posted 6 days ago on ars technica
The Apple Watch is coming out this week, but Google is also hard at work on its wearables platform. Today the company is launching a new Android Wear update that seems to close many of the functionality gaps between Wear and the Apple Watch. A little over a month ago we wrote an article titled "Apple’s contribution to the smartwatch: An app-centric approach and Wi-Fi," and guess what's in today's update? Wi-Fi support—pairing over the internet?! Yep, Wear is getting Wi-Fi support. This will be nice for home use. Wi-Fi has a much larger range than Bluetooth, so users can leave their phone somewhere in their house and the watch will still work. Interestingly, the phone still has to be on and connected to the Internet, but the phone and watch don't have to be on the same Wi-Fi network. Google even lists cellular data as an acceptable method for your phone to be online, so presumably the phone and watch communicate over the Internet. Wi-Fi is definitely more power hungry than Bluetooth though, so how this affects battery life will be concern. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
Bacterial pathogens aren't the only ones that can evolve to evade the drugs we throw at them. In southeast Asia, Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, has begun to develop resistance to a drug called artemisin. Artemisin has been the front-line drug used against malaria since the 1990s, when malaria became resistant to the previous drugs used to combat it. Currently, no real alternatives exist. Combating malaria is a pretty serious priority, as it kills a child a minute in Africa. If we lose our most potent weapon against it, that combat will become much more difficult. (Artemisin's name comes from its source, sweet wormwood—Artemisia annua—which is related, but not identical, to the wormwood used to make absinthe, Artemisia absinthium.) Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
Prosecutors in St. Louis, Missouri, have seemingly allowed four robbery suspects to go free instead of explaining law enforcement’s use of a stingray in court proceedings. The St. Louis case provides yet another real-world example where prosecutors have preferred to drop charges instead of fully disclose how the devices, also known as cell-site simulators, work in the real world. Last year, prosecutors in Baltimore did the same thing during a robbery trial. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the dismissal this month came just one day before a St. Louis police officer was set to be deposed in the robbery case where three men and a woman were accused of stealing from seven people in September 2013. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
A new study examined the galaxy cluster Abell 3827 and found indications that dark matter could be self-interacting. If confirmed, this would mark a significant step forward in the ongoing quest to understand the substance that helps structure the Universe. The team used the MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) along with images from the Hubble Space Telescope to map out the cluster. Because large masses such as galaxies and galaxy clusters bend the paths of light, they act as lenses, a process called (surprise!) gravitational lensing. The team made use of the complex web of lensing effects throughout the cluster to map out the dark matter there. The presence of strong gravitational lensing is fortunate for the study, as the dark matter would be invisible without it. Dark matter and tidal stripping Every galaxy sits within a roughly spherical blob, called a halo, of dark matter. That halo makes up most of the galaxy’s mass. In normal situations this configuration is stable, but when multiple galaxies interact with each other, a process called tidal stripping can take place, in which gravity from one galaxy pulls in material from another. This can separate the dark matter from the stars in the galaxy. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
This week, Norway's Ministry of Culture announced its plans to transition completely towards digital radio and turn off FM radio nationwide, according to an English report from Radio.no (the original announcement in Norwegian can be found here). The switch-off is scheduled to begin in January 2017, and it would make Norway the first country in the world to "decide upon an analogue switch-off for all major radio channels," according to the announcement. "This is an important day for everyone who loves radio," said Thor Gjermund Eriksen, head of Norway's national broadcaster NRK, in a release. "The minister`s decision allows us to concentrate our resources even more upon what is most important, namely to create high quality and diverse radio-content to our listeners." Several countries in Europe and Southeast Asia are in the process of similar transitions, but Norway is the first to set an end date (the country started this endeavor back in 1995). In these processes, the Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) standard is typically what's being tapped to replace FM radio. DAB is a "free, over-the-air digital service that requires only a special receiver attachment on the listener’s end," according to NBC News. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
