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ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);Somehow I expected the Mail application in Windows 10 to be better than it is. Microsoft’s stock e-mail app for Windows was on a clear upward trajectory, from a rough start in Windows 8 to a far more usable version in Windows 8.1. At first glance, Windows 10 Mail looks like an improvement. It has the same basic layout as the 8.1 version but makes more options visible instead of hiding them behind gestures, in keeping with Microsoft’s move back toward a more desktop-centric operating system. The Mail window can also be resized however you’d like, instead of running only in a full-screen or split-screen “snap” view. To me, this change alone makes the Windows 10 Mail, Calendar, and People apps more pleasant to use than their predecessors. But naturally, Windows 10 Mail has bugs and features that should be included but aren’t. Frustratingly, some basic but useful parts of Windows 8.1 Mail were stripped out in this new version. Getting started in Windows 10 Mail. 8 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } I wouldn’t call it a bad application. It grabs your mail from multiple accounts and reliably delivers messages to your inbox, accomplishing the central requirement of an e-mail application without too much trouble. It also looks nice and is pretty easy to use. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Intel and Micron have unveiled what appears to be the holy grail of memory. Called 3D XPoint (pronounced "cross point"), this is an entirely new type of non-volatile memory, with roughly 1,000 times the performance and 1,000 times the endurance of conventional NAND flash, while also being 10 times denser than conventional DRAM. The first 3D XPoint memory chips will be sampled "later this year," but there's no official timeline for commercialisation. Importantly, however, Intel and Micron say that 3D XPoint is "affordable," which means we might actually see it in consumer-grade devices. Other new memory technologies, such as phase-change memory, have so far proven too expensive to compete with gloriously cheap DRAM and NAND. A glorious wafer of 3D XPoint dies 4 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } So, what is this 3D XPoint thing? Annoyingly, neither Intel or Micron are giving away technical details at this point. We've asked for a whitepaper or some kind of technical specification, but no dice. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Windows 10 is happening, and you may or may not be running it by this evening, depending on whatever magical factors are used by Microsoft to determine availability. Upgraders will experience what our own Peter Bright calls a not-quite-perfect Start Menu and (at least eventually) some hot DirectX 12 gaming action, but something else is missing from the launch. See, in years past, as a new version of Windows charged toward release, Microsoft always released a little something extra—a promotional video. This is not a Microsoft-exclusive idea. Every company releases marketing-driven promotional videos, and they range from ludicrously overblown ballads to hilariously insulting and condescending how-to videos. But Microsoft’s promo efforts stand out even in this sea of crap. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The company that claims to own "Happy Birthday" shot back yesterday at what has been described as "smoking gun" evidence that the world's most famous song is not copyrighted. Lawyers for a filmmaker seeking to knock out the copyright found a 1922 songbook that features the lyrics of "Happy Birthday," published without a copyright notice but with a notice giving "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F. Summy Co." On Monday, they filed an application saying that the notice warrants ending the case. Publishing the lyrics without a copyright notice should have forfeited any copyright, and even if it didn't, copyright on the 1922 songbook expired in 1949. Warner/Chappell Music, believed to collect around $2 million per year from licensing "Happy Birthday," filed a response (PDF) yesterday, saying that the new evidence at most creates issues that can be resolved at trial. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Researchers have developed an attack that puts more than 50 percent of Android phones into the digital equivalent of a persistent vegetative state in which they're almost completely unresponsive and are unable to perform most functions, including making or receiving calls. The vulnerability, which resides in the mediaserver service Android uses to index media files, can most easily be exploited by luring a vulnerable phone to a booby-trapped website. Presumably, the phone can be revived by restarting it, but according to a blog post published Wednesday by a researcher from security firm Trend Micro, the bug can also be exploited by malicious apps. In this latter scenario, the malicious app could be designed to automatically start each time the phone is turned on, causing it to crash shortly after each restart. Trend Micro researcher Wish Wu wrote: Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The way William Merideth sees it, it’s pretty clear-cut: a drone flying over his backyard was a well-defined invasion of privacy, analogous to a physical trespassing. Not knowing who owned it, the Kentucky man took out his shotgun and fired three blasts of Number 8 birdshot to take the drone out. "It was just right there," he told Ars. "It was hovering, I would never have shot it if it was flying. When he came down at my girl's room, and came with a video camera right over my back deck, that's not going to work. I know they're neat little vehicles, but one of those uses shouldn’t be flying into people's yard and videotaping." Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Though we’ve made great strides with renewable energy, widespread implementation has proven to be economically challenging, in part due to the existing fossil fuel infrastructure. One promising renewable technology is solar-thermal energy, which harnesses solar energy to generate either heat or electricity. When coupled with a cost-effective thermal storage strategy, it promises to deliver baseload electricity through the existing power grid. Unfortunately, to be an economically attractive option, solar-thermal energy generation requires rather large installs, at tens of megawatts of capacity, which can be quite expensive. But there’s an intriguing approach that solves both the issues of size and existing infrastructure: integrating solar thermal into existing fossil fuel power plants. A new analysis suggests it’s both economical and less harmful to the environment. Instead of trying to completely replace what’s already up and running, this strategy provides time for an incremental shift in the power supply and gives the engineers running the plants a chance to familiarize themselves with a stream of technological changes. From an engineering perspective, these changes would have a major impact on several aspects of the energy and material flow of the plant, which the analysis addresses. The authors demonstrate that solar-aided plants can achieve enhanced solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies without running into issues that limit other solar-powered technologies. Critically, they could cut the use of fossil fuels in half. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Throughout the 8-ification of Windows, Microsoft clearly failed to endear its OS to PC gamers. Above all else, Window 8's root-level Windows Store, and its unclear messaging on how it would coexist with other gaming software, was so bad that it lit a fire under Gabe Newell's ass to create an entirely new, competing OS built off of Steam. It has been a long time since Microsoft was seen as an all-out winner in the "keep PC gamers happy" department. Sure, DirectX laid down the groundwork for the headache-free, high-end gaming we've enjoyed for over a decade—when's the last time you had to adjust IRQ and DMC settings for your sound card, for instance? But those are some long laurels to pin your reputation to at this point. Today, Microsoft is better known to PC gamers for Games For Windows, the Windows Store, and 2012's unclear Xbox Games On Windows initiative. What have you done for PC gamers lately, Microsoft? Windows 10 brings two major initiatives intended to turn things around on this score. The first is DirectX 12, whose performance boosts, processor multi-threading optimizations, and Windows 10 exclusivity will be scrutinized in another article on Ars very soon. The second, which this article will focus on, is deeper Xbox integration than any Windows before it, by way of a major app and new features that connect console and PC players on the online gaming service. Because Microsoft has confused people in the past about Xbox features on computers, we have spent a little over a week fiddling around with the RTM version of Windows 10 to answer every Xbox-specific question you might have. Read 30 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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You may have seen the headlines last week: “Former Top NASA Scientist Predicts Catastrophic Rise In Sea Levels,” “Earth’s Most Famous Climate Scientist Issues Bombshell Sea Level Warning,” “Climate Seer James Hansen Issues His Direst Forecast Yet." Facebook even told me it was trending. The problem is, all those headlines describe a study, and that study doesn’t predict anything. It certainly doesn’t predict 10 feet of sea level rise by 2100 (or even 2050) as a number of stories have claimed. So what happened here? A few things. The circumstances surrounding the paper are unusual. First, the paper has not yet been peer-reviewed. (Many stories did make that clear.) It is currently undergoing a transparent review process for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Rather than the traditional, behind-closed-doors review where nothing is revealed until the final paper is accepted and published, the journal posts manuscripts immediately as “discussion papers.” As peer reviews are submitted, those will also be posted, as will the authors’ responses and their revisions. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics isn’t the only journal doing this, but these papers aren’t normally publicized until the process runs its course. In this case, a press release initiated by the authors went out immediately. In fact, due to a delay getting the manuscript proofread and posted, news stories began running several days before the manuscript was available on the journal’s website. Only those journalists to whom a draft had been circulated knew what was in it. Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Following its acquisition of Ouya earlier this week, a few members of the platform's independent development community began to complain that new owner Razer was exploiting a "bankruptcy clause" to get out of payments owed under Ouya's "Free the Games" promotion. Razer has now taken steps to squash that budding controversy, saying it will make an estimated $620,000 in payments to participants in the promotion as originally promised. As originally envisioned, "Free the Games" sought to match Kickstarter funds raised for independent game projects, provided they met certain development milestones and maintained exclusivity to the Ouya platform for a number of months. Participating developers will now sign a new agreement with Razer that drops the exclusivity requirement in exchange for the developer providing matching free downloads on Razer's new Cortex TV platform. "For example, if $10,000 is funded toward a $1 game, then 10,000 games at $1 would be given away at no cost to gamers on Cortex TV," Razer said in a statement. "Razer has a real interest in supporting indie developers and furthering the expansion of Android gaming on TV," the statement continues. "Moving forward with this plan will ensure that both interests are met, as openly, widely, and beneficially as possible." Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Windows 10 comes with a neat new feature called Wi-Fi Sense, which lets your PC automatically connect to Wi-Fi networks that your friends and acquaintances have previously connected to, even if you don't know the network password. First, a bit of anti-scaremongering. Despite what you may have read elsewhere, you should not be mortally afraid of Wi-Fi Sense. By default, it will not share Wi-Fi passwords with anyone else. For every network you join, you'll be asked if you want to share it with your friends/social networks. With that out of the way, let's talk a little bit about how Wi-Fi Sense works in Windows 10. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Wii U sales might be some way behind the competition, but that hasn't stopped Nintendo from turning in yet another surprising profit. For the three months starting April 1 through June 30, Nintendo racked up a net profit of ¥8.28 billion yen (£43 million, $67 million) off the back of over ¥90 billion (£466 million, $729 million) in sales. This follows Nintendo's overall profit of of ¥24.8 billion ($207 million, £136 million) for its fiscal year ending March 31. Nintendo's profits were way above analyst estimates of a ¥6.3 billion (£32 million, $50 million) loss, and massively improved over the ¥9.5 billion loss ($76 million, £49 million) the company reported for the same period last year. Nintendo cites strong software sales and "favourable sales of amiibo" for its profits, with 4.5 million games shifted on Wii U and 7.9 million games shifted on 3DS. Comic shooter Splatoon was a particularly strong performer, with 1.6 million units sold. It helped move some consoles too, with 470,000 Wii Us sold. The 3DS sold just over 1 million units during the same period. Unfortunately for Nintendo, Wii U sales continue to be down year over year, with the console managing to sell 510,000 units for the same period last year. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In a hole, on some bedrock a few miles outside central Zurich, there lived a spin-polarised scanning electron microscope. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole: it was a nanotech hole, and that means quiet. And electromagnetically shielded. And vibration-free. And cool. When you want to carry out experiments at the atomic scale—when you want to pick up a single atom and move it to the other end of a molecule—it requires incredibly exacting equipment. That equipment, though, is worthless without an equally exacting laboratory to put it in. If you're peering down the (figurative) barrel of a microscope at a single atom, you need to make sure there are absolutely no physical vibrations at all, or you'll just get a blurry image. Similarly, atoms really don't like to sit still: you don't want to spend a few hours setting up a transmission electron microscope (TEM), only to have a temperature fluctuation or EM field imbue the atoms with enough energy to start jumping around on their own accord. One solution, as you have probably gathered from the introduction to this story, is to build a bunker deep underground, completely from scratch, with every facet of the project simulated, designed, and built with a singular purpose in mind: to block out the outside world entirely. That's exactly what IBM Research did back in 2011, when it opened the Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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If your Windows Update looks like this, you can install Windows 10 right now. The free upgrade from Windows 7 and 8 to Windows 10 is available now on Windows update. Those of you who've reserved your copy may find that your Windows Update is already offering to install the new operating system, though the release is staggered so you may not get it just yet. Much to my surprise, upgrading my own system from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 was more or less flawless, and the upgrade is a great deal more convenient than a fresh install. If you want to do a fresh install, or want to upgrade but don't want to wait for Windows Update, ISO images are now available too. The final Windows 10 release is also now available on MSDN for subscribers. While you're waiting for the download, why not read our review? Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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SAN RAFAEL, California—It turns out 21st century baseball with a computer calling balls and strikes feels a lot like 20th century baseball (you know, with a human behind the plate). There appears to be two main differences. The first and most obvious is volume. Machines just aren’t good at giving that classic umpire grunt, so you still need a warm body to do it. The second? Accuracy. "You face [Hall of Fame pitcher] Greg Maddux and he’d get a foot off the plate," recalls Eric Byrnes, former Oakland A's player and current baseball analyst. "So if we have a chance to get it right, if we have a chance to get a pitch every time, why would we not?" Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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I'm more conflicted about Windows 10 than I have been about any previous version of Windows. In some ways, the operating system is extremely ambitious; in others, it represents a great loss of ambition. The new release tries to walk an unsteady path between being Microsoft's most progressive, forward-looking release and simultaneously appealing to Windows' most conservative users. And it mostly succeeds, making this the best version of Windows yet—once everything's working. In its current form, the operating system doesn't feel quite finished, and I'd wait a few weeks before making the leap. From highs to lows Windows 7 Andrew Cunningham Windows 7 was a straightforward proposition, a testament to the power of a new name. Windows Vista may have had a poor reputation, but it was a solid operating system. Give hardware and software vendors three years to develop drivers come to grips with security changes, fix a few bugs, and freeze the hardware requirements, and the result was Windows 7—an operating system that worked with almost any hardware, almost any software. It was comfortable and familiar. Add some small but desirable enhancements to window management and the task bar, and the result was a hugely popular operating system, the high point of the entire Windows family's development. Read 132 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It's like Christmas Eve... but if Windows 10 is as good as receiving presents from Santa. With the imminent release of Windows 10, we're resurfacing our explanation on Microsoft's unique licensing and update structures for its new OS. This piece originally ran on January 30, 2015, but we believe the information remains valid within 24 hours of the Windows 10 release. Windows licensing is more or less straightforward in the consumer sphere. Oh, sure, there are complications surrounding self-built systems, but compared to the world of enterprise licensing, the range of options is limited and the pricing simple. Corporate licensing, however, is a whole other matter. We've been saying for some time that the process of updating and upgrading Windows is going to change in Windows 10, and perhaps unsurprisingly, this is going to have implications for Windows licensing. The underlying theme is this: Microsoft does not want the Windows market to be split between a bunch of different versions. For a brief period, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1 were all both extant and actively supported Windows versions. This is bad for more or less the entire Windows world. It's bad for developers of Windows software because they're forced to choose between the best functionality (found in Windows 8.1) or the widest compatibility (target Windows XP). It's bad for Microsoft, because it has to support all these versions. It's bad, in many ways, for end-users, too; using old versions means that they don't get the latest features, and in the case of Windows XP, they don't even receive security updates. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Security researchers have refined a long-theoretical profiling technique into a highly practical attack that poses a threat to Tor users and anyone else who wants to shield their identity online. The technique collects user keystrokes as an individual enters usernames, passwords, and other data into a website. After a training session that typically takes less than 10 minutes, the website—or any other site connected to the website—can then determine with a high degree of certainty when the same individual is conducting subsequent online sessions. The profiling works by measuring the minute differences in the way each person presses keys on computer keyboards. Since the pauses between keystrokes and the precise length of time each key is pressed are unique for each person, the profiles act as a sort of digital fingerprint that can betray its owner's identity. The prospect of widely available databases that identify users based on subtle differences in their typing was unsettling enough to researchers Per Thorsheim and Paul Moore that they have created a Chrome browser plugin that's designed to blunt the threat. The plugin caches the input keystrokes and after a brief delay relays them to the website in at a pseudo-random rate. Thorsheim, a security expert who organizes the annual PasswordsCon conference, and Moore, an information security consultant at UK-based Urity Group, conceived the plugin after thinking through all the ways the typing profiles could be used to compromise online anonymity. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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One of the first Windows 10 features we learned about was the return of the Start menu, which is sort of funny, since the concept of the Start menu is over two decades old. Microsoft tried to replace it with the Start screen in Windows 8, and you only have to look at the adoption numbers to see how most consumers and businesses felt about it. The Start menu has changed a lot over the years, but there are a handful of common elements that have made it all the way from Windows 95 to Windows 10. We fired up some virtual machines and traveled back in time to before there was a Start menu to track its evolution from the mid '90s to now. Chicago Andrew Cunningham Windows Chicago is the bridge between Windows 3.x and 9x. 5 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);What you’re looking at here is build 58s of “Chicago,” one of the earliest extant betas of what would go on to become Windows 95. Things still look awfully Windows 3.1-ish in many parts of this build, but you can see the seeds that would later grow into the familiar Start Menu, Taskbar, and My Computer features, among a few other things. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);On a recent trip to Ann Arbor and Detroit, General Motors was nice enough to lend us a new Corvette Z06 as a runabout. Although Cars Technica is always up for getting some wheel time with interesting sports cars, the fact that the Z06 was equipped with the Performance Data Recorder (PDR) really piqued our interest. In fact, it has been an option on Corvettes for a little while now; last year it made news because of its 'Valet mode,' something that may not be legal in some states. The PDR combines a 720p video camera with an in-built data acquisition system, bringing driving analytics easily within grasp. A full workout of the PRD's capabilities will have to wait for me to successfully persuade The Powers That Be to let me book some track time on the office dime. But a (relatively) sedate drive through the Michigan countryside with Ars' Lead Developer Lee Aylward seemed like a good time to try out the PDR on the road. Automotive Editor Jonathan Gitlin and Lead Developer Lee Aylward go for a drive in the countryside. Edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) One of the nice things about the relentless pace of Moore's law is the way that consumer-grade hardware enables us to do things that a few years ago would have required six- or even seven-figure price tags. For example, in the car world, cheap and rugged video cameras, processors, and GPS units have brought data recording systems to the masses. Almost no one goes on a track day or racing without a GoPro camera, for example. And data recorders like those from TraqMate and AutosportLabs make it a doddle to analyze one's driving quantitatively and then overlay that data graphically on top of the corresponding video. Some automakers are evidently wising up to this trend and as a result are starting to offer OEM solutions built into their cars. Porsche now offers a Track Precision app which leverages a smartphone's camera to record video and overlay telemetry data, but Chevrolet was first to market with PDR, a standalone solution. PDR uses a camera set into the base of the rear-view mirror, just below the top of the windshield, coupled with a microphone inside the cabin. So far, so interesting, but nothing you couldn't get from a GoPro. But the PDR—developed in a partnership with Cosworth, which also supplies the telemetry system used by Corvette Racing—couples video and audio recording with a telemetry module. This features a dedicated GPS system operating at 5Hz, separate from the one in the car's infotainment system (which only runs at 1Hz). The PDR is also connected to the CANbus, allowing it to pull information from the car's sensors, like which gear you're in, engine revs, throttle and brake applications, steering input, and so on. All of this is then recorded to an SD card, found in the glove box. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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On Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said that a co-pilot's mistake was to blame in the October 2014 crash of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, which killed the co-pilot and injured the pilot over the Mojave Desert, where the craft was being tested. The NTSB added that Scaled Composites, the aerospace company that had built the SpaceShipTwo craft for Virgin Galactic and employed the two pilots, did not adequately consider the consequences of a human error such as the one that occurred and did not build fail-safes into the craft to compensate for that error. The approximate cause of the crash was determined rather quickly—not two days after SpaceShipTwo appeared to explode in the sky 10 miles up, NTSB chairman Christopher Hart faulted an early deployment of “feathering mode,” which changes the direction of the craft's wings to slow it down for descent. As SpaceShipTwo was still in powered flight, the high-drag configuration could have caused the plane to break up. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);Last week was the forty-sixth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing—the first of the six crewed landings on our nearest celestial neighbor. In the years between 1969 and 1972, 12 human beings walked on the surface of the moon: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Pete Conrad, Al Bean, Alan Shepard, Ed Mitchell, Dave Scott, Jim Irwin, John Young, Charlie Duke, Jack Schmitt, and Gene Cernan. Each Apollo landing by necessity leapfrogged the previous by some notable amount, because even as Apollo 11 was preparing to lift off it was obvious that the money wasn’t coming and Project Apollo might be the only chance to visit the moon—perhaps for a long, long time. Even though Apollo 10’s "dress rehearsal" had taken NASA through all but the final phase of the lunar landing two months before, there were still a large number of unknowns in play when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin separated Eagle from Columbia, leaving Michael Collins to watch his crewmates descend to the lunar surface—perhaps to stay there forever. And as it turned out, the first landing on the moon almost did encounter disaster. Shortly after Eagle entered one of the most complicated stages of the descent, the guidance computer began throwing off alarms—very serious alarms, of a type no one in mission control or on the spacecraft was immediately familiar with. Back at MOCR2 in Houston, the burden to determine whether or not the alarms were benign—and therefore the decision to determine whether to abort the landing, blow the Eagle in half, and make an emergency burn to try to make it back up to Columbia—fell on the shoulders of two people: guidance controller Steve Bales and backroom guidance specialist Jack Garmin. Read 42 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Did you hear the one about Conan O'Brien? He's accused of purloining jokes from a San Diego man's Twitter feed and personal blog. According to a copyright infringement lawsuit recently filed in federal court by a self-described Southern California comic writer named Robert Alexander Kaseberg, a few jokes he published were picked up by the comedian O'Brien, who told them during his monologue on the Conan television show throughout the year. The suit comes as Twitter has been in the news for honoring Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown requests from users complaining that their jokes were "lifted wholesale and shared by others, passing them off as their own." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Apple's new music streaming service will no longer count against T-Mobile's limits on high-speed data. T-Mobile announced the expansion of "Music Freedom" today, which in total exempts 33 music services from data limits imposed on certain customers. "Apple Music has become the single most requested new addition to Music Freedom and counts for a full 80% of the requests coming in via Twitter. I heard every one of them, so it’s happening right now!" T-Mobile US CEO John Legere wrote today. T-Mobile today also said that customers who buy the iPhone 6 this summer under its so-called "JUMP! On Demand" installment plan can swap it for the next iPhone without any new fees "and no change to your monthly payment." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In the US, the Energy Information Agency is the leading source of statistics on the production and use of electricity. But it is geared toward the traditional power grid, getting lots of its data directly from utilities or the regional grids. Although residential solar has generally been a rounding error in these numbers, that situation is gradually changing as the price of hardware has plunged. Just how much it has changed was driven home when the EIA analyzed the amount of net-metered solar hardware out there (net metering is used to track electricity fed into the grid by residential consumers). It turns out that, in 2014, residential solar capacity actually passed the capacity of utility-scale facilities. By the end of the year, homes accounted for 3.3 Gigawatts of capacity; large-scale facilities were at 2.9Gw. California had nearly half the residential capacity, trailed by Arizona, Hawaii, New Jersey, and New York. For commercial-scale facilities, Massachusetts replaced Hawaii on that list. (Hawaii has expensive electricity, but lacks space for large-scale commercial installs). The frequency with which states in the Northeast appear on the list is a clear indication that factors other than the potential productivity of the hardware dominate decisions on the use of solar. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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