posted 8 days ago on ars technica
A fine Friday morning to you all, Arsians! Our latest delectable Dealmaster deals come courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, who have slaved away to find for you only the choicest of offerings. Topping the list this morning is an Ooma Telo VOIP phone, which comes with a wireless and Bluetooth adapter. This bit of kit will run you only $89.99, and it's always a good time to pick up the phone and tell your mother that you love her! Or maybe you forgot to file your taxes and you don't want to pick up a phone. Maybe you need to run and hide from the IRS instead. If that's the case, we've got a deal near the end of the list for 50% off a year of Torguard Anonymous VPN and proxy service—that'll show the feds! Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
After complaints from Google about Oregon's tax rules, the state yesterday enacted a bill to address Google's concerns about building a fiber network in Portland and five nearby municipalities.The bill, signed yesterday by Gov. Kate Brown, "exempts 'gigabit' Internet service like Google's from a thorny property tax that dates to the 1970s and was originally intended for microwave towers," The Oregonian reported. Until the change, there was "an unusual Oregon tax methodology that values companies based—in part—on 'intangible' assets such as the value of their brands. For huge companies like Google, that might have added tens of millions of dollars to their annual property tax bill." Oregon's first attempt to change the rule backfired, when Google told lawmakers that proposed legislation would only provide relief temporarily and that "after a certain time period tax rates would return to approximately double what they are in other states." Lawmakers said they would change the bill to address Google's concerns, and they did. Portland has approved a Google Fiber franchise "that exempts the company from some of the fees and service requirements Comcast faces" and "reworked transportation regulations to allow Google Fiber to put 200 utility cabinets along big city streets," The Oregonian article said. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
As we mentioned in our earlier coverage of LINK, Bell Labs is expecting that the near future will bring a lot of growth in cellular devices, like smart appliances and sensors. Part of its solution to this flood of new devices is to give them their own chunk of the spectrum to keep them from getting in the way of user-driven devices, like phones and tablets. But that's only part of the solution; phone and tablet traffic is going to climb as well. The solution there is simply to create more cells so that there are fewer devices talking to a single base tower. But adding more access points isn't a simple matter. Each requires power and a network connection, and constructing large towers can be a headache of siting permits and contracts. To address this, a research effort at Bell Labs called "Blue Cell" is attempting to simplify cellular access points by getting rid of the wires. As solar panel prices have plunged, getting rid of the power cord has gotten a lot easier. Of course, siting a large solar panel can be just as much trouble as siting a cell phone tower, so one of the major goals of the research was to reduce the energy requirements of a cellular access point. Examining the existing hardware, engineers found that the biggest energy draw was the digital signal processor, which converts the cellular signal into something that can be sent over network cables. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
If we polled climate scientists for the weirdest thing we learned by drilling into Greenland’s ice, Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles would be strong contenders. During the colder parts of Greenland’s ice age history, it has frequently experienced a wicked case of climate whiplash. Parts of Greenland could endure a warming of 10 degrees Celsius in the space of a couple of decades. That would be followed by centuries of cooling and, eventually, another abrupt warming. Look at ocean sediment cores in the Atlantic and you’ll see something else happening at the same time: sand and stones appearing in the seafloor mud, carried there by dirty, slowly melting icebergs. (In fact, some icebergs may have made it as far as Florida.) These impressive launches of iceberg armadas are called Heinrich events—and there’s clearly some connection between Heinrich and Dansgaard-Oeschger. We’re pretty sure these wild events relate to the downward flow of salty, dense surface water in the North Atlantic, which completes the conveyor belt that turns northward-flowing surface water into southward-flowing deep water. If the salty surface water loses its greater density, the conveyor belt—and the warmth it carries northward—seizes up. Conversely, switching the conveyor belt back on can rapidly deliver warmth northward, which may explain some of the sudden warmings. