posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Warning, graphic content. The New York Times released cel lphone footage on Friday showing the confusion leading up to the Tuesday shooting death of a black man by Charlotte police. The two-minute footage, which does not show the shooting itself, was taken by the wife of the victim, Keith Lamont Scott. The development comes a day after Charlotte's police chief said the department would not publicly release video footage of Smith's shooting that was captured by police body and dash cams. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Chief Kerr Putney, however, did allow the family to view the police footage on Thursday. The family said the video could not conclusively demonstrate whether the victim had a handgun, as police have said. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Rep. Mike Honda (pictured here) sued his challenger, Ro Khanna, "Ro for Congress," and Brian Parvizshahi, Khanna's former campaign manager, on Thursday. (credit: Bill Clark / Getty Images News) Mike Honda, the congressman who represents a large portion of Silicon Valley, has sued his political opponent, Ro Khanna, under a federal anti-hacking law known as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Khanna, a former Department of Commerce official, is trying to unseat Honda in the upcoming November 2016 election. Honda, who has been a member of the House of Representatives for 15 years, previously defeated Khanna in a tight race in 2014. The lawsuit claims that Brian Parvizshahi, who was Khanna’s campaign manager until Thursday evening, worked as an intern for a Honda campaign fundraising firm, Arum Group, for just a few weeks in the summer of 2012. However, when Parvizshahi left Arum Group, his access to a Dropbox account that included data on thousands of donors was not revoked. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
The Google OnHub, Google's now old router? (credit: Ron Amadeo) As part of Google's multi-device release extravaganza on October 4, Android Police claims Google is going to launch a Wi-Fi router. Another Wi-Fi router. Google's current Wi-Fi router is the Google OnHub, a $200, single-port router that was released over a year ago. Google promised that the OnHub would receive regular updates, and while minor bugfixes and security updates were provided, much of the hardware is still left unactivated: the USB port still doesn't work, and the included smart home antennas are still dormant. Popular user-requested features like IPv6 support and NAT loopback never arrived, either. Now Google is apparently poised to release a new Wi-Fi router, simply called "Google Wi-Fi." Android Police says the new router looks like a "white Amazon Echo Dot"—so a hockey puck with a light on top—and it costs $129. The site also says the router will have mesh Wi-Fi capabilities, meaning you can buy more than one and link them together for better coverage. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge Apple released iOS 10.0.2 to the general public today, the first update for iOS 10 since it was released last week (10.0.1, not 10.0, was the version number of the first public build). The update's main fix is for the Lightning-to-3.5mm dongle that ships with the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. Headsets plugged into the dongle could become unresponsive if plugged into an idle phone for more than five or so minutes. Getting the headset and any volume or playback controls to work again required unplugging the dongle and plugging it back in. With today's update, that should no longer be a problem. The update also solves a problem that caused the Photos app to crash when enabling iCloud Photo Library and a problem that prevented app extensions from being enabled. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Jeff Pachoud/Getty Images) The federal judge who presided over the Google-Oracle API copyright infringement trial excoriated one of Oracle's lawyers Thursday for disclosing confidential information in open court earlier this year. The confidential information included financial figures stating that Google generated $31 billion in revenue and $22 billion in profits from the Android operating system in the wake of its 2008 debut. The Oracle attorney, Annette Hurst, also revealed another trade secret: Google paid Apple $1 billion in 2014 to include Google search on iPhones. Judge William Alsup of San Francisco has been presiding over the copyright infringement trial since 2010, when Oracle lodged a lawsuit claiming that Google's Android operating system infringed Oracle's Java APIs. After two trials and various trips to the appellate courts, a San Francisco federal jury concluded in May that Google's use of the APIs amounted to fair use. Oracle's motion before Alsup for a third trial is pending. Oracle argues that Google tainted the verdict by concealing a plan to extend Android on desktop and laptop computers. As this legal saga was playing out, Hurst blurted out the confidential figures during a January 14 pre-trial hearing, despite those numbers being protected by a court order. The transcript of that proceeding has been erased from the public record. But the genie is out of the bottle. Google lodged a motion (PDF) for sanctions and a contempt finding against Hurst for unveiling a closely guarded secret of the mobile phone wars. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A photo of First Lady Michelle Obama's passport from a dump of the e-mail of White House contractor Ian Mellul. Mellul's password may have been in a 2013 Adobe user data breach. On September 21, a dump of an e-mail account belonging to a White House contractor was posted to the "hacktivist" website DCleaks.com. This is the same site that already revealed e-mails from former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a Navy captain leading a weapons procurement program, and a public relations person who has done advance work for Hillary Clinton. The latest victim did advance work for travel by First Lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. Attributing the leak will be difficult because, as with previous "dumps" published on DCleaks, the compromised account's password information was widely available on the Internet from a previous data breach. An unnamed US intelligence official was quoted by NBC News as calling the leak of contractor Ian Mellul's e-mails "the most damaging compromise of the security of the president of the United States that I've seen in decades"—one caused by the use of an outside personal e-mail account for government business. The e-mails included full scans Mellul had forwarded to himself from a White House e-mail account of passports, including Michelle Obama's. Mellul likely forwarded the e-mails to his Gmail account because he couldn't access White House mail offsite without a secure device. Government sources have described DCleaks.com as being connected to Russian intelligence organizations. But just about anyone could have gotten into Ian Mellul's e-mail if he was using the same password for his Gmail account that was exposed in a 2013 breach of Adobe user data—just as was Navy Captain Carl Pistole's. The accounts of Powell and of Sarah Hamilton were both leaked as part of a 2012 breach of Dropbox's user data, according to data from HaveIBeenPwned. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Screen grab of SpaceX static fire anomaly from YouTube video. (credit: USLaunchReport.com) On Friday, SpaceX released an update on its investigation into the recent loss of its Falcon 9 rocket (the rocket was lost in a fast fire on September 1 at its Florida-based launch pad and took its Israeli satellite payload with it). After a preliminary review, the company has tentatively found that a "large breach in the cryogenic helium system of the second stage liquid oxygen tank took place." The breach occurred during propellant loading in advance of a static fire test, in which the vehicle's engines are fired before launch to ensure their readiness. While this represents a step forward, SpaceX still has not identified the root cause of the accident. The company has, however, concluded that the problem is not related to the June 2015 loss of another Falcon 9 rocket in flight, which also failed because of an upper-stage incident. "All plausible causes are being tracked in an extensive fault tree and carefully investigated," the company stated in its update. "Through the fault tree and data review process, we have exonerated any connection with last year's CRS-7 mishap." According to SpaceX, the biggest challenge with investigating the September 1 accident is that the failure happened during a very short period of time. Just 93 milliseconds passed between the initial sign of an anomaly to a loss of data. An accident investigation team, including officials from SpaceX, the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, the US Air Force, and the industry continues to look at 3,000 channels of data from this short time period, as well as debris and photographs that have been collected. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / No, not really, Capcom. (credit: Aurich Lawson) On Thursday, Street Fighter V's first "season" concluded with a downloadable update that included the game's 22nd fighting character. (If you're curious: the new guy is Urien, a tall fellow who first appeared in Street Fighter III wearing only a thong.) But the download updated more than just the game's roster. It also brought apparent sweeping changes to the PC version—which now demands kernel access from players before every single boot of the game. Windows' User Account Control (UAC) system warns computer users when an application wants to write or delete sensitive files, and, in the case of PC games, you typically only see these warnings during installations. SFV's Thursday patch, however, apparently includes "an updated anti-crack solution" that Capcom insists is "not DRM" but rather an anti-cheating protocol. The anti-crack solution is causing a UAC prompt to pop up for the PC version's users. (Our own Aurich Lawson confirmed the news by booting the latest patched version; his Windows prompt appears above.) Unfortunately, Capcom's public-facing messages about PC version "hacks" have not been about cheats but about players finding workarounds to unlocking in-game content. In July, Capcom issued a stern warning to any PC player who found alternate ways to unlock Street Fighter's alternate costumes, which normally require grinding through the game's lengthy "survival" modes. Capcom producers also condemned PC players who used characters hidden in that game's version before they were officially released. Thursday's patch notes mentioned that the new anti-crack solution is particularly targeted at "illicitly obtaining in-game currency and other entitlements" (so it's, you know, DRM). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Marco Paköeningrat Follow) On Friday, Facebook took to its official blog to confirm and respond to a Wall Street Journal report that had spread far and wide: one of Facebook's most crucial metrics for measuring video-view performance had been wildly inflated. The blog post, from Facebook VP of marketing David Fischer, spells out exactly what the company did wrong. Its advertising-dashboard measure of "average duration of video viewed" was apparently based on questionable math. To get that count, the "total time spent watching a video" was only divided by the number of people who have seen at least three seconds of the video rather than everyone who watched the video. Fischer writes: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / It's exactly like this. Exactly. Last night brought revelations that Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is funding an odd political group that produces anti-Clinton memes to spread online. Today, a handful of smaller developers have publicly announced that they're dropping Oculus support from their current and upcoming games. "Hey Oculus, Palmer Luckey's actions are unacceptable," writes Tomorrow Today Labs, a company working on VR physics middleware and an unannounced VR game. "NewtonVR will not be supporting the Oculus Touch as long as he is employed there." Newcomer indie developer Scruta Games, which is currently working on a number of VR titles, echoed the same sentiment. "Until Palmer Luckey steps down from his position at Oculus, we will be cancelling Oculus support for our games," the company tweeted. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty | Barcroft) The greedy, price-hiking ways of Turing, Mylan, Valent, and countless others are breaking out like blemishes across the face of the pharmaceutical industry. So it may come as no surprise that a simple acne cream, called Aloquin, saw its price hit a whopping $9,561 last week. The 60g tube of zit-zapping topical previously cost just $241.50—but that was months ago, before Chicago-based Novum Pharma bought the medication from Primus Pharmaceuticals in May of 2015 and made no changes to the product at all. Since then, Novum hiked the price three times, reaching an increase of 3,900 percent. Like many other drugs that have seen huge and sudden price hikes, Aloquin is old and cheap to make. It consists of two main ingredients: iodoquinol, a generic, longstanding antibiotic; and extracts from the aloe vera plant. As the Financial Times points out, a similar cream containing the iodoquinol costs less than $30, and aloe vera extracts are just a few dollars. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Jawbone) It has been nearly a year since Jawbone's most advanced tracker, the Up4, hit shelves, and the company doesn't seem to be doing well. According to a Business Insider report, Jawbone didn't pay its customer service partner NexRep, and Jawbone cut ties with the company shortly after. The report cites an e-mail from a NexRep executive that says Jawbone is "struggling financially" and couldn't pay for the company's services. The abrupt termination affected 93 NexRep jobs, leading to some layoffs and others being reassigned to other clients. Jawbone cites "restructuring" of its customer service for the partnership change. In addition to its financial issues, Jawbone's website is curiously out of most of its inventory. All of its fitness trackers, including the Up4, are listed as "sold out" and are unavailable for purchase. Another source familiar with the NexRep-Jawbone relationship claims in the report that Jawbone shipments have slowed in the past few weeks and have nearly come to a halt. Because of this, NexRep employees assigned to Jawbone couldn't fill replacement orders that came in from complaining customers. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Google Fiber) AT&T has sued Nashville to stop a new ordinance designed to accelerate the deployment of Google Fiber. The lawsuit (PDF) was filed in US District Court in Nashville yesterday, only two days after the Nashville Metro Council passed a “One Touch Make Ready” rule that gives new ISPs faster access to utility poles. The ordinance lets a single company make all of the necessary wire adjustments on utility poles itself, instead of having to wait for incumbent providers like AT&T and Comcast to send work crews to move their own wires. Google Fiber says it is waiting on AT&T and Comcast to move wires on nearly 8,000 poles. AT&T’s lawsuit claims that the ordinance is preempted by Federal Communications Commission pole attachment regulations and violates AT&T’s 58-year-old pole attachment contract with Nashville. The company seeks a declaration that the ordinance is unlawful and a permanent injunction preventing the local government from enforcing it. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Rural Learning Center) British consumer rights group Which? isn't very happy with the way that Microsoft has handled Windows 10. The group says that Microsoft should compensate Windows 10 users for when the upgrade caused downtime due to software or hardware incompatibility, and it needs to do more to ensure that Windows users are aware of the customer support options that are available to them. This comes after a June survey of Windows users showed that 12 percent of upgraders reverted back to Windows 7 or 8.1, with a majority of those downgraders saying that the upgrade adversely affected their PC. The group cited a laundry list of complaints about the upgrade, with most of them boiling down to compatibility issues, particularly regarding hardware, with devices such as printers and Wi-Fi adapters ceasing to function after installing Windows 10. This points at one of the more unsatisfactory aspects of the upgrade. Although in principle the upgrade should have verified that there were no compatibility issues (both hardware and software), there are numerous reports that this didn't work in practice, with the upgrade being pushed to machines that were then left partially inoperable as a result. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Transantarctic Mountains. (credit: NASA/Jim Yungel) Since 1984, researchers have been arguing about what to make of tiny ocean plankton shells sitting atop the Transantarctic Mountains. That is obviously not a place plankton would call home, so how did they get there? And what might their presence tell us about Antarctica’s past? The researchers who initially discovered the surprise diatom shells found them mixed in with glacially deposited sediment. They argued that the shells told a pretty big story. Around 3 million years ago, when these species of diatom were alive, we know there were several periods of climatic warmth. During these periods, the researchers said, the Antarctic ice sheets must have “collapsed” down to a much smaller size, opening basins in the interior of the continent that flooded with seawater. That is where these diatoms would have lived, piling up at the bottom of the seaway when they died. When the climate cooled, the ice would have advanced back into these basins, scraping up diatoms and sediment and pushing it up against the Transantarctic Mountains—where it was perhaps lifted to even higher elevation by tectonic uplift of the landscape. This would require a much more dynamic ice sheet than most glaciologists expected, vulnerable to warmth that would drive serious melting and raise sea levels significantly. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we have a number of deals to share today. One of the best is a steal on a Samsung 4K TV—you can now get a 2016 Samsung Series 6 4K UltraHD LED Smart HDTV with high dynamic range plus a $250 Dell gift card for just $749. That's a great deal for a new 4K smart TV, and getting the $250 gift card is a fantastic bonus. There are also bunch of discounted unlocked smartphones available on Amazon now. Check out the full list of deals below. Featured Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge According to a report from CNBC, Twitter wants to sell. CNBC's sources say that Twitter's board of directors is "largely desirous of a deal," and the company has "received expressions of interest" from tech and media companies. The most notable buyers on the shortlist? Salesforce.com and Google. Twitter has had trouble growing its user base, and in turn, its advertising revenue. Twitter's monthly active user count of 320 million puts it in the same neighborhood as Google+ (300 million) and far from Facebook's offerings of Instagram (400 million) and Facebook (1.59 billion). News of a possible sale has sent Twitter stock up over 20 percent. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Same for Siri. Apple may be planning to introduce Siri to a new home, one that doesn't live in your pocket or on your wrist. A Bloomberg report suggests that Apple may be developing a smart home device akin to Amazon's Echo that uses Siri to control other devices around the home, including smart lights and locks. Individuals "familiar with the matter" claim that the project has already gone through research and development, and it has now entered the prototype testing phase. According to the report, Apple will try to set its product apart from Echo and Google's new Home device by incorporating "more advanced" microphones and speakers as well as facial recognition sensors that could help the device identify who is in the room. Apple has acquired the startups Faceshift and Emotient over the past couple years, both of which have experience in facial-recognition technology. Since the device is assumed to be controlled by Siri, it could potentially be used for many existing Siri commands; for example, you might be able to ask the device to read your e-mail, stream Apple Music tracks, or send a text message. Apple reportedly first tried to integrate Siri into the Apple TV, which would have let users speak commands to the set-top box. However, project was never completed, and Apple instead decided to integrate voice-commands into the TV's controller. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Tony Webster) The stream of racist, sexist, and economically illiterate memes appearing in support of Donald Trump during this years' interminable American presidential election are being bankrolled in part by the 24-year-old inventor of Oculus Rift. Palmer Luckey, who came into a personal fortune worth $700 million (£535 million) when his VR headset firm was bought out by Facebook, has admitted to resourcing an unofficial pro-Trump political non-profit called Nimble America that's powering the tsunami of unsavoury Pepes and white supremacist image macros that have plagued Reddit. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Maserati + 4K + Windows 10 + Forza Horizon 3 = ...uh, this doesn't seem like a good math problem. (credit: Playground Games / Turn 10 Studios) Our Forza Horizon 3 game review from earlier this week took a long, hard look at Microsoft Studios' latest open-world racer. Short version: it's a damned good continuation of Forza's wilder half, and while its physics system felt looser and lighter under the wheel-controller hands of cars editor Jonathan Gitlin than he expected (even based on FH2, mind you), he still believed it deserved a spot at the top of the current open-world racer ecosystem. We don't normally return to games after their releases to analyze performance, and certainly not only three days after a review publishes, but FH3 just so happens to be the first PC racing game sold by Microsoft in... gosh, 16 years! The company's last retail PC racer was 2000's Motocross Madness 2, while this year's sim-minded Forza Motorsport 6 Apex doesn't count because it was an experimental freebie—albeit an amazing and surprising one, at least in terms of performance. That Apex release was probably easier to optimize for high-end PC performance, since it forced players to stick to specific racetracks (and could therefore limit on-screen elements like draw distance and geometry at any given moment). FH3, on the other hand, isn't just an open-world game; it's an outright romp that begs its players to kick up trails of dust, water droplets, and tree branches while competing against tons of AI-controlled opponents in no-rails races. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: 2016 Wizards of the Coast / Tyler Jacobson) Magic: The Gathering finally jumps away from grim alien-infested worlds in the last set of 2016: Kaladesh, a new world full of inspired, steampunky inventors with a vivid colour scheme. We got our hands on the new set a couple of weeks ahead of the official release; here’s our take on what it adds to the ever-growing Magic universe. The setting The last year has been a dark one for Magic’s story. Even without looking at any of the cards from this new set, the packaging and promotional material makes a tone shift very clear; colour, celebration, and creation jump out at you immediately. This is a drastic change to the mise en scène of the past year, but Magic happily accommodates this without it ever being jarring; embracing different worlds is part of the appeal of the evolving game. There’s plenty of depth to the world of Kaladesh, rather than just being a simple inventor’s world. The designers have blended classic steampunk elements (protruding, brutal machinery) with fantasy tropes (elves, gremlins, and the first Magic dwarves in just under a decade). The result is something much brighter than many steampunk settings, but there are elements hinting at struggle below the bright surface, stopping things from lapsing into the saccharine or cliché. Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge Prepare to feel old: this October marks 20 years since Lara Croft made her debut on the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn in Tomb Raider. To celebrate, publisher Square Enix has put together a goody bag of treats in the form of Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration on PlayStation 4. There are zombies (because zombies=£££), a new PlayStation VR mode, co-op, and even a new point-and-click adventure game mode. Xbox One players get everything, minus the VR support of course, as DLC. It would have been easy for Square Enix to just cobble together a few odds and ends that were chopped out of Rise of the Tomb Raider for Lara's twentieth, but there's a level of depth that gives the anniversary a ballroom rather than pub feel. After a few hours of hands-on time, it was the new co-op Endurance mode that stood out. Endurance is largely the same single-player variation that appeared in the original version of Rise of the Tomb Raider, which tasked you with hunting down valuable artefacts across a procedurally generated, snow-bound wilderness. The constant struggle to stay warm and well-fed adds the challenge. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Apple Watch Series 2 running watchOS 3. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) One of my favorite pieces of Apple writing from the last couple years is Ben Thompson’s discussion of the Apple Watch’s introduction and how it compared to past Apple product introductions. I’m not just referring to standard Apple product events, but the events at which Apple introduces an entirely new product line to the press and its customers for the first time. The iPod, iPhone, and iPad introductions, Thompson writes, all went to great lengths to communicate Apple’s goals for the product. And often, that part of the presentation would go on for as long as 10 or 15 minutes before the product itself was even announced or shown. Even if you didn’t necessarily agree with Apple’s stated vision, you came away with clear knowledge of what that vision was. Contrast that with the introduction for the Apple Watch, which began with a general statement about Apple’s product philosophy and moved on to a pre-recorded video (relatively rare during Jobs’ era, but a frustrating hallmark of Cook-era presentations). That was followed by a rundown of the watch’s UI and multiple app demos, some of which landed better than others. It was sort of a phone substitute sometimes, it sort of did some fitness things, it sort of ran limited versions of apps, it was sort of a wrist-bound communicator and personal assistant, and it was sort of a status symbol aimed at the luxury watch market. Plenty of possibilities, but no clearly communicated vision. Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Vieilles Annonces) On Thursday, Tesla filed a lawsuit against three Michigan officials (PDF)—Secretary of State Ruth Johnson, Attorney General Bill Schuette, and Governor Rick Snyder—on the grounds that the state is violating the electric vehicle company’s right to sell Teslas directly from the manufacturer instead of through a dealer. Section 445.1574 of Michigan’s code prohibits any auto manufacturer from being able to “Sell any new motor vehicle directly to a retail customer other than through franchised dealers, unless the retail customer is a nonprofit organization or a federal, state, or local government or agency.” Tesla's complaint claims that this law violates "the Due Process, Equal Protection, and Commerce Clauses of the Constitution as applied to Tesla, by prohibiting Tesla from selling its vehicles directly to consumers and by precluding Tesla from performing service and repairs within the State." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 6 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Shot of a male coworker acting inappropriately in the workplace (credit: Peopleimages.com via Getty Images) Over the last year, there have been a series of revelations about research faculty that have sexually harassed students they were supposed to mentor. In two cases, the faculty got to keep their jobs, leaving future students unaware of potential risks. In the third, the researcher was hired by a series of prestigious universities, a trend that only ended when a University of Chicago investigation determined he had assaulted an unconscious student. The one thing in common with these cases is that nobody was made aware of the outcomes of investigations, which are generally kept confidential. Even faculty, who could have acted to protect students, and students themselves, who could have been alerted to problems and made sure to report any additional issues, were kept in the dark. While the University of Chicago faculty who hired one of the harassers were aware of some past issues, the full extent of the problems are still unclear. Congresswoman Jackie Speier (D-CA) has helped publicize this issue, and she is now attempting to cut down on the confidentiality in order to make it a bit harder for people who engage in sexual harassment to continue careers in mentorship positions. Her effort relies on a key piece of the research machinery: the federal agencies that provide grants to many researchers. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...