posted 8 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Just a normal discussion of video game murder with a sitting House member. (credit: AOC / Twitch) Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) drew more than 430,000 concurrent viewers to her first-ever Twitch stream Tuesday night. Ocasio-Cortez's 3.5 hour Among Us session—which she used in part to encourage viewers to vote—included fellow Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and popular streamers like Pokimane and Disguised Toast, who responded rapidly to an off-handed tweet invite on Monday. And just in case you were wondering, Omar tweeted out the specs of her (very nice) gaming rig. The debut instantly made Ocasio-Cortez—who admitted to having little experience with Among Us beforehand—one of the most popular streamers on the Amazon-owned video streaming service. Her peak of 435,000 viewers put her in the top 20 most popular streams ever on the site, according to data gathered by TwitchTracker, an echelon that's dominated by major gaming brands with massive marketing departments. As of this writing, the AOC Twitch account has over 571,000 followers, and her debut video clip has attracted over 4.73 million views.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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If a small electric hatchback couldn't capture Americans' interest, maybe a gigantic electric truck will do the trick. This is the GMC Hummer EV, and if you squint, it looks like a cross between a Toyota FJ Cruiser and a Porsche 914. [credit: GMC ] On Tuesday night, and after a long teaser campaign that included a Super Bowl advert, GMC introduced its new Hummer EV to the world. The Hummer EV is the first of a promised onslaught of new electric vehicles from General Motors, but for real, unlike the last time GM promised such a thing. It's also the company's first battery electric vehicle since the Chevrolet Bolt EV, and it represents a complete volte-face for the automaker. After all, if an affordable, compact, efficient BEV won't find favor with American consumers, maybe a 1,000hp (745kW) super truck with a 0-60mph time of three seconds will do the trick. Oh, and a $112,595 price tag, at least to begin with. And this one is big: 216.8 inches (5,507mm) long, making it slightly shorter than the Escalade that you all hate. It's 86.7 inches wide (2,201mm) without counting the mirrors, or 93.7 inches (2,380mm) with them included. and we're pretty sure it's 81.1 inches (2,060mm) tall. I have no idea about its curb weight in pounds but would guess it starts with a six.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Amazon) Roughly one month ago, Amazon ended over a year of speculation by announcing the upcoming launch of Amazon Luna, its own dedicated gaming-in-the-cloud service. At the time, Amazon suggested that Luna would launch "next month" in the form of a limited public beta, meant to reach a tiny subset of interested users before a wider launch at an unspecified date. "Next month" is right about now, and sure enough, Amazon began sending random invites on Monday to users who'd previously signed up. Somehow, I received an invite to my personal Amazon account faster than any formal "press" demo opportunity. I immediately signed up and logged in to see what Luna's $5.99/mo tier will look and feel like when it launches to a wider audience in the near future. So far, I must say: It's pretty darned good, but not perfect. One more big-tech fish in the cloud-gaming stream Amazon Luna's starting menu. If you're oblivious to the rising trend of cloud-streamed video games, catch up by checking out our previous coverage of major players in the space: Microsoft Project xCloud, Google Stadia, PlayStation Now, and Nvidia GeForce Now.Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 8 days ago on ars technica
Victoria Pedretti stars as Dani Clayton, who takes a job as a governess to two orphaned children at Bly Manor. [credit: Netflix ] A young American woman fleeing her tragic past finds herself caring for two orphaned children on an English estate that she suspects might be haunted in the new Netflix series The Haunting of Bly Manor. Showrunner Mike Flanagan's highly anticipated followup to 2018's exquisitely brooding The Haunting of Hill House, this season is loosely based on the Henry James novella The Turn of the Screw. Granted, Bly Manor never quite reaches the same level as the exquisitely rendered Hill House, but it's nonetheless a "perfectly splendid" ghost story that doubles as a quiet, thoughtful reflection on love and loss, in keeping with the oblique writing style of James. Between Doctor Sleep, Hill House, and Bly Manor, Flanagan has pretty much established himself as the reigning master of reinventing classic horror stories for a modern audience. (Some spoilers for The Turn of the Screw, The Innocents, and The Turning. Only mild spoilers for Bly Manor; no major reveals.)Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Ars Technica) Operators of Trickbot—a for-hire botnet that has infected more than 1 million devices since 2016—are looking for new ways to stay afloat after Microsoft and a host of industry partners took coordinated action to disrupt it last week. In an update published on Tuesday, Microsoft Corporate VP for Security & Trust Tom Burt said the operation initially managed to take down 62 of the 69 servers Trickbot was known to be using to control its vast network of infected devices. Trickbot operators responded by quickly spinning up 59 new servers, and Microsoft was able to eliminate all of them except for one. In all, the industrywide operation has taken down 120 of 128 servers identified as belonging to Trickbot. Now, Trickbot is responding by using a competing criminal group to distribute the Trickbot malware.Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / If the company got broken up, maybe each business would take a different color with them when they go. (credit: JHVEPhoto | Getty Images) The Justice Department today filed a landmark antitrust case against Google. The hotly anticipated, long-awaited lawsuit accuses Google of using its market dominance to force unfair contract terms on suppliers and competitors, to the detriment of competition and the marketplace. The suit might just be the biggest thing in antitrust since the DOJ sued Microsoft in the 1990s... or it might not. Even though the investigation that led here has been going on for 16 months, a suit like this is the beginning, not the end, of the process. So here's everything we know—and more importantly, everything we still don't—about what this blockbuster case really means. What does the suit allege? The complaint (PDF) lays out the case that Google used "exclusionary agreements and anticompetitive conduct" to become dominant in the search marketplace, and then kept abusing that market dominance to prevent nascent rivals from gaining enough of a toehold potentially to become real competition. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Ars Technica) Today's Dealmaster is headlined by a $10 pre-order discount on Cyberpunk 2077, the latest open-world RPG from The Witcher developers CD Projekt Red. The deal applies to the PS4, Xbox One, and PC (via GOG) copies of the game, bringing them all down to $50. This deal has actually been live at Amazon and Walmart for much of the past several months—continuing a trend we've seen for various high-profile games recently—but given that we're now less than a month from the game's November 19 launch, we figured it's worth highlighting for anyone who already plans on taking the plunge. Now, to be perfectly clear: we have no clue if Cyberpunk 2077 will be any good. CD Projekt Red has revealed a good chunk about the game's systems and futuristic sci-fi setting, we know it looks to be mammoth in scope, we know it stars Keanu Reeves, and we know the studio's last major game was the tremendous The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt. (Unfortunately, we also know about reports of CD Projekt Red forcing overtime onto its employees to get the game out the door.) We won't be able to give a final judgment until we're able to actually play and review the game closer to launch, though. But we also realize that Cyberpunk 2077 has been hugely anticipated for several years now and that many players are committed to getting it on launch day, for better or worse. If you're one of them, you might as well save a Hamilton along the way. Note that the PS4 and Xbox One versions of the game will be backward-compatible with the PS5 and Xbox Series X|S, respectively, and that CD Projekt Red says those copies will get free upgrades that take "full advantage" of the new hardware at some point in the future. When those upgrades will arrive is not clear, but this means you may wind up saving money getting a current-gen copy here instead of buying directly through a PS5 or Xbox Series console.Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Pedro Pascal stars as the titular character in The Mandalorian, returning to Disney+ for a second season on October 30. We're just a little over a week away from the S2 debut of The Mandalorian, the Emmy-nominated, first live-action Star Wars TV series. And Disney+ has decided to whet our appetites with one last "special look" teaser for the series. Created by Jon Favreau and starring Pedro Pascal as Din Djarin, the titular Mandalorian, the series takes place a few years after the fall of the Empire and before the emergence of the First Order. The basic premise is that, after the defeat of the Empire in Return of the Jedi, there was a period of chaos and lawlessness as a new government struggled to emerge from the wreckage. Pascal's bounty hunter is "a lone gunfighter in the outer reaches of the galaxy, far from the authority of the New Republic." The first season garnered 15 Emmy nomination for its eight-episode freshman outing. And it easily landed a spot on our top TV shows of 2019. "Favreau's brainchild has proven to be a killer vehicle for the most Star Trek-like storytelling yet in a live-action Star Wars product," Ars Tech Culture Editor Sam Machkovech wrote at the time. "Even better, its freak-of-the-week and brand-new-planet progression has been paired with a proper samurai story, as anchored by the religious, fervent, and conflicted Mando himself."Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 9 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai on December 14, 2017, in Washington, DC, the day of the FCC's vote to repeal net neutrality rules. (credit: Getty Images | Alex Wong ) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has turned the FCC into "a political appendage of President Trump's campaign" by aiding Trump's battle against social media websites, two House Democrats said yesterday. "Chairman Pai's decision to start a Section 230 rulemaking is a blatant attempt to help a flailing President Trump," said Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone Jr. (D-N.J.) and Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle (D-Penn.). "The timing and hurried nature of this decision makes clear it's being done to influence social media companies' behavior leading up to an election, and it is shocking to watch this supposedly independent regulatory agency jump at the opportunity to become a political appendage of President Trump's campaign." On Thursday last week, Pai announced that he is backing President Trump's proposal to limit legal protections for social media websites that block or modify content posted by users. Pai said he will propose a new interpretation of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, limiting the legal immunity websites like Facebook and Twitter are granted when they block or screen content. Trump claims the companies are biased against conservatives, and he wants to post on social media without the platforms adding fact checks or limiting the reach of posts that violate their rules.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Specs at a glance: MSI Summit E14, as tested OS Windows 10 Pro CPU 3.0GHz 4-core Intel i7-1185G7 (4.8GHz turbo) RAM 32GB LPDDR4 GPU Nvidia GTX 1650Ti MaxQ SSD 1TB Western Digital SN370 NVMe Battery 52.4Wh 3-cell LiOn Wi-Fi Intel AX201 Wi-Fi 6 Display 14-inch 1080p IPS Camera 720p, top bezel mounted Connectivity one USB-A 2.0 port two Thunderbolt 4/USB-C 4 ports (power delivery support) 3.5mm phone/mic combo jack one microSD card slot fingerprint reader Price as tested expected retail ~$1,800 Last month, we got a look at one of Intel's engineering prototype laptops for its new Tiger Lake CPU family. We still don't have any production Tiger Lake laptops to test, but as of today we're one step closer with an MSI Summit sales/engineering sample. MSI provided the sample to us mostly for a "photo opportunity," but IT graciously allowed benchmarking as long as we clearly marked the tests as being on a preproduction sample unit. This model, marked as a sales sample, seems to be a prototype of what will be the Summit E14-087. Our MSI representative warned us that some hardware tuning and details may change between now and launch but confirmed that the chassis itself is exactly as it will be in production. In particular, we expect the power tuning to change—MSI promotes the laptop as having a 10hr+ battery life, which we suspect will not be possible with the 28W cTDP our sample shipped with. This is not a cheap laptop—we managed to find an early retail listing for this model, and it looks like it will sell for $1,800. However, the device is jampacked with high-end parts, including but not limited to Intel's newest i7-1185G7 top-of-the-line processor and an Nvidia GTX 1650Ti MaxQ discrete GPU. The laptop also has a distinct, bold style that stands out from its competitors.Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Scientists genetically altered a Venus flytrap so that it glows green in response to outside stimulation, yielding important clues about how the plant's short-term "memory" works. Scientists are continuing to tease out the mechanisms by which the Venus flytrap can tell when it has captured a tasty insect as prey as opposed to an inedible object (or just a false alarm). There is evidence that the carnivorous plant has something akin to a short-term "memory," and a team of Japanese scientists has found evidence that the mechanism for this memory lies in changes in calcium concentrations in its leaves, according to a recent paper published in the journal Nature Plants. The Venus flytrap attracts its prey with a pleasing fruity scent. When an insect lands on a leaf, it stimulates the highly sensitive trigger hairs that line the leaf. When the pressure becomes strong enough to bend those hairs, the plant will snap its leaves shut and trap the insect inside. Long cilia grab and hold the insect in place, much like fingers, as the plant begins to secrete digestive juices. The insect is digested slowly over five to 12 days, after which the trap reopens, releasing the dried-out husk of the insect into the wind. Back in 2016, a team of German scientists discovered that the Venus flytrap can actually "count" the number of times something touches its hair-lined leaves—an ability that helps the plant distinguish between the presence of prey and a small nut or stone, or even a dead insect. The scientists zapped the leaves of test plants with mechano-electric pulses of different intensities and measured the responses. It turns out that the plant detects that first "action potential" but doesn't snap shut right away, waiting until a second zap confirms the presence of actual prey, at which point the trap closes.Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) Ad-blocking extensions with more than 300,000 active users have been surreptitiously uploading user browsing data and tampering with users’ social media accounts thanks to malware its new owner introduced a few weeks ago, according to technical analyses and posts on Github. Hugo Xu, developer of the Nano Adblocker and Nano Defender extensions, said 17 days ago that he no longer had the time to maintain the project and had sold the rights to the versions available in Google’s Chrome Web Store. Xu told me that Nano Adblocker and Nano Defender, which often are installed together, have about 300,000 installations total. Four days ago, Raymond Hill, maker of the uBlock Origin extension upon which Nano Adblocker is based, revealed that the new developers had rolled out updates that added malicious code.Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Microsoft today unveiled a modular data center that can be deployed to remote areas, as well as a partnership with SpaceX to connect those data centers to the Internet with Starlink satellite broadband. Microsoft said the Azure Modular Datacenter (MDC) is "for customers who need cloud computing capabilities in hybrid or challenging environments, including remote areas" for scenarios such as "mobile command centers, humanitarian assistance, military mission needs, [and] mineral exploration." The MDC is "a self-contained datacenter unit" that "can operate in a wide range of climates and harsh conditions in a ruggedized, radio frequency (RF) shielded unit," Microsoft said. It can be deployed in areas "where temperature, humidity, and even level surfaces" would normally pose a big problem. Microsoft's Azure Modular Datacenter. [credit: Microsoft ] Bringing Internet connectivity to remote areas is often a challenge, and that's where SpaceX comes in. Microsoft is also using SES satellites as part of what it calls a "multi-orbit, multi-band, multi-vendor" approach to connectivity. MDCs will be able to use satellite service either as a backup or as the primary Internet connection.Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge It seems like every few months, we hear word of a new studio formed by Blizzard Entertainment veterans, which isn't always newsworthy. But after a rough stretch for Blizzard's roster of real-time strategy games, the latest cast of Blizzard veterans starting a new shop has put a bright new gleam in our figurative axe. Frost Giant Studios made its formal debut on Monday, and it's composed of serious names from the original StarCraft II team: its production director, lead artist, lead designer, and lead co-op designer. Those staffers are joined by the lead campaign designer of WarCraft III's expansion pack The Frozen Throne, along with a former Blizzard senior writer, a former Blizzard engineer, and a former Blizzard program manager. As part of its announcement, Frost Giant made its mission clear via a single Twitter post: "We're launching a new game studio to build the next great RTS!" That same slogan was repeated over and over in Frost Giant's announcement video, with each of the company's eight representatives offering some version of that language.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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"Free" continues to be the world's greatest marketing tool. Last June, Google first revealed that it would be selling individual Stadia streaming games as full-priced à la carte purchases. At the time, we lamented that this old-fashioned business model ignored the service's greatest potential feature: convenience. The value of streaming media is often in the "ability to simply dive into a new work immediately, without having to think about whether it's worth the marginal cost of an additional purchase," as we wrote at the time. Now, Google finally seems to be catching on to that idea, at least a little bit. Starting today, Google will begin offering time-limited, completely free demos for upcoming Stadia games, which can be played instantly in a Web browser simply by clicking on a link. The program begins today with Pac-Man Mega Tunnel Battle, a 64-player competitive Battle Royale take on the classic maze game that evokes instant comparisons to Tetris 99 and Super Mario Bros. 35. You can try that game out right now just by clicking a link, with no downloads or installation required. While you will need a Google Stadia account to take part, you won't need to sign up for a "free trial" of Google's $10/month Stadia Pro subscription or even enter any payment information, Google says.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This is what a Nest Secure looks like. That's a hub/keypad up top, with a key chain presence sensor and two pieces of a "Nest Detect" sensor. The Nest Secure is dead. Google confirmed to Android Police that its home security product has been discontinued. Nest Secure has been listed as "no longer available" on the Google Store for about a week now. The Nest Secure launched in 2017 after a reportedly troubled development period that ended up lasting four years. The product had been changed so many times in development that it earned the informal nickname "Tombstone," which now seems very appropriate. The main unit—called the "Nest Guard"—was a speaker and (an originally secret) microphone with a push-button keypad on top for arming and disarming the security system. It was also a hub for the "Nest Detect" sensors, which would measure motion at a door or window. The final piece of the Nest Secure puzzle was the "Nest Tag," which was a round NFC key fob that would let you arm and disarm the system by tapping it on the hub. This was all pretty expensive, with the initial starter pack costing $500 for a Guard hub, two Detect sensors, and two Tags. The initial pack would only cover two doors or windows, and from there any other doors and windows you wanted to monitor would be another $60 each, which would quickly add up if you wanted comprehensive coverage. All three of the Nest Secure devices should be on the way out now, with the Google Store listing "no longer available" for the hub and " out of stock" for the sensors. The tags are still for sale, though.