posted 4 days ago on ars technica
In the US, the Energy Information Agency is the leading source of statistics on the production and use of electricity. But it is geared toward the traditional power grid, getting lots of its data directly from utilities or the regional grids. Although residential solar has generally been a rounding error in these numbers, that situation is gradually changing as the price of hardware has plunged. Just how much it has changed was driven home when the EIA analyzed the amount of net-metered solar hardware out there (net metering is used to track electricity fed into the grid by residential consumers). It turns out that, in 2014, residential solar capacity actually passed the capacity of utility-scale facilities. By the end of the year, homes accounted for 3.3 Gigawatts of capacity; large-scale facilities were at 2.9Gw. California had nearly half the residential capacity, trailed by Arizona, Hawaii, New Jersey, and New York. For commercial-scale facilities, Massachusetts replaced Hawaii on that list. (Hawaii has expensive electricity, but lacks space for large-scale commercial installs). The frequency with which states in the Northeast appear on the list is a clear indication that factors other than the potential productivity of the hardware dominate decisions on the use of solar. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Unsurprisingly, the White House formally announced Tuesday that it will not be granting a pardon to Edward Snowden anytime soon. Immediately after Snowden was formally charged in 2013 with espionage, theft, and conversion of government property, supporters began petitioning the White House to pardon the famed former National Security Agency contractor. In a brief statement, Lisa Monaco, the president's advisor on homeland security and counterterrorism, wrote: Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When it comes to major anthropogenic sources of methane (an important greenhouse gas), leaky natural gas wells and pipelines might come to mind, and maybe livestock. However, rice cultivation is also among the largest sources. Microbes in wetlands, where water saturation leads to low-oxygen conditions, produce most of the world’s methane, and rice paddies are essentially human-controlled wetlands. Down in the warm muck of a rice paddy, the roots of the rice plant release some organic compounds, and they eventually die off and decay themselves, providing the food that microbes turn into methane. Researchers are working on ways to limit that methane production, but this will always be a secondary concern for farmers. Yields rule the day, especially as demand is growing. But a 2002 study hinted at a win-win: increase above-ground growth at the expense of below-ground growth, and yield goes up while methane production goes down. A great idea, but how to make it happen? A group of researchers led by Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences researchers Jun Su, Changquan Hu, and Xia Yan have used a gene from barley to create a genetically modified rice plant that does just that. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The 2015 Moto X. (The Moto X Style, if you're in a non-US region) 14 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);NEW YORK—Motorola just took the wraps off its newest flagship, the 2015 Moto X, in addition to a couple other phones. There's a new version of the Moto G and two Moto Xes, but only one Moto X is coming to the US. Internationally, Motorola calls the flagship the "Moto X Style," and the mid-range Moto X the "Moto X Play." In the US, there's only one Moto X model, so it's called the Moto X Pure Edition. We're just going to call it the "2015 Moto X." We've long considered Motorola to be the best Android OEM, and with the new Moto X, the company seems to be making all the right moves. The Moto X is still running stock Android—Motorola wants to make experiences that "augment, not compete" with Google's OS. And the Moto X is still really cheap—$399 gets you a 1.8GHz Snapdragon 808, 3GB of RAM, a 5.7-inch, 1440p display, 16GB of storage, and a 3000 mAh battery. Motorola says the big upgrade this year is the camera. The company called the new 20MP camera "one of the best in the world," with "better light, faster focus, faster capture, and better color" when compared to the 2014 Moto X. Camera review site DxOMark has rated the Moto X 2015 camera as one of the top three cameras in the world, ahead of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6+. The font of the device has some camera upgrades, too, as the 5MP front-facing camera now has an LED flash. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Anyone hoping to score a real life, wrist-mounted, smartphone-powered Pip-Boy as part of the limited edition Fallout 4 package first announced at E3 had better try to snag one of the last shipments filtering into stores now. That's because the factory making them literally can not make any more, according to Bethesda Marketing Vice President Pete Hines. Hines told GameSpot that the company has tried to make as many of the limited editions as it could, responding to demand that made the first two waves of shipments sell out almost immediately at major retailers. The problem, it seems, is that the factories producing the plastic enclosures are absolutely at capacity. "We reached a point where we'd go back to the factories and they were like, 'Guys, this is it, sorry. This is as long as we can run the lines and as many of them as we can make,'" Hines told GameSpot. "We'd go back to [the factories] and say, 'Demand for this is insane, we've got to make more.' And they'd move other projects off or shift stuff to other factories and it just came to [them telling Bethesda], 'Final answer: sorry, this is as many as we can make.' And we sold every single one of those that we could." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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AT&T is trying to convince the Federal Communications Commission to backtrack from a $100 million fine issued to punish AT&T for its throttling of customers on unlimited data plans. “The Commission’s findings that consumers and competition were harmed are devoid of factual support and wholly implausible,” AT&T wrote in a response to the FCC, according to The Hill. “Its 'moderate' forfeiture penalty of $100 million is plucked out of thin air, and the injunctive sanctions it proposes are beyond the Commission’s authority.” AT&T claimed it made all the required disclosures to customers, and also that the statute of limitations on the alleged violations had passed. The company also claimed that the FCC is infringing its First Amendment rights by requiring AT&T to tell customers that it violated an FCC rule. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An attack in early 2014 on Anthem, the No. 2 US health insurer, was by most measuring sticks a historic hack, leading to the biggest healthcare data breach ever. New evidence unearthed by researchers from security firm Symantec, however, shows it was business as usual for the hacking group, which over the past three years has carried out more than a dozen similar attacks. Dubbed Black Vine, the group is well financed enough to have a reliable stream of weaponized exploits for zero-day vulnerabilities in Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser. Since 2012, the gang has brazenly infected websites frequented by executives in the aerospace, energy, military, and technology industries and then used the compromises to siphon blueprints, designs, and other intellectual property from the executives' organizations. The targeting of Anthem appears to reflect more of a secondary interest that was intended to further advance a primary interest in aerospace, energy, and other similar industries rather than to target healthcare information for its own sake. "If someone just has Vikram's healthcare records, overall there's very little gain," Vikram Thakur, senior security researcher with Symantec, told Ars, as he described the motivations of the Black Vine group hacking Anthem. "But then you get healthcare information about a Vikram working for a government entity or a defense contractor, there is substantial value in that. This is the kind of data that's used in combination with something else to reach an entirely non-healthcare related goal." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Andrew Cunningham The new Moto G, back and front. 8 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);We’ve been big fans of Motorola’s Moto G since its inception—when the first one was released in 2013, it offered a ratio of features-to-value that nobody else could really touch. Competition at the low end of the market has gotten more intense since then, but the third-generation Moto G that Motorola revealed today looks like it can still hang. The new Moto G starts at $189, which will get you 8GB of storage and 1GB of RAM. Stepping up to the $219 option gets you 16GB of storage and 2GB of RAM, and it looks like as of this writing the more expensive model is the only one that can be customized in Moto Maker. Storage in both models is expandable by up to 32GB using the microSD card slot under the rear shell. Both models are available for purchase today. The basic design language is the same all the Moto phones have used: gently curved back, rounded edges, camera and logo aligned in the center. Like past Moto Gs, this one comes in black and white trim and includes colorful replaceable rear shells. The headphone jack is mounted in the center at the top, and the USB 2.0 port (not Type-C, sadly) is mounted on the bottom. The textured power button and non-textured volume buttons are both mounted on the right side. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Indie developers say they're owed thousands of dollars as a result of Razer's acquisition of the Ouya microconsole storefront and technical team. Speaking anonymously to Vice, multiple developers claim that contracts they originally signed with Ouya, which promised to pay them thousands of dollars, are not being honoured. The value of those deals ranged from $5,000 (£3,000) all the way to $30,000 (£20,000), according to Vice. Shortly after the release of the Ouya, the microconsole maker attempted to entice developers to create games with the Free the Games Fund. The idea behind the fund was for Ouya to match a game's successful crowdfunding campaign, provided it raised a minimum of $50,000 and the developer agreed to a six-month exclusivity deal. Unfortunately for Ouya, the fund was embroiled in controversy after it emerged that developers were backing their own Kickstarter campaigns in order to get hold of the free cash. Ouya later updated the terms of the fund to combat gaming of the system, which included a clause that said developers would get 50 percent of the money when they completed a playable beta version, 25 percent when the game launched, and the final 25 percent at the end of the exclusivity period. According to Vice, as developers were launching their beta builds, they were also asked to sign a new contract, which stated that either party may terminate the agreement in the event that the other party becomes insolvent, unable to pay its debts, or goes bankrupt. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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July has not been a good month for naval missile launches. On July 18, during an exercise off the coast of Virginia, the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS The Sullivans launched a Raytheon Standard Missile 2 Block IIIA anti-aircraft missile. The missile, an older model of SM-2 originally delivered to the Navy in 1991, exploded shortly after launch, just barely clear of the ship's superstructure—showering the ship with debris and starting a fire on its flight deck. Then, on July 26—during a naval parade at Sevestapol, the home of the Russian Black Sea fleet in Crimea—the Russian Navy's guided missile frigate Ladny attempted to launch an RPK-3 Metel anti-submarine missile. The RPK-3 Metel is a torpedo-carrying missile called the SS-N-14 Silex by NATO, and it has a range of about 55 kilometers. The RPK-3 was launched at a simulated target from within Sevestapol's harbor. But the boost stage of the missile spectacularly exploded at launch, sending its rocket engines spinning wildly away while the body of the Metel splashed into the harbor. Amazingly, no one aboard the ship or watching from the shoreline was injured. The Metel weapons system was first introduced into the Soviet Navy in 1969. This could have ruined everybody's day. In the wake (so to speak) of the explosion of the missile launched from The Sullivans, the US Navy has restricted use of some older SM-2 missiles to "Wartime Use Only" while a review board determines the cause of that failure. The Sullivans is in Mayport, Florida undergoing repairs to damage caused by the explosion. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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DHI Group—formerly known as Dice Holdings Incorporated prior to this April—announced plans this morning to sell the combination of Slashdot and SourceForge. The announcement was made as part of DHI’s 2Q15 financial results, which were mostly positive, with DHI showing an increase in revenue over the same period last year (totaling $65.8 million) and a net income of $5.7 million. The telling quote comes under the section titled "Planned Sale of Slashdot Media," wherein the company states the following (emphasis added): The Company acquired Slashdot Media in 2012 both to provide the Dice business with broader reach into Slashdot's user community base and to extend the Dice business outside North America by engaging with SourceForge's significant international technology user community. The Company, however, has not successfully leveraged the Slashdot user base to further Dice's digital recruitment business; and with the acquisition of The IT Job Board and success of Open Web, the anticipated value to the Company of the SourceForge traffic outside North America has not materialized. The Company now plans to divest the business, as it does not fit within the Company's strategic initiatives and believes the Slashdot Media business will have the opportunity to improve its financial performance under different ownership. The report goes on to note that in spite of what the report calls "an incredibly loyal and passionate following of tech professionals," Slashdot and SourceForge aren't core to DHI’s business and that DHI has partnered with KeyBanc Capital Markets to advise DHI on the sale. There is no buyer lined up yet. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In a surprise announcement, publisher Square Enix has just taken the wraps off the very first games for Nintendo's upcoming NX console. Dragon Quest X, along with its newly unveiled sequel Dragon Quest XI: In Search of the Departed Time, will be coming to the NX alongside the 3DS and PlayStation 4 in 2016. While the NX version of the game got little more than a name-drop, Square Enix did reveal during its presentation in Japan (via Siliconera) that—unlike the online MMO Dragon Quest X—Dragon Quest XI will be a standalone single-player title. The PS4 version of the game is being developed in Unreal Engine 4, which suggests that Nintendo's next console will have the horsepower to drive Epic's new engine. The 3DS version of the game is being developed with the help of Toy Logic, and won't be just a straight port. Instead, the game will run in full 3D on the top screen, while simultaneously displaying a retro 2D sprites version of the game on the bottom screen. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Amiga 500: It's an Amiga. It's a Commodore. It's the bleeding edge of 1987. 