack or a heavy-duty bot weighing as much as 500 pounds. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: flickr user Nick) In places like California, researchers have been working to understand how climate change is affecting droughts. But in the UK, it’s unusually wet weather making headlines of late. Southern England and Wales got soaked over the winter that ran into January 2014, leading to near-historic flooding. This led to a natural question: did climate change have a hand in it? Climate is basically the statistics of weather, so the way we answer this is to use climate models to look for a change in those statistics. We can’t necessarily convict climate change for any particular weather disaster, but we can learn whether we should expect to see that disaster more often than we would in the absence of climate change. A home run hitter on steroids is a common analogy—they'd clearly hit some out of the park anyway, but not with the same frequency. Good statistics require a lot of samples, so to look at the English flooding, a climate model was used to generate over 130,000 simulations of weather in the region. To do the computational heavy lifting, the team (led by University of Oxford researcher Nathalie Schaller) relied on weather@home running on volunteers’ computers. Some of the simulations were run with greenhouse gas concentrations, Arctic sea ice extent, and sea surface temperatures to match the 2013/2014 winter. The other simulations were run under approximated pre-industrial conditions: lower greenhouse gas concentrations, cooler sea surface temperatures, and the largest sea ice extent available from the satellite era (1986/1987). Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Wally Gobetz) A man using a drone to take pictures of the Manhattan skyline accidentally crashed the device into the Empire State Building. He then went in to ask security for his drone back. Instead of helping, they called the cops. 27-year-old Sean Riddle, of Jersey City, NJ, was arrested yesterday sometime before 8:00pm, according to the New York City Police Department. Riddle was charged with reckless endangerment, misdemeanor criminal mischief, and illegally navigating an aircraft over the city. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Sam Machkovech) The good news is that XCOM 2 actually does support the use of a handheld gamepad for today's launch, despite early promises to the contrary. The bad news is that the support is limited to Valve's decidedly non-standard Steam Controller for the time being. Backing up a bit, Firaxis announced back in June that the PC-exclusive XCOM 2 would not bring along its predecessor's surprisingly competent support for standard console controllers (which was a necessity for the Xbox 360 and PS3 versions of the game). At the time, Creative Director Jake Solomon told IGN that the team tweaked XCOM 2's on-screen user interface to be mouse-and-keyboard friendly. Though there were vague nods toward supporting gamepads "in the future," such support was not supposed to be ready at launch. Then, last night, Firaxis took to the XCOM 2 Steam page to explain that the game was getting launch-day controller support... as long as you have a Steam Controller. The "early access" native integration for the Steam Controller, being developed in conjunction with Valve, reportedly lets players: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Tarter speaks after a screening of Contact, in 2014, at the Qualcomm Institute. (credit: Qualcomm Institute) When Jill Tarter first began to look for aliens, she drew looks askance from her friends and colleagues. The perception was “What’s a nice girl like you doing in a subject like this?” she recalled in an interview with Ars. Tarter, now 72, would go on to rise above that perception, becoming a leading figure at the SETI Institute. And the astronomer played by Jodie Foster in the movie Contact, which was largely based on Tarter, would further bolster her reputation. She and her fellow searchers haven’t found E.T. yet, but they have become respected members of the scientific community. These days, when NASA plots future explorations of Mars or ice-covered moons in the outer solar system, they’re driven by the search for microbial life. And with the discovery of billions of planets in the Milky Way, no one snickers any more at the idea of sniffing atmospheres around other worlds for biosignatures. The search for aliens has become respectable because it no longer is a philosophical or religious matter to ask if we are alone. During Tarter’s lifetime, scientists and engineers have developed the tools and technology to finally probe this question in a meaningful way. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Ethan Ligon) BERKELEY, Calif.—Days after a group of concerned professors raised alarm bells over a new network monitoring system installed at the University of California, Berkeley and the other nine campuses of the University of California system, a separate committee of system-wide faculty has now given its blessing. Some Berkeley faculty remain concerned that their academic freedom has been threatened by the new full packet capture system that sits on each campus network’s edge, however. They say that retaining such information could be used as a way to constrain legitimate discussion or research on controversial topics. Last summer, the University of California Office of the President ordered that a Fidelis XPS system be installed at all 10 campuses at a total estimated cost of at least a few million dollars. The Fidelis hardware and software is designed to "detect attacks" and analyze "every single packet that traverses the network." The move came in response to a July 2015 attack against the University of California Los Angeles Health System, which resulted in 4.5 million records being stolen. Following that attack, University of California President Janet Napolitano, the former Secretary of Homeland Security, moved quickly to bring more digital monitoring onto the campuses, which stretch from Berkeley to San Diego. The UC Regents, the governing board of the entire UC system, now face 17 separate lawsuits as a result of the breach at UCLA. Similar network monitoring hardware has also been installed at other universities nationwide. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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