posted 4 days ago on ars technica
If you know how to do something and people around you start doing it differently, you have two options: stick to what you know, or change to use their strategy. If the new strategy is more efficient than yours, or gets better results, it’s a no-brainer, so you switch. But if it’s exactly as efficient and produces the same results, the decision to switch is based on another factor—conformity. We know that we have a tendency to fall in line with those around us, sometimes even when this results in obvious mistakes. This tendency can explain why human culture varies so widely among different societies, but is so similar within groups. Our closest primate relatives don’t have cultural variation to the same degree, so what makes humans different? Previous research on non-human great apes has shown that they learn from their peers. However, what hasn’t been established is whether this process is similar in humans and non-humans, including when the learning involves overriding existing habits. A group of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, recently found that human children are more likely than chimpanzees and orangutans to change their behavior to conform to their peers. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Federal law places limits on how robo-calling can be used. Federal Trade Commission Morgan Pietz, one of the lawyers who wrapped "copyright troll" Prenda Law in a whirl of judicial sanctions, has set his sights on a new target: Rightscorp. In a class action lawsuit (PDF) filed on Friday, Pietz says the copyright enforcement company made illegal, harassing robo-calls to his clients, who were accused of illegal downloading. The lawsuit says that Rightscorp broke the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), a 1991 law which limits how automated calling devices can be used. The suit also claims that Rightscorp met the legal definition of a "debt collector" but made harassing phone calls and didn't abide by federal or California debt collection laws. Rightscorp company managers, including CEO Christopher Sabec and COO Robert Steele, and Rightscorp's clients are all named as defendants in the lawsuit. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true});LOS ANGELES—The commercially-viable hydrogen fuel cell vehicle has long been the white whale for automakers. Using hydrogen as a fuel means a car could produce nothing but electricity and water. Hydrogen fuel cells also offer greater energy density than battery-powered cars, and they can be refilled faster than their battery-only brethren. But (there's always a but), fuel-cell vehicles lack supporting infrastructure; there are only nine hydrogen-filling stations in the state of California currently. Plus, hydrogen generally requires pressure or extremely cold temperatures to store it. But a handful of automakers think they've figured the engineering out. Toyota is on the cutting edge with its Mirai mid-sized sedan, which will go on sale in the US in late 2015 (and sooner in Japan). Honda, Audi, Hyundai, and Volkswagen also all showed off a hydrogen concept car or announced plans for real production vehicles in the coming year or two. And while hybrid gas/electric vehicles are becoming passé with hydrogen as the new darling, there are still some interesting all-electric and natural gas-powered cars out there. The LA Auto Show provided the perfect opportunity to see them all on the show floor. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Party time with the corporate tool, BlackBerry's Passport. Sean Gallagher Specs at a glance: BlackBerry Passport Screen 1440 x 1440 pixels, 4.5 inches (493 ppi) AMOLED OS BlackBerry 10.3 (with Android compatibility) CPU 2.26 GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 RAM 3GB GPU Adreno 330 Storage 32 GB internal, with microSD support up to 128 GB Networking Wi-Fi 802.11ac, dual-band, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot Cellular Bands D-LTE 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, 17, 20 (2100/1900/1800/1700/850/2600/900/700/700/800 MHz) HSPA+ 1, 2, 4, 5/6, 8 (2100/1900/1700/850/900 MHz) Quad band GSM/GPRS/EDGE (850/900/1800/1900 MHz) Ports Micro USB 2.0, headphones Camera 13MP rear camera with OIS and LED flash, 2MP front camera Size 5.04" × 3.56" × 0.36" (128 x 90.3 x 9.3mm) Weight 6.91 oz. (196g) Battery 3220 mAh Starting price $599 unlocked (AT&T exclusive contract pricing still pending) Other perks NFC, FM radio, Miracast direct media streaming to Roku and Wi-Fi wireless charging, voice commands, BlackBerry Blend integration with computers, iOS and Android tablets. “That is the worst designed thing, like ever.” That's exactly what my 13-year-old daughter said as she gazed upon the BlackBerry Passport, freshly unboxed upon my desk. She picked it up, ran fingers across the keys, and put it down again. She acted as if she mistakenly touched something she found on the sidewalk, right down to taking a step back in retreat. If BlackBerry had been out to design a phone for the teen demographic, her assessment would have been dead on. The Passport is not designed for a tiny little purse or jeans back pocket. It