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Enlarge / An Orthodox priest hands out Easter eggs to the media at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad after blessing the Soyuz rocket on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Kazakhstan. Barring any unexpected technical problems, a Soyuz rocket will launch Thursday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, carrying just two people: first-time NASA astronaut Jack Fischer and veteran Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin. The launch will occur during the afternoon local time, but it will come early in the morning in the United States, at 3:13am EDT (8:13am UK time). The rocket launch comes amid some uncertainty after a Soyuz rocket carrying an uncrewed Progress spacecraft exploded about six minutes into flight on December 1, 2016, wiping out 2.6 tons of food, fuel, and supplies. This was due to a problem with the rocket's third-stage engine, the kerosene-fueled RD-0110. That Progress spacecraft launched on an older Soyuz-U rocket, and crewed launches now take place on a more modern Soyuz-FG rocket, but the two rockets share a common third stage. This is now the second time the third-stage engine has failed in some way in the last five years, as a similar problem occurred during the 2011 launch of Progress 44P. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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With the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 finally ready for market, it's time for a round of smartphone updates from the usual suspects. The chip debuted in the Galaxy S8 (full review coming soon), and Xiaomi is now featuring the 835 in the Xiaomi Mi 6, the new flagship for the company's home market of China. Unlike the stunning Xiaomi Mi Mix, a slim-bezel "concept" phone from Xiaomi that the company actually sold, the Mi 6 is pretty boring to look at. Xiaomi has fallen back to its standard "do what Apple is doing" design language, with thick bezels on the top and bottom of the phone and a front-mounted fingerprint sensor. It gets a lot harder to complain when you see the price, though: $362 (RMB 2,499). Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The actual SNES Mini probably won't be this small or have a cartridge slot. But we can dream... (credit: DannyChoo.com) Eurogamer's report this morning that Nintendo is working on an "SNES Mini" plug-and-play console in the style of the NES Classic Edition (according to "sources close to the company") isn't too surprising. The original NES Mini was an unexpectedly large success that should logically inspire Nintendo to mine more of its classic hardware for more easy profits. On the other hand, Nintendo recently discontinued the NES Classic Edition despite evidence of continuing huge demand that hasn't been satisfied by the paltry supply Nintendo rolled out to stores. Eurogamer goes so far as to say the SNES Mini's impending release is part of the reason the NES Classic Edition was discontinued, suggesting that the company thinks only one retro console can exist on the market at a time, for some reason. In all likelihood, the SNES Mini will likely be nearly identical to the miniature NES that came before it. If we had Nintendo's ear, though, here's what we'd recommend to help it build the retro console of our dreams: Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Video shot and edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK—For fans of the racing game, Electronic Arts' 17-year-long exclusive contract with Porsche must rank as one of the great injustices of all time. These days, games like Gran Turismo and Forza Motorsport—which sell in the millions—do much to introduce cars to new audiences. Arguably, that has been true for some time now. Don't believe me? Just look at the Nissan GT-R's following in Europe and the US, fueled by Polyphony Digital. So the sporadic nature of Porsche's presence in these games has been frustrating for gamers who just want to race the cars. Thankfully, all that appears to be at an end. Back in December we discovered that the EA contract had expired, and the German automaker hasn't been hanging around. Porsches will feature in the upcoming Project CARS 2. Sony recently revealed Porsche will be in Gran Turismo Sport. And at the New York International Auto Show, Microsoft and Porsche announced a six-year partnership. As you'll see in the video above, we spoke to Microsoft's Dan Greenawalt and Sebastian Hornung of Porsche to find out more. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / That sketchy speedy delivery gig you were offered by that company that you applied to work for? It's probably a scam. If you're using a Web-based third-party recruiter site to look for and apply for jobs, you may want to keep a close eye on the e-mails you get in response. As Steve Ragan of CSO reports, scammers are harvesting information from recruiter sites to offer "flexible" jobs that are in fact criminal undertakings—often posing as executives from the companies where applicants have applied for jobs. One woman who applied for a job at the paint manufacturer Sherwin-Williams through the site of ZipRecruiter received an e-mail shortly afterward from someone posing as the CEO of the company. The person claimed that the position she had applied for was filled but offered another job as a "personal assistant" for the CEO himself for $500 a week. "If you accept my offer, I will need you to take charge of my mails pick up and drop off as well as errand running during your spare time outside of work," the e-mail read. "The job is flexible so you can do it wherever you are as long as there is a post office in the area. I will pay for the first week in advance to run errands, and will also have my mails/packages forwarded to a nearby post office where you can pick them from at your convenience." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has a lot of money and nothing to prove. Post-Microsoft, his biggest achievement so far has been paying $2 million to buy the LA Clippers, but on Monday The New York Times dropped an extensive report about his next venture: a project called "USAFacts," which aggregates publicly available government data to tell you how your city, state, and federal tax dollars are spent. Ballmer has already spent $10 million on the project and is "happy to fund the damn thing" (his personal net worth is estimated at over $22 billion, so he's good for it). He describes it as "a [Form] 10-K for government," a big searchable database that shows where tax revenue goes in and where it comes out. If you want to find out how many police officers or public school teachers the government employs in your area, you can do that; if you want to know what percentage of their salaries come from taxes paid by businesses instead of individuals, you can do that, too. Ballmer's enthusiasm for the project is infectious, according to the Times: Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: https://www.ge.com/) This week, General Electric (GE) and Southern California Edison (SCE) announced that they had retrofitted a natural gas peaker plant with a 10 MW, 4.3 MWh battery installation to create the world’s first hybrid electric gas turbine. Peaker plants only run when demand for electricity is high, and they can be used to fill in the gaps between baseload energy and intermittent renewables. The trouble with natural gas peaker plants, however, is that they can waste a lot of fuel in standby mode and when getting ramped up to the point where they can be put on the grid. But GE’s battery solution cuts out the fuel used during those times. “The energy storage capacity of the battery has been specifically designed to provide enough time coverage to allow the gas turbine to start and reach its designated power output,” GE writes. This eliminates the need to burn fuel while the gas turbine is kept spinning in standby mode. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The old showbiz adage continues to hold true (even in Wi-Fi testing): you can't please everyone. Shortly after our last round of mesh Wi-Fi testing, in which a six-pack of Plume devices surprised the field, e-mails arrived from both the Google Wifi and AmpliFi HD teams. The results weren't representative of their devices, they said, and perhaps I placed the devices badly. Both companies suggested placing an access point (AP) downstairs instead of all three APs being upstairs. While I doubted this pretty strongly—such a setup would require a multi-hop "tree" topology, which neither device is really designed well for—I set my own ego aside. At the very least, these pleas highlighted a weakness common to any three-piece mesh kit: they're deceptively difficult to place well. But blindly following Google's and AmpliFi's recommendations to move an access point downstairs would have weakened the devices' previous coverage pattern upstairs. That arrangement means the upstairs and downstairs access points have to cover half of the house from one location rather than each covering about a third of the house the way I'd had them arranged. Read 55 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Seth Anderson) Mirai, the botnet that threatened the Internet as we knew it last year with record-setting denial-of-service attacks, is facing an existential threat of its own: A competing botnet known as Hajime has infected at least 10,000 home routers, network-connected cameras, and other so-called Internet of Things devices. Hajime uses a decentralized peer-to-peer network to issue commands and updates to infected devices. This design makes it more resistant to takedowns by ISPs and Internet backbone providers. Hajime uses the same list of user name and password combinations Mirai uses, with the addition of two more. It also takes steps to conceal its running processes and files, a feature that makes detecting infected systems more difficult. Most interesting of all: Hajime appears to be the brainchild of a grayhat hacker, as evidenced by a cryptographically signed message it displays every 10 minutes or so on terminals. The message reads: Just a white hat, securing some systems. Important messages will be signed like this! Hajime Author. Contact CLOSED Stay sharp! Another sign Hajime is a vigilante-style project intended to disrupt Mirai and similar IoT botnets: It blocks access to four ports known to be vectors used to attack many IoT device. Hajime also lacks distributed denial-of-service capabilities or any other attacking code except for the propagation code that allows one infected device to seek out and infect other vulnerable devices. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Forget the box! It's free now! Finally! (credit: Blizzard Entertainment) Last month, the game makers at Blizzard announced a remastered, 4K-friendly version of the original StarCraft, set to launch this summer. That announcement also teased a much sooner release of the original StarCraft that would be completely free. After a delay, that free version is finally available to download worldwide. Blizzard has posted links to Mac and Windows builds here. The late-March remaster announcement included the promise of the game's original, lower-res version, complete with all Brood War expansion content. The low-res version would be made entirely free to download (technically, "free as in beer"—you can grab the compiled game and play it to your heart's content, but you are not formally allowed to pick the files apart and use, say, the game's source code as you please). However, a beta launch of this new version, numbered 1.18, resulted in crashes and issues for testers, so Blizzard held it back for testing and tweaking until Tuesday. It makes sense that the patch's beta launch was a little rocky, considering the game hadn't been updated since 2009 and had to pass muster on modern Windows and Mac operating systems. This version may very well receive further patches as well, since it will contain identical gameplay to the summer remaster version. The newer StarCraft will only receive a superficial update in the form of completely redrawn assets; all other parts and mechanics of the game will be so identical that remaster players will be able to compete online against original-version players. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: kris krüg) One of the things that Microsoft does with its Insider Preview builds of Windows is run experiments. A couple of experiments that were briefly available during the development of the Creators Update are back, as Microsoft develops new power management capabilities. The new feature is called Power Throttling, although this name is just temporary. Power Throttling was originally trialed in the Creators Update preview build 15002. When used in conjunction with an Intel Skylake or Kaby Lake processor—and only those processors, for the moment—the system will classify certain applications as being "background work." If a background task demands processor time, Windows will avoid kicking up the processor into a high performance mode, instead keeping it in its low power state. Only when a foreground application—or certain classes of important background task, such as music apps—needs processor time will the processor have its speed increased. The slider is back. (credit: Microsoft) Power Throttling is controlled by new settings in the Settings app—you can set them so that Windows will never treat certain apps as being background apps if you prefer—and by a second Creators Update-era experiment that has been resurrected. Build 15014 included a power management slider that appeared when you clicked the battery icon in the system notification area. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Verizon has struck a deal with Corning to purchase up to 37.2 million miles of optical fiber and related hardware over the next three years, with Verizon planning to use that fiber to boost capacity and lower latency in its wireless network. "The agreement calls for Corning to provide and Verizon to purchase up to 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) of optical fiber each year from 2018 through 2020, with a minimum purchase commitment of $1.05 billion," Verizon said in its announcement of the purchase agreement today. The fiber will be used for network improvements "designed to improve Verizon’s 4G LTE coverage, speed the deployment of 5G, and deliver high-speed broadband to homes and businesses of all sizes." But while Verizon mentioned both mobile and home Internet service, this doesn't mean there will be any unexpected expansions of FiOS, Verizon's fiber-to-the-home service. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Piotrus) Joel Abel Garcia, a 35-year-old from the Bronx, New York, became the third member of an alleged ring of automated teller machine "skimmers" to plead guilty today in the US District of New Jersey to the charge of conspiracy to commit bank fraud. Another member of the group—Victor Hanganu, a Romanian citizen living in Bayside, New York—pleaded guilty to the same charge on April 10. Eleven others have been charged in the conspiracy, which targeted PNC and Bank of America ATMs in New Jersey from March 2015 until June of 2016. Another Romanian, Radu Marin, pleaded guilty on March 29. "According to admissions made in connection with the pleas, Garcia, Hanganu, and others sought to defraud financial institutions and their customers by illegally obtaining customer account information, including account numbers and personal identification numbers," a Department of Justice spokesperson said in a statement made on behalf of federal prosecutors in New Jersey. Garcia was found to be personally responsible for $132,805 in withdrawals using forged ATM cards out of a total of $428,581 over the 15-month period. Garcia admitted as part of the plea that "he installed 'skimming' devices on the ATMs" belonging to PNC and Bank of America at multiple locations in New Jersey, "including pinhole cameras that recorded password entries and card-reading devices capable of recording customer information encoded on magnetic strips," according to the statement. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Floyd Lee Buchanan (left), and Troy Montgomery Cornish. The pair was arrested Friday in Maryland while allegedly camcording Fate of the Furious. (credit: Anne Arundel County Police Department) A June 15 trial date has been set for two Maryland men arrested on suspicion of camcording the new action flick Fate of the Furious, a court clerk said Tuesday. The men, Troy Montgomery Cornish, 38, and Floyd Lee Buchanan, 35, were arrested Friday at a Hoyts Movie Theater after an investigator from the Motion Picture Association of America alerted the authorities to the alleged piracy. The two were charged under a state law making it illegal to record a movie in a theater. The maximum penalty is a year in jail and a $2,500 fine. Many states and the federal government have laws barring the use of recording devices in theaters. Anne Arundel County Police reported (PDF) that the MPAA "investigator stated that he had been watching two known piracy suspects and observed them enter the movie theater. He also observed them watching and illegally recording an early release feature of Fate of the Furious." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Mac and iOS users with old hardware can now get some of Apple's fundamental software for free. According to a report from MacRumors, the iWork and iLife suite of apps, including iMovie, Numbers, Keynote, Pages, and GarageBand for Mac and iOS, are now listed as free in the App Store. Previously, users with old hardware had to pay for each app. Individual programs cost between $5 and $20 each, which would add up if a user with an old Mac or iOS device wanted to download and use both suites. In 2013, Apple made iWork and iLife apps free for new Mac and iOS customers, but that meant you had to purchase a new Apple device before you could download any of those apps at no cost. Until now, users with hardware released before 2013 still had to pay for iWork and iLife if they hadn't made a new Apple purchase recently. Now there's no more confusion surrounding the availability of Apple's basic apps. Anyone with old Apple devices can download the latest versions of iWork and iLife apps for free with no strings attached. It might be too little, too late for some; Apple's App Store is so vast that users with old hardware probably found iWork- and iLife-equivalents to use. While we don't know if future updates of iWork and iLife apps will be compatible with all old devices, it's worthwhile to download the latest versions now. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg kicked off his company's annual "F8" conference on Tuesday with a stark mission statement: People don't look at Facebook on their phones enough, and he has plans to change that. The plan revolves around adding "augmented reality" (AR) features to Facebook's smartphone apps using our existing cameras. Starting today, basic features will be added to the Facebook app in a "closed beta" that makes more content appear when pointing a phone's camera at the real world. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The following article contains some spoilers for Fate of the Furious. Ten of the most expensive cars in the world. (video link) To celebrate the Fate of the Furious—and the ridiculous rides that characterize the franchise—we've put together a video of the world's most expensive hypercars. But while there's a lot for the car-obsessed to like about the new movie, it at times left my brain ready to blow a gasket. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: NBC Today) Theranos, Inc., the infamous and embattled blood-testing company, has agreed to pay the state of Arizona more than $4.65 million dollars in consumer restitution for blood tests that were allegedly misrepresented and, in some cases, voided. The agreement, announced Tuesday by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich’s office, comes after Brnovich alleged that Theranos’ advertisements in the state “misrepresented, omitted, and concealed material information regarding its testing service’s methodology, accuracy, reliability, and essential purpose,” the consent judgement reads. The state also alleged that Theranos was out of compliance with federal regulators. Theranos denies any wrongdoing but agreed to pay to avoid a trial. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An AI contemplates its own biases in the movie Ex Machina. (credit: UPI) Ever since Microsoft's chatbot Tay started spouting racist commentary after 24 hours of interacting with humans on Twitter, it has been obvious that our AI creations can fall prey to human prejudice. Now a group of researchers has figured out one reason why that happens. Their findings shed light on more than our future robot overlords, however. They've also worked out an algorithm that can actually predict human prejudices based on an intensive analysis of how people use English online. The implicit bias test Many AIs are trained to understand human language by learning from a massive corpus known as the Common Crawl. The Common Crawl is the result of a large-scale crawl of the Internet in 2014 that contains 840 billion tokens, or words. Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy researcher Aylin Caliskan and her colleagues wondered whether that corpus—created by millions of people typing away online—might contain biases that could be discovered by algorithm. To figure it out, they turned to an unusual source: the Implicit Association Test (IAT), which is used to measure often unconscious social attitudes. People taking the IAT are asked to put words into two categories. The longer it takes for the person to place a word in a category, the less they associate the word with the category. (If you'd like to take an IAT, there are several online at Harvard University.) IAT is used to measure bias by asking people to associate random words with categories like gender, race, disability, age, and more. Outcomes are often unsurprising: for example, most people associate women with family, and men with work. But that obviousness is actually evidence for the IAT's usefulness in discovering people's latent stereotypes about each other. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Harrison Weber) Smartphones know an awful lot about us. They know if we're in a car that's speeding, and they know when we're walking, running, or riding in a bus. They know how many calls we make and receive each day and the precise starting and ending time of each one. And of course, they know the personal identification numbers we use to unlock the devices or to log in to sites that are protected by two-factor authentication. Now, researchers have devised an attack that makes it possible for sneaky websites to surreptitiously collect much of that data, often with surprising accuracy. The demonstrated keylogging attacks are most useful at guessing digits in four-digit PINs, with a 74-percent accuracy the first time it's entered and a 94-percent chance of success on the third try. The same technique could be used to infer other input, including the lock patterns many Android users rely on to lock their phones, although the accuracy rates would probably be different. The attacks require only that a user open a malicious webpage and enter the characters before closing it. The attack doesn't require the installation of any malicious apps. Malicious webpages—or depending on the browser, legitimate sites serving malicious ads or malicious content through HTML-based iframe tags—can mount the attack by using standard JavaScript code that accesses motion and orientation sensors built into virtually all iOS and Android devices. To demonstrate how the attack would work, researchers from Newcastle University in the UK wrote attack code dubbed PINLogger.js. Without any warning or outward sign of what was happening, the JavaScript was able to accurately infer characters being entered into the devices. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Atlantis and the final landing of the Space Shuttle program. (credit: NASA / Wikimedia Commons) No humans have launched into space from US soil for more than five years, when space shuttle Atlantis made its final voyage. Since that spacecraft landed on July 21, 2011, a total of 2,098 days have passed. Former Space Shuttle Program Manager Wayne Hale noted on Twitter Tuesday that this gap has now surpassed the previous longest US spaceflight gap—2,089 days—which occurred between the end of the Apollo program and the first space shuttle mission. The final Apollo mission, which launched in 1975 and featured an in-space rendezvous with a Russian spacecraft, presaged the end of the "space race" and future cooperation between the United States and Russia in space. And since the space shuttle's retirement in 2011, NASA has relied exclusively on Russia to get its astronauts to the International Space Station. It will do so again on Thursday, with the launch of Jack Fischer from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It would be easy to pillory NASA for this gap, but the space agency largely doesn't deserve the blame. The failure belongs to the American government, which knew literally for more than a decade that the shuttle's end was coming, but it failed to prepare for its inevitable retirement or articulate a plan for what was to come next. This failure belongs to the presidencies of George W. Bush and Barack Obama and especially to Congress, which underfunded the program both Bush and Obama settled on to replace the space shuttle—a commercial crew plan to leverage development of private spacecraft. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The sulfer-coal-burning John E. Amos Power Plant in West Virginia. (credit: Cathy) Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Rick Perry ordered a review (PDF) of electricity markets and reliability late last week, saying that "certain policies" have hindered the development and use of baseload energy sources like coal. Although Perry never mentions renewable energy explicitly in his letter, he references "significant changes within the electrical system." That seems to be a direct allusion to the record amount of renewable capacity that has been added to the grid in recent years. The Obama administration had supported initiatives to increase renewable energy on the US grid given the urgency of climate change and with a mind to mitigate the health problems that come with pollution related to coal burning and mining. Although wind and solar power are intermittent resources (meaning they only produce power when there’s wind and sun), government agencies including the DOE have funded research (PDF) to improve renewable energy efficiency and energy storage. The idea has been that adding renewable energy to the grid makes it more resilient, because power generation doesn’t rely on shipments of natural gas, coal, or oil. It also decreases the grid's reliance on large fossil fuel-burning facilities and allows more distributed energy generation. The Trump administration, on the other hand, has been openly critical of climate change science, with the president even falsely claiming that climate change is a hoax made up by China. In March, the president killed the Clean Power Plan and ordered agencies to ignore climate change. Perry, too, spent most of his early career rejecting climate change science, but during his January Senate confirmation hearing the former Texas governor said he now accepts science showing that the Earth is warming. Still, Perry has remained coy about whether he believes that climate change is caused by humans (which scientific evidence has been unambiguous about). Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Jet Black iPhone 7, replete with fingerprints. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple is said to be planning not one, not two, but three new iPhones for release this fall, if "people familiar with the matter" speaking to Bloomberg are to be believed. Two of those models will use the same 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch IPS screens that we're already used to, though Bloomberg doesn't say whether the designs will look much different from the current iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. But this year Apple is also said to be preparing a third higher-end model with a dramatically different approach, a slim-bezeled design with curved glass and an OLED screen that takes up most of the front of the device. If true, it's something that doesn't sound all that different from what Samsung is doing with the Galaxy S8. According to the report, all three phones would be revealed at the same time, but the redesigned model wouldn't actually ship until later. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: US Navy) Northrop Grumman has announced that new software for the Navy's MQ-4C Triton long-range patrol drone has passed a key flight test. The Triton is an upgraded maritime patrol version of Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk, and it's now on track for initial deployment by the Navy next year. The new software upgrade is a step toward tackling a problem that had grounded Northrop Grumman's program to provide long-range drones to Germany—and it has wider implications for autonomous aircraft of all sorts. The new software includes a feature called the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)—a capability that provides the remote operator of the aircraft with awareness of other aircraft operating nearby independent from air traffic control data. This proactively allows drone pilots to avoid other aircraft and prevent potential collisions. Earlier versions of the Global Hawk (including the Euro Hawk built for Germany) did not include this type of technology, and as a result those devices were not allowed to operate in the same airspace as civil air traffic in the US and Europe. With the new tweaks, Germany now plans to buy the Triton. Additionally, the software upgrades now allow a single operator to control multiple Triton drones and provide modes for operating the Triton's Multi-Function Active Sensor radar. The Triton, which has a range of 8,200 nautical miles (about 9,400 miles, or 15,000 kilometers), is intended to perform long-range ocean and coastal intelligence collection, including tracking and identification of ships. Flying for more than 24 hours at a time, the Triton will be capable of observing over a million square miles of ocean during a flight. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | Scott Olson) Banishing trans fats from foods is linked to reductions in the number of heart attacks and cardiovascular deaths in the years after the bans are implemented, according to data from cities and counties in New York that have made the cut. After three years, the areas banning trans fats from eateries seemed to have an extra 6.2 percent reduction in heart attacks and strokes compared with those that didn’t, researchers report in JAMA Cardiology. Last year, other researchers reported in the Journal of Health Economics that the New York bans appeared to cut deaths from cardiovascular disease by 4.5 percent—that is, they spared about 13 lives from cardiovascular deaths per 100,000 people each year. While the decade of bans that have gone into effect in the state offer “natural experiments” on how cutting out trans fat may affect health, the results back up a slew of older studies—animal, controlled trial, and observational studies—that found harms of trans fats, plus benefits of ousting them from people’s diets. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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