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Tens of millions of Match.com subscribers risk having their site password exposed each time they sign in because the dating site doesn't use HTTPS encryption to protect its login page. The screenshot above was taken Thursday afternoon. Showing a session from the Wireshark packet sniffing program, you can see that this reporter entered "dan.goodin@arstechnica.com" and "secretpassword" into the user name and password fields of the Match.com login page. Amazingly, the page uses an unprotected HTTP connection to transmit the data, allowing anyone with a man-in-the-middle vantage point—say, someone on the same public network as a Match.com user, a rogue ISP or telecom employee, or a state-sponsored spy—to pilfer the credentials. Had Match.com followed basic security practices and properly enabled HTTPS on the login page, the entire session would have been unintelligible to all but the end user and connecting server. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
As part of its 1Q 2015 earnings release, AMD has announced that it is leaving the high density microserver market, effective immediately. AMD bought SeaMicro in 2012 for $334 million to get a foothold into the microserver business. At the time, SeaMicro built systems containing dozens of Intel Atom and Xeon processors connected to a shared storage and network fabric. Since the acquisition, AMD has only released a single new SeaMicro system, the SM15000. This could use either AMD Opteron systems (using the Piledriver core) or Intel Xeons (using the Ivy Bridge core). With today's announcement, it's clear that system will also be the last new SeaMicro system to be released. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
The Securities and Exchange Commission launched an informal investigation on Thursday into the details of the Los Angeles Unified School District's (LAUSD) notorious $1.3 billion iPad project, which was supposed to give every child in the nation's second-largest school system an iPad loaded with Pearson curriculum. The Los Angeles Times said that a source inside LAUSD confirmed that the commission was asking questions about how the bond money that was set aside to fund the program was used. The iPad program met many roadblocks since its inception in 2013, and recent allegations of improprieties during the bidding process for the bond money derailed the program permanently. Back in December, the FBI raided the school district's offices, taking with them 20 boxes of information pertaining to the program. At the time, the LAUSD superintendent resigned, although he has denied wrongdoing. Just yesterday, LAUSD's attorney wrote to Apple demanding refunds for Pearson curriculum that the school system deemed unsatisfactory. It also said it would not accept any more shipments from Apple or Pearson in the future. Pearson was a subcontractor for Apple in the deal between the tech giant and LAUSD. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Microsoft will continue to provide search results for Yahoo, but in a reduced capacity. The two have renegotiated the 2009 agreement that saw Redmond become the exclusive provider of search results for a company that was once known for its own search services. This came amid speculation that Yahoo would try to end the agreement entirely. The two made the original agreement after Microsoft decided against buying Yahoo for $45 billion after a series of rebuffs from Yahoo. Under the agreement, Microsoft was the sole provider of desktop search services for Yahoo, with Yahoo taking responsibility for signing up advertisers. This deal allowed Yahoo to back out after five years if revenue per search did not hit certain targets, and there was no exclusivity for mobile search. The new terms appear to be more favorable to Yahoo. Microsoft's Bing is no longer the exclusive provider of Yahoo search results on the desktop. Yahoo will still use Bing results and Bing ads for a "majority" of desktop search traffic, but can now "enhance the search experience" with other technology. This puts desktop search on a similar non-exclusive footing to mobile. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Video: the CRS-6 Falcon 9 almost remotely lands on a barge but then falls over and explodes because space is hard. (video link) The April 15 launch of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 booster carrying supplies for the International Space Station went well, but the automatic return and landing of the booster didn’t quite work out. Although the rocket was able to navigate to the landing barge waiting for it out in the Atlantic Ocean, video released yesterday shows it coming down too quickly, frantically gimbaling its LOX/RP-1 engines to shed velocity and stay on target. Today, new video has been released that shows the landing from a different perspective—from the landing barge’s deck. It’s a much closer view of the same landing, showing the booster slewing in from the upper right of the frame. It appears that, at the last moment, the rocket managed to handle its excess of vertical velocity. But that didn't leave it enough time for it to handle its horizontal velocity or the large yaw motion introduced by swinging into position—when it does touch down, it does so at a significant angle. The small cold-nitrogen reaction control jets near the booster’s apex can be seen frantically attempting to keep the stack upright, but the rocket is already past its tipping point and the jets simply don’t have the thrust. The explosion is only a few frames long, but it’s pretty spectacular. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