17 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);Last week marked the 30th anniversary of Amiga, the PC line from Commodore that tried to fight the growing IBM PC hegemony in the spirit of the Commodore 64. And despite being unaware of the Amiga's birthday, I somehow managed to recently publish two brief tours of landmark computers from the 1980s: the Apple II Plus, which I had rescued from my parents' attic, and the TRS-80 Model 100, which I won on eBay with a bid of $35. This sparked an e-mail from Ars reader Dave Hough, and the subject line said it all: "would you like another old computer - amiga 500." Dave was clearing things out and wanted to find a good home for his Amiga 500—the computer upon which his kids first learned to program. Who was I to say no? This past Saturday, I met up with Dave and picked up a box filled with not just the 500, but a host of attachments and accessories—everything but the monitor. Fortunately, there was an RGB to composite video adapter in the box as well, so I didn't have to go on a great search for RGB-to-VGA converters. The box even included something more valuable: a SupraDrive hard drive. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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SAN FRANCISCO—In a breezy, open-air lobby of a small office building in the city, Bridget Hickey, a representative for Chinese mobile phone company OnePlus, invites a handful of journalists to check out two neatly organized rows of phones on a nearby table. “Basically this is super low-key,” she tells us, adding that a VR demo will be available later this evening to people around the world. Hickey is right on multiple counts. Not only is the event relaxed and free-form, without any speeches from company officials or slides showing OnePlus statistics, but the company’s new phone itself, called the OnePlus 2 (that’s “two” in numeral form, not spelled out, company representatives informed us), is low-key, quietly offering improvements on the strong showing it made last year without taking any giant or unexpected turns in form or function. The phone looks very much like its predecessor, the OnePlus One (“one” is spelled out here, naturally), and it feels like its predecessor too. There are some obvious hardware improvements, as well as more incremental software improvements. But there is one big difference from the phone’s debut last year—it’s no longer running Cyanogenmod, opting instead for an in-house OS called Oxygen built on top of Android Lollipop 5.1. The OnePlus 2 runs on a 64-bit Snapdragon 810 processor with 1.8GHz “Octa-core CPUs” as well as an Adreno 430 GPU. The Snapdragon 810 does have some heat issues, but it's really unavoidable for most companies this generation. We'll have to see how well the OnePlus 2 deals with heat when we have more time with it. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It's been two years since filmmakers making a documentary about the song "Happy Birthday" filed a lawsuit claiming that the song shouldn't be under copyright. Now, they have filed (PDF) what they say is "proverbial smoking-gun evidence" that should cause the judge to rule in their favor. The "smoking gun" is a 1927 version of the "Happy Birthday" lyrics, predating Warner/Chappell's 1935 copyright by eight years. That 1927 songbook, along with other versions located through the plaintiffs' investigations, "conclusively prove that any copyright that may have existed for the song itself... expired decades ago." If the filmmakers' lawyers are right, it could mean a quick route to victory in a lawsuit that's been both slow-moving and closely watched by copyright reform advocates. Warner/Chappell has built a licensing empire based on "Happy Birthday," which in 1996 was pulling in more than $2 million per year. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is the gift that keeps on giving. After completing a historic flyby of Pluto on July 14, the spacecraft continues to provide scientists with never-before-seen views of Pluto and its five moons as well as incredible data packets. Last Friday, the spacecraft left us with some amazing science data to digest and a hauntingly beautiful view of Pluto backlit by the Sun. Transmitting data's slow in part due to the vast distance between the Earth and New Horizons, but the probe also has to share its "talking time" with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN)—a special worldwide network of large antennas designed to support interplanetary missions. As a result, scientists cannot download all the data on board New Horizons at one time. Over the next few weeks, mostly engineering data will be beamed back, so this is the last of the new images we'll see for a while. Scientists have known for years that Pluto has an atmosphere but have never been able to directly observe it. The first detection of Pluto's atmosphere came in 1988 during a stellar occultation—meaning Pluto passed between the Earth and a distant star, blocking out the star's light and allowing scientists to gather data. If Pluto had an atmosphere, the light from the star would gradually fade versus being suddenly blocked out. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Last November, Charles Tendell quietly launched a website called Hacker's List. Its name was literal. In this online marketplace, white-hat security experts could sell their services in bite-size engagements to people with cyber-problems beyond their grasp. "Hacker's List is meant to connect consumers who have online issues to hackers or professionals out there who have the skills to service them," Tendell told Ars. "Consumers get bullied online, they lose personal information, they have things stolen from them, they get locked out of things, and they have people post negative things or post personal information. They didn't have a place to go to be able to get help and make sure they're getting the right price or the best person for a particular job. That's what Hacker's List is for." The idea seemed clever enough. Soon after launch, The New York Times found the site and brought a stampede of traffic that initially caused it to go down under the strain. In the six months or so since, Hacker's List has been running without technical hitches. (The site is also utilizing CloudFlare's content delivery network nowadays.) Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Gaming Editor Kyle Orland - "Action-Oriented, Proficient, Relaxed, Competitive, Grounded, and Practical" (full results) Top 3 games: Super Mario 64, Hearthstone, Spelunky 10 more images in gallery As an industry, we tend to refer to anyone who plays games as a "gamer." But now more than ever, that's a term that's so broad as to be useless, lumping obsessive Candy Crush Saga players with Dark Souls speedrunners, Final Fantasy fans, and people who only play the new Madden and Call of Duty every year. Grouping them all together as "gamers" is about as clarifying as putting fans of horror movies and fans of romantic comedies together as "movie watchers." There are plenty of attempts to subdivide gamers into smaller, more descriptive groups—"hardcore," "casual," "retro," and the like—but these all rely on imprecise definitions and self-assessments. These groupings are often more about declaring an affiliation than about identifying specific types of games someone likes. The folks at Quantic Foundry seem to have developed a more detailed way of breaking down different gaming subgroups. The "game behavior analytics" consultancy has developed a five-minute online quiz intended to narrow down a person's gaming tastes to a "gamer motivation profile." Participants are rated on a percentile basis along six different axes identifying what game design elements they find interesting: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The pages of Ars Technica are littered with stories in which owners of copyrights are suing others for exploiting those works without permission. Think of the Motion Picture Association of America and the Recording Industry Artists Association, to name but a few of the key litigants. Whether groups like the MPAA and RIAA are being overbearing about it depends on where you line up on the debate. The same can be said about the latest entrant into the Copyright War—the state of Georgia. While they aren't even suing over a music recording or motion picture, the Peach's State's complaint (PDF) can be seen as equally nitpicky. Georgia claims that a legal rebel, Public.Resource.org, is publishing and making it easy for others to copy the physical text and accompanying annotations of Georgia's state law—the Official Code of Georgia Annotated. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Michael Chertoff, the former head of the Department of Homeland Security and a former federal prosecutor, made some surprising remarks last week, coming out strongly against cryptographic backdoors that could be provided to the government upon request. "I think that it’s a mistake to require companies that are making hardware and software to build a duplicate key or a back door even if you hedge it with the notion that there’s going to be a court order," he said to the crowd at the Aspen Security Forum. This sentiment stands in contrast to what the FBI and other top government officials have said while lamenting the problem of "going dark"—the idea that criminals, ne’er-do-wells, and miscreants have access to more encryption than ever before, and that’s bad for law enforcement. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google lawyers are trying to wrest more information from movie studios about their relationships with Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood, who began investigating the search giant at the behest of the Motion Picture Association of America. Ongoing litigation between Google and the MPAA has unearthed and made public just one new e-mail so far—and it's very revealing. The e-mail (PDF), published in court records on Thursday, shows Hood's plan of how a media attack against Google could proceed—and how the MPAA could help out. It's a six-step plan, which begins with a call to several Google attorneys. It proceeds as follows: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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DEARBORN, MI—Everybody thinks they're a great driver; distracted driving is something that happens to everyone else. However, plenty of research suggests this isn't the case, and it only takes a few seconds of looking away