Back when I was a youngling, getting information about new Star Wars movies in the run-up to their release required networks of Bothan spies. Then the Internet became a thing, and everything changed. Those of you old enough to remember the pre-YouTube days of Internet video may well remember downloading the Episode I trailer from Apple. At the time I was in grad school and fortunate enough to benefit from Imperial College London’s rather fat pipes, yet it still took several hours. That all seems like it happened a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, though. Earlier this week, Lucasfilm and Disney used a Star Wars convention in Southern California to unleash a torrent of information about the next installment of the space opera franchise on the world. There was the new teaser trailer for Star Wars: The Force Awakens, which at this point has racked up more than 36 million views on YouTube. There was much to love in the new trailer. The crashed Imperial Star Destroyer and Super Star Destroyers on the surface of desert planet Jakku were particular favorites in the orbiting HQ’s editorial office, sparking a vigorous debate among a few of us about whether or not there was any sign of technological progress during the sixty-odd years that span the Star Wars cinematic universe. Another office favorite was an Interstellar/Star Wars mashup, showing Matthew McConaughey’s reaction to the trailer: Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
On Friday, the Wall Street Journal published a previously-lost three-page passage of Madeleine L'Engle's 1962 science fantasy book A Wrinkle In Time. L'Engle's granddaughter, Charlotte Jones Voiklis, discovered the passage, which was cut before publication, in her grandmother's draft of the book. This missing section is unique and interesting in that it contains a more overtly political message than the rest of L'Engle's book, warning against both totalitarianism as well as an over-dependence on security in democracies. A Wrinkle in Time follows a 13-year-old girl named Meg Murry, her brothers, and her friend Calvin as they search for Meg's father, a government scientist who disappeared during work on a secret experiment. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
SAN FRANCISCO—The first iteration of Google Glass was a valuable experiment. It started out as a neat concept that enjoyed a lot of hype, but it exposed a lot of problems that practical augmented reality still faces—battery life, processing power, not to mention the huge social implications of carrying a camera on your face in public. But BMW Group and Qualcomm think they have an answer to those problems, and the answer involves making the use case for augmented reality a little more narrow. Enter Mini Augmented Vision. The system is a pair of glasses that integrate with BMW Group's Mini cars to project helpful information in a low-impact way over the wearer’s immediate field of vision. Rather than try to be everything a smartphone is—but for your face—Augmented Vision is simply "the next iteration of the head-up display,” a representative from Mini told Ars. The Research and Technology branch of BMW Group has been working for years on ways to improve heads-up displays, which were born from airplane technology, giving fighter pilots critical information without them having to look down at their instruments (and away from the sky). Where Mini Augmented Vision departs from the standard HUD is that the glasses are connected to the Mini so they can take cues from sensors and cameras placed in the car and on the car’s body. In addition, the prototypes offer some limited information about your surroundings to make “first and last mile” travel easier (that is, walking to your car and then getting to your location after you’ve parked). Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
Mortal Kombat will turn 23 years old later this year, but from the look of its latest iteration, the fighting game franchise still carries the raging insecurities of a teenager. With every sequel, the game’s designers—once employed at Midway, now working at NetherRealm Studios—have amped up the series’ technology, plot, and demeanor, desperate to be taken seriously. That’s never been more apparent than in Mortal Kombat X. Perhaps that’s due to the incredibly violent chip this game carries on its shoulder—one in the shape of a spine yanked out of a masked ninja’s back, at that—which forms a legacy it will certainly never escape. Hell, it tried that in 2009 with a DC Comics mash-up game, and those no-fatality results proved disastrous. As such, the gore and dismemberment aren’t going anywhere, but as the tenth official game makes clear, neither is the game’s insistence that we'd better appreciate the bloody gravitas of its fisticuffs. In many ways, Mortal Kombat X fails miserably with that ambition, as NetherRealm has draped the proceedings with all kinds of mixed pomp and underwhelming circumstance. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 7 days ago on ars technica
