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Two cold beers, ready for drinking and not spitting out. (credit: Megan Geuss) I’m in my mother’s kitchen in Los Angeles drinking a beer with my sister on a hot spring afternoon. The beer is a bready, hoppy IPA without any overwhelming flavors that would make you think too hard. The alcohol content is acceptable. The brew is properly carbonated and doesn’t taste flat. This beer isn’t going to win any awards, but I could serve it to friends and family without having to apologize for it. In short, it’s easy drinking, something you can have a conversation over. The beer, however, came from a beer-making machine on my countertop, which was why the overwhelming averageness of the brew instead felt amazing. Maybe that’s a low bar to clear in order to merit applause, but given my past experience with the PicoBrew Zymatic, it felt appropriate. In 2015, I reviewed the Zymatic, a large machine that was supposed to help brewers cook up their wort automatically—but the fermentation process was largely left in the hands of the Zymatic owner. I produced two below-average beers, perhaps owing to the heatwave I was brewing in at the time (the temperatures surely killed off some yeast). But another part of the problem with the Zymatic was that it combined a machine-driven brewing process with the traditionally hands-on fermentation, bottling, and carbonating processes. It was hardly the “set-it-and-forget-it” appliance that I expected. Read 51 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Codemasters When it comes to racing games, Codemasters' F1 2016 was my biggest surprise of last year. Here was an F1 game that was tricky to master yet engaging and fun. More fun than watching the actual 2016 F1 season, in many regards. The actual sport has had quite a few big changes this year—new ownership is bringing in fresh ideas, and the cars are quite a bit faster thanks to tires that aren't intentionally rubbish. As a result, Lee Mather's team at Codemasters has had to do the same with F1 2017, which arrives for the PC (via Steam), PS4, and Xbox One on August 25. To be honest, if they'd stopped there, I imagine the game would still be plenty of fun based on how much I enjoyed the last installment. (Words i never thought I'd write, given my past history with F1 games.) But wait, there's more. If you've been watching F1 for a while now, you probably think things were better in the olden days—for some value of "olden days" that probably corresponds to around the time you first got hooked on the sport. If so, I've got some good news for you. For the first time in four years, classic F1 cars are making their in-game return. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Mari Tefre/Svalbard Globale frøhvelv) In Arctic Svalbard, there is a vault that might sound like a sci-fi plot device. Completed in 2008, the Global Seed Vault is a remote archive for safeguarding seeds for thousands of crop varieties. If anything dramatic should happen elsewhere around the world, we want these seeds to be there. The vault consists of a giant freezer room bored into a mountain, protected by the bedrock around it and the permafrost above it. But according to a report in The Guardian, the vault experienced an unhappy surprise recently—melting permafrost in winter. The Arctic just experienced its second-warmest winter on record (surpassed only by 2016), and Svalbard saw remarkable temperatures and even rain. In fact, Svalbard averaged more than 4 °C above even the 2004-2013 average. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: youkaine) On Friday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California’s Air Resources Board (CARB) announced that they approved a new fix (PDF) for 84,390 diesel vehicles that were caught up in the Volkswagen Group scandal that broke in 2015. The fix applies to automatic 2.0L Passats from 2012-2014 (manual Passats do not have an approved fix yet). The approval is good news for VW Group, which is required to fix or buy back all of the 475,474 diesel vehicles that were caught using illegal software to circumvent nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions rules in 2015. The cars with the offending software belched many times the amount of NOx permitted by US regulators while being driven under normal driving conditions, but the cars passed emissions tests when hooked up to a dynamometer in a lab. Although car owners can choose whether they want VW Group to buy back their vehicle or fix it, VW Group can’t resell any cars that aren’t in compliance with US emissions standards, even in countries where emissions standards are more lax. With the approval of a fix, VW Group doesn’t have to eat so much of a loss on those 84,390 cars. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Richard Unten) A federal appeals court on Friday struck down a regulation requiring the public to register drones. The US Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia found that the Federal Aviation Administration did not have the authority to regulate so-called "model aircraft." The decision, (PDF) if it stands, means that the public does not have to abide by the FCC requirement established in 2015. The ruling is not yet enforceable, however, as the court gave the FAA seven days (PDF) to consider its legal options. To legally fly a drone, hobbyists are currently required to pay a $5 fee and dole out their name, home address, and e-mail address. They must display a registration sticker on the drone that includes a number unique to the registered drone. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.