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Produced by Vara Reese, directed by Adam Lance Garcia, edited by Danny Behar. Click here for transcript. After checking off a bucket list item by doing a video with LGR's Clint Basinger last month, there was only one place we could go next: to space. And no creator occupies the intersection of space science, gaming, and sheer lunacy quite like engineer and physics master Scott Manley. Manley's videos are most often a mix of smarts and charm, delivered in a slow, calming Gaelic cadence. Manley's videos run the gamut from space tech explainers to game reviews to physics thought experiments, and all points in between. He's perhaps best known for doing ridiculous things in Kerbal Space Program (something I know a little bit about!). It's pretty good odds that if you're an Ars reader who already follows Scott, you were introduced to his channel by a KSP video. As we've done now with a few different YouTubers, we booked some time on Scott's calendar and then took him on a trip down his own memory lane, pulling up notable and much-upvoted comments from some of his standout videos to see if Scott could tell us a bit about the videos each comment came from. Perhaps unsurprisingly for a student of engineering, Scott's recall remained excellent—and we learned quite a bit from him not just about physics but also about how sometimes the best-performing videos can be the ones you didn't even plan on shooting.Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Will the sun ever set on the Google empire? (credit: 400tmax | Getty Images) The Department of Justice today filed a landmark antitrust suit against Google, alleging that the company behaved anticompetitively and unfairly pushed out rivals in its search businesses. A company does not have to be a literal monopoly, with no available competition of any kind, to be in violation of antitrust law. The law is instead primarily concerned with what a company does to attain dominance and what it does with that dominant position once it's at the top. And according to the DOJ's complaint (PDF), Google did indeed abuse its outsized market power to tilt the playing field in its favor and keep potential rivals out. "Google is the gateway to the Internet," Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said in a call with reporters. "It has maintained its power through exclusionary practices that are harmful to competition."Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Artist’s conception of NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft collecting a sample from the asteroid Bennu. (credit: NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona) Hundreds of scientists and engineers have labored for the better part of two decades to reach this point. Now, their passenger-van-sized spacecraft is finally ready for its big moment, hovering near an asteroid about as long as the Empire State Building is tall. Later today, this space drama will play out 333 million kilometers from Earth. NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will approach an asteroid named Bennu and extend its sampling arm. The circular head at the end of this arm will essentially bump into the asteroid for about five seconds. During this critical juncture, the spacecraft will expel nitrogen gas onto the surface of Bennu, aiming to drive small particles on the asteroid's surface—with a width of 2cm or less—into a device akin to a catcher's mitt.Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A person wears a protective face mask outside Trump International Hotel & Tower New York. (credit: Getty | Noam Galai) The US is climbing toward a third peak in the coronavirus pandemic as the Trump Administration continues to belittle public health experts and their advice. The country’s seven-day average of new daily cases has increased about 33 percent from just two weeks ago, according to tracking by the COVID Tracking Project. On Friday, there were 68,000 new cases recorded, a high not seen since July. The current seven-day average is around 57,000 new cases per day. The surge is diffuse. Last week, 17 states set their own new records for cases in a single day. Those states include nine of 12 states in the Midwest and six of 11 in the west, according to the tracking project. Altogether, the US once again has the highest seven-day average of new cases of any country in the world, according to tracking by Johns Hopkins University researchers.Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / There's a lot to unpack in this infographic, which serves as a pretty concise description of what TrueNAS SCALE is and does—or will do, when it's completely finished. (credit: iXsystems) Today, storage vendor iXsystems is launching a new R-series hyperconverged infrastructure appliance for its TrueNAS product line—and the first beta release of TrueNAS SCALE, a Debian Linux-based version of the TrueNAS storage distribution. The new R-series appliances are designed to run either traditional, FreeBSD-based TrueNAS, or the new Debian-based TrueNAS SCALE. The series launches with four models—all rack-mounted—ranging from the 1U, 16-bay TrueNAS R10 to the up to 12U, 52 bay TrueNAS R50. All four models offer Ethernet connectivity up to dual 100GbE, as well as optional dual 32Gb Fibre Channel and Intel Xeon CPUs. The three larger models are expandable via separate JBOD shelves as well. TrueNAS itself is an OpenZFS-based storage distribution, which can be purchased preinstalled on NAS hardware or installed by users on their own generic PC equipment. It offers users the rich feature set of the ZFS filesystem—including block-level checksums and data healing, advanced storage topologies, atomic COW snapshots, rapid asymmetric replication, and more—along with a broad range of network sharing protocols, including SMB, NFS, sFTP, and iSCSI.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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SN8 test. Static fire occurs at 2 hours, 27 minutes. SpaceX engineers achieved another milestone early Tuesday morning when the company's Starship vehicle roared to life for the first time with multiple Raptor engines. At 3:13 am local time in South Texas, a Starship prototype dubbed SN8, or Serial Number 8, fired three Raptor engines for several seconds during a static fire test. Although there was no immediate confirmation from the company, the test at the company's Boca Chica launch site appeared to be successful. This was an important step toward preparing SN8 for a 15km test flight later this month, or in early November. Even as one team prepared to ignite the rocket during the wee hours on Tuesday—which tested its plumbing to handle chilled liquid oxygen and methane fuels, and the recent installation of three Raptor engines—another team assembled the nose cone that will go on top of SN8 in preparation for its flight.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: US Justice Department) Six men accused of carrying out some of the world's most destructive hacks—including the NotPetya disk wiper and power grid attacks that knocked out electricity for hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians—have been indicted in US federal court. The indictment said that all six men are officers in a brazen hacker group best known as Sandworm, which works on behalf of Unit 74455 of the Russian Main Intelligence Directorate, abbreviated from Russian as GRU. The officers are behind the "most disruptive and destructive series of computer attacks ever attributed to a single group," prosecutors said. The alleged goal: to destabilize foreign nations, interfere with their internal politics, and cause monetary losses. Among the hacks is NotPetya, the 2017 disk-wiping worm that shut down the operations of thousands of companies and government agencies around the world. Disguised as ransomware, NotPetya was in fact malware that permanently destroyed petabytes of data. The result, among other things, was hospitals that turned away patients, shipping companies that were paralyzed for days or weeks, and transportation infrastructure that failed to function.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The PlayStation 5 comes with everything seen here. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. From Sony! [credit: Sony / Youtube ] Earlier this month, Sony gave us the first peek inside the PlayStation 5 in the form of a teardown video that examined the upcoming console piece by piece. Now, Japanese specialty site 4Gamer has posted an interview with the Sony hardware design engineer featured in that video, Yasuhiro Otori. That interview (Google Translate, ResetEra user translation) goes into a lot of nitty-gritty detail on the design decisions behind Sony's uniquely shaped console and focuses heavily on the unit's heat dissipation technology. One of the most interesting tidbits on that score is an apparent plan to "optimize" the speed of the cooling fan on a per-game basis via downloadable system updates. "Various games will appear in the future, and APU [accelerated processing unit] behavior data for each game will be collected," Otori said. "Based on this, there is a plan to proceed with the optimization of fan control."Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Right now the channel is just an uninterrupted stream of music videos, with the name and artist of each song appearing at the beginning and end. [credit: Samuel Axon ] Today, Apple launched a 24-hour streaming video channel called Apple Music TV that will harken back to the early days of MTV by playing mostly music videos—but in this case, it's ad-free. Viewers will be able to watch the channel in either the TV app (on an Apple device like a Mac, iPhone, or Apple TV) or the Music app (it's found in the Browse tab). Additionally, you can find it at apple.co/AppleMusicTV. There is no live chat, there aren't any interactive features, and there's no integration at all with the Apple Music app (like the ability to favorite songs), so users may find the service is barebones compared to some other music-focused streaming offerings.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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