A researcher who specializes in the security of commercial airplanes was barred from a United Airlines flight Saturday, three days after he tweeted a poorly advised joke about hacking a key communications system of the plane he was in while it was in mid flight. Chris Roberts was detained by FBI agents on Wednesday as he was deplaning his United flight, which had just flown from Denver to Syracuse, New York. While on board the flight, he tweeted a joke about taking control of the plane's engine-indicating and crew-alerting system, which provides flight crews with information in real-time about an aircraft's functioning, including temperatures of various equipment, fuel flow and quantity, and oil pressure. In the tweet, Roberts jested: "Find myself on a 737/800, lets see Box-IFE-ICE-SATCOM, ? Shall we start playing with EICAS messages? 'PASS OXYGEN ON' Anyone ? :)" FBI agents questioned Roberts for four hours and confiscated his iPad, MacBook Pro, and storage devices. Find myself on a 737/800, lets see Box Box-IFE-ICE-SATCOM, ? Shall we start playing with EICAS messages? “PASS OXYGEN ON” Anyone ? :) — Chris Roberts (@Sidragon1) April 15, 2015 On Saturday night, Roberts faced more fallout, this time from the airline itself. Shortly after passing TSA screening and arriving at the gate to board a San Francisco-bound flight, members of United Corporate Security were there to stop him from getting on the plane. They told him United officials would inform him by mail of the reason within the next two weeks. Roberts was able to book last-minute travel on a Southwest flight and arrived in San Francisco late Saturday night, three days ahead of a presentation he's scheduled to present at next week's RSA security conference. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
MIAMI—Electric vehicles (EVs) have come a long way over the course of the previous few years. It’s no longer a hair-shirt decision to drive an EV, but range continues to be an issue for a society accustomed to the convenience of refueling cars in minutes. Any improvements that make it easier to recharge EVs are therefore welcomed. Coincidently, we learned that Qualcomm had something interesting to show off during our Formula E weekend. The company brought along Qualcomm Halo, its wireless charging system for EVs, and demonstrated the tech on a pair of lightly modified BMW i8 hybrid sports cars. The i8s are traveling the world with the Formula E racing series, where they have the important job of being the safety car (driving ahead of the field of racing cars to control speeds if there is an incident on track). The Miami ePrix in the middle of March was the first US appearance for the wirelessly charging BMWs, and so we found ourselves in the pit lane on the morning of the event, eagerly poring over the cars in all their carbon fiber glory. Graeme Davison, VP at Qualcomm Halo, told Ars that the company’s interest in inductive charging was originally centered on personal electronics applications. "We decided to look at disruptive technologies and found out that high-power inductive charging was being developed by a Qualcomm research team in Switzerland, but the researchers didn’t have a use for it," he said. Halo's next question was whether the technology—originally conceived for smartphones—would scale up and work with a vehicle. The answer certainly looked more futuristic than the 40 Spark-Renault SRT_01E race cars with which it shared a pit lane. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
 Chris Pangilinan, a former San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency engineer who uses a wheelchair, has alleged that new private bus startup Leap is in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). As such, Pangilinan recently filed a formal complaint with the Department of Justice. Leap recently launched its service, offering interested commuters a luxury transit option that includes things like Wi-Fi, more personal space, and refreshments. Leap charges riders $6 per fare (more than double what local buses charge), and riders use the company's smartphone app to pay for fare or refreshments as well as to monitor when the buses are approaching. Pangilinan, who moved away from San Francisco before Leap launched its service, said he found the company’s lack of accessibility "pretty shocking." His complaint alleges that Leap "removed features that made the buses previously wheelchair accessible, such as the front door ramp, and wheelchair securement areas within the vehicle." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
