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Enlarge / Velodyne's lidars aren't the only game in town any more. (credit: Velodyne) David Hall invented modern three-dimensional lidar more than a decade ago for use in the DARPA Grand Challenge competitions. His company, Velodyne, has dominated the market for self-driving car lidar ever since. Last year, Velodyne opened a factory that it said had the capacity to produce a million lidar units in 2018—far more than any other maker of high-end lidars. Now Velodyne is starting to see some serious competition. Last week, lidar startup Luminar announced that it was beginning volume production of its own lidar units. The company expects to produce 5,000 units per quarter by the end of 2018. Meanwhile, Israeli startup Innoviz is also getting ready to manufacture its InnovizPro lidar in significant volume. The company declined to give Ars exact production numbers, only telling us it has orders for thousands of units. Innoviz believes it can scale up manufacturing quickly to satisfy that demand. Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Prayitno) Yet another Los Angeles city councilman has taken Waze to task for creating "dangerous conditions" in his district, and the politician is now "asking the City to review possible legal action." "Waze has upended our City’s traffic plans, residential neighborhoods, and public safety for far too long," LA City Councilmen David Ryu said in a statement released Wednesday. "Their responses have been inadequate and their solutions, non-existent. They say the crises of congestion they cause is the price for innovation—I say that’s a false choice." In a new letter sent to the City Attorney’s Office, Ryu formally asked Los Angeles’ top attorney to examine Waze’s behavior. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Moto G6, Moto G6 Play, Moto E5 Plus, and Moto E5 Play. (Not exactly to scale.) NEW YORK CITY—Motorola is taking the wraps off its mid- to low-end lineup today. The company is launching four phones at once—the Moto G6, Moto G6 Play, Moto E5 Plus, and the Moto E5 Play. And no matter what Motorola does with these devices, there's almost no competition in the sub-$300 price range (especially here in the US), making all of these phones worthy of consideration just because of their price point. Announcing four phones at once (some with multiple configurations!) can get really confusing, so let's start with a giant spec sheet comparing them all. Right off the bat, there are some notable similarities: all four phones have headphone jacks, MicroSD slots, fingerprint readers, a "water repellent" coating, Android 8.0 Oreo, and all the usual connectivity options except for NFC. MOTO G6 MOTO G6 PLAY MOTO E5 PLUS MOTO E5 PLAY STARTING PRICE $249 $199 unknown unknown SCREEN 5.7" 2160×1080 LCD 5.7" 1440×720 LCD 6" 1440×720 LCD 5.2" 1080×720 LCD CPU Snapdragon 450 (Eight 1.8Ghz Cortex A53 Cores, 14nm) Snapdragon 427 (Four 1.4GHz Cortex A53 Cores, 28nm) Snapdragon 435 (Eight 1.4GHz Cortex A53 Cores, 28nm) Snapdragon 425 or 427 (Four 1.4GHz Cortex A53 Cores, 28nm) GPU Adreno 506 Adreno 308 Adreno 505 Adreno 308 RAM 3GB or 4GB 2GB or 3GB 3GB 2GB STORAGE 32GB or 64GB 16GB or 32GB 32GB 16GB PORTS USB-C, headphone jack Micro USB, headphone jack Micro USB, headphone jack Micro USB, headphone jack BATTERY 3000Ah 4000Ah 5000Ah 2800Ah BACK MATERIAL Gorilla Glass 3 Clear plastic Clear plastic Opaque plastic The Moto G6 Motorola Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Scott Olson | Getty Images) Reveal News, a non-profit organization based in Emeryville, California, published a story Monday concluding that Tesla "has failed to report some of its serious injuries on legally mandated reports, making the company's injury numbers look better than they actually are." In turn, Tesla retorted Monday that Reveal is a "extremist organization working directly with union supporters," adding that the story "paints a completely false picture of Tesla and what it is actually like to work here." Ars specifically asked Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Twitter whether he agreed with the use of the phrase "extremist organization" and under what criteria he makes such an assessment. He did not reply. We also put the same question to Tesla spokespeople, who similarly did not respond. Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) Dash cams excel at watching over you while you're driving, but most take a break after you park the car. A new entry in the dash cam market, the $349 Owl Car Cam, promises to keep an eye on your vehicle even when the car is turned off and you're not in the driver's seat. Using LTE connectivity and your car's battery power, the Owl Car Cam constantly looks out for movement in and around your car and pings your smartphone if and when something or someone appears near your vehicle. Some dash cams have external battery packs, and a scant few have LTE. But the Owl Car Cam boasts these features as ways to add levels of convenience and security that other devices can't provide. The company hopes users will be willing to fork over more money upfront or pay a monthly fee for the ability to check up on their car whenever they please—and for their car to communicate with them when necessary. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Honda Honda spent the better part of the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s honing the simple. In fact, in the US, it was literally the company's advertising slogan: "Honda. We make it simple." However, it also ventured into the exhaustingly complex, as well, but that was fairly hidden from the mainstream. Remember its Formula 1 engines that shattered records? And don't forget how the company's roots in motorcycle engine development blew up engineering precepts. Honda combined oval pistons, V5 engines, and crankshafts that clustered the power pulses in a brief duration over the 720 degrees in a four-stroke cycle; in so doing, it created a kind of intrinsic traction control. To the racing nerds of the world, it was all fascinating, complex, and reliable to boot. Engineering precepts be damned. But their road cars of the time? Mostly still simple. At least on the surface. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The view taking off from Keflavik International Airport. (credit: Eric Salard) One of the arrested suspects believed to be involved in Iceland’s "Big Bitcoin Heist" has reportedly fled the country for Sweden. According to the Associated Press, Sindri Thor Stefansson likely left a "low-security prison" in the southern region of the country on Wednesday. He then apparently made his way to the Keflavik International Airport and boarded a flight bound for Stockholm. Coincidentally, Iceland’s prime minister, Katrín Jakobsdóttir, was also on the very same flight. Stefansson, who was one of 11 arrested over the recent theft of 600 Bitcoin mining computers, likely did not have to show a passport in order to board his flight as Iceland is part of the European passport-free Schengen zone. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / OneNote UWP. (credit: Microsoft) While the main Office apps remain traditional desktop Windows applications, Microsoft has been developing a modern version of OneNote using the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) APIs for some years; it's arguably one of the more complex and capable UWP applications available today. In Office 2019 shipping later this year, that new version of OneNote is moving to the foreground, and will become the primary version of OneNote. The existing desktop application, OneNote 2016, will continue to be supported in maintenance mode, receiving bug fixes through October 2020 and security fixes until October 2025, but new features are going to be reserved for UWP version. Microsoft has already said that Office 2019 will require Windows 10—it's the only version of Windows still in mainstream support—so the switch to using a UWP app should be fairly transparent. Clean installations of Office 2019 won't include OneNote 2016 by default, but if it's already there it won't be harmed by upgrading. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Technica Live #21, featuring economist Bradford DeLong and Ars editor-at-large Annalee Newitz. Filmed by Chris Schodt, produced by Justin Wolfson. (video link) Last week, we had lots of questions about the fate of democracy in a world where the Internet feeds us propaganda faster than we can fact check it. Luckily, Ars Technica Live featured guest Bradford DeLong, an economist who has spent his career studying tech and industrial revolutions, as well as the connections between economics and democracy. So we had a lot to discuss, and the result is the longest Ars Technica Live episode ever. Brad worked in the US Treasury department during the Clinton administration, and he's a professor at UC Berkeley. So he's familiar with economic theory and history, as well as what happens when the rubber meets the road in trade agreements, regulations, and policy. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Although these corals are colored, they've been bleached, in that they have lost their photosynthetic symbiotes. (credit: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies / Gergely Torda) The intense El Niño event that started in 2015 drove global air temperatures to new records, helped by the long trend of human-driven warming. But the air wasn't the only thing affected. El Niño is fundamentally about Pacific Ocean temperatures, and those were exceptionally hot as well. One of the unfortunate results of this was a massive bleaching of the corals of the Great Barrier Reef. While the damage to corals looked dramatic at the time, appearances aren't the same as data, and they don't give a comprehensive view of the damage, much less the corals' ability to recover from the bleaching. Now, a large Australian-US team of researchers has provided a comprehensive overview of the damage to and recovery of the Great Barrier Reef. The results are grim, showing that mass coral die offs started at lower temperatures than we had expected. The overview also shows that the entire composition of sections of the Great Barrier Reef have changed and are unlikely to recover any time soon. Bleached to death The corals that build reefs are actually a collaboration between animals (the coral proper) and single-celled algae that form a symbiotic relationship with corals, providing them with nourishment. At high temperatures, this relationship breaks down and causes the corals to lose their photosynthetic guest. The reefs turn white, giving bleaching its name. And, if recovery doesn't happen quickly enough, the corals will starve, causing a mass die off. Complicating matters, different species of coral will bleach at different temperatures and recover at different rates. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Put these on your face. (credit: Daydream) Google has temporarily cut the price of its latest Daydream View virtual reality headset in half, bringing the device from $99 to $49. The deal is available through Google's own online store as well as various third-party retailers, including Best Buy, B&H, and Verizon. Google Daydream View (2017) Price: $49 at B&H Ars Technica may earn a commission on this sale. Buy The deal technically began on April 15 at the Google Store, but Google says it will run through April 28. The company says the deal is only available for those in the US on its site. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Best Buy CEO Hubert Joly do a photo op in a Best Buy store. (credit: Best Buy) Amazon and Best Buy today announced a partnership that will see Best Buy selling smart TVs running Amazon's Fire TV software and Alexa in its physical stores. The deal will begin with "more than 11" models of Insignia and Toshiba TVs going on sale at Best Buys this summer. TVs are a challenge for Amazon, as consumers might be disinclined to buy a TV sight unseen. You can't judge comparative quality from images on your computer monitor. Some things, like HDR, are not possible to experience at all without being physically present in most cases. So Amazon needs a popular retail outlet for its TVs to make progress in that market. Best Buy dedicates much of its stores' square footage to showcasing TVs, though the lighting conditions are only suitable for assessing quality in the specialized rooms reserved for the highest-end sets. When Amazon acquired Whole Foods, industry analysts suggested several options for other retailers that Amazon could benefit from acquiring, and Best Buy has come up in that context a few times. However, Best Buy's partnership with Amazon indicates that Amazon doesn't need to make an acquisition to reach consumers who need to see a TV in person before buying it. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / California State Capitol building in Sacramento. (credit: Getty Images | joe chan photography) The strongest state net neutrality bill in the nation passed a key test yesterday when a California Senate committee approved it over the objections of AT&T and the cable lobby. AT&T claimed that the rules aren't needed because it already follows its own net neutrality guidelines, while a cable lobbyist told senators that large corporate users shouldn't get "free access" to consumer broadband networks. The California legislation would replicate the US-wide bans on blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization that were implemented by the FCC in 2015, and it would go beyond the FCC rules with a ban on paid data-cap exemptions. The FCC passed its rules under Democratic leadership but voted to eliminate them after Republican Ajit Pai took over the chairmanship. AT&T and a cable lobby group spoke out against the California bill at a hearing of the state Senate Energy, Utilities, and Communications Committee yesterday. But lawmakers were unswayed by the industry lobbyists and voted 8-3 to move the bill forward. The eight ayes came from Democrats and the three noes came from Republicans. Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(video link) On April 13, the United States, France, and the United Kingdom launched the largest barrage of cruise missiles since the opening of the Gulf War. One hundred and five cruise missiles launched from sea and air struck three alleged chemical weapons facilities in Syria. The majority of the US military's strike package—75 cruise missiles—targeted a cluster of three buildings on the outskirts of Damascus, in the midst of Syria's greatest concentration of air defenses. But while President Donald Trump was quick to tweet "MISSION ACCOMPLISHED," US military officials have already acknowledged that the strikes did little to blunt Syria's capacity to manufacture and deliver chemical weapons. The mission was a compromise from the start, targeting facilities that would result in the lowest possible probability of loss of civilian life. And the US warned Russia in advance using the deconfliction line between the US and Russian militaries that there would be an operation over Syria, tipping off Russia and Syria of the strike Trump had already promised was coming. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) New regulatory filings may hint at new iPhone models coming earlier than this September. According to a MacRumors report, the French website Consomac first reported new Russian-language regulatory filings in the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) database that indicate 11 new iPhone models all running iOS 11. The model numbers in the filing are all different from existing iPhone model numbers, which means all 11 models would be totally new iPhones. The EEC has a decent track record in revealing new Apple device model numbers: in February, the EEC detailed two new iPad model numbers, and those ended up being the identifiers of the two new 9.7-inch iPads that debuted in March. The EEC also had the model numbers of the new MacBook models revealed at WWDC 2017 one month before they were announced. So which iPhones correspond with these new model numbers? Probably not any new variations of the iPhone X—while it's safe to say that Apple will debut new iPhone X-like models in September, that's unlikely to come before then (much less around WWDC time). Apple is reportedly planning three new iPhones for a fall announcement, including 5.8- and 6.5-inch OLED models and one more affordable LCD model. These will all likely have the same stand-out features as the current iPhone X, including an edge-to-edge display, FaceID, ARKit capabilities, and wireless charging. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Electric car charging point, Shanghai Pudong. (credit: Getty Images) This week China announced plans to ease restrictions on automakers importing cars into the country, with electric vehicle makers being the first to benefit from the change. Currently, foreign automakers that want to sell their cars in China must either face a 25-percent import tariff or must build a factory in China with a 50-percent ownership cap—a domestic firm must own the other 50 percent. Tesla has been the most vocal in its opposition to China's restrictions, and it could stand to gain the most from the changes off the bat. Tesla doesn't yet have a manufacturing presence in China, and the country has said that it will relax its factory ownership restrictions on electric vehicle manufacturing within the year. According to the South China Morning Post, the 50-percent factory ownership restriction will be relaxed in 2020 for non-electric commercial vehicle manufacturers and in 2022 for non-electric passenger vehicle manufacturers. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Microscope image showing diamond (blue), graphite (black/gray), and blobs of iron-sulfur minerals (yellow). (credit: Dr. F. Nabiei/Dr. E. Oveisi/Prof. C. Hébert, EPFL, Switzerland) On Earth, diamonds are time capsules with fascinating stories to tell. After all, they form at great depths—below the tectonic plates that make up Earth’s crust. It's only because they travel to the surface with the volcanic equivalent of a jet pack that we're able to see them at all. But there's another way to get your hands on a diamond: wait for one to crash to Earth inside a meteorite. And in the case of a new study published this week, it might even tell a story of a different planet, one that died in the early days of our Solar System. Diamonds from space The meteorite in question fell in 2008 in Sudan and contained a type of meteorite rock called “ureilite” that is composed of minerals you’d only find in the deep mantle of the Earth. Among those minerals were microscopic crystals of diamond and graphite—two minerals composed entirely of carbon atoms. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Improvisational "Heat Actions" end fights quickly. Yakuza 6: The Song of Life is not the game I was expecting. The series’ newest numbered release (actually the seventh, after Yakuza 0) has long been billed as the swan song for longtime protagonist Kazuma Kiryu. As such I expected a celebration of the hero’s interpersonal relationships—those key moments of Yakuza storytelling that have propelled the series forward for more than a decade. Strangely, though, Yakuza 6 feels like yet another solid, introductory jumping-on point after 2016’s prequel and last year’s remake of the first game. It opens with Kiryu enjoying another stint in prison; this time for three years. When he gets out, his adopted daughter is in a coma, his closest allies are in prison, and the Tojo Clan he once served is at war with an entirely new criminal faction. Without these direct ties to the past, Yakuza 6 feels like a fairly self-contained—if not exactly clean—tale of international criminal conspiracy. I’ll be honest. I wasn’t thrilled about this de facto “reset” at first. Kiryu and company have carried Yakuza through six numbered games, three spin-offs, two full remakes, and a couple of movies. Much of that wealth of history is completely missing this time around. Where were Daigo, Haruka, and the kids from the Morning Glory orphanage? How could Sega send Kiryu off without resolving the violent sexual tension between him and Goro Majima? Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Facebook's guidelines visually sum up "offensive things" with this blue text balloon. Meaning, it doesn't resemble a "fully exposed buttock." Criminals have compromised tens of thousands of Facebook accounts in the past few days using malware that masquerades as a paint program for relieving stress. "Relieve Stress Paint" is available through a domain that uses Unicode representation to show up as aol.net on search engines and in emails, researchers from security firm Radware said in a post published Wednesday morning. (This query showed the trojan was also available on a domain that was designed to appear as picc.com.) The researchers suspect the malware is being promoted in spam emails. Once installed, the malware acts as a legitimate paint program that changes colors and line size with each user click. Behind the scenes, it copies Chrome data that stores cookies and any saved passwords for previously accessed Facebook accounts. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Chrome's unsafe content warning.) Chrome already provides effective protection against malicious sites: go somewhere with a poor reputation and you'll get a big, scary red screen telling you that you're about to do something unwise. But Microsoft believes it can do a better job than Google, and it has released a Chrome plugin, Windows Defender Browser Protection, that brings its own anti-phishing protection to Google's browser. Microsoft justifies the new plugin with reference to a 2017 report that claims that the company's Edge browser blocked 99 percent of phishing attempts, compared to 87 percent by Chrome and 70 percent in Firefox. The plugin brings Edge's protection to Chrome, so if the theory holds, it should bump the browser up to 99 percent, too. The new extension doesn't appear to disable Chrome's own checking (or at least, it doesn't seem to be doing so for me), so at the very least isn't likely to make you less safe, and with phishing being as widespread as it is, the extra protection probably doesn't hurt. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ron Amadeo The US government is going after another Chinese Android device maker. After shutting down Huawei's carrier deals and retail partners, the government is now pursuing ZTE. The US Department of Commerce has banned US companies from selling parts and software to ZTE for seven years. ZTE was caught violating US sanctions by illegally shipping telecommunications equipment to Iran and North Korea. The company then made things worse by "making false statements and obstructing justice, including through preventing disclosure to and affirmatively misleading the US Government," according to the Department of Commerce. The company reached a settlement with the government, agreeing to pay up to $1.2 billion in penalties and discipline the employees involved in the sale. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Video shot and edited by Justin Wolfson. Click here for transcript. When we got a chance to talk to Hearthstone game director Ben Brode recently, we wanted to go beyond the kind of strategy and card-level gameplay analysis that has already flooded the Internet in the past four years. So, in the tradition of our Unanswered Mysteries of Overwatch video, we took a deep dive with Brode into the behind-the-scenes design process for making Hearthstone's thousands of cards. We don't want to spoil all of the entertaining anecdotes Brode shared with us during our wide-ranging talk, but keep an eye out for the following as you watch the video (or read the transcript): Brode's thoughts on "the optimal state of the game" and what makes it so hard to achieve Which popular cards Blizzard never expected to see high-level play The never-seen card concept that would have allowed for "a 3-mana 600/600 minion" The hidden Lich King vocal tracks that few players ever heard in the course of play The secret song that unlocks a volcano explosion on the Journey to Un'goro board The design thinking behind mechanics like Fatigue and Echo. Are there any other games you'd like us to give the Unsolved Mysteries treatment in the future? Let us know in the comments and we'll see what we can do! Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Enlarge / A Russian 3-stage Proton rocket blasts into the sky in 2000. (credit: NASA) As recently as 2013, Russia controlled about half of the global commercial launch industry with its fleet of rockets, including the Proton boosters. But technical problems with the Proton, as well as competition from SpaceX and other players, has substantially eroded the Russian share. This year, it may only have about 10 percent of the commercial satellite launch market, compared to as much as 50 percent for SpaceX. In the past, Russian space officials have talked tough about competing with SpaceX in providing low-cost, reliable service to low-Earth and geostationary orbit. For example, the Russian rocket corporation, Energia, has fast-tracked development of a new medium-class launch vehicle that it is calling Soyuz-5 to challenge SpaceX. On Tuesday, however, Russia's chief spaceflight official, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, made a remarkable comment about that country's competition with SpaceX. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Jonathan Gitlin In 2017, Nissan sold 403,465 Rogue crossovers. That makes it the fifth best-selling vehicle in the US, narrowly losing out to the Toyota RAV4 (407,594) and the trio of domestic trucks that always sweeps the podium. It's easy to see why vehicles like this have displaced the sedan as America's go-to for driving a family around. It's spacious, easily carrying four large humans—or five, if some of them are smaller—and their stuff. It's pretty good value for money; even the cheapest $24,800 front-wheel drive Rogue S comes with a lot of standard equipment. IIHS rates it highly, and I even think it looks pretty good, if a bit fussy. All of which is to say, it's not a bad vehicle. Yet if that sounds like I'm damning the Rogue with faint praise, I am. A week with one of America's best-selling vehicles once again proves I'm out of the mainstream, or too many people are happy to settle. The Rogue is fine, but it's not great. The infotainment system needs work. The cabin is fussy. The steering is so light it's almost disconcerting. And the hybrid version that was available for model year 2017 is missing in action. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Bhattacharya et al. 2018) In 2003, Oscar Munoz found a mummy in the Atacama Desert ghost town of La Noria. The six-inch-long mummy, now called Ata, has an elongated skull, oddly shaped eye sockets, and only ten pairs of ribs... which helped fuel wild speculation that she was an alien hybrid. Ata was sold several times—probably illegally—and ended up in the private collection of Barcelona entrepreneur and UFO enthusiast Ramón Navia-Osorio. A 2013 documentary called Sirius soon helped immortalize Ata, focusing heavily on the alien hybrid claims. When a team led by University of California, San Francisco bioinformatics researcher Sanchita Bhattacharya recently sequenced the tiny mummy’s genome, however, it revealed only a girl of Chilean descent. There were a complicated set of genetic mutations, including some usually associated with bone and growth disorders and a few more that have never been described before. Those mutations, the researchers claim, may help explain her unusual appearance. It’s easy to see why the team's March paper attracted so much interest: a high-profile urban legend was fully debunked at last, but now there were hints at compelling medical discoveries. Most press outlets presented the results as conclusive, cut-and-dried science—except for a few UFO fan sites that loudly insisted the study was part of a cover-up. But even beyond the extraterrestrial exchanges, things have gotten very complicated, both in terms of the scientific claims and in terms of whether the research should have been done at all. Read 47 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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