The latest update patch for the 3DS version of Super Smash Bros. contains more than just a lot of nitty gritty balance changes to the game's fighters (including a much-needed downgrade for Diddy Kong). A couple of hidden, encyrpted files included with the update also point to the possibility that Street Fighter series regular Ryu could be making an appearance in the game in the future. The files, labeled "snd_bgm_SF01_SF2_Ryu_3DS" and "snd_bgm_Z81_F_Ryu_3DS," were first discovered by a reddit user active in the Nintendo hacking community (who sheepishly admitted that he didn't even know who Ryu was) and were later confirmed by the editors of The Cutting Room Floor Wiki, a must-visit resource for hidden and deleted bits from classic games. Those files contain pitch-perfect recreations of Ryu's stage background music and winning quote music from Street Fighter II. Other unused sound files in the code's "bgm" folder point to new characters like Earthbound's Lucas, who was previously confirmed as a future bit of DLC, and Roy from the Fire Emblem series, who hasn't appeared in the Super Smash Bros. since Melee. Since the beginning of the month, Nintendo has been actively seeking fan suggestions for new fighters to add to Smash Bros.' already sizeable roster. Ryu would be right at home in Smash Bros., which has over the years gone from a showcase for Nintendo characters to a showcase for all sorts of Japanese gaming mascots, from Sega's Sonic and Konami's Solid Snake to Namco/Bandai's Pac-Man and fellow Capcom creation Mega Man. Of course, if Capcom gets a second fighter in the series, those other companies might expect to up their character counts as well. Maybe our dream of battling Simon Belmont, Tails, and Heihachi aren't as doomed as we thought. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
A flaw in the wildly popular online game Minecraft makes it easy for just about anyone to crash the server hosting the game, according to a computer programmer who has released proof-of-concept code that exploits the vulnerability. "I thought a lot before writing this post," Pakistan-based developer Ammar Askar wrote in a blog post published Thursday, 21 months, he said, after privately reporting the bug to Minecraft developer Mojang. "On the one hand I don't want to expose thousands of servers to a major vulnerability, yet on the other hand Mojang has failed to act on it." The bug resides in the networking internals of the Minecraft protocol. It allows the contents of inventory slots to be exchanged, so that, among other things, items in players' hotbars are displayed automatically after logging in. Minecraft items can also store arbitrary metadata in a file format known as Named Binary Tag (NBT), which allows complex data structures to be kept in hierarchical nests. Askar has released proof-of-concept attack code he said exploits the vulnerability to crash any server hosting the game. Here's how it works. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Whistleblowers beware: At least 29 US government agencies' websites that allow the online reporting of abuse, waste, and fraud are not encrypted with HTTPS, according to a survey by the American Civil Liberties Union unveiled Thursday. "When individuals use these official whistleblowing channels to report waste, fraud, or abuse, the information they submit is transmitted insecurely over the Internet, where it can be intercepted by others. This not only puts the identity of whistleblowers at risk, but also the confidentiality of the information they provide to inspectors general," the rights group said in a letter to Tony Scott, chief information officer for the Office of Management & Budget. The affected agencies range from the Department of Agriculture and the General Services Administration to the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Treasury. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
“Never before have I written so long a letter. I'm afraid it is much too long to take your precious time. I can assure you that it would have been much shorter if I had been writing from a comfortable desk, but what else can one do when he is alone in a narrow jail cell, other than write long letters, think long thoughts and pray long prayers?” - Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from Birmingham City Jail” April 16, 1963 Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham City Jail” is considered by many civil-rights historians to be one of the seminal writings of the era, on par with King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. But while King’s moving oration at the Lincoln Memorial was delivered directly to thousands, his impassioned letter was composed in solitary confinement and would not have seen the light of day without the help of several brave and dedicated intermediaries. In the spring of 1963, King was arrested