A federal judge issued a stern rebuke Friday to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's method for breaking up an illegal online betting ring. The Las Vegas court frowned on the FBI's ruse of disconnecting Internet access to $25,000-per-night villas at Caesar's Palace Hotel and Casino. FBI agents posed as the cable guy and secretly searched the premises. The government claimed the search was legal because the suspects invited the agents into the room to fix the Internet. US District Judge Andrew P. Gordon wasn't buying it. He ruled that if the government could get away with such tactics like those they used to nab gambling kingpin Paul Phua and some of his associates, then the government would have carte blanche power to search just about any property. "Permitting the government to create the need for the occupant to invite a third party into his or her home would effectively allow the government to conduct warrantless searches of the vast majority of residents and hotel rooms in America," Gordon wrote in throwing out evidence the agents collected. "Authorities would need only to disrupt phone, Internet, cable, or other 'non-essential' service and then pose as technicians to gain warrantless entry to the vast majority of homes, hotel rooms, and similarly protected premises across America." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
This is the museum's newest arrival, an analog computer from MIT, which only arrived yesterday. 12 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The Vintage Computer Festival East is a once-a-year museum exhibit in Wall, New Jersey that shows off vacuum tube and transistor computers from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. While our own John Timmer visited the museum several years ago, we were long overdue to check back on the exhibition. VCF's newest addition made the trip well-worth it. The incredible piece of big iron you see in the first picture above arrived yesterday. It's a one-of-a-kind analog computer built for MIT, so it doesn't really have a name or model number. Built by George A. Philbrick Researches in 1958, the volunteers at the science center have just taken to calling it "George." Video: Ars gets a preview of the show from festival organizer, Evan Koblentz. Shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn (video link) ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);After this relic arrived at the museum, volunteers were up late into the night assembling it just for the show. It's now mostly put together but non-functional. While many museums aim solely to preserve an item as is, VCF actually refurbishes the computers in its collection. A lot of work remains, but the group will clean years of gunk off the unit in hopes to eventually get George in working order. One of the first upgrades will be replacing the 400 Volt power supply with something a little more modern—and less lethal. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
Ars recently reviewed two "Tor routers", devices that are supposed to improve your privacy by routing all traffic through the Tor anonymity network. Although the initial release of Anonabox proved woefully insecure, the basic premise itself is flawed. Using these instead of the Tor Browser Bundle is bad: less secure and less private than simply not using these "Tor Routers" in the first place. They are, in a word, EPICFAIL. There are four possible spies on your traffic when you use these Tor "routers", those who can both see what you do and potentially attack your communication: your ISP, the websites themselves, the Tor exit routers, and the NSA with its 5EYES buddies. Now it's true that these devices do protect you against your ISP. And if your ISP wants to extort over $30 per month for them to not spy on you, this does offer protection. But if you want protection from your ISP, just use a VPN service or run your own VPN using Amazon EC2 ($9.50/month plus $.09/GB bandwidth for a t2 micro instance). These services offer much better performance and equal privacy. At the same time, if your ISP wants to extort your privacy, choose a different ISP. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
The original Magicka was something of a surprise hit for publisher Paradox Interactive. The top-down, dungeon crawler by way of twin-stick shooter was a big enough seller back early in 2011 to sustain half-a-dozen updates since, including Magicka: Vietnam, an iOS spin-off, minor paid expansions, and of course a MOBA tie- in the form of Magicka: Wizard Wars. The popularity of the series probably has something to do with the inbuilt sense of humor. Magicka was a colorful, light, and pun-filled fantasy parody with wizards endlessly lighting each other (and themselves) on fire with a silly and incomprehensible magical combo system. This is especially surprising from Paradox, a company otherwise known for its dry European war simulations and political strategy games. Magicka 2, the first direct sequel to the original, continues that tradition, but without the original developers at Arrowhead Game Studios. They've since moved on to games like Gauntlet and Helldivers—titles that continue to play on the idea of accidentally screwing over yourself and your friends, but with new twists and styles. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);BOLTON LANDING, New York—Arriving at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's field research station on the shores of lovely Lake George, the offices appeared deserted. The station's staff didn't hide from us; they had all relocated to another building for a training session on a new piece of technology. They've been doing a lot of that lately. The scene in their meeting room was mostly pretty standard—tables, chairs, coffee, and snacks—but not many field stations have a shiny new nine-panel computer display on the wall. And no field stations have what that display will soon be showing. Nestled along the eastern edge of New York’s stout and beautiful Adirondack Mountains, south of sprawling Lake Champlain, Lake George is a long, glacially sculpted basin filled by clear waters. The lake is 51 kilometers long, doesn’t get much more than three kilometers wide, and has long been a natural attraction. Thomas Jefferson once called it “the most beautiful water I ever saw." But today, a partnership between IBM, the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the local FUND for Lake George has a different descriptor in mind—“smartest” lake in the world. It's an effort dubbed the “Jefferson Project.” Read 32 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
On Friday, Motherboard reported that 3D printing company MakerBot laid off 20 percent of its staff today, estimating that approximately 100 people from the 500-person company had their positions cut. MakerBot has been the friendly face of 3D printing for about six years, marketing to a “prosumer” audience rather than business-class customers with more intensive rapid prototyping needs. In 2013, MakerBot was purchased by a seasoned rapid prototyping and 3D printing company called Stratasys, which has been in business since 1989. Stratasys paid $403 million in stock for MakerBot at the time, plus $201 million “in performance-based earn-outs,” the company said at the time. The orders to lay off staff at MakerBot reportedly came from the company's new CEO, Jonathan Jaglom, who was previously a general manager at Stratasys and replaced MakerBot native Jenny Lawton, who was promoted to a position within Stratasys. An anonymous employee told MotherBoard that the reason for the layoffs was to “streamline” the staff of the company so it could integrate more fully with Startasys. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
This weekend, Ars staff is checking out the Vintage Computer Festival East (and you probably should, too, if you can). But two weeks ago, I got the chance to take a different trip through the history of computing. Rather than focusing simply on the past, an exhibit at the Bard College Center is tracking the changes in our interactions with computing hardware, from the Commodore to the Kinnect. The exhibit consists of a mixture of displays. The walls are covered with a mixture of hardware, from early "luggable" portable computers (there's an Osborne 1) through to some of the latest hardware. Mixed in are video screen captures of some key pieces of software: the Xerox Alto OS, Visicalc, PageMaker, and Netscape Navigator. There's also a wall dedicated to music players, cellphones, pagers, and other portable devices. But the central focus of the display is working versions of some of the hardware that was, in retrospect, revolutionary. The earliest of these is the Commodore 64 which, along with the TRS80 and Apple ][e, was part of what Byte magazine called the "holy trinity" of personal computing. Because it stayed on the market for so long, it's still the single best-selling model of computer in history, with estimates ranging from 12 to 30 million sold. But it was separated by only two years from the introduction of the Apple Mac, which ushered in the era of the GUI. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
This week, "Salty Dog 502"—one of the Navy's two X-47B carrier based unmanned aircraft— did something no other drone has ever done: it lined itself up behind a human-flown tanker plane and pulled up for a fill-up. While the technology used for the refueling had been previously tested and demonstrated on a manned Learjet acting as an "unmanned aircraft surrogate testbed", this was the first time that a drone had completely autonomously flown in behind a tanker plane and completed an actual refueling. In-flight refueling extends the range of military aircraft, allowing them to stay in the air longer while on patrol and fly extended long-range missions. The refueling plane used in the test, a modified Boeing 707, belonged to Omega Air Refueling, a DOD contractor that provides refueling to Navy and Marine Corps planes and the air forces of other countries. The test was important because of the roles envisioned for carrier-launched drones in the future: combat air patrol around carrier groups, persistent surveillance, and long-range attack missions. The X-47B flies autonomously, guided by commands from a desktop application rather than by a pilot with remote controls. It was the first unmanned aircraft to ever perform a carrier landing with a tailhook capture (though other drones have been flown from ships, they have either been unmanned helicopters or were small drones captured by hook or net). And while drones have conducted in-flight refueling tests before—DARPA and NASA performed a test using two Northrop Global Hawks—those unmanned aircraft have been piloted by humans remotely. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