—After years of rumors and speculation, Google finally announced a plan to put a Google-blessed, car version of Android in a production vehicle. Audi and Volvo have both signed up to have their "next gen" vehicles powered by Google's OS. Previously we've seen "concept" Android-as-a-car-OS displays from Google in the form of a "stock Android" car OS in a Maserati and an FCA/Google concept for a "skinned android" infotainment system. With Audi and Volvo, the "concepts" are over, and we're finally seeing a work-in-progress product that will actually make it to market. And while previous concepts were quietly shown off with no one willing to comment, Google finally seems ready to talk about how Android in the car will work. First off, there isn't really a name for the project—internally it's called "Android Automotive;" externally it doesn't really have a name other than "Android." This is a little weird since the smartwatch, TV, and IoT variants of Android all have special names to distinguish them from the smartphone UI. In this case, the most obvious name is already taken by Android Auto, a smartphone-based projected car interface. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An example of Hamas content on Facebook, from the Force v. Facebook complaint. (credit: Force v. Facebook complaint) Two lawsuits seeking to hold Facebook responsible for terrorism groups' use of the social media platform have been dismissed by a federal judge. The plaintiffs in Force v. Facebook, filed last year, are the families and estates of US citizens who were killed by Hamas, a Palestinian organization that is considered a terrorist group by the US government. The plaintiffs group also included one victim who was injured but survived. They sought $1 billion in damages, claiming (PDF) that by providing social media services to Hamas, Facebook had violated the US Anti-Terrorism Act, which forbids the "provision of material support" to officially designated terrorism groups. The plaintiffs complained that Facebook's approach to expunging Hamas material from the Web was "piecemeal and inconsistent." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Ligeia Mare, the second-largest body of liquid hydrocarbons on Titan. (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell) At this point, we’ve worked out the basics of the processes that produced the topography around us here on Earth. But other worlds in our solar system have very different landscapes that could partly be the result of foreign processes. The distant glimpses we get of these worlds make revealing those landscape histories a real challenge. Reconstructing a crime from a detailed inspection of a crime scene is one thing, doing it through a telescope is another. Rivers are, in a way, topography bystanders that always flow downhill. The channels they carve certainly modify the landscape, but their paths reflect the elevations around them. They can also tell you about past topography if you know how to look. A team led by City University of New York researcher Benjamin Black sought to apply this concept not just to the Earth, but also to the two other worlds where we see river channels—Mars and Titan. The researchers distinguished between long-wavelength topography (think continents and ocean basins on Earth) and short-wavelength topography (think mountain ranges within continents). The differing scales signify different processes, with smaller features resulting from local interactions between Earth’s tectonic plates rather than the fundamental difference between continental and ocean crust. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / North Carolina Judge Arnold Ogden Jones. (credit: CBS North Carolina / YouTube) A North Carolina judge now stripped of his robe has been sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine as part of a plea deal with federal prosecutors. Arnold Ogden Jones had pleaded guilty to charges that he tried to bribe an FBI official with beer and cash to get his wife's text messages when he was a Wayne County judge in 2015. "The evidence established that between October 10, 2015 and November 3, 2015, Jones gave, offered, and promised cases of beer and $100 to a Federal Bureau of Investigation Task Force Officer in contemplation of the Task Force Officer’s act of compelling Verizon to produce Jones's wife’s text messages in order to disclose those messages to Jones, even though Jones was not permitted to receive them by law," the Justice Department said. The judge was convicted last year but won a new trial after the defense claimed that, among other things, it was wrongly denied a chance to show the jury alleged evidence of misconduct by the member of an FBI task who brought the bribery allegations. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) Seven weeks after Congress voted to prevent implementation of new ISP privacy rules, a lawmaker who helped lead that effort has proposed legislation that would impose similar rules in a new form. Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) introduced the House version of legislation that ultimately killed those privacy rules in March. But now she's back with a new bill (full text) that requires broadband providers and websites to obtain users' opt-in consent before using or sharing Web browsing history, application usage history, and other sensitive data like the content of communications and financial and health information. There's one big caveat: Blackburn's bill would prevent individual states and municipalities from imposing laws that are stricter than the proposed federal standard. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | AFP) As the weather warms, schools let out, and people head to pools and water parks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants to once again warn you of the dangers lurking in those cool, chlorinated waters. This year, the agency is drawing attention to an uptick in pool-associated outbreaks of Cryptosporidium, aka Crypto. The protozoan parasite is spread by the stool of sick swimmers. A single “fecal release” can unleash tens of millions of hardy oocysts, which can survive in properly chlorinated pool water for up to 10 days. If just a handful of the tiny critters slips into a swimmer's mouth or nose, they can cause stomach cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea. You might not think that fecal matter is very common in pool water... oh, but it is. As the CDC pointed out in another pool warning from May of 2013, 58 percent of public pools tested positive for fecal bacteria. (A recent Canadian study suggested that large public pools contain an average of about 75 liters of urine, too.) Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Anthony Levandowski, VP of engineering at Uber, speaking to reporters at the Uber Advanced Technologies Center on September 13, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (credit: ANGELO MERENDINO/AFP/Getty Images) Uber has threatened to fire its top self-driving car engineer if he doesn't comply with a court order and hand over documents in the Waymo v. Uber trade secrets lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed by Google self-driving car spinoff Waymo in February, claims that Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski illegally downloaded more than 14,000 files when he was working on self-driving cars at Google. Levandowski quit Google without notice in January, then founded a self-driving car startup called Otto, which was sold to Uber within a few months for $680 million. Levandowski, who is not a defendant in the case, pled the Fifth Amendment and answered almost no questions when he was deposed. Last week, US District Judge William Alsup issued an order barring Levandowski from any work on lidar, the key technology behind self-driving cars. The order also calls on Uber to do a thorough investigation, listing every person "who has seen or heard any part of the downloaded materials;" interview everyone who has communicated with Levandowski about lidar; and submit a log of "all oral and written communications" in which Levandowski mentions lidar. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Julian Assange gestures from the balcony of Ecuador's embassy in London. (credit: Jack Taylor/Getty Images) Swedish prosecutors said Friday that they were dropping the long-running rape investigation into Julian Assange. The embattled founder of document-spilling site WikiLeaks has been living in Ecuador's embassy in London since 2012 in a bid to avoid prosecution on those allegations and to shield himself from a potential US espionage prosecution. The Swedish Prosecution Authority chief Marianne Ny said that the agency has "decided to discontinue the investigation" because neither Assange nor Ecuador would cooperate. Almost 5 years ago Julian Assange was permitted refuge at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where he has resided ever since. In doing so, he has escaped all attempts by the Swedish and British authorities to execute the decision to surrender him to Sweden in accordance with the EU rules concerning the European Arrest Warrant. My assessment is that the surrender cannot be executed in the foreseeable future. According to Swedish legislation, a criminal investigation is to be conducted as quickly as possible. At the point when a prosecutor has exhausted the possibilities to continue the investigation, the prosecutor is obliged to discontinue the investigation. Assange, 45, has always maintained his innocence. His attorney, Per Samuelson, said "an innocent man proved he was not guilty." The authorities, however,  said that they were not declaring Assange's innocence but instead conceding they could not leap the legal hurdles presented by Assange's diplomatic protection. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Ed Westcott / American Museum of Science and Energy) New hope glimmered on Friday for people hit by last week's virulent ransomware worm after researchers showed that a broader range of PCs infected by WCry can be unlocked without owners making the $300 to $600 payment demand. A new publicly available tool is able to decrypt infected PCs running Windows XP and 7, and 2003, and one of the researchers behind the decryptor said it likely works for other Windows versions, including Vista, Server 2008, and 2008 R2. The tool, known as wanakiwi, builds off a key discovery implemented in a different tool released Thursday. Dubbed Wannakey, the previous tool provided the means to extract key material from infected Windows XP PCs but required a separate app to transform those bits into the secret key required to decrypt files. Matt Suiche, cofounder of security firm Comae Technologies, helped develop and test wanakiwi and reports that it works. Europol the European Union's law-enforcement agency, has also validated the tool. Suiche has published technical details here, and provided the following screenshot of the tool in action: Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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BostonGlobe.com has a new message for visitors using private mode. The Boston Globe website is closing off a hole in its paywall by preventing visitors who aren't logged in from reading articles in a browser's private mode. "You're using a browser set to private or incognito mode" is the message given to BostonGlobe.com visitors who click on articles in private mode. "To continue reading articles in this mode, please log in to your Globe account." People who aren't already Globe subscribers are urged to subscribe. Like other news sites, the Globe limits the number of articles people can read without a subscription. Until the recent change, Globe website visitors could read more articles for free by switching to private or incognito mode. (You can still get a new supply of free articles by clearing the Globe's cookies from your browser.) Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A picture of Luckey from a time when he probably had a better opinion of the media. Oculus cofounder Palmer Luckey hasn't exactly been eager to talk to the media since leaving Facebook nearly two months ago (a cosplay-focused Japanese interview notwithstanding). In fact, Luckey hasn't said much about the controversy surrounding his political giving since a short statement posted last September. In Twitter posts yesterday, though, Luckey seemed to express exasperation at the public pressure he felt following publicized donations to Nimble America, a pro-Trump group that sold itself on "shitposting," "meme magic," and donations to Trump's inauguration effort. "I don't think someone should be disqualified from being the 'face of a medium' for supporting the President of the US, no matter the party," Luckey wrote in response to a poster who pushed back against "politics [that] support the oppression of people based on sexuality, race, religion or gender." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / IBM's deadline for remote employees to decide if they're willing to relocate to keep their jobs has arrived. (credit: Coolcaesar/Wikimedia) IBM, one of the earliest companies to embrace the concept of employees working en masse from home or small satellite offices, has informed thousands of employees that it's time to return to the mothership—or find a new job. As The Wall Street Journal reports, this week is the deadline for remote employees—who make up as much as 40 percent of IBM's workforce—to decide whether to move or leave. IBM once heralded the savings and productivity gains it won from its "Mobility Initiative." The company has also made untold millions over the past two decades selling software and consulting services, such as its Sametime instant messaging and voice products, to companies looking to support far-flung workforces. Earlier this month, IBM touted research from IBM's Smarter Workforce Institute that found "remote workers... were highly engaged, more likely to consider their workplaces as innovative, happier about their job prospects and less stressed than their more traditional, office-bound colleagues." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Destiny 2's first multiplayer map includes a ton of tight city-styled corridors. Activision has been shouting from the rooftops for months now that Destiny 2 will be available starting September 8. Now, the publisher has clarified that this release date only applies to the console version of the game. PC users will likely have to wait a bit longer to play the highly anticipated massively multiplayer shooter. "We're not committed to a PC date yet, but at Bungie we're totally committed to making a PC build as great as we can," Destiny 2 Director Luke Smith told PC Gamer following the first gameplay reveal for the title. "Our partnership with Blizzard and being on Battle.net, we want to make sure that this version of the game has the time it needs to bake in the oven so it's a delicious piece of bread when it comes out." Blizzard was also squishy about PC release specifics in a FAQ regarding the game's release on Battle.net (which is supposedly actually called the Blizzard app now, even though no one calls it that). "We’re excited to work with Bungie to bring the PC version of Destiny 2 to every region Blizzard currently operates in," the FAQ reads. "Bungie is actively working through the global details. We look forward to sharing additional information later this year." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Hot tip: Don't get as close to the new Gladiator enemy as I did. (credit: Bungie) LOS ANGELES—Bungie knows how to deliver a first-person shooter that immediately looks and feels solid. The game developer's prowess with accessible, sexy blasting has never been in doubt. But two big questions remain as the company's highly anticipated sequel, Destiny 2, nears its September 9 launch: How much better will the sequel feel over a long span of time as it tries to hook fans for multiple years? And what should we expect from the series' Windows PC premiere? A few hours with the game was too brief to answer the first question, though a fantastic "Strike" mission got my hopes up. My hours of play were certainly long enough to wholeheartedly sell me on Destiny 2's PC build. Sadly, Bungie and Activision have saddled this superior PC version—one that enjoys tight mouse-and-keyboard controls and higher frame rates—with quite the asterisk: a PC-specific delay. A terrible wait for the good stuff Ars Technica plays Destiny 2's Inverted Spire co-op Strike mission. NOTE: This was played and captured on a PlayStation 4 Pro. PC game capture was not allowed at the event. Also, NOTE: Sorry for my so-so performance. I played way better on keyboard-and-mouse, I swear. (video link) Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Image of the star KIC 8462852 at infrared (left) and ultraviolet (right) wavelengths. (credit: Infrared: IPAC/NASA; Ultraviolet: STScI (NASA)) For the last few years, a distant star in the constellation Cygnus, known officially as KIC 8462852 and unofficially as Tabby's star or the WTF star, has intrigued astronomers due to its irregular but significant dimming. Astronomers have struggled to find a natural explanation for why the star dims so much, 20 percent, before returning to its regular brightness. These observations have led to various hypotheses, including the exotic notion of some kind of alien megastructure passing between the star and Earth-based telescopes. Now the enigmatic star has been observed to be dropping in flux again, and astronomers have put out a call for telescopes around the world to measure light coming from the system. #TabbysStar IS DIPPING! OBSERVE!! @NASAKepler @LCO_Global @keckobservatory @AAVSO @nexssinfo @NASA @NASAHubble @Astro_Wright @BerkeleySETI — Tabetha Boyajian (@tsboyajian) May 19, 2017 As of Friday morning, it appeared that the light curve coming from the star had only just begun to dip, offering observatories a chance to observe most of dimming cycle. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Microsoft's love for developers is well-known and has been enthusiastically expressed over the years. Windows' strength as a development platform—the abundance of custom, line-of-business applications, games, Office integrations—has given the company an entrenched position in the corporate world, ubiquity in Western homes, and extensive reach into the server room. In the past, Microsoft's focus on developers had a certain myopic quality. One manifestation of this that was close to my heart was the development of the company's C and C++ compiler—or perhaps I should say, non-development. Microsoft's compiler did not support the C99 standard (and still does not today, though it's better than it used to be), and for a dark period through the 2000s, it made only half-hearted attempts to support the full C++98 and C++03 standards. The failure to support these standards meant that many open source software libraries were becoming difficult or impossible to compile with Microsoft's own compiler, making Windows at best a second-class citizen. I asked Microsoft about this many times, wondering why the company didn't appear to care that it was making Windows irrelevant to these groups. The response was always unsatisfactory: the existing body of Windows developers wasn't demanding these features, and hence they were unimportant. Never mind that there was a wider community of developers out there that Microsoft was making unwelcome on its platform. Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / General Hospital's Anna Devane gets diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer. (credit: Itslorigh, General Hospital) This year on General Hospital, central character Anna Devane is stricken with a rare and life-threatening type of blood cancer. Gasp! OK, this may not be shocking; dramatic, unlikely, and always tragic events are the norm on soap operas. But this one is a little different. Prior to the tear-jerking diagnosis, the ABC daytime drama—the longest running soap opera in the US—made a deal with a pharmaceutical company to come up with her fate. And the company, Incyte Corporation, just so happens to make the only targeted therapy for fictional Anna’s very real form of cancer. This did not sit will with two doctors. In an opinion piece published this week in JAMA, Sham Mailankody of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Vinay Prasad of Oregon Health & Science University systematically question the intent of the promotion. The piece ends with a call to arms to medical policy makers and regulators to try to stamp out these "creative" promotions. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Evleaks Images of the next Surface Pro leaked out yesterday—and it seems Surface chief Panos Panay wasn't lying when he said "there's no such thing as the Surface Pro 5": Microsoft's next lappable tablet will simply be called Surface Pro without a descriptive numeral. The Surface Pro images leaked by @evleaks show a device that is slimmer and has slightly more rounded edges than the Surface Pro 4, but otherwise it seems mostly unchanged. Just like the new Surface Laptop, there's still no USB-C connector. The leaked images suggest there will be some new keyboard and pen colours, though. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge AMD promised more details on its 14nm FinFET Vega architecture—which debuted earlier this week in the form of the compute-focused Radeon Vega Frontier Edition—at Computex in May. But those hopeful for a snappy release following the reveal are out of luck. Radeon RX Vega, a consumer version of Vega, will be shown off at Computex, but won't be available to buy until later in the year. Radeon Vega FE, the workstation/cloud-oriented part, is currently earmarked for a "late June" launch. News on the availability of RX Vega comes from Radeon VP Raja Koduri, who took to Reddit yesterday in a AMA. "We'll be showing Radeon RX Vega off at Computex, but it won't be on store shelves that week," said Koduri. "Some of Vega's features, like our High Bandwidth Cache Controller, HBM2, Rapid-Packed Math, or the new geometry pipeline, have the potential to really break new ground and fundamentally improve game development. These aren't things that can be mastered overnight...We believe those experiences are worth waiting for and shouldn't be rushed out the door." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) When Donald Trump won the presidency, his early decisions made it clear that the Federal Communications Commission would become much less strict in regulating Internet service providers. The FCC transition team he formed to chart a new course for the agency was primarily composed of people who oppose net neutrality rules and want ISPs to face fewer regulations in general. After the transition advisors finished their analysis and made recommendations, Trump named Republican Ajit Pai the new chairman, and Pai has since gotten to work reversing the net neutrality rules and other decisions made by his Democratic predecessor, Tom Wheeler. One of the most immediate changes was that the FCC leadership now fully supports zero-rating, the practice in which ISPs exempt some websites and online services from data caps, often in exchange for payment from the websites. Zero-rating is controversial in the US and abroad, with many consumer advocates and regulators saying it violates the net neutrality principle that all online content should be treated equally by network providers. But some zero-rating proponents believe it can serve a noble purpose—bringing Internet access to poor people who otherwise would not be online. That's the view of Roslyn Layton, who served on Trump's FCC transition team, does telecom research at Aalborg University in Denmark, and works as a visiting fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute. Read 44 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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