from the road to get into trouble. Car companies have created a number of safety aids to help with this problem. Some—like adaptive cruise control with lane centering—take control in place of the driver, such as the Volvo system we experienced in May. More common are systems that alert drivers when they're veering out of their lane or are about to rear end another vehicle. On a recent visit to Ford's Research and Innovation Center in Dearborn, Michigan, I got a chance to experience the kind of research that goes into optimizing such systems, courtesy of the company's Virtual Test Track Experiment (VIRTTEX) simulator. Jonathan M. Gitlin VIRTTEX, as seen from the control room. 3 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);VIRTTEX, run by Dr. Mike Blommer and his team, is one of a handful of full-size vehicle motion simulators in the US car industry. It wouldn't look out of place if the name on it read Boeing instead of Ford. I met Blommer along with Reates Curry and Radhakrishnan Swaminathan in VIRTTEX's control room, which looks out at the simulator via a wall of windows along one side. Banks of monitors, computers, and control panels take up the other walls. The other side of the window is where VIRTTEX lies, tucked inside a three-story room. A white dome sits atop six hydraulic struts, and it's capable of moving 9.8ft (3m) laterally or vertically and pitching 6.5ft (2m). Inside the dome is a matte black Ford Edge. This was once a real, working vehicle, but now it lacks suspension or a drivetrain, and it's hard-mounted to the dome's floor. Projectors create a 360 degree field of view inside the dome, and speakers inside the Edge recreate vehicle and road noise sampled from the real world. On one side of the dome is an escape hatch—borrowed from a Boeing 727—for use in emergencies, although Blommer told me that the only time it has ever needed to be opened is for the biannual safety check. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A very large number of scientific and technological luminaries have signed an open letter calling for the world's governments to ban the development of "offensive autonomous weapons" to prevent a "military AI arms race." The letter, which will be presented at the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI) in Buenos Aires tomorrow, is signed by Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, Noam Chomsky, the Woz, and dozens of other AI and robotics researchers. For the most part, the letter is concerned with dumb robots and vehicles being turned into smart autonomous weapons. Cruise missiles and remotely piloted drones are okay, according to the letter, because "humans make all targeting decisions." The development of fully autonomous weapons that can fight and kill without human intervention should be nipped in the bud, however. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In a blog post published today titled "Everything in its right place," Google acknowledged that forcing its users into Google+ was a bad idea. The company said it will no longer require Google+ accounts to use any of its products, and as we've seen it happening, it will continue stripping Google+ integration out of all of its products. "It doesn’t make sense for your Google+ profile to be your identity in all the other Google products you use," the company said. The next product to be de-plussified is YouTube. The YouTube blog announced that "in the coming weeks" comments will no longer require Google+; as of today, comments made on YouTube won't show up on Google+, and vice-versa. Google also says that in the future, YouTube users will be able to delete the Google+ accounts that they were forced to make, without losing any data. (Don't do that right now because you will lose data.) YouTube's Google+ integration was almost universally disliked by users. It lead to an influx of spam, and many of the sites popular personalities came out against the new comment system. To this day, some popular channels still have comments disabled altogether. The cofounder of YouTube even came out against the system, asking "Why the f*** do I need a Google+ account to comment on a video?" Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Almost all Android mobile devices available today are susceptible to hacks that can execute malicious code when they are sent a malformed text message or the user is lured to a malicious website, a security researcher reported Monday. The vulnerability affects about 950 million Android phones and tablets, according to Joshua Drake, vice president of platform research and exploitation at security firm Zimperium. It resides in "Stagefright," an Android code library that processes several widely used media formats. The most serious exploit scenario is the use of a specially modified text message using the multimedia message (MMS) format. All an attacker needs is the phone number of the vulnerable Android phone. From there, the malicious message will surreptitiously execute malicious code on the vulnerable device with no action required by the end user and no indication that anything is amiss. In a blog post published Monday, Zimperium researchers wrote: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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