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Enlarge / The error message that greeted thousands of Felmyst players after the server was shut down by a legal threat mere hours after launching Friday. A highly anticipated private server intended to emulate the state of World of Warcraft during the decade-old "Burning Crusade" expansion was shut down by a legal demand delivered by Blizzard representation mere hours after the server launched on Friday. The planned launch of the Felmyst server had been heavily anticipated in the "legacy server" subcommunity of WoW players who seek to emulate a "vanilla" version of the game as it existed before the current slate of expansions and updates changed how the MMO looks, plays, and feels. While other fan-run, "Burning Crusade"-era legacy servers exist, Felmyst had already earned a reputation before launch as one of the best and most complete efforts to capture that well-remembered era of the game in a playable way. But with thousands of players reportedly logged on after that launch Friday afternoon, the Felmyst server was unceremoniously taken down after just five hours. The reason: a cease-and-desist letter from Mitchell Silberberg and Knupp LLP, representing Blizzard, asking for an immediate shutdown under numerous copyright laws. A copy of that letter can be seen in a message from Felmyst coder and creator Gummy52 (which now stands in place of the removed Felmyst webpage and forums) as well as a video Gummy52 posted this morning. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | Bloomberg) Brenda Fitzgerald, the newly appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will consider allowing Coca-Cola to once again help fund the agency’s anti-obesity campaigns, according to e-mailed comments reported by the New York Times over the weekend. Though it would be a turnabout for the agency—which ditched Coke funding in 2013—Fitzgerald's position shouldn't be surprising, as she has a controversial history of accepting funding from Coca-Cola. As health commissioner of Georgia from 2011 to this year, she accepted $1 million from the soda giant to fund an exercise program aimed at cutting the state’s childhood obesity rate—one of the highest in the country. The exercise-based campaign seemed to fit well with Coca-Cola’s interests. The company has long appeared interested in shifting anti-obesity efforts toward improving physical activity levels rather than focusing on the role of diet, particularly sugary beverages. That’s despite many studies, including those by the CDC, that have found that sugar-loaded drinks are a prominent factor in childhood obesity, as well as the development of associated health conditions such as Type II diabetes, heart disease, and kidney disease. Nevertheless, in 2015, a Times investigation revealed that Coke had been secretly funding and orchestrating a network of academic nutrition researchers, which had a suspiciously keen focus on combating obesity with exercise while downplaying the role of sweetened beverages and excess calories. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Who needs Aurich's artistic talents, anyway? (credit: Peter Bright) The venerable Windows Paint program, known to many by the name of its executable, mspaint.exe, has been marked as deprecated in the forthcoming Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, The Guardian reports. Deprecation states formally that the feature is no longer actively developed, and it serves as a warning that Microsoft may remove the feature in a future release. Removal isn't guaranteed, however; there are parts of the Win32 API that have been deprecated for 20 years but still haven't been removed. It's possible that Paint will continue to ship with Windows in a kind of zombie state: not subject to any active maintenance but kept around indefinitely since it's self-contained and not a security risk. Indeed, the end of the development of Paint is not going to surprise anyone who actually uses the thing; the last time it received any non-negligible improvements was in Windows 7, when its user interface was updated to use a ribbon control. Before that, it had an interface that had been largely untouched since Windows 3.1. As such, Microsoft's official deprecation is merely confirming something that was already obvious; it's not an indicator that anything has actually changed. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Samsung's chip manufacturing business goes way beyond Exynos. (credit: Samsung) A report from Reuters says Samsung Electronics plans to "triple the market share" of its foundry business over the next five years. Samsung plans to "aggressively add new clients," with E.S. Jung, head of the Samsung foundry division, telling Reuters, "We want to become a strong No. 2 player in the market" behind TSMC. In May, Samsung officially created a new business unit for its growing foundry operations. The business unit will fight TSMC and Intel for orders from Apple, Qualcomm, and other SoC vendors. Despite the recent creation of the business unit, Samsung has been doing foundry work since 2005 and is a major player in the high-end SoC space. It exclusively manufactures the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, which goes into nearly every high-end Android phone. Samsung's foundry has also done business with Apple in the past, but for the A10 SoC, Apple went exclusively with TSMC. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Who needs connected cars when almost all of us drive around emitting Bluetooth signals? (credit: dion gillard @flickr) One big promise of the connected car revolution has been the potential to help clear up traffic problems. When every vehicle and traffic signal is connected to the cloud, municipalities and local governments should be able to have a constant view of the traffic on their streets, aware of any problems almost instantly. The catch? It's going to take a long time before there are sufficient vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) or even vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V)-equipped cars on our roads. But the city of Aarhus in Denmark has shown you don't need to wait for V2x to finally penetrate the market to start doing that; all you need are outdoor Bluetooth sensors. For some time, Aarhus has been using Bluetooth sensors to collect traffic pattern information. As people drive around, emitting Bluetooth signals, the sensors log their movements around the city. In doing so, their traffic patterns can flag and reveal problems that the city needs to fix. Blip Systems Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / SpaceX may be dumping the outer ring of 21 engines for its new Mars vehicle. (credit: SpaceX) Last year, SpaceX founder Elon Musk shared plans for his transportation system to send humans to Mars in the 2020s. But the fantastically huge rocket, with 42 Raptor engines and enormous technical challenges, seemed more like science fiction than reality. Then there was the small matter of who would pay the tens of billions of dollars to develop a rocket that had few—if any—commercial prospects beyond sending 100 people to Mars at a time. Musk seems to have realized that his ambitions were a tad too ambitious in recent months, and has said he will release a "revised" plan for Mars colonization that addresses some of these technical and fiscal questions. Now, we know this discussion will come during the 2017 International Astronautical Conference in Adelaide, Australia, on September 29. And this weekend, Musk dropped a big hint about the change. In response to a question on Twitter, Musk wrote, "A 9m diameter vehicle fits in our existing factories ..." And this is actually quite a substantial hint, because the original "Interplanetary Transport System" had a massive 12-meter diameter. By scaling back to 9 meters, this suggests that Musk plans to remove the outer ring of 21 Raptor engines, leaving a vehicle with 21 engines instead of the original 42. While still complicated to manage during launch and flight, 21 engines seems more reasonable. Such a vehicle would also have about 50 percent less mass. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Magic: The Gathering has expanded yet again with Hour of Devastation, a follow-up to Amonkhet that continues to riff on Egyptian mythology with a large helping of dragon-led apocalypse. We’ve drafted, built decks, and played a bunch of Hour of Devastation matches—read on for our review! We’re also going to dive into some of the recent news around the game, including changes to set structure and release cadence, and the future of Magic’s digital offerings. Elder dragon planeswalker deity Nicol Bolas is here, and he's going to royally ruin your day. What happened to Amonkhet? Hour of Devastation (HOU) is set on the world of Amonkhet (see our review of the original set for more info) as the prophesied “hours” arrive, momentous events that promised glory and eternal life. It turns out, though, that those events were the machinations of Nicol Bolas, the major antagonist of the set. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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We saw the first trailer for season 2 of Stranger Things at Comic-con. Excitement about Netflix retro-horror series Stranger Things was at a fever pitch during Comic-con this weekend, especially after we saw the first trailer for season 2. Set during the mid-1980s, the series picks up one year after the events of the first season. The trailer promises we'll be diving deep into the Upside Down mythos, which represents an even greater threat than before. The kid gang is back together, innocently playing videogames, when Will starts to see visions of the Upside Down taking over the entire world. And you know what? It's scary and looks amazing. I wasn't that excited about a second season for this show—I thought the ending of last season was basically perfect, and that the new season should focus on a new horror story. But this trailer guaranteed I'll be tuning in. It looks like we'll focus a lot Will's post-Upside Down transformation. The scene of him in some kind of experimental facility is reminiscent of what we saw happening to Eleven last year. David Harbour, who plays Sheriff Hopper, said on Wired's Facebook Live that his character has changed a lot in the past year. We'll see flashbacks of his journey, Harbour said, and it has "a lot to do with the Eggos he's delivering to the woods." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Comic-con teaser for Ready Player One. The first trailer for Ready Player One, based on Ernest Cline's legendary novel, just dropped at San Diego Comic-con. Ever since Cline's novel shot to the top of bestseller lists, fans have been waiting for the movie. It's the story of a kid growing up in the near future, dreaming of escape from his life in a massive, dystopian trailer park. He's only happy in the Oasis, a massive multiplayer VR world, where he indulges in his love for 1980s pop culture. This trailer is a little uneven at first, but won me over when the 80s Rush song "Tom Sawyer" provided the perfect soundscape for an incredible VR-powered car chase. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Yale University Press) In February 2003, the largest demonstration in Britain's history saw two million people march across London to protest the approaching Iraq War. Dozens of other cities across the world saw similar events, and yet. Why did politicians feel safe ignoring the millions who participated in those marches—yet stand down after the protests against the proposed intellectual property laws SOPA and PIPA? Why did Occupy apparently vanish while the Tea Party has embedded itself into US national electoral politics? How much did Facebook really have to do with the Arab Spring? How—and this is the central question technosociologist Zeynep Tufecki considers in her new book, Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest—do digital media change the reality and effectiveness of social protest? Over the quarter-century since the Internet went mainstream, much has been written and argued about digital technologies' ability to transform disparate individuals into a movement. Dismissives argue that social media-fueled movements are too fragile and their participants too uncommitted to achieve much. (Writing in Slate, Tufecki found that tone in Evgeny Morozov's The Net Delusion, despite broad agreement that oppressive governments are sufficiently smart and motivated to harness these technologies for self-preservation.) Online-protest optimists saw the Arab Spring as evidence that these enabling tools create democratic change. And there are those who presume that governments will never be digitally literate or quick enough to take advantage, an early example being John Perry Barlow's 1996 essay A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Emmy-nominated showrunners of The Americans, Joel Fields (L) and Joe Weisberg (R), sat down with Ars at ATX Television Fest 2017. One of 'em is a regular reader who enjoys our iOS and macOS reviews (but will revert to a flip phone when the show isn't in production). (video link) Warning: This post contains mild spoilers from the first five seasons of The Americans. AUSTIN, Texas—On its surface, FX’s The Americans is a sleeper-cell spy drama set in DC during the Cold War. But fans will quickly tell you the show’s more about relationships and the difficulties of family and marriage; the show’s creators echo this sentiment, too. “If you really look at the show honestly, the picture it paints of marriage is that there's a lot of ups, a lot of downs, and it's not an easy road,” showrunner Joe Weisberg says to fellow showrunner Joel Fields. The duo met up with Ars during this summer’s ATX Television Festival, and this author’s recent wedding comes up pre-interview. “He’s right at the beginning; he just got married. I don’t know if I want to lay out for him what’s really ahead.” Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / These bikes have not been thrown into the Puget Sound... yet. (credit: Sam Machkovech) SEATTLE—Let's say you want to whisk across a city's downtown at a pace somewhere between walking and taxiing, and you're not interested in bus waits or looking like a dork on a hoverboard. How about a bike? How about a bike that you can pick up on practically any street corner, then leave behind in the same fashion when you're done? That's the promise of not one but two bike-sharing efforts (Spin and LimeBike) that launched in Seattle this week. They differ largely from another former Seattle bike-sharing program, Pronto, in that they don't require any official docks. Take a bike; leave a bike. It's the two-wheeled equivalent of app-powered, car-sharing services like Daimler AG's Car2Go and BMW's ReachNow, only with a much cheaper rate of $1 per half hour of use. Upon hearing about these services launching in my town, I got excited. Hop from place to place with shared bikes and my phone? Cool! But a few days of intermittent use—and some very odd encounters—have cooled my pedaling heels. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Yes, folks, this was once a revolutionary experience in gaming. In the early 1950s, just as rock ‘n’ roll was hinting at social change, the first video games were quietly being designed in the form of technology demonstrations—and a scientist was behind it. In October 1958, Brookhaven National Laboratory physicist William Higinbotham created Tennis for Two. Despite graphics that are ridiculously primitive by today’s standards, it has been described as the first video game in history. Higinbotham was inspired by the government research institution’s Donner Model 30 analog computer, which could simulate trajectories with wind resistance, and the game was designed for display at an annual public exhibition. Although his purpose in creating the game was rather academic, Tennis for Two turned out to be a hit at the three-day exhibition, with thousands of students lining up to see the game. At first glance, today's video gamers and scientists might appear to be worlds apart. But starting with Tennis for Two, video games have quietly and consistently been within the purview of academic study. Each generation of gamers has seen new titles created at various research institutions in order to explore programming, human-computer interaction, and algorithms. Lesser-known chapters of history reveal these two worlds are not as far apart as you might think. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: European Network on Invasive Alien Species) Across the globe, invasive species have caused no end of trouble. Their populations can explode because they have no natural predators. Or they are predators themselves who push native species to the brink of extinction. They can upset ecosystems that had evolved a fine balance. But, according to a new study published this week in PNAS, not every invasive species is a negative. In some cases where we've wiped out a key component of the local ecosystem, an invasive species can take its place. The study's example? An invasive algae can restore lost habitat to coastal ecosystems, providing a nursery for species like crab and shrimp. The work that led to this conclusion took place in tidal flats on the coast of North Carolina. Normally, this type of geography is broken up by distinct habitats provided by different organisms: coral reefs, beds of sea grass, and oyster reefs. The habitats formed by these species provide shelter for other species, allowing entire ecosystems to develop. But, over the last century or so, many of these habitats have been wiped out, leaving bare sediment behind. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: EWE) A German energy company recently announced that it’s partnering with a university to build a massive flow battery in underground salt caverns that are currently used to store natural gas. The grid-tied battery, the company says, would be able to power Berlin for an hour. The technology that the project is based on should be familiar to Ars readers. Two years ago, Ars wrote about an academic paper published in Nature that described “a recipe for an affordable, safe, and scalable flow battery.” German researchers had developed better components for a large, stationary battery that used negatively and positively charged liquid electrolyte pools to exchange electrons through a reasonably priced membrane. These so-called “flow batteries” are particularly interesting for grid use—they have low energy-density, so they don’t work for portable energy storage. But as receptacles for utility-scale electricity storage, their capacity is limited only by the amount of space you have. Now the ideas in that paper are graduating to real-world use. EWE Gasspeicher, a gas-storage company owned by German power company EWE, announced in June that it’s looking into building the researchers’ flow battery in two medium-sized salt caverns that the company has been using to store natural gas. EWE is calling the project “brine4power,” reflecting how a saltwater brine is used in the electrolyte. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Welcome to the nerdiest, most-inside-baseball TV event this side of network upfronts. (credit: Nathan Mattise) AUSTIN, Texas—Familiar IP (intellectual property) runs rampant on TV these days no matter where a viewer turns. Netflix openly exploits its access to the Marvel universe and has a penchant for reinvigorating classic IP across medium (from Wet Hot American Summer to Fuller House). Small cable networks offer numerous examples: CW has opted for DC with Arrow and The Flash; FX has Fargo; SyFy has The Expanse; Showtime has American Gods; and on and on. Even the big networks have embraced this, and recently they can’t seem to leave vintage movies alone (whether we’re discussing Fox’s Minority Report and Lethal Weapon attempts or NBC’s departed-too-soon Hannibal). At this summer’s ATX Television Festival, execs from major players like HBO, Freeform, Marvel, and Dreamworks took the stage together hoping to shed some light on the trend. High rates of IP recycling haven’t coincided with a lack of engaging originals (see: Stranger Things, Mad Men, Breaking Bad/Better Call Saul, The Americans, GLOW, etc.). Evidently, the modern TV landscape offers room for both, so why the glut of familiar franchises? Everyone in attendance had plenty of theories. “To start, it’s a risky business, and most of the stuff we develop just fails,” Marvel’s Grant Gish said. “But when you have a leg up—a great book, comic book, old movie, or TV show—it eliminates some of that.” Gish notes a known Marvel entity carries with it automatic audience awareness. And if network execs remain conservative when greenlighting productions, assurances of an inherent audience can go a long way. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Linday Fox) A divided federal appeals court is upholding a President Barack Obama-era regulation that barred e-cigarette smoking—also known as vaping—on both inbound and outbound US flights. The US Department of Transportation officially banned electronic cigarettes on flights in March of 2016 to clear up any confusion as to whether they were also outlawed like traditional tobacco cigarettes. The Competitive Enterprise Institute and the Consumer Advocates for Smoke-Free Alternatives sued, alleging Congress' "no smoking" statute didn't apply to e-cigarettes. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Punch Escrow releases on July 25. (credit: Inkshares) The teleportation accident is an all-too-common trope of science fiction. The moral quandary of teleporters as "suicide boxes" and as potential human duplicators has been grist for many science fiction and speculative fiction writers, from George Langelaan's 1957 short story "The Fly" to China Miéville's 2010 novel Kraken (and yes, a few Star Trek episodes). But that trope has been given a fresh spin by Tal Klein in his debut novel, The Punch Escrow—fresh enough that, even before its release, the book was optioned for a film by Lionsgate. A compelling, approachable human narrative wrapped around a classic, hard sci-fi nugget, The Punch Escrow dives into deep philosophical territory—the ethical limits of technology and what it means to be human. Cinematically paced yet filled with smart asides, Klein's Punch pulls off the slick trick of giving readers plenty to think about in a suspenseful, entertaining package. Watch out for those killer nanobots Set in the year 2147, Punch is the story of Joel Byram, a self-described smart-ass who makes his futuristic currency as a sort of bot-whisperer. Byram works as an artificial intelligence "salter" who helps train AIs to master the art of human interaction through the use of jokes and language puzzles. He's something of an AI interface hacker as a result, and he has the skills required to linguistically trick AIs into elevating his privileges and performing tasks they'd otherwise not. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Vascularized engineered human liver tissue that has self-organized into a lobule-like microstructure. (credit: Chelsea Fortin/Bhatia Lab/Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research) Being able to grow your own new organs may be in reach—with some cellular assembly required. With a carefully constructed clump of cells, mice grew their own functional human liver organoids in a matter of months, researchers report this week in Science Translational Medicine. The cellular organ seeds blossomed in the rodents, expanding 50-fold in that time. They appeared to form complex liver structures, tap into vasculature, and carry out the functions of a normal liver. The critical factor in getting the organoids to take root, the authors report, was having the seed cells arranged just right. Though the organ seeds are far from any clinical application, researchers are hopeful that they’ll one day be able to engineer larger liver organs to treat patients with liver failure or damage. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Alexandre Cazes, in an undated photo posted by his stepmother, Kathy Gauthier. (credit: Kathy Gauthier) The stepmother of the late Alexandre Cazes told Ars that she and her husband have a hard time believing what American and European authorities have said about their son as a criminal suspect. The Department of Justice said Thursday that Cazes was behind the recently shuttered AlphaBay, the world’s largest underground drug website, The DOJ also said that Cazes was arrested on July 5 in Thailand at his home outside Bangkok and apparently committed suicide while in a Thai jail on July 12. In a brief French-language interview conducted over Facebook Messenger on Friday afternoon, Kathy Gauthier, of Trois-Rivières, Québec, said that Cazes was always a "good boy" who had no previous run-ins with the law. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Valery Brozhinsky) US Senator Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) criticized the Federal Communications Commission for failing to turn over its internal analysis of the DDoS attacks that hit the FCC's public comment system. The FCC declined to provide its analysis of the attacks to Gizmodo, which had filed a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request for a copy of all records related to the FCC analysis "that concluded a DDoS attack had taken place." The FCC declined the request, saying that its initial analysis on the day of the attack "did not result in written documentation." “If the FCC did suffer a DDoS attack and yet created no written materials about it, that would be deeply irresponsible and cast doubt on how the FCC could possibly prevent future attacks," Wyden told Gizmodo in a story today. "On the other hand, if FCC is playing word games to avoid responding to FoIA requests, it would clearly violate Chairman Ajit Pai’s pledge to increase transparency at the FCC.” Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Harald Deischinger) On Friday, representatives of the notorious hacking entity known as Fancy Bear failed to appear in a federal court in Virginia to defend themselves against a civil lawsuit brought by Microsoft. As the Daily Beast first reported on Friday, Microsoft has been waging a quiet battle in court against the threat group, believed to be affiliated with the GRU, Russia's foreign intelligence agency. For now, the company has managed to seize control of 70 domain names, but it's going after many more. The idea of the lawsuit, which was filed in August 2016, is to use various federal laws including the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), and American trademark law as a way to seize command-and-control domain names used by the group, which goes by various monikers including APT28 and Strontium. Many of the domain names used by Fancy Bear contain Microsoft trademarks, like microsoftinfo365.com among hundreds of others. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | MrsWilkins) Verizon Wireless customers this week noticed that Netflix's speed test tool appears to be capped at 10Mbps, raising fears that the carrier is throttling video streaming on its mobile network. When contacted by Ars this morning, Verizon acknowledged using a new video optimization system but said it is part of a temporary test and that it did not affect the actual quality of video. The video optimization appears to apply both to unlimited and limited mobile plans. But some YouTube users are reporting degraded video, saying that using a VPN service can bypass the Verizon throttling. The Federal Communications Commission generally allows mobile carriers to limit video quality as long as the limitations are imposed equally across different video services despite net neutrality rules that outlaw throttling. The net neutrality rules have exceptions for network management. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Yahoogle. Google's homepage has been a stark white page for basically ever, with little more than a search box and a few buttons to get users to a search results page as fast as possible. Yesterday, a report from The Guardian claimed this would be changing, and Google would be adding a "news feed" to "Google.com." The Google app on mobile devices has long had a news feed—originally introduced as "Google Now"—and the report claims a similar interface is coming to the desktop. The crux of The Guardian's report says, "The feed of personalised information, which has been a mainstay of Google’s mobile apps for Android and iOS since 2012... will become part of the main desktop experience in the near future, the Guardian understands." But there are a few aspects of the report that make me question its authenticity. First, the report pulls quotes and images from Google's July 19 blog post about news feed upgrades, but Google's post was only speaking about the mobile site and apps, and The Guardian's report doesn't make that clear. Second, the report contains an error in the title and lede: "Google to radically change homepage for first time since 1996," the report reads. "Google’s famously simple homepage with its logo and single search box on a white background is set to undergo a radical change for the first time since its launch in 1996, with the addition of Google’s interest and news-based feed." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Kate Evans for Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)) We’re trashing the world not because it’s fun, but because it pays to do so. People respond to financial incentives. So, how do you provide an incentive to stop trashing the world? One idea is to use cold, hard cash. If people earn more by not trashing, the thinking goes, the incentive flips: it suddenly pays to conserve. Based on this idea, a trial program in Uganda paid landowners to preserve the forest on their land and tracked the results. It turned out not to be so simple—people don’t always neatly do what they’re supposed to. What if these landowners were already concerned about deforestation and were already preserving their land? You’ve just forked out quite a bit to pay for something that was already going to happen. Or what if they just cut down trees elsewhere instead? Figuring out whether the benefits of the program are worth the cost requires collecting a lot of data. A paper in Science this week reports on the results, which are encouraging: deforestation slowed to about half the previous rate, and it looks as though people didn’t just shift their forest clearing elsewhere. The program benefits seem to have outweighed the costs, whichever way you slice it. In other words, money provides a great incentive to preserve habitats, which is great news for climate change efforts. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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