An April Fool's prank Google pulled two weeks ago inadvertently broke some of the site's security, an error that briefly allowed so-called click-jacking exploits that trick users into performing undesired actions such as changing their user preferences. Google's April Fool's pranks have become a favorite pastime on the Internet. This year, people who visited the site on April 1 found the entire contents of Google's iconic home page displayed backwards. Web developing nerds also found a line in Google's Web response headers that read "!sLooF LIRPA YPPAH," which spells "Happy April Fool's" backward. According to a blog post published Friday by researchers from Netcraft, the prank also caused Google's homepage to omit a crucial header that's used to prevent click-jacking attacks. Attackers could have seized on the omission of the X-Frame-Options header to change a user's search settings, including turning off SafeSearch filters. The chief reason for using X-Frame-Options is to prevent the use of HTML iframe tags to display Google's homepage on third-party Web pages. With that protection bypassed, attackers were free to stitch the Google page into their own site and embed hidden code that changed the function of certain links. As the Netcraft blog post explained: Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Pirate Bay co-founder Fredrik Neij (aka "Tiamo") has lost his effort to keep an original Nintendo in his cell while serving time at the Skänninge prison in Mjölby in central Sweden. Expressen (Google Translate) quoted the Swedish Prison and Probation Service as saying in its decision: The console is sealed in such a way that it can not be opened without the machine being destroyed. In light of this, the institution implements the necessary control of the game console and it is therefore impossible to ensure that this does not contain prohibited items. Ars contacted the Service but did not immediately receive a reply. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Department of Justice (DOJ) antitrust lawyers are "nearing a recommendation" to block Comcast's proposed acquisition of Time Warner Cable, Bloomberg reported today. To prevent the merger, the DOJ would have to sue in federal court and prove that the transaction is likely to reduce competition. The DOJ has made no public announcement, but Bloomberg cited anonymous sources while reporting that "The antitrust lawyers will present their findings to Renata Hesse, a deputy assistant attorney general for antitrust, who will decide, along with the division’s top officials, whether to file a federal lawsuit to block the deal."The findings could be submitted as soon as next week, Bloomberg wrote. There is also a separate review underway at the Federal Communications Commission, which could block the deal if it finds it is not in the public interest. The FCC could also approve the deal and impose conditions designed to benefit consumers, as it did when Comcast bought NBCUniversal in 2011. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Nearly ten years after the series went dormant with Star Wars: Battlefront 2, a new shooter set in the Star Wars universe game series is set to hit the PC, Xbox One, and PS4 on November 17. At the Star Wars Celebration in Anaheim, members of the DICE development team showed off a pre-alpha trailer for the Frostbite engine-powered game, which is simply being called Star Wars: Battlefront. While the footage didn't show off much direct gameplay, the whole thing was reportedly rendered in real-time on a PS4. The in-game footage displayed the team's use of photogrammetry to render models directly from pictures of the actual models used in the movies rather than 3D figures created whole cloth by digital artists. The development team said they took trips to shooting locations for the original Star Wars films and referenced materials from the libraries at Skywalker Ranch to add further to the authenticity to the source material. Skywalker Sound will be providing the audio for the game. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
We've already seen the new Outlook-branded mail and calendar apps for Windows 10 for phones, as they were included in the new preview build released last week. The rest of Office, however, wasn't included in that build. It will, Microsoft announced today, be available soon—the apps should become available by the end of the month. The apps will be universal; the forthcoming phone apps will use essentially the same code as the tablet apps released in February. The universal apps won't support all the features of the traditional desktop app, with Microsoft still promoting those as the best option for mouse and keyboard heavy users and those looking to do complex data processing in Excel or complex layouts in Word or PowerPoint. To ensure that the universal apps provide the best possible compatibility (and, critically, that they do not break any features that they do not directly support), they share the same core code with the desktop apps. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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