after he and others in the racial equality movement defied a court injunction against public protesting. From behind bars, he obtained a copy of a joint statement written by white religious leaders criticizing his methods. King felt compelled to respond. As the daughters of King’s attorney, Arthur Shores, explain in their father’s biography, King scribbled his response in the margins of old newspapers and on toilet paper and other paper scraps. His lawyers smuggled the notes out of the jail to be transcribed, then they smuggled the edits back into the jail for King to review. Eventually, the letter made it onto the pages of several influential newspapers. If King were a prisoner in the state of Alabama today, those supporters may very well have first published the letter on King’s Facebook page. But under current Alabama law, that would have been a crime: Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Can users of review sites like Yelp bash a business but remain anonymous? Unless a business can show a court from the outset that they have strong evidence the statements are false and defamatory, the user's identity will usually be protected. Yelp says it gets about six subpoenas a month seeking user identities, often from businesses who want to sue anonymous reviewers. One closely watched Virginia case about reviewer anonymity has now been resolved. The anonymous reviewers won, although not on the grounds free speech advocates had hoped for. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
On Thursday, J.J. Abrams kicked off a weekend-long Star Wars convention by revealing the second teaser trailer for the upcoming Star Wars: The Force Awakens film, and it included the first reveal of Harrison Ford reprising his role as Han Solo. "Chewie, we're home!" Ford says with Chewbacca standing behind him to close the teaser, which also included footage of a Millennium Falcon chase, a melted Darth Vader mask, a lightsaber hand-off, and Mark Hamill's speech to Leia from Return of the Jedi, though this time chopped up to sound like he's now saying it to an heir apparent. Stormtroopers, X-Wings, TIE Fighters, new droids, and the sequel's three new leads also feature prominently. As a lead-up to that teaser reveal, Entertainment Weekly columnist Anthony Breznican hosted a panel with Abrams and Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy, where he asked questions about filming scenes in Abu Dhabi, designing new droids (including new droid "BB8," whose impressive rolling ball design includes a head that swivels on its top), and casting the series' three new lead actors. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Facebook's Internet.org project, which aims to give impoverished people around the world free mobile access to a selection of Internet services, is facing criticism and defections over alleged violations of net neutrality principles. Internet.org offers a mobile app in parts of Africa, Latin America, and Asia, and through partnerships with cellular carriers the app provides free access to a few dozen Web services including Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Wikipedia, AccuWeather, BBC News, Bing Search, ESPN, and others. While the app itself doesn't provide access to the entire Web, users could still access the rest of the Internet if they have a browser and data plan. But in India, concerns about providing free access to some websites but not others led several companies to abandon the platform. "Cleartrip, NDTV, Newshunt and the Times Group announced that they are stepping away from Facebook’s Internet.org initiative," The Huffington Post wrote yesterday. "The Times Group will be pulling out TimesJobs and Maharashtra Times from Internet.org, and has committed to withdraw from internet.org if its direct competitors—India Today, NDTV, IBNLive, NewsHunt, and BBC—also pull out." Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
The US stepped up the enforcement of copyright law dramatically when authorities chose to press criminal copyright charges against Kim Dotcom in 2012, grabbing his servers and raiding his New Zealand house. Dotcom's "cyberlocker" site Megaupload, which the US government accuses of massive piracy, went down instantly. Then things slowed down dramatically, as New Zealand authorities weren't quick to hand Dotcom over. An extradition trial, delayed many times, is currently scheduled for June. Now it's come to light that Kim Dotcom may get kicked out of New Zealand sooner than that, but it has nothing to do with copyright. The New Zealand Herald reports that the country's Immigration Minister has launched an inquiry to decide whether to deport Dotcom because of an unreported driving violation, in which he pled guilty to driving 149 kilometers per hour in a 50 kilometer per hour zone. (That's 93 mph in a 31 mph zone.) Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
