posted 5 days ago on ars technica
Federal Communications Commission member Michael O’Rielly yesterday argued that "Internet access is not a necessity or human right" and called this one of the most important "principles for regulators to consider as it relates to the Internet and our broadband economy." O'Rielly, one of two Republicans on the Democratic-majority commission, outlined his views in a speech before the Internet Innovation Alliance, a coalition of businesses and nonprofits (see transcript). O'Rielly described five "governing principles" that regulators should rely on, including his argument that Internet access should not be considered a necessity. Here's what he said: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This afternoon, Eric Saldarriaga, a private investigator from Astoria, New York, will be sentenced in federal court for his part in a conspiracy to hack into the e-mail accounts of more than 50 individuals as part of his investigations. (He has pled guilty.) Among his victims are two prominent critics of the Church of Scientology, both of whom were recently featured in the book and HBO documentary film Going Clear. Who were Saldarriaga's clients? That remains unclear; court documents haven't revealed it, and the transcripts of his guilty plea are still held by the court awaiting redaction. But both Scientology critics are now convinced that it was the church which set Saldarriaga on them. "There can be no doubt that one of Mr. Saldarriaga’s clients is Scientology," Mike Rinder, a former Scientology official and one of the victims notified by the US Attorney's Office, said in a written statement sent to the court. Ars attempted to get a comment from a Church of Scientology spokesperson, but did not receive a response in time for publication. We will update this story if we receive comment. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In my view, consumer printers are hulking and inscrutable plastic machines, worse to look at than to use. When industrial design students need to be punished, they have to sit alone in a room with one. So a year ago, I got excited about a new Kickstarter project that promised to change the printing design paradigm. Zuta Labs' printer looked like a tiny marvel: a little machine the size of a large apple that walked across pieces of paper, leaving ink footprints. Twee as a doily collar in a Wes Anderson movie, this device seemed a perfect critique of existing printing technology. I wanted a whole family of them. I wanted to replace my family with them. We'd go to the park, eat ice cream, chase each other though the grass, and during a quiet moment, sitting on a blanket, the printers would inch across my hands and knees, writing, "I'm so happy." Me too, printers. Me too. Zuta Labs' Kickstarter goal was high ($400,000) and its estimated ship deadline was far off—January 2015. "Buying" a printer through the project was expensive, the reward for a minimum $180 contribution. I had to say no. Ultimately $180 was too much money for that adorable little printer, even if it was the only kind of printer that will ever fit in a tiny New York City apartment. And as I talked myself down, I reasoned that if it succeeds, I can buy it later. Maybe. Hopefully. Read 42 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Internet Archive—including its Wayback Machine, which currently stores 485 billion snapshots of the world's web pages at different dates—is inaccessible for some users in Russia, as a post on the Global Voices site explains. This is the result of a blocking order from the country's Attorney General, under legislation originally designed to protect minors from pornography sites, sexual abuse sites, and sites that provide details about drug use and suicide, but later extended to cover sites advocating "extremist activities" too. The Attorney General's order is to block a single page held by the Wayback Machine—one called "Solitary Jihad in Russia," which contains information about the "theory and practice of partisan resistance," as Global Voices reports. Since the Internet Archive site uses HTTPS by default for its connections, Russian ISPs are unable identify which page is being requested by their users, and thus whether it is the one subject to the new ban. Mindful of the consequences of ignoring the Attornery General's order, some have responded by blocking the entire archive.org domain. As more sites move to HTTPS by default, this problem may become more widespread in Russia, as well as in other countries that seek to block specific web pages. The Internet Archive is not alone in encountering problems caused by Russia's increasingly restrictive Internet laws. Last month, the country's communications watchdog threatened to fine Facebook, Google and Twitter for failing to comply with a 2014 "blogger's law," which requires owners of accounts receiving more than 3,000 visitors a day to be registered with the Russian government. The US companies were also warned that they could face web blocks if they refused to delete from their sites “information containing calls to participate in mass rioting, extremist activities.” Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Apple seems to be partially walking back its recent efforts to remove all apps and games featuring the Confederate battle flag from the iOS App Store. Reports and public statements from Apple suggest the company is working to reinstate games that use the flag in an "educational or historical" context. Apple's full statement on the matter, issued to many press outlets, reads as follows: We have removed apps from the App Store that use the Confederate flag in offensive or mean-spirited ways, which is in violation of our guidelines. We are not removing apps that display the Confederate flag for educational or historical uses. Despite that statement, yesterday saw the App Store removal of numerous games that use the Confederate flag merely to represent the Southern side in historical war simulations. As strategy game maker HexWar told Touch Arcade at the time, "We're in no way sympathetic to the use of the flag in an offensive way, we used it purely because historically that was the flag that was used at the time." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The 27-inch 5K iMac was introduced in October and got a price cut in May, but it still hasn't been joined by a smaller, cheaper 4K iMac. According to references found in the latest OS X El Capitan developer beta, we may have one coming soon, and it could be using the quad-core Intel Broadwell processors that were introduced earlier this month. A tipster pointed 9to5Mac toward the relevant text strings. One shows an Apple-made display with a resolution of 4096×2304, and another shows a reference to Broadwell's Iris Pro 6200 GPU. Most outlets, 9to5Mac included, have assumed that this is some kind of 21.5-inch 4K iMac, which makes sense since current iMacs use Iris Pro 5200 GPUs. That said, if we are looking at a 4K iMac, that resolution would be an odd choice. The 5K iMac has a screen with exactly four times the number of pixels of the non-retina 27-inch iMac—5120×2880 compared to 2560×1440. 2015 Retina MacBook aside, that's how Apple has always added Retina displays to its Macs. By that logic, though, a 4K version of the current 21.5-inch iMac would use a 3840×2160 screen, four times the pixels in the current model's 1080p display. Some kind of 4K iMac is still the best general fit for these specs (and 4096×2304 is still a 16:9 aspect ratio), but the model could include other changes as well.  Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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You could be forgiven for thinking there's a bit of a crisis going on in biomedical science these days. Tenured academic positions are few and far between—and are often dependent upon the researcher's success in obtaining scarce funding. The pressure to succeed—measured by publications—is sometimes blamed for leading less-scrupulous scientists to break the rules. A new paper by Morton Oskvold, a Norwegian scientist, will fan those flames, as it makes the bold claim that 25 percent of cancer biology papers contain duplicated data. Is something rotten in our research labs? There has been a real uptick in scientific misconduct in recent years, but it's not going unchallenged. Post-publication peer review, where papers are critiqued publicly on the Internet by other scientists, is putting the literature to the test. And journals are taking a tougher line with authors to ensure they include all the relevant details, not just the ones that make them look good. Some of this comes in response to high-profile publications like one from researchers at the biotech company Amgen. They tried to reproduce the findings of 53 "landmark" preclinical cancer research papers, but were only able to do so for six of them. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back with a big batch of deals to help you roll into the weekend with style. The top deal this week is pretty awesome: $50 off an Xbox One bundle and a free game! Your options for bundles are the 1TB Xbox with the new headphone jack-equipped controller, the 500GB Xbox with the Halo Master Chief Collection, and a few others. The free game selection has some good ones in there, too. Just pick your bundle, add it to your cart, and scroll down on the next page to pick from games like Batman: Arkham Knight, The Elder Scrolls Online, Destiny, Titanfall, and more! Featured Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Crossing Souls Trailer As we all know, the 80s were the most superior of decades, a time of glorious nonstop excess, technological revolution, and questionable fashion choices all bathed in a bright neon glow. Perhaps that's why Crossing Souls, an 80s-inspired 2D action-adventure game developed by a team of just three people at developer Fourattic, had no trouble hitting its Kickstarter goals last year. And when I say 80s-inspired, what I actually mean is, a total, no-holds-barred 80s love-in that embraces 16-bit pixel art, ropey animated kid's TV shows, VHS-style tracking errors, and Amblin Entertainment films like The Goonies and E.T. For a child of the 80s, then, Crossing Souls pushes every nostalgic button imaginable. The intro animation, which skips and jumps around the screen like on old videotape, is exactly what you'd imagine an old 80s cartoon to look like, complete with missing frames and a wonderful synthesised soundtrack. The game's cast of characters adheres to old tropes too: there's a brainy kid, a sporty kid, a big kid, a goofball kid, and of course, the handsome and heroic leader. The story, set in the California of 1986, sees the clichéd cast uncover a mysterious artefact in the woods outside their town, which allows them to move between the living world and the world of the dead. Outside the high school, the large town (which acts as a hub world of sorts) is filled with boom boxes, skateboards, and loads of kooky characters to speak to. The attention to detail in the environment is impressive, and gets even better upon entering a local neighbourhood where houses were draped in bright yellow police tape, and hazard suit-wearing scientists wander the streets in scenes reminiscent of Steven Spielberg’s E.T. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Charter yesterday promised that it won't impose any data caps or overage charges on customers for at least three years if the Federal Communications Commission allows it to buy Time Warner Cable. Charter also said it will offer service to one million homes that are in the combined companies' franchise areas but haven't been served yet. Charter's filing with the FCC seeks to convince the commission that consumers will benefit from the proposed transaction. The FCC previously forced Comcast to give up a plan to buy Time Warner Cable, the nation's second largest cable company. Charter is the fourth largest. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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What is this woman thinking? Figuring that out is half the fun. 14 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]); To anyone who was paying attention to video games in the mid-'90s, the term "FMV game" probably still inspires snorts of derision. The handful of titles that shoehorned simple gameplay on top of highly compressed full-motion video usually suffered from low-quality sound and images, poor production values, limited interaction options, and ponderous repetition of a few short video clips through multiple plays (yes, I'm including Dragon's Lair, especially on those last two problems). The results ranged from mediocre at the high end to some of the worst games ever made at the low end. By the end of the '90s, filmed, live-action video clips gave way to polygons and animated, pre-rendered sprites as the gameplay and story-telling engine of choice. But just as failed '90s experiments in virtual reality are leading to a resurgence in the form today, the FMV gaming failures of decades past are finally being explored with the technology and game-design advancements of today. Her Story is proof that FMV games don't have to be awful and that filming actors on a set could be a criminally underexplored form for interactive storytelling. Her Story takes place entirely within the creaky interface of a late-'90s database terminal, complete with a cathode ray tube screen that reflects the fluorescent lights behind you. A pair of readme files teach you how to search through the database, which consists entirely of transcribed video clips of a young woman responding to police questions (the questions themselves have been lost). You're not given any details or direction for what to do with this mountain of unearthed evidence, but the first default search term—the word "murder"—gives some clue as to what's going on. Don't be fooled, though; "what's going on" is not as simple as just figuring out whether the woman on camera is guilty or innocent. The story of one murder eventually opens up to include other potential homicides, cases of mistaken identity, childhood trauma, incomplete physical evidence, complex psychosexual personality quirks, and the vagaries of memory and fantasy itself. Discussing any of those elements in any kind of detail here would unfortunately spoil the entire point of the game, which is about slowly discovering all of these complexities for yourself. Suffice it to say that playing and watching alongside my wife, we ended up constantly pausing to discuss what we had just seen and heard, trading and scrapping a series of convoluted theories to try to explain the facts as we knew them at the time. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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crazylenny2 @ Flickr Jenson Button managed to score McLaren's sole top-ten finish (and therefore sole championship point) at this year's Monaco Grand Prix. 4 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } 2015 is going to be the year that Honda wishes never happened, at least as far as the company's motorsports activities are concerned. Its high-profile (and big budget) return to F1 is a debacle, Chevrolet is dominating the company in IndyCar, its endurance prototype had to be withdrawn at the beginning of the year, and now it has pulled out of the annual Pikes Peak Hillclimb. Honda returned to F1 this year, supplying the engines for the McLaren team, something that has rapidly turned into a fiasco with multiple engine failures that will probably contribute to the team's worst result since Ron Dennis' Project 4 merged with Bruce McLaren's team back in 1981. It had the potential to be a match made in heaven; the last time Honda and McLaren partnered up in the late 1980s, they dominated the sport, winning 15 out of 16 races in 1988. But the current F1 hybrid engines are complex beasts to get working properly, and each driver is only allowed to use a maximum of four engines during the year. If you need to use a fifth, that's an automatic penalty, but worse still, cumulative penalties are also levied if a car needs to use a fifth turbocharger, kinetic energy motor/generator unit (MGU-K, that recaptures energy under deceleration), MGU-H (that captures energy from the turbo), ECU, or battery. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A pair of self-driving cars from rival companies had a close call in Silicon Valley earlier this week, Reuters reported Thursday evening. According to John Absmeier, the head of Delphi’s local lab, who was a passenger in his company’s prototype Audi Q5, a Google car suddenly cut off the Delphi car as it was about to change lanes on San Antonio Road in Palo Alto. When that happened, the Audi Q5 took “appropriate action”—Absmeier did not elaborate to Reuters. But that's not what Absmeier meant, according to Kristin Kinley, a Delphi spokeswoman. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Two Republican senators running for president proposed legislation Thursday that would ban casino-style online gambling. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina reintroduced the Restoration of America's Wire Act and got rival GOP presidential challenger, Marco Rubio of Florida, to co-sponsor the package. Online, casino-style gambling was considered illegal in the United States until 2011, when the Justice Department said it was OK as long as it was done in-state and that Internet sports wagering was prohibited. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Megan Geuss Ford's MoDe:Pro was introduced this year, but it's still a prototype. The bike includes a motor and a battery, and it's meant to be easily reconfigurable . 18 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);PALO ALTO, CA—In the searing bright sunlight of a Silicon Valley afternoon, I walked a half-mile from Hewlett Packard's headquarters—where Ford was hosting a series of talks on the future of cities, driving, and marketing—to the automaker's own Research and Innovation Center, a two-story, Spanish-tiled building that sits, unassuming, down the hill from Lockheed Martin's majestic offices. Ford opened this research center in January, writing in its press release that it aimed to "be part of the Silicon Valley innovation ecosystem—anticipating customers’ wants and needs, especially on connectivity, mobility and autonomous vehicles." The company opened up the bottom floor of the center to a handful of demonstrations for reporters and industry types to look at how the company is trying to shake up its staid business model. Ford has been running a number of test programs to assess the way people travel, hoping to find ways to insert itself into our commutes, be they on bike, via car share, or by bus. Accordingly, on Wednesday, the company set up stationary bikes to demonstrate its bike research, it showed off a prototype system to incorporate smartwatches and a Nest into your drive, and it talked about making seat cushions in cars out of biodegradable material. But Ars found that some of the most interesting work was in the company's garage, where a prototype Ford Focus was built with a mix of engineered materials to reduce the car's weight by a whopping 800 pounds (363kg). And, of course, we had to check out Ford's line of prototype eBikes that fold up. Check out our pictures in the gallery above. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Satya Nadella. Microsoft In the run-up to Microsoft's new financial year (the current one ends when the month does), Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella sent a companywide e-mail to lay out the company's direction for the next year and beyond. The e-mail, exclusively reproduced by GeekWire sets out a new mission statement for the company: "[T]o empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more." Nadella elaborates further, saying that Microsoft has a "unique capability in harmonizing the needs of both individuals and organizations" and that its employees "deeply care about taking things global and making a difference in lives and organizations in all corners of the planet." The new mission statement doesn't seem to be a million miles away from the mission described by Nadella's predecessor, Steve Ballmer. In 2013 Ballmer wrote that Microsoft was to "create a family of devices and services for individuals and businesses that empower people around the globe at home, at work and on the go, for the activities they value most." Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Pwnie Express, the company that began as a builder of "drop boxes" for penetration testers and white-hat corporate hackers, has been evolving toward a more full-service security auditing platform vendor over the past few years while continuing to refine its hardware and software in ways that appeal to the corporate security set. Now Pwnie has released the third generation of its flagship mobile penetration testing platform, the Pwn Pad, bringing the Android and Kali Linux-based platform a step further away from the rough-hewn penetration testing tools it began with and into the realm of something with a lot more polish—and performance. Pwnie Express' Mobile Platform Engineer Tim Mossey and Director of Research and Development Rick Farina recently gave Ars a walk-through of the Pwn Pad 3, which has just begun shipping out to pre-order customers. We expect to do a full review of the Pwn Pad 3 soon but wanted to get an early look at what to expect. The biggest visible change is the hardware itself, as Pwnie has left the relative comfort zone of Google's reference platform Nexus tablets and moved to the more powerful Nvidia Shield. But there are some changes behind the scenes as well that make the Pwn Pad 3 act more like an actual flagship commercial product and less like something way off the corporate reservation. Full disclosure is in order here—Ars bought hardware from Pwnie Express to support our own security testing lab, and we enlisted help from Pwnie Chief Technology Officer Dave Porcello for our joint project with National Public Radio last year. So we've had a bit of experience with Pwnie's platform in many of its incarnations. We've also worked with a number of open source penetration tools, including the Kali Linux-based NetHunter platform for Android. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler is sticking with his plan to limit the amount of spectrum the biggest carriers can buy at the next big auction, refusing to grant a T-Mobile US request to impose even stricter limits. More than a year ago, the FCC tentatively decided that the planned auction of broadcast TV airwaves to wireless carriers will set aside up to 30MHz in each geographic area for carriers that don't have significant amounts of low-band spectrum in the region. In most cases, this means that AT&T and Verizon Wireless will not be able to bid on that 30MHz. (The reserve could be lower than 30MHz if it turns out the total amount of available spectrum is less than 70MHz.) T-Mobile has argued that the FCC should make 40MHz available exclusively to the smaller carriers, but Wheeler today said he's sticking with his 30MHz plan. His latest proposal, which would be voted on July 16, "concludes that the current reserve size of 30 megahertz balances the desire to make low-band spectrum available to parties with limited holdings while facilitating competitive bidding for all auction participants," Wheeler wrote on the FCC blog today. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The homescreen with and without the theme. You get new icons and a new wallpaper. 12 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);We've never really been fans of skinning Android. Adding new features is fine, but OEMs try to "brand" the software by changing the colors and icons, which usually makes things look worse and really only serves to make things harder for new users. No OEM tries to "brand" the Windows UI—you can happily hop from one computer to another and all the icons and buttons will be the same. Similarly, on Android, when you hop from phone to tablet to watch to TV to car, if would be nice if all the designs and buttons on those devices looked the same. Lately more and more phones have been shipping with a built-in theme store, and when we see them we usually think, "Yes! A way to get rid of this skin!" Samsung's Galaxy S6 shipped with a built-in theme store, but at launch it only had a handful of ugly skins—mostly officially licensed Avengers skins (like a red and chrome Iron Man skin. Yikes.) or "Character" themes that filled the UI with cutesy Hello-Kitty style characters. Today, Samsung started posting skins from third parties, and one of the best-looking and most popular ones is a theme that brings TouchWiz more in line with stock Android. There are actually two different Stock Android skins fighting for acceptance in the Samsung Theme Store. Above we have pictures for Samer Zayer's "Material" theme, which is currently rolling out in Samsung's store. Right now reports are all over the place as to availability, with some users seeing the theme and some not getting it yet. The theme should eventually show in either the "New" section or the weirdly exclusionary and grammatically questionable "Themes for Man" section—Samsung thinks women don't like stock Android, apparently. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Intel continues to quietly expand the NUC family, its lineup of barebones mini PCs. Today we noticed two new low-end boxes, based on Intel's low-end 14nm Braswell chips instead of the Ultrabook-class Broadwell CPUs in the more expensive models. There are two new boxes to look at, each with decidedly unmemorable product numbers instead of names: the NUC5CPYH includes a 1.6GHz (2.16GHz Turbo) dual-core Celeron N3050, and it will supposedly be available this month. The NUC5PPYH uses a 1.6GHz (2.4GHz Turbo) quad-core Pentium N3700 instead, and it's coming out at some point in July. A quick refresher on Braswell: it uses the same "Airmont" CPU cores and cut-down Broadwell GPU as the recent Cherry Trail Atom processors, but the Celeron and Pentium parts run at a higher TDP (6W versus 2W for the Atoms), which lets them run at higher speeds for longer. They also support technologies like SATA, which makes them better suited for use in low-end desktops and laptops than their Atom counterparts. They also improve over older Bay Trail-D Celeron and Pentium chips by supporting more USB 3.0 ports and faster DDR3 1600 RAM. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Xbox One owners will soon get a bit more value out of their optional $60 (or less) annual membership. Starting in July, Microsoft will begin offering two free Xbox One games to Gold members as part of its existing Games With Gold program. Xbox One owners will be able to download Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag starting on July 1 and indie puzzle-platformer So Many Me on July 16. A similar twice-monthly release schedule for free Xbox One games will continue into the future, Microsoft said. Gold members will also be able to download two Xbox 360 games each month, as they have since the program began in June of 2013. Until now, though, Microsoft has generally made only one Xbox One title available through Games for Gold each month. As usual, Xbox One Games for Gold titles claimed and downloaded during their monthly availability window will be playable as long as the Gold membership is maintained (Xbox 360 games can be kept permanently, regardless of future membership). Sony has made 46 PlayStation 4 games available through the similar PlayStation Plus program in the 20 months the system has been available in North America, increasing from a general rate of one per month in the early days to an average of three or four titles every month in 2015. Both Sony and Microsoft's free game programs are dominated by smaller indie titles, with the occasional AAA release thrown in months after its initial release. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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A Nebraska jury has ordered Sprint to pay $30 million to Prism Technologies, a patent-holding company that has sued the five largest cell phone carriers. Tuesday's verdict (PDF) comes at a time when Congress is debating, for the second time in recent years, a bill to rein in companies like Prism, often referred to as "patent trolls." Prism Technologies was founded as a successor to Prism Resources, an operating company that existed from 1991 to 2001 according to an online biography of co-founder Richard Gregg, who testified at trial. The company is now focused solely on licensing and litigation, and it has continued to get more patents. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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As Netflix continues to add more content to its streaming service—and millions more paying subscribers each quarter—the company's viewing audience is growing fast enough to draw subjective comparisons to major American TV networks. On Thursday, an investment bank's analysts crunched the numbers and came to a substantial conclusion: Netflix will surpass the top networks' reported Nielsen viewer numbers by next year. FBR Capital Markets' analysts made the claim while commenting on Netflix's recent seven-to-one stock split, which will go into effect on July 14. FBR believes the streaming company's continuing stock price surge isn't over yet. The analysts, Chase White and Barton Crockett, crunched Netflix's Q1 2015 numbers to estimate a little over two hours of streaming per American customer; in Nielsen terms, that amounts to the service's total, 24-hour content rating of 2.6, which is neck-and-neck with American broadcasters ABC and NBC. "However, Netflix is growing its ratings at a 40 percent-plus compound annual growth rate; the broadcasters are, on average, declining," the FBR analysts wrote. "At this pace, in a year, Netflix will have a larger 24-hour audience than all broadcast networks." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The agency that runs the Internet's technical infrastructure—ICANN—is mulling a plan pushed by the entertainment industry that could dramatically limit the use of proxy registration services that mask domain ownership. Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) analyst Jeremy Malcolm and EFF attorney Mitch Stoltz said the content industry wants "new tools to discover the identities of website owners whom they want to accuse of copyright and trademark infringement, preferably without a court order." ICANN is accepting comments on the proposal until July 7. Comments can be e-mailed to: [email protected] Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When New York City officials ordered Verizon to finish the citywide fiber rollout that it promised but didn't deliver on time, the city also said Verizon must not demand bulk agreements from landlords in exchange for faster deployment. Verizon agreed to wire up the whole city in 2008 in exchange for a lucrative cable television franchise, but it didn't meet the deadline of June 30, 2014. Today, parts of the city are still without access to the FiOS TV, Internet, and phone service, according to city officials. One reason for the missed deadline is that Verizon has demanded bulk agreements or exclusive agreements from multi-unit residential buildings that would limit or eliminate competition from other Internet providers, city officials allege. We wrote about the NYC Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) audit report last week, but now let's dig into the bulk agreement allegations a bit further. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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