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Enlarge / The iPhone 6S. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Late last month, Apple announced a repair program for the batteries in early iPhone 6S models manufactured in September and October of 2015 (the 6S Plus is apparently not affected). The batteries could cause the phones to shutdown without warning, an issue that Apple now says was caused by overexposure to "controlled ambient air" (in other words, they sat out in the open in some warehouse for longer than they should have). The same press release—issued only in China so far, but available in English if you scroll down—says that some owners of later iPhone 6S models are also reporting problems with unexpected shutdowns. Apple isn't replacing those batteries just yet, but the company says that an iOS update "available next week" will add "additional diagnostic capability" that will allow Apple to better track down and diagnose the causes of these shutdowns. It "may potentially help [Apple] improve the algorithms used to manage battery performance and shutdown," as well. Those improvements will be included in future iOS updates. Apple says that the battery problem "is not a safety issue," an important thing to note given the way the Galaxy Note 7 blew up in Samsung's face. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: T-Mobile USA) T-Mobile USA is looking forward to fewer regulations and more mergers in the telecom market under President-elect Donald Trump. With net neutrality rules possibly being overturned, the company says mobile Internet providers will have a lot more leeway for "innovation and differentiation." The election results will lead to a regulatory environment that is "more positive for my industry," T-Mobile CFO Braxton Carter said in a Q&A session at a UBS investors conference yesterday. "You look at some of the earlier decisions that Trump has already made [in choosing advisors], I think it's very clear there is going to be less regulation, and regulation often destroys innovation and value creation in bringing benefits to the consumer. And the trick is bringing a benefit to the consumer while you're also benefiting your shareholders." Under President Obama, the Federal Communications Commission reclassified fixed and mobile ISPs as common carriers and imposed net neutrality rules that forbid blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. Carter seems confident the Title II decision will be reversed. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Android 7.1.1 came out for Nexus and Pixel devices this week, and while the Pixels just got a minor update from 7.1 to 7.1.1, the Nexus devices are moving from 7.0 to 7.1.1. This finally brings the older Nexus phones on par with Google's new flagships, the Pixel and Pixel XL. When the Pixel phones were first released, there was a good bit of confusion as to which new features were Pixel exclusive and which were Android 7.1 features that would be coming to all devices. To help clear things up, Google passed along a list in early October outlining which features went where. Now that we can compare the finished Android 7.1 product to that list, we have noticed a few differences. Here's the full software feature list as it stands today. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / It may look like a standard USB-C cable, but it's actually a hint to new Nintendo Switch information. (credit: EB Games Australia via Technobuffalo) As we eagerly wait for Nintendo to reveal more official details about the Nintendo Switch on January 12, new information about the system continues to dribble out from unlikely sources. Today's report suggests that the new console will do away with the company's penchant for proprietary chargers and instead opt for the USB-C standard to get power to the system. That suggestion comes via EB Games Australia, which briefly listed a trio of Nintendo Switch accessories from bargain hardware maker @play. Though the listings were quickly taken down, screengrabs from Technobuffalo and other sources confirm that the accessories included a "Nintendo Switch Extra-Long 3M Charging Cable," alongside a picture of an apparent USB-C cable. The listed product description as a "USB-A to USB-C Charging Cable compatible with the Nintendo Switch Console" leaves few questions about the Switch's charging standard. And the retail leak comes on top of earlier reports, via multiple unnamed Nintendo sources, that the current Nintendo Switch prototypes use USB-C for their charging needs. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The announcement of the Creators Update in October 2016. For consumers, next spring's Windows 10 Creators Update is going to bring integrated virtual reality and 3D creativity. Today, Microsoft described what it will have to offer to enterprise customers. The Anniversary Update added Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) that extended the Defender anti-malware to include cloud-based intelligence to detect anomalous behavior. Microsoft gave us a real-world example of this: a previously unknown (and hence, able to bypass antivirus software) cryptolocker variant was noticed to be deleting System Restore points prior to encrypting user data. This is an unusual thing for a piece of software to do, so much so that it was flagged, enabling the infected system to be isolated and the malware dealt with. This ATP has also been integrated with Office 365 so that, for example, a malicious file can be correlated with the e-mail it was sent in. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Progress MS-04 cargo spaceship lifts off from Baikonur last week. (credit: TASS/Oleg Urusov) On December 1 a Soyuz rocket carrying an uncrewed Progress spacecraft laden with 2.6 tons of food, fuel, and other supplies lifted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Following a normal launch, first-, and second-stage firings, things started to go wrong for Progress MS-04 at about six minutes into the flight. The details are a bit sketchy, but according to Russian space journalist Anatoly Zak, the third stage was supposed to fire from five minutes after launch until almost nine minutes into the ascent. Instead of a nominal ride to orbit, however, mission controllers lost telemetry from the vehicle at about six minutes, and there was no confirmation of the Progress spacecraft separating from the rocket's third stage. Around that time, a large explosion was observed in the sky over the Tuva Region of Russia, a remote area of southern Siberia, followed by reports of falling debris. Tanks and other debris associated with the rocket and spacecraft were later found on the ground. The Progress spacecraft launched on an older Soyuz-U rocket, which is being phased out. Crewed launches now take place on a more modern Soyuz-FG rocket, but the two rockets share a common third stage. So it is conceivable that such an incident could occur with a human launch. Had this happened last week, would the crew have survived? The answer is maybe—with some luck. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Sushi, anyone? (credit: myke lyons) Pollution can seem like a vague, general problem, but sometimes it is specific and personal. People with asthma living in some major cities know to keep tabs on the ozone report in the weather forecast, for example. And frequent anglers should be keenly aware of how much of their catch they put on the dinner table because of mercury contamination in fish. Mercury is a problem for marine fish, as well—particularly the ever-popular tuna. Mercury emitted by burning coal finds its way from the atmosphere into seawater, but an additional step is necessary to weaponize the heavy metal. Bacteria convert mercury into methylmercury by attaching a carbon atom and three hydrogens, making a molecule that freely wanders into biological tissue and hangs around. Since predators are made up of all the many critters they eat, this mercury accumulates to greater and greater levels at each step in the food chain. The meaty tuna sits at the top of its food chain, and that means it can contain a lot of accumulated mercury. Because of how much tuna is consumed in the US, the fish actually accounts for about 40 percent of the mercury ingested from fish. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The current Air Force One fleet has been in service for 26 years. The new ones won't arrive until 2024—if a Trump administration doesn't cancel them entirely. (credit: US AIr Force) This morning, President-Elect Donald Trump lambasted the ongoing program to build a new presidential aircraft in a post to Twitter, calling for its cancellation: Boeing is building a brand new 747 Air Force One for future presidents, but costs are out of control, more than $4 billion. Cancel order! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 6, 2016 The Air Force One replacement contract, awarded in February 2016 to Boeing, is for a single 747-8 aircraft equipped for the chief executive's travel and communications. The current pair of VC-25A aircraft that serve as Air Force One—two heavily modified Boeing 747-200B jetliners—are the last of their kind, and have been in service since 1990. There are no 747-200 aircraft in commercial service anywhere in the world, making logistic support for them expensive. "Parts obsolescence, diminishing manufacturing sources, and increased down times for maintenance are existing challenges that will increase until a new aircraft is fielded,” Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James said of the existing aircraft when the Boeing contract was announced. The 747-8 has a longer range, greater maximum take-off weight, and higher top airspeed than the 747-200 that it is intended to replace, as well as better fuel efficiency and lower carbon dioxide emissions. Capable of Mach 0.855, according to Boeing, the 747-8 is the fastest commercial jet in the world. However, the modifications required for a presidential aircraft are extensive. The VC-25A version of the 747-200 is capable of in-flight refueling, carries a full communications suite, and is "self-sufficient" at airports (having its own self-deploying "air stairs" and baggage handling equipment). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Getty Images | Jonathan Nackstrand) Netflix has big plans for 2017. After recently announcing it plans to have half of its content consist of original programming over the next few years, the company also stated it would come out with 20 unscripted shows in 2017. First reported by Variety, Netflix plans to double its amount of original content in 2017 to 1,000 hours, and will include new unscripted series like the global competition show Ultimate Beastmaster, produced by Sylvester Stallone and The Biggest Loser executive producer Dave Broome. Netflix Chief content officer Ted Sarandos spoke about his company's plans at Monday's UBS Global Media & Communications Conference in New York. Sarandos said unscripted content is a "very interesting business," and Netflix will focus on shows that have the potential to reach an international audience. A specific example is the planned show Ultimate Beastmaster, which will feature athletes and announcers from the US, Brazil, South Korea, Mexico, Germany, and Japan. Each country will record its part of the show, in its own native languages, and follow athletes competing across an obstacle course called "The Beast." At the end of the 10-episode series, one athlete will be crowned Ultimate Beastmaster. Sarandos cited the company's hit show Stranger Things as a milestone in Netflix's original programming journey. It was the first series Netflix produced and developed in-house, and thanks to its popularity, the company is already working on season two. However, Netflix doesn't want to be an all-originals streaming company. While the company continues to develop unique show and movie ideas, it still only plans to have 50 percent of its content be totally original programming. Sarandos mentioned the recent reboot of Gilmore Girls as an example where licensing and collaboration made for the best result. “Warner Bros. owned the IP. There was no model I could do that myself," Sarandos said, according to Variety. "We had a unique ability to do it." Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Software as a Service offerings are pushing further and further into territory companies would have never considered outsourcing. Just how much can a company practically put into cloud application provider's hands? (credit: Nicoelnino/Getty Images) Everything old is new again. Software as a Service (SaaS) may seem like a recent innovation, but the basic concept stretches back half-a-century to IBM's mainframe timesharing of the 1960s. Even its most current incarnation pre-dates the "cloud computing" phenomenon by nearly half a decade. SaaS supplanted the software-retail model by hosting distributed software as well the company's own data in the cloud, accessible via a Web browser. Enterprises pay for services, not software. After 16 years of SaaS, some companies have moved almost all their functions into the cloud, from enterprise software to productivity packages to telephony. According to IT research company Gartner, cloud office systems—like Office 365 and Google Apps—will achieve 60 percent total market penetration by 2018. Despite that prediction, the majority of companies still maintain a significant portion of their software on site. Companies do this for a variety of reasons, including security and compliance concerns and the initial and long term costs of switching from software licenses they already own to a pay-as you go model. But there are also many cases in which companies suffer from decision inertia. Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: ZM Yi/Flickr) Nintendo has launched a new bug bounty programme that offers rewards of up to £15,000 ($20,000) in exchange for vulnerability information regarding its handheld console, the 3DS. Hosted by San Francisco-based HackerOne—a bug bounty platform created by security staff from Facebook, Microsoft, and Google—the programme invites researchers to find and address security vulnerabilities in the 3DS. These include "dissemination of inappropriate content to children," cheating methods like "save data modification," and of course piracy via "game application dumping" and "copied game application execution." Nintendo also lists potential areas of investigation, including system vulnerabilities via "ARM11 kernel takeovers," and hardware vulnerabilities via "security key detection." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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After being unveiled in October, today marks the official launch of Google Wifi. Google Wifi is Google's second attempt at a Wi-Fi router, after the Google OnHub released last year. The new feature for "Google router version 2" is mesh networking, while the OnHub's promised-but-never-delivered smart home features are dropped. You can buy multiple Google Wifis, and they'll all mesh together, offering (hopefully) better coverage than a single device. Google is pushing the mesh capabilities heavily with a $299 "3-pack" option or $129 for a single device. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Frettie) Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and YouTube have announced that they will be working together to curb the dissemination of terrorist material online. The Web giants will create a shared industry database of hashes—digital fingerprints that can identify a specific file—for violent terrorist imagery and terrorist recruitment materials that have previously been removed from their platforms. According to a statement the four companies have jointly released, the hope is that "this collaboration will lead to greater efficiency as we continue to enforce our policies to help curb the pressing global issue of terrorist content online." Once a hash has been added to the database, "other participating companies can then use those hashes to identify such content on their services, review against their respective policies and definitions, and remove matching content as appropriate." Matching content will not be removed automatically, the statement says, and other online services will be encouraged to join the scheme. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Zach Gibson/Getty Images) Here's a seemingly sure-fire way to avoid violating US patent laws: just don't make or use your product in the US. Pretty straightforward, right? Maybe not, in the age of modern supply chains and manufacturing. Today, the US Supreme Court takes up a case that will determine how much help an overseas manufacturer can get from the US without running afoul of US patent laws. The case originates in a dispute between two competitors in the field of genetic testing. Both Promega Corporation and Life Technologies (selling through its Applied Biosciences brand) make DNA testing kits that can be used in a variety of fields, including forensic identification, paternity testing, medical treatment, and research. Promega licensed several patents to Applied Biosystems that allowed its competitor to sell kits for use in "Forensics and Human Identity Applications." The license forbade sales for clinical or research uses. In 2010, Promega filed a lawsuit in federal court, saying that Life Technologies had "engaged in a concerted effort to sell its kits into unlicensed fields," thus infringing its patents. A Wisconsin federal jury found that Life Tech had willfully infringed and should pay $52 million in damages. But the district judge overseeing the case set aside that verdict after trial, ruling that since nearly all of the Life Tech product had been assembled and shipped from outside the US, the product wasn't subject to US patent laws. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A website bot as it distributes CVV guesses over multiple sites. (credit: Ali, et al.) Thieves can guess your secret Visa payment card data in as little as six seconds, according to researchers at Newcastle University in the UK. Bad actors can use browser bots to distribute guesses across hundreds of legitimate online merchants. The attack starts out with a card's 16-digit number, which can be obtained in a variety of ways. Attackers can buy numbers on black-market websites, often for less than $1 apiece, or use a smartphone equipped with a near-field communication reader to skim them. The numbers can also be inferred by combining your first six digits—which are based on the card brand, issuing bank, and card type—with a verification formula known as the Luhn Algorithm. Once an attacker has a valid 16-digit number, four seconds is all they need to learn the expiration date and the three-digit card-verification value that most sites use to verify the validity of a credit card. Even when sites go a step further by adding the card holder's billing address to the process, the technique can correctly guess the information in about six seconds. The technique relies on Web bots that spread random guesses across almost 400 e-commerce sites that accept credit card payments. Of those, 26 sites use only two fields to verify cards, while an additional 291 sites use three fields. Because different sites rely on different fields, the bots are able to enter intelligent guesses into the user field of multiple sites until the bots hit on the right ones. Once the correct expiration date is obtained for a given card—typically banks issue cards that are valid for up to 60 months—the bots use a similar process to obtain the CVV number. In other cases, when sites allow the bots to obtain the CVV first—a process that can never require more than 1,000 guesses—the bots then work to obtain the expiration date and, if required, the billing address. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / "Let's go shopping!" "No, let's Amazon Go shopping." "Dave, I hate your puns." (credit: Sam Machkovech) SEATTLE—Amazon's foray into the world of brick-and-mortar grocery shopping has been all but confirmed for nearly a year thanks to leaks such as spotted permit applications. The rumor became reality on Monday with the announcement of Amazon Go, an experiment in grocery shopping that removes the clerks. This is not just another idle announcement, either: the company's pilot store is now open for business. It's attached to one of Amazon's headquarter buildings in Seattle's South Lake Union neighborhood and is already stocked with food options (and a giant staff of cooks and food preparers). There's just one catch—only full-time "blue badge" Amazon staffers can get in right now. Never one to take "no" for an answer, I grabbed a camera and walked up to the front door with hopes that my shining blue eyes would make up for my lack of a blue badge. That didn't work out, but I did gather a few more details while receiving death glares from staffers and security personnel. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Microsoft is going to make the Windows 10 PC a more family-focused device, taking on Amazon's Echo and Google Home as it does, according to the latest reports and rumors about forthcoming features. The story starts with Twitter user Walking Cat poking around preview builds and finding reference to a feature named Home Hub. This appears to take the multi-user features of Windows 10 in a new direction. In addition to individual per-user accounts on shared machines, Home Hub will enable a shared Family Account and Family Desktop. This account will have its own calendar, music, pictures, and other resources that are used by and shared between several different people. Mary Jo Foley tied that to job postings from November, where Microsoft outlined its desire to build family-oriented sharing features for Windows and its desire to compete with Google, Amazon, Apple, and AT&T Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Note: this video contains violence. A Charleston, South Carolina judge declared a mistrial Monday in the case of a white South Carolina police officer on trial for the video-taped shooting of Walter Scott, a 50-year-old black man. The video was secretly taken last year by a passerby, and it has been viewed online millions of times. This week, after four days of deliberations, the 12-member jury announced it was hopelessly deadlocked. Michael Slager testifying. (credit: Today/YouTube) On trial is Michael Slager, a 35-year-old now-fired North Charleston officer. He's accused of killing Scott by shooting the man in the back. Scott was pulled over in April 2015 for a routine traffic stop—a tail-light that was not working. He had a warrant for his arrest and fled the scene, prompting a chase. The officer testified that there was a brief altercation in a park over his Taser, and the cop then shot Scott five times as he fled. Slager has said he acted out of "total fear." The killing is yet another instance of police shooting a black man in the US. According to various watchdog sources—the Washington Post, The Guardian, and the Killed by Cops database—between 706 and 844 people have been killed by US cops during the first nine months of 2016. Of that total, the North Carolina ACLU notes there were 194 deceased black Americans. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Pioneer Courthouse Square in Portland, Oregon, was the site of an attempted bombing on November 27, 2010. (credit: Craig Mitchelldyer / Getty Images News) A federal appeals court has rejected an effort to overturn the Portland Christmas tree bomber’s conviction on the grounds that the surveillance to initially identify the suspect did not, in fact, require a warrant. On Monday, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also rejected an entrapment argument raised by lawyers for suspect Mohamed Osman Mohamud. As Ars reported back in January 2016, the case (United States v. Mohamud) involves a Somali-American accused of trying to blow up a 2010 lighting ceremony in Portland. Undercover FBI agents posed as jihadis and presented Mohamud with the means to conduct the operation, which turned out to be wholly bogus. Mohamud was eventually found guilty and sentenced to 30 years in prison. But after the conviction, the government disclosed that it used surveillance under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act to collect and search Mohamud's e-mail. Seeing this, Mohamud’s legal team attempted to re-open the case—but the judge denied their motion. Mohamud's defense raised this issue on appeal, but they have now been rejected by the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The USS Freedom (LCS-1), designed by Lockheed Martin... or perhaps by a jilted British designer who is pressing IP theft claims against the Navy. (credit: US Navy) This has not been a good year for the US Navy's newest ships. Four ships from the Navy's two classes of Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)—the high-tech, modular warships that were supposed to be the future of naval warfare in areas close to shore—have suffered major engineering problems, including breaking down at sea. Three of the LCS ships that suffered engineering failures were from the Freedom class, ships built by Lockheed Martin for the LCS program: USS Freedom, USS Fort Worth, and USS Milwaukee. The program has also seen other setbacks, including the USS Montgomery (an Independence-class LCS built by Austal USA) suffering a cracked hull after bumping the wall of a Panama Canal lock. But the LCS' engineering woes may not be the end of the trouble its shipbuilding programs are facing. As defense writer David Axe reports, David Giles, a British aerospace engineer-turned-marine architect, has filed a lawsuit accusing the Navy of stealing elements of the Freedom's design from work he did to commercialize a wave-piercing, "semi-planing" hull—work Giles patented in the early 1990s. Giles' design, called the Prelude, was derived from work his firm first pitched to the British Royal Navy. The patents were filed for a design for high-speed container ships, called Fastships. Giles formed a company by the same name to build them. The design patents expired in 2010, but Giles' company—which is now bankrupt—filed suit against the Navy in 2012 after years of seeking compensation. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Nexus 5X and 6P. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Today, Google released a new minor version of Android: 7.1.1 Nougat. The new release means different things to different Google devices. The Pixel and Pixel XL move from Android 7.1 to 7.1.1, bringing the December security update and some bugfixes. It's a bigger deal for Nexus devices, however, as the update marks the move from Android 7.0 to 7.1.1 and the end of the "Android 7.1 Developer Preview" for Nexus devices. For now, 7.1.1 is out for the Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel C, and the Nexus 6P, 5X, 9, 9 LTE as well as the Nexus Player. Interestingly, the Nexus 6 also received a December security release today, but it's based on Android 7.0. It seems like the Nexus 6 won't get an Android 7.1 update this month. Android 7.1 exclusively launched on Google's new flagship device, the Google Pixel, in October. Nexus devices—a brand which Google seems to be done with—were instead relegated to a "developer preview" release of Android 7.1 (along with the Pixel C), which ends with this update. Android 7.1 was developed alongside the Pixel devices, and Google chose to make many features exclusive to the Pixel line. For instance, Nexus devices still won't get the Google Assistant, new navigation bar, or the Pixel Launcher, but they should see better touch input latency and a F.lux-style "night mode." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Edgar Maddison Welch, 28, arrested outside the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, DC. (credit: ABC News/YouTube) A rifle-wielding North Carolina man was arrested Sunday in Washington, DC for carrying his weapon into a pizzeria that sits at the center of the fake news conspiracy theory known as "Pizzagate," authorities said Monday. DC's Metropolitan Police Department said it had arrested 28-year-old Edgar Maddison Welch on allegations of assault with a dangerous weapon. "During a post arrest interview this evening, the suspect revealed that he came to the establishment to self-investigate 'Pizza Gate' (a fictitious online conspiracy theory)," the agency said in a statement. Welch was arrested without incident. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Mike Mozart) The two Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission criticized the FCC for investigating AT&T and Verizon in a net neutrality case centering on data cap exemptions. Any action taken now will be overturned under President Donald Trump, they promised. The FCC's Wireless Telecommunications Bureau last week said it reached a preliminary conclusion that AT&T is violating net neutrality rules by using data cap exemptions (or "zero-rating") to favor DirecTV video on its mobile network. The FCC also kicked off a similar examination of Verizon's data cap exemptions. AT&T and Verizon are exempting their own video services from mobile data caps while charging other companies for the same zero-rating treatment. But Republicans, who opposed the net neutrality rules and will gain the FCC majority from Democrats after the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, are trying to protect AT&T and Verizon from FCC action. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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ANAHEIM, Calilfornia—HDR, or high dynamic range, has finally begun rolling out in a major way this year, thanks to compatible hardware, games, and videos also rolling out in droves. But how long ago did HDR content really start to come down the pipeline? On Saturday, one of Sony's most esteemed game producers, Gran Turismo series creator Kazunori Yamauchi, told reporters that his team at Polyphony Digital was the first to lead the charge for HDR content within Sony. Surprisingly, Yamauchi-san also said that his team, the designers of the 2017 racer Gran Turismo Sport, made those plans before the PlayStation 4 Pro even existed, in the middle of 2013. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Today Google launched a "personal safety app" for Android called "Trusted Contacts." The new app offers another location-sharing service from the company, one that Google envisions for use in emergency situations. After installing the app, you can flag some of your contacts as "trusted." Then you'll be able to send your location to a trusted contact or ask for their location. The whole app is built around the "emergency" use case, complete with a dead man's switch for location requests. When someone asks for your location, you'll get a full screen pop up allowing you to approve or deny the request. You only have five minutes to do this, though—after five minutes, your location will be shared automatically. The idea is that if you're unable to use your phone, your trusted contacts will still be able to find you. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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