There's nothing quite like the sight or sound of a wall of cranked Marshall guitar amplifiers, as evidenced by their continued popularity on-stage since the first units were handmade in a British garden shed way back in 1963. But as fans of any vintage amplifier will tell you, getting that sweet, natural tube distortion usually means cranking the volume up way past socially acceptable levels. That's fine if you're playing to an audience of thousands, but if you're just jamming at home, or even if you're trying to capture the best tone in the studio, high volumes simply aren't practical. One of the solutions to this problem has been digital modeling, i.e. the recreation of classic analogue amplifiers and effects with software or a standalone device. Modeling has come a long way the past few years, with the likes of Native Instrument's Guitar Rig software and in particular Fractal's range of Axe-FX hardware coming incredibly close to replicating the real thing. But all the Marshall simulations on these modelers (as great as they are) haven't borne the official Marshall stamp of approval yet, hence why these models are often called something like "Brit 800" rather than "Marshall JCM 800." Marshall had been one of the few amp makers left to embrace digital modeling (its JMD:1 series of modeling amps still made use of tubes in both the preamp and power amp), but the march of progress finally caught. Marshall has released the $199 Marshall "Plexi" Super Lead plugin, the first and only software modeling plugin to bear the company name. The plugin—released by Universal Audio with help of Softube (the same company brought in to help with the JMD:1) and AC/DC engineer Tony Platt—is a digital recreation of a 1959 100-watt Marshall Super Lead, famously known as a Plexi. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
One California state senator has a fairly simple idea: what if a city or county government had to affirmatively and publicly approve any acquisition or use of a stingray? A new bill pushing for just that cleared its first committee hurdle in California on Wednesday, as Senate Bill 741 passed the state's Senate Committee on Governance and Finance by a vote of seven to zero. SB 741’s language is pretty straightforward, as authored by Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo): No local agency may acquire or use cellular communications interception technology unless approved by its legislative body by adoption of a resolution or ordinance authorizing that acquisition or use. The legislative body of a local agency shall not approve a resolution or ordinance authorizing the acquisition or use of cellular communications interception technology, unless the resolution or ordinance is adopted at a regularly scheduled public meeting of the legislative body at which members of the public are afforded a reasonable opportunity to comment upon the proposed resolution or ordinance. The resolution or ordinance shall set forth the policies of the local agency as to the circumstances when cellular communications interception technology may be employed, and usage and privacy policies, which shall include, but need not be limited to, how data obtained through use of the technology is to be used, protected from unauthorized disclosure, and disposed of once it is no longer needed. If the local agency maintains an Internet website, the cellular communications interception technology usage and privacy policies shall be posted conspicuously on that site. The bill is related to another bit of proposed stingray legislation also in the early stages of the lawmaking process—SB 178 would go so far as to impose a warrant requirement for stingray use. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Netflix will soon use the HTTPS protocol to authenticate and encrypt customer streams, a move that helps ensure what users watch stays secret. The move now leaves Amazon as one of the most noticeable no-shows to the Web encryption party. Flipping on the HTTPS switch on Netflix's vast network of OpenConnect Appliances (OCAs) has been anything but effortless. That's because the demands of mass movie streaming can impose severe penalties when transport layer security (TLS) is enabled. Each Netflix OCA is a server-class computer with a 64-bit Xeon CPU running the FreeBSD operating system. Each box stores up to 120 terabytes of data and serves up to 40,000 simultaneous, long-lived connections, a load that requires as much as 40 gigabits per second of continuous bandwidth. Like Amazon, Netflix has long encrypted log-in pages and other sensitive parts of its website but has served movie streams over unsecured HTTP connections. Netflix took the unusual step of announcing the switch in a quarterly earnings letter company officials sent shareholders Tuesday. Failed experiment Netflix first experimented with TLS-protecting customer streams six months ago when it dedicated several servers to deliver only HTTPS traffic to a subclass of users and compared the results to similarly situated servers serving HTTP streams. The results weren't encouraging. There was as much as a 53-percent capacity hit. The penalty was the result of the additional computational requirements of the encryption itself and the lost ability to use certain Netflix streaming optimizations. The optimizations involve avoiding data copies to and from a server's user space, something that's not possible with HTTPS turned on. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Cyanogen Inc. and Microsoft announced a "strategic partnership" today to bundle Microsoft services into the Cyanogen OS. The agreement includes "Bing services, Skype, OneDrive, OneNote, Outlook, and Microsoft Office." Cyanogen started as an aftermarket Android ROM maker, but recently the group went pro, formed a company, and started taking VC funding. It got an outside CEO, Kirk McMaster, who has stated that the new company's (very ambitious) goal is to "take Android away from Google." Cyanogen wants to supply its Android distribution to OEMs as a kind of outsourced software house, and currently CyanogenMod powers the OnePlus One. The Wall Street Journal reported that Microsoft was going to invest in Cyanogen, but the deal fell through at some point, apparently in favor of this partnership. "People around the world use Cyanogen's operating system and popular Microsoft services to engage with what matters most to them on their mobile devices," said Cyanogen's CEO. "This exciting partnership with Microsoft will enable us to bring new kinds of integrated services to mobile users in markets around the world." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Shipping dates for most Apple Watches have slipped into May or June at this point. According to an internal Apple Store memo obtained by The Telegraph, the high demand combined with Apple's initial supply will keep the watches from being sold in brick-and-mortar Apple stores until at least June. Apple will still allow customers to come into Apple Stores and try the watches on—we came away generally impressed by the experience last week—but the memo from Apple retail head Angela Ahrendts says that actual orders will need to be placed online "through the month of May." Because of the number of different watch and band combinations buyers can choose from, Ahrendts says Apple "will be able to get customers the model they want earlier and faster by taking orders online." The memo stresses that this won't necessarily be the norm for Apple product launches going forward. For many products, we'd expect online and in-store availability to continue to happen at about the same time. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
After 15 years of providing Ars readers with deep insight into the internals of Apple’s desktop operating system, John Siracusa has announced that his OS X Yosemite review will be his last OS X review for Ars or for any other publication. John has published a review for every major OS X revision stretching back to the before the operating system's formal release, and his explorations into the Unix-y underpinnings of OS X are the main reason why I am writing this retrospective on a Mac today. His retirement post on Hypercritical states that in 1999 he was "at the forefront of long-form nerd-centric tech writing," and that’s absolutely spot-on. I still remember being absolutely mesmerized by his 6,000-word OS X Developer Preview 2 review in 1999, and I was in awe of how clearly it laid bare the still-developing internals of Mac OS X. John’s reviews quickly became an unofficial but integral part of Apple’s OS X release cycle. To me and to countless others—millions, judging by each review’s statistics—Apple hadn’t really released a new version of OS X until Siracusa weighed in on it. A Siracusa OS X review was the ultimate "one more thing," a new OS X release started with Steve Jobs and ended with John Siracusa. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
A new standard for DSL, G.fast, can reach speeds of up to a gigabit of data per second, though its performance drops rapidly once the copper wires extend for more than 100 meters. That's enough to get service from a very nearby service closet but not much beyond that. Are we at the end of the line for the technology? Maybe not. The engineers at Bell Labs, however, said that its customers—ISPs in this case—have other ideas. It's not easy to run fiber through every town or into every building, and ISPs see opportunities for higher-tier services over copper wires. So Bell Labs has joined a number of companies in working on a technology that can reach 10Gbps over copper wiring, and Ars got a chance to look at some of the preliminary hardware. The new tech is limited to a distance of only about 50 m before the dropoffs become substantial, but that's enough to handle services like fiber to the driveway or fiber to the floor of a multifamily dwelling. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Netflix says it regrets striking a deal that exempted its videos from data caps imposed by an Internet service provider and will avoid such arrangements in the future. Netflix has criticized data caps on fixed broadband for years and said that when they are applied, they should be applied equally to all content. But in Australia, where data cap exemption deals are common, the company negotiated with iiNet to exempt Netflix video from the ISPs' caps. One month later, Netflix said in its quarterly letter to shareholders yesterday that it was a mistake: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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