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In a release posted today to Lockheed Martin's F-35 program website, a spokesperson for Lockheed Martin and the Department Of Defense's F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) responded to this week's media coverage of a leaked F-35 test pilot report. The test pilot's assessment of the performance of the F-35 in mock combat encounters with an F-16D in January, which was published by David Axe of War is Boring, was that the F-35 was at a distinct disadvantage against the F-16. This despite the F-16 carrying two wing fuel tanks that give it inferior aerodynamics. The author of the Lockheed Martin/JPO response wrote that the War is Boring post "does not tell the entire story. The F-35 involved was AF-2 [the second F-35 airframe]...designed for flight sciences testing of the aircraft. It is not equipped with a number of items that make today's production F-35s 5th Generation fighters." The tests that the report was based on were intended "to test the flying qualities of the F-35 using visual combat maneuvers to stress the system, and the F-16 involved was used as a visual reference to maneuver against. While the dogfighting scenario was successful in showing the ability of the F-35 to maneuver to the edge of its limits without exceeding them and handle in a positive and predictable manner, the interpretation of the scenario results could be misleading." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The head of Kenya's Communications Authority, Francis Wangusi, announced a new set of regulations on Tuesday aimed at combatting cybercrime in the country. The new rules would require all users of devices with wireless networking capability to register their devices with the Kenya Network Information Centre (KENIC)—much in the same way that some US states require registration of assault rifles and sex offenders. Yesterday, in a speech before the annual general meeting of the Association of Regulators of Information and Communications for Eastern and Southern Africa (ARICEA), Wangusi said, “We will license KENIC to register device owners using their national identity cards and telephone numbers. The identity of a device will be known when it connects to Wi-Fi." He also said that the Communications Authority would set up a forensics laboratory within three months to "proactively monitor impending cybersecurity attacks, detect reactive cybercrime, and link up with the judiciary in the fight," according to a report from Kenya's Daily Nation. The registry will enable Kenyan authorities to "be able to trace people using national identity cards that were registered and their phone numbers keyed in during registration" if the devices are associated with criminal activity on the Internet, Wangusi said. The regulation would apply to anyone connecting to a public Wi-Fi network. KENIC would maintain the database of devices; anyone connecting to a public network at a hotel, café, or other business would be required to register before accessing it. If businesses providing Wi-Fi fail to comply with the regulation, they could have their Internet services cut off. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A new crowdfunding platform has been launched by consumer electronics giant Sony in Japan. Dubbed First Flight, the platform is designed to finance internal projects developed by Sony employees that might not fit, or be a little too esoteric, for one of its more established product lines. First Flight forms part of Sony's Seed Acceleration Program, which aims to foster the kind of innovation that saw the company dominate the consumer electronics market back in the 1980s with products like the Walkman portable cassette player. First Flight gives employees the opportunity to seek funding from the public, rather than internal or external investors. There are two products already available to pre-order through First Flight. The first, the FES e-ink watch, was actually already crowdfunded last year under a phantom company called Fashion Entertainments, a move that proved controversial at the time. The second is MESH, a DIY kit that allows users to turn add "smart" connectivity to a range of devices. Another product, the HUIS Remote Controller, is running as a crowdfunding campaign, which has currently reached around 20 percent of its 5 million yen (£26,000/$40,000) goal. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Computers are taking over our cars. In the longer term, self-driving vehicles have the potential to make significant cuts to road deaths, congestion, and pollution. Right now though, most of the immediate impact can be seen in infotainment systems. Focus groups have told car OEMs that to appeal to them as customers, they need to replicate the smartphone experience within our cars, which is why LTE modems and large touchscreens are proliferating as rapidly at auto shows as they are at Best Buy. That's OK with us at Ars Technica, because processing power also makes things like DSC Sport's active suspension technology possible, as we found out this past weekend on our trip to Watkins Glen, NY. Ars takes a drive with DSC Sport. Edited by Jennifer Hahn (video link) First, a little background. Generally, a car's suspension consists of various metal bits that connect the wheels to the chassis—wishbones or struts and so on that allow the wheel to articulate—and some combination of spring and shock absorber to control that articulation. A well-engineered suspension should provide good road-holding (keeping all four tires in optimum contact with the road surface) while also insulating the car and its occupants from bumps and jolts. This is easier said than done. Very few cars are successful at both, with their designers opting instead for soft springs and wallowy comfort at the expense of handling, or stiff springs and great cornering ability combined with a spine-rattling ride. But active suspension systems promise we can drive our cake and eat it too, using software and CPU cycles to dynamically control what each wheel does. The technology came to the attention of the general public in the 1980s, thanks to its use in Formula 1 back when its rulebook encouraged innovation. Early active systems used in F1 used hydraulic actuators to control wheel movement. The aim was to keep the car as flat and level to the ground as possible. The constant ride height kept the car's wings at their optimum angles for creating downforce—think of the exact opposite of a plane's wing, where the air pushes the car (and therefore the tires) down onto the road. Lotus Cars were an early pioneer of such active systems, but they were always too complex and too expensive for use beyond a number of technology demonstrators. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Electric racing cars are in vogue right now. The first Formula E championship just concluded in London (sadly the Ars-sponsored car did not win), and this side of the pond saw an electric vehicle win the prestigious Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in Colorado, setting a new record in the process. Rhys Millen took his Drive eO PP03 to the top of the mountain in 9:07.022, beating rival Nobuhiro "Monster" Tajima by more than 20 seconds. Ride along with Rhys Millen as he becomes the fastest EV up the side of the mountain. The consequences of getting a corner wrong and going over the side don't bear thinking about. The annual Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in Colorado is the second-oldest race in the US. It first took place in 1916, and it's a unique challenge for man and machine. Starting at Mile 7 on Pikes Peak Highway, cars race one at a time up the side of Pikes Peak, completing 156 turns in 12.4 miles (20km). It may be familiar to you from Gran Turismo 2, featuring prominently in that game, and indeed Polyphony Digital sponsored this year's race, making us wonder if the iconic event will reappear in GT7, whenever that happens to arrive. For most of the race's long and storied history, Pikes Peak Highway was covered in gravel, but environmental concerns led to the road being paved all the way to the summit in 2011. Since then, rally cars with supple suspension, good ground clearance, and knobby tires have given way to vehicles more at home on a smooth racetrack than a forest trail. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greece needs a hand, man. Remember that time it brought you the seeds of democracy? Remember that night you were going to order pizza again but instead you called some friends and ended up having a great time at that new Greek restaurant down the street? And need Greece remind you that those faux ionic columns outside of your dentist's office were invented by it? Well now, the banks are coming a-knocking, and it would be really cool if you could all chip in, like, €3 each. For Greece. Your buddy. Or at least that's the pitch being made by Thom Feeney, a London shoe shop worker who started a campaign to raise €1.6 billion (that's US $1.78 billion). Feeney's IndieGoGo campaign, started just two days ago, has already raised an astonishing €478,575 (or $533,010) from more than 30,000 people. “All this dithering over Greece is getting boring,” Feeney wrote on his IndieGoGo page. “Why don't we the people just sort it instead?” He added that to come up with the €1.6 billion, every member of the European would only have to give €3 each (well, technically you'd only need to collect from members of the European Union, that's not even counting any potentially generous Swedes or Swiss people.) Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Second Court of Appeals has affirmed (PDF) that Apple is liable for engaging in e-book price fixing, holding up the 2013 judgment of a district court that ruled in favor of the Department of Justice (DoJ) and 33 states. The DoJ sued Apple as well as publishers Penguin, HarperCollins, Hachette, Simon & Schuster, and Macmillan back in 2012. The publishers agreed to settle for $164 million. Apple fought the charges and lost, and it appealed the decision in February 2014. When it appealed last year, Apple argued that at the time of its entry into the e-book business, Amazon was its only real competitor, and Amazon was selling e-books for $9.99, which Apple said was well below a competitive range. Instead, Apple said that it worked with publishers to hit a price point that would help Apple be profitable enough to enter the e-book market. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A test pilot report obtained by defense journalist David Axe of War is Boring detailed the performance of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter in a mock air battle against a two-seat F-16D in January. The F-16D—based on a design developed 40 years ago and from a production run in the mid-1990s—bested the F-35 in close-range combat maneuvers. In the report, which Axe had obtained but did not publish in full, the F-35 pilot reported that his aircraft was in a "clean" configuration for the test, carrying nothing under its wings or in its internal weapons bays. The F-16, on the other hand, was flying with under-wing external fuel drop-tanks, which in theory would have put the aircraft at an aerodynamic disadvantage. Apparently, it didn't. "Even with the limited F-16 target configuration, the F-35A remained at a distinct energy disadvantage for every engagement," the F-35 pilot reported. That means the F-35 constantly found itself flying slower and more sluggishly, unable to effectively maneuver to get the F-16 in its sights. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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I’ve spent the past four nights sitting in the darkened cockpit of a fictional but mostly plausible spaceship. For an hour or two at a time, I busily turn knobs, flip switches, and watch gauges. Every once in a great while, I’ll very slowly fly a few hundred meters out from the station where the ship spends most of its time moored, then turn around and very slowly fly back—and then I’ll stop and go back to the switches and gauges. Welcome to Rogue System. It’s a little different from the kinds of combat-focused space sims we’ve had our hands on lately, like Elite: Dangerous—this is much more a module for the realism-oriented DCS World simulation package, crossed with a bit of Kerbal Space Program just for grits and shins. It’s also not actually much of a game yet—there are six tutorial missions you can "play" through, and you can also kind-of-sort-of fly around in free flight mode (by selecting one of the tutorial missions and turning the "tutorial" part off), but the actual game itself is still in early development. The semi-official "how to undock your ship in Rogue System" video by Youtuber Deephack. Well—sort of. Rogue System has actually been busy being born for more than two years, and developer Michael Juliano ran an unsuccessful crowdfunding campaign in 2013 to try to assist in funding development of the game. After that didn’t work out, Juliano put development on hold and returned to his day job; now, after a considerable hiatus, Juliano has brought on publisher Image Space Inc and has released a completely redone version of the game as an early access title. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Daily Windows 10 builds? OK, not really. Or at least not yet. But Microsoft will today be releasing a new Windows 10 Insider Preview build, version 10159, to its fast track testers just a day after releasing build 10158 to the fast track. Yesterday's build was the first to sport the new Microsoft Edge branding in the browser—prior builds had used the "Project Spartan" codename—along with many bug fixes and other minor improvements. Today's build includes a further 300 fixed bugs, along with another piece of branding: it includes the new default wallpaper, a Windows logo made with lasers. As we discussed a couple of weeks ago, both yesterday's build and today's build are on the final path toward creating the release-to-manufacturing (RTM) build. While early builds didn't have Windows Activation and preinstalled the Insider Hub for getting news about the previews, the latest builds are set up for the general public. As such, they include the activation system and only preinstall the apps that will ship when Windows 10 goes live. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The battery in your iPhone or Apple Watch is a precious resource, and it becomes more precious as your devices age and their batteries begin to lose capacity. One solution to this problem is to buy an aftermarket replacement battery, look up an iFixit guide, and crack your phone or tablet open yourself. If you've paid for the AppleCare and AppleCare+ extended warranty programs, though, we've got good news. Apple will now replace any battery covered by AppleCare+ once it drops below 80 percent of its original capacity, as outlined in refreshed AppleCare+ documents spotted by MacRumors late last week and reported on other sites today. Previously, a battery had to drop to 50 percent of its original capacity to be eligible for replacement under AppleCare+, limiting its helpfulness to all but the heaviest users and those with defective batteries. Macs covered by the standard AppleCare agreement can also have their batteries replaced if they drop below 80 percent of their original capacity, as outlined in a footnote here. AppleCare+ can be added to an iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, or Apple Watch at purchase or within 60 days of the purchase date. AppleCare for Macs can be purchased at any point during the computer's standard one-year warranty term. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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On Tuesday, Facebook changed the login process for its Messenger app, meaning users no longer need to have a Facebook account in order to talk to the service's members. All they need is a phone number—but not a landline one. Ars confirmed the change by installing and testing the Facebook Messenger app. Now when Android and iOS users load the app without having been logged in, they will see a smaller-text option that reads, "Not on Facebook?" If a user taps that, the app will automatically fill in the device's default number if it's a mobile phone, which can be changed—but whatever number is used, it has to accept SMS, as Facebook confirms your phone number via a text message. Once that has been done, Messenger asks for a full name—which, again, it will auto-populate based on your mobile device's information, but you can delete and retype that as you see fit. It also asks new users to upload an image, but that's not required. Phone-only Messenger users only have one way to add new contacts: by entering the phone number attached to any FB profiles. Searching by name won't work; you'll have to ask friends for their account phone numbers (or let the app comb your contact list for numbers that match up with Facebook accounts). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Crowdfunding platform Kickstarter was approached by a competing platform, ArtistShare, in 2011. Just what happened next is disputed. ArtistShare founder Brian Camelio says he wanted to strike a business deal with Kickstarter. In court papers, Kickstarter said that Camelio had a patent he said Kickstarter was infringing, and Camello intended to sue. Kickstarter took the matter to court first, filing a lawsuit seeking to invalidate the patent. The move left Camelio "stunned and disappointed," he said in a 2011 interview. This week, Camelio, who founded ArtistShare in 2003, may be even more disappointed. His patent, "Methods and Apparatuses for Financing and Marketing a Creative Work," is no more. It was invalidated in an order (PDF) published yesterday, four years after his dispute with Kickstarter began. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A secret US tribunal ruled late Monday that the National Security Agency is free to continue its bulk telephone metadata surveillance program—the same spying that Congress voted to terminate weeks ago. Congress disavowed the program NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden exposed when passing the USA Freedom Act, which President Barack Obama signed June 2. The act, however, allowed for the program to be extended for six months to allow "for an orderly transition" to a less-invasive telephone metadata spying program. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Last weekend I attended EdgeConf, a conference populated by many of the leading lights in the Web industry. It featured panel talks and breakout sessions with a focus on technologies that are just now starting to emerge in browsers, so there was a lot of lively discussion around Service Worker, Web Components, Shadow DOM, Web Manifests, and more. EdgeConf’s hundred-odd attendees were truly the heavy hitters of the Web community. The average Twitter follower count in any given room was probably in the thousands, and all the major browser vendors were represented—Google, Mozilla, Microsoft, Opera. We had lots of fun peppering them with questions about when they might release such-and-such API. There was one company not in attendance, though, and it served as the proverbial elephant in the room that no one wanted to discuss. I heard it referred to cagily as “a company in California” or “a certain fruit company.” Its glowing logo illuminated nearly every laptop in the room, and yet it seemed like nobody dared speak its name. Of course I’m talking about Apple. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Last month, Google rolled out an updated version of its Photos app that had been divorced from Google+ and bolstered with a few slight tweaks—in particular, its ability to automatically tag photos and generate albums based on objects it identifies, including "food" and "landscapes." And it's only photos I have with her it's doing this with (results truncated b/c personal): pic.twitter.com/h7MTXd3wgo — diri noir avec banan (@jackyalcine) June 29, 2015 Unfortunately, that object database not only included wild animals but also conflated them with humans—specifically, on Monday, when an African-American man looked in his Google Photos collection and discovered an automatically generated album of him and his black female friend labeled "gorillas." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Security researchers at ESET in Bratislava have published an analysis of another apparently state-sponsored cyber-espionage tool used to target computers in Iran—and potentially elsewhere. The malware, also recently mentioned by Kaspersky researchers, was named "Dino" by its developers and has been described as a "full featured espionage platform." And this advanced persistent threat malware, according to researchers, might as well come with a "fabriqué en France" stamp on it. Based on analysis of Dino's code from a sample that infected systems in Iran in 2013, "We believe this malicious software has been developed by the Animal Farm espionage group, who also created the infamous Casper, Bunny and Babar malware," ESET's Joan Calvet wrote in a blog post today. The Casper malware was part of a large-scale attack on Syrian computers last fall. "Dino contains interesting technical features, and also a few hints that the developers are French speaking," Calvet noted. Other members of the "Animal Farm" malware family have been attributed to French intelligence agencies by researchers—including a 2011 analysis by Canada's Communications Security Establishment revealed by documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. Dino shares attributes with the other members of the "Animal Farm" malware family and improves on many of the techniques of "Babar," the previous generation intelligence-gathering software implant. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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On Tuesday, California Governor Jerry Brown (D) signed into law one of the most stringent vaccination laws in the United States, eliminating the state's previous personal and religious belief exemption for vaccines. Under the new law, which takes effect January 1, 2016, all California schoolchildren must prove that they have been vaccinated in order to attend school. They can only be exempted when that child’s physician explicitly approves it. "The science is clear that vaccines dramatically protect children against a number of infectious and dangerous diseases," Brown wrote in a signing statement. "While it’s true that no medical intervention is without risk, the evidence shows that immunization powerfully benefits and protects the community." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Pretty much every operating system in use these days supports TRIM—a special ATA command that the OS sends along to an SSD when deleting files on that SSD. The lone exception to that list has been Apple’s OS X, which—at least until today—only supported TRIM on its OEM SSDs. If you took a Mac that originally came with a spinning disk and installed an aftermarket SSD in it yourself, the operating system wouldn’t use TRIM on the disk—at least, not unless you resorted to third-party tools. With today’s OS X 10.10.4 update, however, Apple has added a command line utility that can be used to enable TRIM on third-party SSDs without having to download and install anything. Called trimforce, the utility can be executed from the OS X terminal, and it requires a reboot to start working. We’ve enabled it on a pair of older Macs in the Orbiting HQ with aftermarket SSDs in them, and so far we’ve had no issues—giant scary warning notwithstanding. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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As many adults can attest, teenage behavior is often characterized by impulsivity and impatience. From a psychological perspective, this behavior can result either from disregard for future outcomes or from an over-emphasis on immediate rewards. Prior to the publication of a new study in PNAS, it wasn’t entirely clear which of these two components underlies developmental changes. This new paper examines impatience in teens and finds that it’s mostly a result of teens’ disregard for future outcomes. In their conclusions, the researchers state that increased control and increased integration of future-oriented thought are direct contributors to the changes in behavior that (hopefully) occur as we age. For this study, 50 participants between the ages of eight and 25 were recruited from the paid participant pool of the Stanford University Psychology Department. Participants completed a task in which they were asked to repeatedly assess their preferences for either a smaller monetary reward that would come sooner or a larger monetary reward that would come later. This task was performed before and during brain scans with a functional MRI machine, which allows researchers to see which parts of the brain were most active. Analysis of the decisions that participants made revealed that age had an effect on the way that they chose their rewards and revealed an expected decline in impatience for seeing a reward as teenagers grew older. But the researchers could actually separate the two effects. They found that propensity for future orientation increased significantly with age, whereas sensitivity to immediate rewards did not. In other words, our increase in self-control comes from an increased ability to focus on the future rather than a drop in the demand for immediate rewards. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back! This week our featured item is a Lenovo U31 Ultrabook with a 13.3-inch 1080p display, a 3.0GHz Intel i7-5500u processor, 8GB of RAM, and an Nvidia GT920m GPU, all for $749.00. That's $350 off the original MSRP! Featured (Only 3.3lbs & 0.75" thin) Lenovo U31 Intel i7-5500u Broadwell 13.3" 1080p Ultrabook Laptop w/ Nvidia GT920m 2GB GPU for $749.00 (list price $1,099 - use code WSU31FUS625) Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Defendant Robert Fenn. A Virginia man serving 10 years for possessing child pornography says the images found on computer hard drives at the family home were not his and instead belonged to his father, whom he lived with. The elementary school teacher claims a forensic examination of the computers seized from the Fairfax County home where he lived with his parents and brother will confirm his suspicions, as well as allegations that his defense counsel erred by not demanding an examination of the drives following his 2012 arrest. US District Judge James Cacheris agreed to a limited degree and said defendant Robert Fenn "shoulders a heavy burden in seeking to vacate his judgment of conviction." Over federal prosecutor's objections, the judge ruled (PDF) that the defendant could have the media drives examined by forensic experts. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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By now, we're accustomed to platform holders like Apple refusing to carry games and apps with questionable content on their digital storefronts. We're less accustomed to national governments stepping in to decide what apps can and can't be downloaded within their borders. That's just what Australia is set to do tomorrow, though, as a new pilot program will ban hundreds of mobile titles that have been "refused classification" in the country on platforms like Google Play. Starting July 1, those titles will be effectively banned in Australia, according to an ABC report. The Australian government announced back in March that it was working with the International Age Rating Coalition (IARC) in an attempt to rate the hundreds of thousands of games being added to digital storefronts. Under the IARC system, developers fill out a questionnaire detailing in-game content like violence, crime, sexuality, gambling, language, discrimination, controlled substances, "crude humor," and "scary elements." Those answers are then automatically converted into local age ratings using standards set by the individual ratings boards in participating regions, including Australia, the US, UK, Canada, Brazil, and much of Europe. IARC content ratings can be amended or changed based on player complaints after the fact. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Andrew Cunningham The new Music app. The navigation at the bottom of the app is mostly Apple Music-related now. 23 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ars.AD.queue.push(["xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true}]);iOS 8.4 is here, and aside from fixing a few nasty bugs, its biggest new feature is a redesigned Music app. Music hasn't gotten any major tweaks since being redesigned for iOS 7, and the gallery above will walk you through the changes. In general, it's a visual and functional improvement, especially on the iPad, where it makes better use of the screen space. Also included are a few first-time setup impressions for the Apple Music service, which is included with iOS 8.4 and is free for the first three months to anyone who wants it. We haven't been using the service for long enough to say much about its quality—that will come later—but Apple makes it pretty easy to start getting relevant music recommendations. One pro tip: if you aren't sure you'll want to keep using Apple Music after the trial period is up, tap the icon in the upper-left corner of the Music app, tap View Apple ID, and then tap the Manage button under the Subscriptions section. Apple Music subscriptions are set to automatically renew by default, but you can turn that setting off there. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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The Seattle Police Department reported Monday that a local woman was recently struck and knocked unconscious by a drone that crashed into a building and then fell to the ground, hitting her. On Sunday, during the Emerald City’s Pride parade, a 25-year-old woman was hit by the two-pound drone. The woman, whose name was not released by police, collapsed into the arms of her boyfriend. Some of the woman’s friends apparently located the drone and turned it over to police, who described it as retailing for "about $1,200" and weighing "about two pounds." Those bystanders also handed over photographs of a man believed to be the drone’s pilot. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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