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Enlarge (credit: Getty | Media for Medical ) Looking to find the most effective probiotics? You may need to look no further than your own body. Scientists could rid eczema patients’ arms of disease-spurring Staphylococcus aureus simply by picking out rare but helpful bacteria also on their skin, growing it up to large quantities, and mixing it with off-the-shelf lotion that the patients slathered on. The finding, reported this week in Science Translational Medicine, is another example of harnessing the protective and disease-fighting potential of the human microbiome. Researchers are optimistic that in future clinical trials, the personal bacteria boosts will prove useful in longterm treatment for eczema, without the risks that come with antibiotics. “This approach is inherently superior to current pharmaceutically derived antibiotics,” the authors conclude. Unlike bottled antibiotics that may kill microbes indiscriminately—friends or foes—the patient’s skin bacteria selectively killed off harmful S. aureus and left the protective community intact. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: alizasherman) Social media calls to #DeleteUber are getting the company's attention in ways that previous efforts have not. This week, Uber drew increased scrutiny in the wake of public allegations by a former engineer named Susan Fowler. She described Uber as having a culture of sexual harassment during her tenure there. The San Francisco company has since publicly rebuked this behavior and announced that it has retained former US Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate those claims. In response, some customers, however, renewed calls to "#DeleteUber," which lead the company to respond with an automated message about the investigations. The hashtag that dates back to 2011, but didn't really get going until 2014, and it has flared up at various moments since. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / You don't want to know what this guy's been evolving. (credit: Washington Fish and Wildlife) BOSTON—"The national debt is a big structural problem," former Representative Brian Baird told his audience at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And that, according to Baird, is one reason scientific research comes under fire. “If you can’t solve something big," he went on, "distract people by attacking something small.” All too often, that something small has been scientific research. Two of the researchers who found their work under fire were on hand to describe the experience and talk a bit about the lessons they learned. Does that treadmill look expensive to you? One of them was David Scholnick of Pacific University who produced the video above, showing a shrimp going for a run on an underwater treadmill. It's hard to tell just how many people have ended up viewing the video, given that it has been cloned, set to various music, and appeared in news reports that have also made their way onto YouTube—it's fair to say that it's quite popular. Scholnick wasn't looking for that popularity. He had just put the video up on his faculty webpage; someone else grabbed it and stuck it on YouTube. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Looking up at the TRAPPIST-1 system's M8 star. (credit: Frontier Developments) More than two years after its official release back in December 2014, spaceship simulator Elite: Dangerous continues to grow and add content. The latest update is called “The Commanders,” and it bumps the game’s version number to 2.3 (or 1.8, if you’re not running the “Horizons” expansion). There are plenty of new features in 2.3, including a vastly updated camera system for taking in-game images or movies; a “commander creator” feature for players to create and customize their avatars; and the ability to join friends on their ships and fly as a single crew. But one feature will be showing up as a last-minute addition: the newly discovered TRAPPIST-1 star system, complete with its seven exoplanets, will become part of the game’s simulated galaxy. NASA broke the news about the discovery only days before the 2.3 update was set to enter semi-open (pay wall) beta testing among the Elite: Dangerous player base. Between that announcement and some last-minute bugs, publisher and developer Frontier decided to slip the beta date from February 23 to February 27 to try to add bug fixes and the TRAPPIST-1 system to the game. The bad news is that the newly discovered exoplanets won’t make it into Monday’s beta release; the good news is that TRAPPIST-1 will be in the second beta release, which will come some days or weeks after the initial beta. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / "We can both find our way through a maze!" (credit: flickr user: Ron Reiring) Spatial ability is a bit of a fuzzy concept. There are lots of different tests that can be used to assess it, like mentally rotating a 3D shape or reasoning out how a mechanical object would work. Are all of these tests really looking at the same thing, or are they probing unrelated capacities that we’re artificially combining under the heading of “spatial ability?" A paper in PNAS this week suggests that different spatial tests are all basically testing the same underlying ability—and that this ability is only partly explained by general intelligence. This means that spatial ability is, to some extent, independent: you can have better (or worse) spatial ability than your general intelligence might suggest. The results also suggest that about a third of the differences in people's spatial scores can be explained by genetics. Your genes don't have the last word For any given trait that people have, both genes and environment will play a role. The tricky part is working out how much of a role each can claim. Take height, for instance: if everyone has enough food when they’re growing up, the role of environment will be limited, and so people’s heights will be determined mostly by their genetics—maybe as much as 80 percent. In a more unequal society, someone may have the genes to be very tall but not get enough food as a child, and this person will end up much shorter than they might have been. In this more unequal environment, genes can explain much less of the differences between people. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Andy Ryan) The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to eliminate a requirement that Charter Communications compete against other ISPs with new broadband deployments spurred by its purchase of Time Warner Cable. The FCC's approval of the merger last year required Charter to deploy broadband with download speeds of 60Mbps to at least 2 million residential and small business locations, of which at least 1 million must be in areas served by at least one other high-speed provider. Then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who was frustrated by cable companies' unwillingness to compete against each other, argued that having two high-speed providers in cities and towns would lower prices and give consumers more choice. ISPs often avoid each other's territories because it's easier to get customers in unserved areas. But lobby groups for small and medium-sized ISPs objected to the merger requirement and asked the FCC to eliminate it. Newly appointed FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is ready to oblige, as multiple news reports say he has circulated an order to fellow commissioners that would eliminate the "overbuild" requirement. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Racks of servers that populate Apple's $1 billion data center in Maiden, North Carolina. (credit: Image courtesy of Apple Inc.) A mid-2016 security incident led to Apple purging its data centers of servers built by Supermicro, including returning recently purchased systems, according to a report by The Information. Malware-infected firmware was reportedly detected in an internal development environment for Apple's App Store, as well as some production servers handling queries through Apple's Siri service. An Apple spokesperson denied there was a security incident. However, Supermicro's senior vice-president of technology,Tau Leng, told The Information that Apple had ended its relationship with Supermicro because of the compromised systems in the App Store development environment. Leng also confirmed Apple returned equipment that it had recently purchased. An anonymous source was cited as the source of the information regarding infected Siri servers. Apple has used a variety of server hardware since the company got out of the server business itself, including servers from HP and storage from NetApp. A few years ago, Apple added Supermicro as a supplier for some of its development and data center computing infrastructure. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The iPhone 6S and 6S Plus. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) A couple of months ago, Apple acknowledged that some iPhone users were experiencing unexpected shutdowns—their phones would turn off before the battery was fully discharged and could only be turned back on if plugged in. These problems primarily affect the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and 6S and 6S Plus. Apple released some fixes in iOS 10.2.1 in late January, though the company didn't specifically mention battery or shutdown issues in the release notes. But now that the update has been out for a while, Apple told TechCrunch that it had fixed 80 percent of the issues for iPhone 6S users and 70 percent for iPhone 6 users. Apple says iOS 10.2.1 has been installed on about half of all compatible iDevices, so if you have one of the affected phones and you've noticed problems, fire up your updaters now. The report says that the problems were caused primarily by older batteries—spikes in power draw could make these batteries "deliver power in an uneven manner," triggering a shutdown. For the 20 percent of iPhone 6S users whose problems haven't been fixed by the update, Apple says that they should now at least be able to turn their phones back on without plugging them in if their batteries still have a charge; iPhone 6 users should get a similar fix in a future iOS update. Newer batteries are also more resistant to the problem, so a battery replacement might be a good idea. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | Drew Angerer ) Opioid’s deadly grip on the US continued to tighten in 2015, pushing up death rates across the board, according to new data released Friday by the National Center for Health Statistics, a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (credit: CDC) Overall, drug overdose deaths rose to 16.3 per 100,000 in 2015—that’s 2.5 times the 1999 rate of 6.1 per 100,000. In that time range, increases were seen for both men and women, as well as across all age groups and races, with whites seeing the most dramatic increases. Generally, overdoses of opioid painkillers continued to be a leading killer, but heroin and synthetic opioids, such as deadly fentanyl, are behind an increasing number of deaths. Drug overdose deaths rose 43 percent in Hispanic persons, 63 percent among blacks, and 240 percent in whites. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) The total download capacity for a single 5G cell must be at least 20Gbps, the International Telcommunication Union (ITU) has decided. In contrast, the peak data rate for current LTE cells is about 1Gbps. The incoming 5G standard must also support up to 1 million connected devices per square kilometre, and the standard will require carriers to have at least 100MHz of free spectrum, scaling up to 1GHz where feasible. These requirements come from the ITU's draft report on the technical requirements for IMT-2020 (aka 5G) radio interfaces, which was published Thursday. The document is technically just a draft at this point, but that's underselling its significance: it will likely be approved and finalised in November this year, at which point work begins in earnest on building 5G tech. I'll pick out a few of the more interesting tidbits from the draft spec, but if you want to read the document yourself, don't be scared: it's surprisingly human-readable. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Spotify is doing more to become the place you go for original audio and video content, rather than just preexisting content. The streaming company announced that it is producing three original podcasts about various aspects of music culture, with more titles to be announced later this year. The first episode of one of the podcasts is already available: Showstoppers, with host Naomi Zeichner, Editor in Chief of The Fader magazine, focuses on "pop culture analysis of our favorite music moments in TV." The second podcast, called Unpacked, debuts March 14, coinciding with South by Southwest. Hosted by Matt FX, music supervisor for Comedy Central’s Broad City, and Michele Santucci of Spotify Studios, Unpacked brings the festival scene to you even when you're miles away from the action. The hosting duo will travel to different music festivals and record interviews daily with musicians, filmmakers, and more so listeners can experience the festival via the podcast. The third podcast announced, which has the working title The Chris Lightly Story, will showcase how music industry icon Chris Lightly shaped some of the biggest names in hip-hop culture. Hosted by Reggie Ossé, the podcast will dive into Lightly's life and influence on the careers of artists including Missy Elliot, Foxy Brown, and LL Cool J, with commentary from other big names including Russell Simmons and Fat Joe. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Heck yeah I'll move this ball if it means I'll get some sugar. I'm a bee, dammit! (credit: Lida Loukola/QMUL) You can now add bees to the rarefied list of tool-using animals, which already includes primates, crows, octopods, otters, porpoises, and more. A fascinating set of experiments has revealed that bees can be taught to use tools, even though they don't use them in the wild. Queen Mary University of London biologist Olli J. Loukola and his colleagues wanted to find out more about how bee intelligence works. Previous experiments with the insects have shown that they can count, communicate with each other using "waggle dances" that reveal the direction of food, and pull strings to get access to food. Loukola's new tool use test showed that not only are bees good with tools, but they can also extemporize to use them more effectively. Loukola wanted to test bees' intelligence with a scenario that they would never encounter in nature. So he decided to teach the bees to move a tiny ball into the center of a platform to get a sugary reward. First, he showed them how it was done by using a plastic bee on the end of a stick. After about five days of training, the bees started to drag the ball to the center of the platform on their own. Then, Loukola allowed the trained bees to show other bees how to unlock the sweet reward. He and his colleagues also trained bees using a "ghost bee," or a magnet under the platform that moved the ball to the center. Bees learned best from other bees (and the plastic bee), but many were able to learn from the ghost bee, too. Bees without training were not able to figure out how to get sugar water in the test. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / As the technology has improved, 3D printing has become a more realistic option for medical professionals, though printing a femur replica (seen here) presents much less of a challenge than creating a functioning prosthetic. (credit: Getty Images) For people who are missing limbs, 3D printing can make new prosthetics—faster, cheaper, and better. For Mosaic, Ian Birrell reports that this idea could transform mobility for millions around the world. This article was first published by Mosaic and is republished here under a Creative Commons license. John Nhial was barely a teenager when he was grabbed by a Sudanese guerrilla army and forced to become a child soldier. He was made to endure weeks of walking with so little food and water that some of his fellow captives died. Four more were killed one night in a wild-animal attack. Then the boys were given military training that involved “running up to ten kilometres in the heat and hiding” before being given guns and sent to fight “the Arabs.” He spent four years fighting, bombed from the skies and blasting away on guns almost too heavy to hold against an enemy sometimes less than a kilometre away. “I think, ‘If I killed that one it’s a human being like me,’ but you are forced,” he said. One day the inevitable happened: Nhial (not his real name) was injured, treading on a mine while on early-morning patrol with two other soldiers in a patch of Upper Nile state surrounded by their enemies. Read 42 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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At MWC 2015, the entrance had a massive LED screen that wrapped up the wall, across the ceiling, and down the other wall. (credit: Ron Amadeo) Every year the smartphone industry gets together and has a big conference in Barcelona, Spain called "Mobile World Congress." The show floor is open from February 27 through March 2, but most of the big press conferences happen the day before the show: February 26. This year, we expect a slew of flagship smartphones to be announced at Mobile World Congress. BlackBerry, LG, Motorola, Huawei, Sony, and Nokia will all be in attendance with anticipated, high-profile launches. With many OEMs presenting at the show, let's go around the horn and check in on everyone's plans for MWC. LG: The LG G6 packs last year's processor into this year's phone Evan Blass Read 37 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Rafy/Syfy) Welcome to week four of Decrypted: The Expanse, our podcast devoted to the TV we're currently obsessed with. This week, Detective Miller was still left holding the bomb—quite literally—on an Eros station that appears both self-aware (for some value of that term) and able to ignore the laws of physics. Eros is headed right for Earth, where there's an awful lot of mistrust happening in the UN's war room. Is this whole thing a Martian plot? Of course, we the viewers know that it's really Jules-Pierre Mao and his stooge Errinwright, although the former has disappeared from view, presumably hoping his vast wealth will let him escape the consequences of his science experiment. Back on Eros, we've finally gotten to see what the protomolecule is really up to. Miller gets to retrace his earlier visit to the station, taking in the pachinko parlor and ending up back at the Blue Falcon Hotel, the last resting place of Julie Mao. Our hangdog detective finally gets to meet his missing person, for the protomolecule has incorporated Julie Mao as its control structure of sorts. With Eros able to break the laws of physics to defend itself, it's up to Miller to persuade it/her not to crash into Earth. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Acid the meme machine) Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords, and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time, by making Web requests to affected websites, and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Pacificas are topped with LIDAR sensors, among other new appendages. (credit: Waymo) As the Waymo, the division of Alphabet previously known as Google’s self-driving car project, has sued Uber and its self-driving truck acquisition, Otto, for patent infringement. In a Medium post published Thursday afternoon, Waymo accused Anthony Levandowski—a former Google engineer now working for Uber—of having downloaded “over 14,000 highly confidential and proprietary design files for Waymo’s various hardware systems.” In particular this allegedly included “Waymo’s LiDAR and circuit board” designs—a total of nearly 10 gigabytes. Uber did not immediately respond for comment. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Who needs fee disclosures? (credit: Getty Images | JW LTD) ISPs with 250,000 or fewer subscribers won't have to follow rules that require greater disclosures about fees and data caps after a vote today by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC's Republican majority approved the change to help small providers avoid "onerous reporting obligations" included in the 2015 net neutrality order, they said. But by setting the threshold at 250,000 subscribers and exempting small ISPs owned by larger companies, the FCC is effectively "exempt[ing] billion-dollar public companies" from rules that can be complied with in mere hours each year, said Mignon Clyburn, the FCC's only Democrat. The commission's 2015 order temporarily exempted ISPs with 100,000 or fewer subscribers from the so-called enhanced transparency requirements, but that exemption expired in December 2016. Clyburn said she would support reinstating the exemption for ISPs with 100,000 or fewer subscribers, but she dissented from today's order. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Heat at the bottom, a thermometer at the top, and just a single atom to bridge the two. (credit: University of Buffalo) Thermal transport—the way heat is carried away from a processor, for instance—is very familiar to us. Viewing it as a quantum phenomena, by contrast, is quite alien. But heat is carried by electrons and phonons (phonons being the equivalent of photons for mechanical vibrations), and these are quantum objects. As a result, heat transport should be quantized into steps, just like electron conductance is. A recent paper shows that it's a bit more complicated than that. Yes, the thermal conductance of materials varies in fixed steps, but that's only true for some materials. The thermal properties of bulk materials can be described as a combination of electrons and phonons that transport energy through a solid. This description means that heat transport should have some element of discreteness to it. Phonons and electrons can only take on the specific energy values that are allowed by their environment. At high temperature, though, you should abandon all hope of seeing any discrete behavior. You can act as if the phonons and electrons can take on any energy (because the energy spacing is so small) and get accurate predictions. This approximation is how you end up with all the rules of heat conduction that engineers know and love. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Valve Software) Every hopeful gaming thread on the Internet has at least one person making this kind of guess: Valve Software will one day drop its next major project as a previously unannounced, out-of-nowhere surprise for immediate download. And it'll do it for free, just for funsies. Valve did exactly that on Wednesday. The release even kinda-sorta has a "3" in the title, but it's pretty much the polar opposite of what you might expect: a massive, multi-functional middleware solution for more realistic and efficiently rendered 3D audio. What's more, this toolkit—dubbed Steam Audio—doesn't even require its namesake digital delivery service to function. Developers can head to github right now and grab the tools, either as a Unity plugin or a C API, should developers wish to integrate it into their own engines. (Official support for Unreal Engine 4, FMOD, and Wwise has been announced but is not yet available for download.) Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Join us.... join the open standards... LAS VEGAS—With everybody and their brother seemingly working on their own mutually exclusive virtual reality platform these days, it would be nice if everybody could somehow agree on some standards that allow VR games, hardware, and accessories to be easily interoperable with each other. Facebook-owned Oculus has gained a reputation for defending its own platform in order to protect access to exclusive content. In a presentation at the DICE conference this week, though, Oculus' Head of Content Jason Rubin pushed back on this reputation and highlighted the company's work on developing standards in the VR space. "This is actually a place where we agree with the industry more than most people think," Rubin said. "We support an open standard... We want everybody in the PC business to join an open standard that's a platform where everybody gets to say what's important to them." Here, Rubin is referencing Oculus' work with the Khronos group (of OpenGL fame) on developing a common set of industry-wide VR standards. Announced back in December, the effort aims to create a set of "APIs for tracking of headsets, controllers and other objects, and for easily integrating devices into a VR runtime. This will enable applications to be portable to any VR system that conforms to the Khronos standard, significantly enhancing the end-user experience, and driving more choice of content to spur further growth in the VR market." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Martin Shkreli. (credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images) In court documents, Evan Greebel, Martin Shkreli’s former lawyer, alleges that the notorious ex-pharmaceutical executive is a “serial fraudster” that duped him into alleged wrong-doing. That argument counters Shrkeli’s, which is that if he did anything wrong it’s because Greebel gave him bum legal advice. Shkreli was arrested in December of 2015 and charged by the FBI with several counts of securities fraud related to three interwoven, Ponzi-like schemes that defrauded investors and swindled $11 million from his former pharmaceutical company Retrophin, Inc. At the same time, Greebel was arrested and charged with wire fraud conspiracy in connection with the alleged schemes. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Behind you, red! LAS VEGAS—In a Thursday speech at the gaming-minded DICE Summit, Microsoft's head of its 343 Industries group (meaning, all things Halo) confirmed a return to split-screen modes in the series' first-person shooter games. "We will always have split-screen support going forward" for all first-person shooter games in the series, 343 chief Bonnie Ross told the Vegas crowd. Ross did not clarify if that ruling would apply to either cooperative or competitive modes in the series going forward, nor did she clarify how split-screen modes would work in any potential "Xbox Play Anywhere" entries in Halo that work on Windows 10. (This month's Halo Wars 2 is the first true "Play Anywhere" game in the Halo series.) We have reached out to Microsoft to seek clarification, and we will update this report with any response. 2015's Halo 5: Guardians was a peculiar release in the series for a few reasons, but one stands out to the couch-combat fans at Ars Technica: its lack of split-screen combat, either in four-player local versus modes or in its campaign, which revolved around four-player co-op battling (as opposed to many prior games that limited campaign co-op to two players). While the game was in development, a 343 developer told fans via Twitter that Halo 5 would include split-screen modes, but the studio eventually walked that statement back. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Frank Abagnale, as played by Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me If You Can, once pretended to be a doctor. Now he's teaching the health industry about the threat of identity theft. (credit: Dreamworks) Frank Abagnale is world-famous for pretending to be other people. The former teenage con-man, whose exploits 50 years ago became a Leonardo DiCaprio film called Catch Me If You Can, has built a lifelong career as a security consultant and advisor to the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. So it's perhaps ironic that four and a half years ago, his identity was stolen—along with those of 3.6 million other South Carolina taxpayers. "When that occurred," Abagnale recounted to Ars, "I was at the FBI office in Phoenix. I got a call from [a reporter at] the local TV news station, who knew that my identity was stolen, and they wanted a comment. And I said, 'Before I make a comment, what did the State Tax Revenue Office say?' Well, they said they did nothing wrong. I said that would be absolutely literally impossible. All breaches happen because people make them happen, not because hackers do it. Every breach occurs because someone in that company did something they weren't supposed to do, or somebody in that company failed to do something they were supposed to do." As it turned out (as a Secret Service investigation determined), a government employee had taken home a laptop that shouldn't have left the office and connected it—unprotected—to the Internet. Government breaches of personal information have become all too common, as demonstrated by the impact of the hacking of the Office of Management and Budget's personnel records two years ago. But another sort of organization is now in the crosshairs of criminals seeking identity data to sell to fraudsters: doctors' offices. Abagnale was in Orlando this week to speak to health IT professionals at the 2017 HIMSS Conference about the rising threat of identity theft through hacking medical records—a threat made possible largely because of the sometimes haphazard adoption of electronic medical records systems by health care providers. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Mercedes-Benz GP Formula 1 is set to be a radically different sport in 2017, and that mainly has to do with the change in ownership. Long-time F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone has been shuffled out by new owner Liberty Media, replaced by a three-person team with Chase Carey as CEO, Sean Bratches as head of commercial operations, and legendary engineer Ross Brawn overseeing the sporting and technical stuff. But the changes for this season aren't solely in the boardroom. 2017's F1 cars have a few notable changes compared to recent years, and this week the teams started pulling off the dust sheets to show us. Bigger Tires For one thing, the tires are bigger. F1 is still sticking with those silly 13-inch wheels, but they're about 25 percent wider this year: 305mm up front (compared to 245mm last year) and a whopping 405mm at the back (up from 325mm). Pirelli has also been told to make tires that won't rapidly degrade, which means an end to drivers cruising around many seconds a lap slower than their cars are capable. (The tire company was instructed to make those rubbish tires on purpose following an exciting race in Canada in 2010, except that race was exciting because the teams were all reacting to the unknown. Once everyone knew how the new tires would behave, the racing turned out to be dull as dishwater.) Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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