is designed for people who are dead center in the cult of BlackBerry—business types who want a phone that is a workspace, those who crave the tactile feedback of actual keys. There must be a bunch of those people out there, since the Passport has been difficult to find since its release in September. It sold out fast, and that was mostly through BlackBerry and Amazon—AT&T, the exclusive carrier for Passport in the US, hasn't even put the phone on its Web store yet. Because of the Passport's unique position in the smartphone market, it’s only fair to review the Passport as a business tool—not in comparison to the latest Lollipop thing or iPhone Whatever+ as a consumer device. So rather than doing the usual feature-by-feature crawl, we put the Passport through the paces of several typical Ars 18-hour workdays to focus on its business acumen. And while we ran some basic benchmarks and explored its features, this focus was mostly on its security features. We even did some packet sniffing to see what could be seen. Read 50 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The five stages of Regin. Symantec Researchers have unearthed highly advanced malware they believe was developed by a wealthy nation-state to spy on a wide range of international targets in diverse industries, including hospitality, energy, airline, and research. Backdoor Regin, as researchers at security firm Symantec are referring to the trojan, bears some resemblance to previously discovered state-sponsored malware, including the espionage trojans known as Flame and Duqu, as well as Stuxnet, the computer worm and trojan that was programmed to disrupt Iran's nuclear program. Regin likely required months or years to be completed and contains dozens of individual modules that allowed its operators to tailor the malware to individual targets. To remain stealthy, the malware is organized into five stages, each of which is encrypted except for the first one. Executing the first stage triggers a domino chain in which the second stage is decrypted and executed, and that in turn decrypts the third stage, and so on. Analyzing and understanding the malware requires researchers to acquire all five stages. Regin contains dozens of payloads, including code for capturing screenshots, seizing control of an infected computer's mouse, stealing passwords, monitoring network traffic, and recovering deleted files. Other modules appear to be tailored to specific targets. One such payload included code for monitoring the traffic of a Microsoft IIS server. Another sniffed the traffic of mobile telephone base station controllers. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Shalini Saxena We’re increasingly dependent upon our batteries, so finding ways of building ones with enhanced lifetimes would make a lot of people happy. Research on batteries has ranged from trying new materials to changing the configuration of key components. Now, researchers have managed to restructure the materials in a nano-battery, then bundle lots of these individual batteries into a larger device. Batteries rely on two electrodes to create separate currents of electrons and ions, generating electricity. Nanostructured electrodes have useful properties, such as large surface area and short ion transport time, which enables a high storage capacity and enhanced lifetimes—these batteries hold charge longer and can undergo more charge-discharge cycles. 3-D connectivity and organization of nanostructured electrodes could further improve these devices. Previously, researchers had developed 3-D nanostructured batteries by placing two electrodes within a nanopore (made of anodic aluminum oxide) and using ultrathin electrical insulating material to separate them. While this system had improved power and energy density, use of such thin electrical insulators limits charge retention and requires complex circuits to shift current between them—it's difficult to retain the benefits of the 3-D nano-architecture due to spatial constraints of the material. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites. dennis asks: I am currently working on a Ruby on Rails project which shows a list of images. Read 28 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Artist's impression. A long-standing oddity of Windows is that its branded number has for some years now not matched the version number stamped into the kernel and other parts of the operating system. Windows 7, for example, reported itself to software as being version 6.1. Windows 8 is 6.2, and Windows 8.1 is 6.3. Current public builds of Windows 10 repeat this trend—they purport to be version 6.4—but not for much longer. Chinese site ITHome published a picture showing the version number to be 10.0. Version number 10.0 is also cropping up on BuildFeed which tracks build numbers, and has been further corroborated elsewhere. Our sources tell us that the version number has indeed changed, and that Windows 10 will be version 10.0, ending a discrepancy that has existed for five years. Prior to the decision to brand the operating system Windows 10, we're told that there were some versions built calling themselves 9.0, too. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The three Amiibos! Sam Machkovech Woe be to the uninformed parent who hides Amiibo figurines in a child's stocking this holiday season. A giddy child will surely light up after unwrapping a beloved, cool-looking Nintendo character, and that excitement might quintuple when the kid realizes this thing is like a Skylanders or Disney Infinity figure—it'll come to life on your Wii U! Which is good, because the figurines, while quite attractive, are frozen solid; no bendy limbs or karate-chop action here. No matter, as the box loudly advertises that fans can "battle with Amiibo in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U." That means the happy little tyke will surely slap their new Mario or Donkey Kong figurine onto a Wii U Gamepad with stars in their eyes. "My own custom Pikachu," they might emote, "maybe with cool, custom outfits or special superpowers that I can use when I 'settle it in Smash.'" Well, not exactly. After shelling out $39 (plus tax) for three of Nintendo's new toys, we've come to learn that the Amiibo sales pitch has been worded pretty carefully to shade the truth from potential buyers. The figures come to life, yes, but it's not your life. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Specs at a glance: Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro SCREEN 3200×1800 at 13.3" (276 ppi) OS Windows 8.1 64-bit CPU 1.1GHz Intel Core M-5Y70 RAM 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 GPU Intel HD Graphics 5300 HDD 256-512GB SSD NETWORKING Dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.0 PORTS 2x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0, micro-HDMI, SD card reader, headphone/microphone dual jack SIZE 13 × 9 × 0.5" WEIGHT 2.62 lbs BATTERY 4-cell 44.8Wh Li-polymer WARRANTY 1 year STARTING PRICE $1299.99 OTHER PERKS 720p Webcam, volume rocker, screen orientation lock button, system back-up button When Lenovo launched its first Yoga laptop, it seemed rather weird. It arrived on a wave of new Windows 8-oriented devices that tried all manner of new things to offer the best of the traditional laptop and the tablet experience. The Yoga's premise was simple: make a hinge that bends all the way around, so you can fold the laptop back on itself to make it into a sort of chunky laptop. It skewed more heavily towards laptop usage than tablet usage—there are no compromises when using it as a laptop, unlike, for example, Microsoft's Surface Pro range—but still offered that flexibility for those who wanted it. Although designed to let the device transform into a tablet, it is perhaps the other positions that have been the real winners with the Yoga's hinge: what Lenovo calls "tent mode," where the keyboard is folded most of the way back to prop the screen up, is excellent when watching movies in planes and similar cramped situations, as it drastically shrinks the footprint of the device. This flexibility made the Yoga design one of the big winners. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A RAT user spying on a girl from Malaysia. In the background is a complete list of "slaves" this RAT user controls. Fifteen people have been arrested across seven European countries “who are suspected of using remote access trojans (RATs) to commit cybercrimes,” Europol said in a statement on Thursday. The people were apprehended in Estonia, France, Romania, Latvia, Italy, the United Kingdom, and Norway. The National Crime Agency (NCA), a rough British equivalent to the FBI, lead a sting operation resulting in the arrests of five (out of the 15 total) across the United Kingdom. In May 2014, over 100 people were arrested as part of a similar worldwide sting operation. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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More details are now public about the deal Apple reached in June to settle claims that it engaged in price-fixing in the e-book market. That settlement was approved by a federal judge on Friday. It's an unusual one, in which Apple essentially bets the outcome in its class-action lawsuit on the outcome of another case. In 2011, Apple got sued in a class-action case, where a class of e-book buying consumers was ultimately joined by attorneys general of various states. The Department of Justice also came after Apple for price-fixing, and the government won that case in 2013. Apple has appealed its loss to DOJ. In the class-action, Apple and plaintiffs' lawyers have agreed that the outcome of that case should rest on how the appeal turns out. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Flickr user Prayitno Our brains start soaking in details from the languages around us from the moment we can hear them. One of the first things infants learn of their native languages is the system of consonants and vowels, as well as other speech sound characteristics, like pitch. In the first year of life, a baby’s ear tunes in to the particular set of sounds being spoken in its environment, and the brain starts developing the ability to tell subtle differences among them—a foundation that will make a difference in meaning down the line, allowing the child to learn words and grammar. But what happens if that child gets shifted into a different culture after laying the foundations of its first native language? Does it forget everything about that first language, or are there some remnants that remain buried in the brain? According to a recent PNAS paper, the effects of very early language learning are permanently etched into the brain, even if input from that language stops and it’s replaced by another language. To identify this lasting influence, the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans on children who had been adopted to see what neural patterns could be identified years after adoption. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A video showing off Smealum's Ninjhax homebrew exploit in action. Earlier this week, hacker Jordan "Smealum" Rabet announced that obscure 2011 3DS platformer Cubic Ninja held the key to unlocking the 3DS hardware to run homebrew code, causing an immediate run on the hard-to-find game. Now, Smealum has published the details of his hack, along with the instructions and tools needed to unlock the system. What Smealum is calling "Ninjhax" exploits an error in Cubic Ninja's level creation and sharing function, which passes created level data via generated QR codes. Scanning a specifically manufactured QR code, generated by a tool on Smealum's site to match any current 3DS hardware/firmware combination, causes the game to run a boot file loaded on the SD card. At that point, the bootloader downloads additional code over Wi-Fi and installs and runs a front-end channel that can run other homebrew software stored on the SD card. After that initial QR code scan, the homebrew menu can be loaded simply by accessing the save game file through Cubic Ninja. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Via Tsuji Days after a BuzzFeed journalist revealed that an Uber executive floated the idea of using its “God mode” ability to snoop on journalists who write about the ridesharing service, rival firm Lyft has changed its policy to prevent most employees from doing something similar. Erin Simpson, a Lyft spokeswoman, told Ars in a statement by e-mail that the company’s “longstanding policy prohibits employees or contractors from accessing any user personal information except to the extent such use is necessary to do their job.” As of Thursday, the company has “proactively made additional updates to further safeguard our community members' privacy, including the development of tiered access controls that further limit access to user data to a smaller subset of employees and contractors. Ride location data is restricted to an even smaller subset of people.” Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Network neutrality protest at Google headquarters. Steve Rhodes "The European parliament is poised to call for a break-up of Google" in a vote next week, the Financial Times reported today. The resolution would be nonbinding, because any final action would have to be taken by the European Commission, the executive branch of the European Union. "A draft motion seen by the Financial Times says that 'unbundling [of] search engines from other commercial services' should be considered as a potential solution to Google’s dominance," the paper wrote. "It has the backing of the parliament’s two main political blocs, the European People’s Party and the Socialists." While the parliament itself "has no formal power to split up companies," it does have "increasing influence on the [European] Commission, which initiates all EU legislation," the report said. "The commission has been investigating concerns over Google’s dominance of online search for five years, with critics arguing that the company’s rankings favor its own services, hitting its rivals’ profits." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. Computer History Museum It won't be a surprise if the Federal Communications Commission gets sued when it issues net neutrality rules. In fact, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler expects it. Since November 10, when President Obama called on the FCC to reclassify Internet service as a utility and impose strict net neutrality rules, the FCC has been urged to act quickly. But it appears the commission won't issue final rules before the end of 2014. When reporters today asked Wheeler when he'll act, he said he's taking his time because he wants to make sure the commission's net neutrality rules aren't overturned in court. "We are going to be sued," he said in a Q&A after the FCC's monthly meeting. "That's the history. Every time in this whole discussion anytime the commission has moved to do something, one of the big dogs has gone to sue... We don’t want to ignore history. We want to come out with good rules that accomplish what we need to accomplish, an open Internet, no blocking, no throttling, no fast lanes, no discrimination, and we want those rules to be in place after a court decision. So we want to be sure we’re thoughtful in the way in which we structure them and we're thoughtful in the way we present what will ultimately be presented to a court." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The harsh environment of the Tibetan Plateau was made a little more welcoming by the arrival of barley. NASA Western mountain climbers are fortunate that there are Sherpas to guide them up Mount Everest. While Westerners can train for years and still not make the summit—although they may still get headlines—Sherpas do it repeatedly, with little fanfare, and while carrying food, packs, and oxygen for their clients. Anthropologists have long been wondering how any humans ever managed to start living up at the Roof of the World in the first place. New work suggests that one of the keys is very, very mundane—nothing like their having superpowers or anything like that. No, the key is... barley. The northeastern Tibetan Plateau is at an inhospitable elevation, approximately 3,000-4,000 meters above sea level. Yet there are traces of human life there dating back at least 20,000 years BP (Before Present, Present being defined as January 1, 1950, as used in radiocarbon dating). And indications are that at least some aspects of altitude tolerance had evolved long before then (see sidebar). Handprints, footprints, small hearths, and stone tools have been found from this early period, but these artifacts are probably evidence of temporary hunting camps, each used perhaps only once when parties ventured onto the plateau seeking game. These types of objects do not imply any kind of permanent human habitation up there. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Divine Harvester Amid complaints that phone companies such as AT&T and Verizon are letting copper networks deteriorate, the Federal Communications Commission today said it will examine the allegations and develop rules that maintain customers' access to emergency services even after old copper networks are discontinued. Today’s vote is one of the first steps in planning for the discontinuation of the primarily copper-based Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). The PSTN is being replaced by Internet Protocol (IP)-based voice services that rely on network technologies such as fiber, cable, and wireless. AT&T and Verizon are anxious to make the transition because they want to shed costly infrastructure and century-old utility rules that likely won’t apply to Voice over IP (VoIP) services. Customers from around the country have complained that the companies are letting the copper networks rot in order to push them onto largely unregulated services. Keeping VoIP phones running during power outages is perhaps the biggest concern. Copper lines conduct electricity and supply power to phones from central offices, potentially keeping phones running for weeks on end during outages. This system isn’t foolproof because damage to lines or the central office could result in loss of power, but backup options for VoIP phones are more limited, consisting of batteries in customers’ homes. When the power is out and the batteries for landline phones and cell phones have run out, customers won’t be able to call 911. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Wikipedia Target’s massive data breach, in which criminals were able to drop malware onto point-of-sale systems and compromise at least 40 million credit and debit cards, is now the subject of a federal lawsuit by banks who issued those cards. And Target is arguing in court today that those claims should be thrown out, Bloomberg reports—because the company claims it had no obligation to protect the banks from damages. The suit has been brought by five banks—First Federal Savings, Village Bank, Umpqua Bank, Mutual Bank, and Louisiana’s CSE Federal Credit Union. As a group, the banks are claiming losses because the breach exceeded $5 million. The lawsuit is playing out as representatives from financial organizations, including the US’ two major credit union industry associations, are pressing Congress to take action to hold retailers more accountable for payment data breaches and to bring them under the same privacy standards as financial institutions with regard to financial data. Major retailer data breaches over the past year, including the ones at Target and Home Depot, have caused banks and credit unions to have to reissue hundreds of millions of payment cards. The Home Depot breach, first reported in September, was revealed last week to have exposed 53 million customer e-mail addresses, as well as 56 million payment cards. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Scott A judge in Charlotte, North Carolina, has unsealed a set of 529 court documents in hundreds of criminal cases detailing the use of a stingray, or cell-site simulator, by local police. This move, which took place earlier this week, marks a rare example of a court opening up a vast trove of applications made by police to a judge, who authorized each use of the powerful and potentially invasive device. According to the Charlotte Observer, the records seem to suggest that judges likely did not fully understand what they were authorizing. Law enforcement agencies nationwide have taken extraordinary steps to preserve stingray secrecy. As recently as this week, prosecutors in a Baltimore robbery case dropped key evidence that stemmed from stingray use rather than fully disclose how the device was used. The newspaper also reported on Friday that the Mecklenburg County District Attorney’s office, which astonishingly had also never previously seen the applications filed by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD), will now review them and determine which records also need to be shared with defense attorneys. Criminals could potentially file new claims challenging their convictions on the grounds that not all evidence was disclosed to them at the time. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Aurich Lawson In early 2013, researchers exposed some unsettling risks stemming from Android-based password managers. In a paper titled "Hey, You, Get Off of My Clipboard," they documented how passwords managed by 21 of the most popular such apps could be accessed by any other app on an Android device, even those with extremely low-level privileges. They suggested several measures to help fix the problem. Almost two years later, the threat remains viable in at least some, if not all, of the apps originally analyzed. An app recently made available on Google Play, for instance, has no trouble divining the passwords managed by LastPass, one of the leading managers on the market, as well as the lesser-known KeePassDroid. With additional work, it's likely that the proof-of-concept ClipCaster app would work seamlessly against many other managers, too, said Xiao Bao Clark, the Australia-based programmer who developed it. While ClipCaster does nothing more than display the plaintext of passwords that LastPass and KeePassDroid funnel through Android handsets, a malicious app with only network privileges could send the credentials to an attacker without the user having any idea what was happening. "Besides the insecurity of it, what annoyed me was that I was never told any of this while I was signing up or setting up the LastPass app," Clark wrote in an e-mail. "Instead I got the strong impression from LastPass that everything was very secure, and I needn't worry about any of it. If they at least told users the security issues using these features brings, then the users themselves could decide on their own trade-off between usability and security. Not mentioning it at all strikes me as disingenuous." Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Google is giving new Chromebook buyers a place to put their stuff, for a couple of years anyway. Andrew Cunningham Chromebooks don't have much local storage, which is kind of the point—their vision of computing is one where basically everything is done in the cloud, and the computer on your lap is just your window to the Information Superhighway. To make that usage model more plausible, Google is giving new Chromebook buyers 1TB of Google Drive storage free for two years. To take advantage of the deal, you just have to buy any new Chromebook between now and January 1, 2015. Google runs similar promotions with most Chromebooks, though with differing subscription lengths and amounts of storage space. The expensive Chromebook Pixel came with 1TB of storage for three years; the cheaper HP Chromebook 11 came with 100GB for two years. A year of Google Drive on the 1TB plan costs $9.99 a month and there are no yearly subscription options, so the subscription is worth a grand total of $239.76. Chromebooks like Acer's C720 start at $199, though you'd do well to spend more money and get more than 2GB of RAM. If the cloud model doesn't work for you, a new class of cheap Windows laptops like HP's Stream have been creeping down into the $200 price category lately. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Six members of the United Kingdom’s National Union of Journalists—including comedian and journalist Mark Thomas—have filed suit against London’s Metropolitan Police after discovering that their daily activities were being monitored and recorded in a police database. The database is gathered by the National Domestic Extremists and Disorder Intelligence Unit, a task force led by the Metropolitan Police Service that tracks political and religious groups in the UK and monitors protests. In an interview on BBC Radio 4, Thomas said that the surveillance was discovered through information uncovered by a request under the UK’s Data Protection Act—a law similar to the US’ Freedom of Information Act. “The police are gathering information under the domestic extremist list about journalist and NUJ members, “ he said. “And we know this because six of us have applied to the police using the Data Protection Act to get some of the information the police are holding on us on these lists. And what they are doing is monitoring journalists’ activities and putting them under surveillance and creating databases about them." Thomas has used the Data Protection Act in the name of both journalism and comedy. In 2001, he launched a contest in which he encouraged people to do creative performances in front of surveillance cameras and then submit the videos to him after obtaining them through Data Protection Act requests. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A computer programmer whose massive public records request threatened Seattle's plan to put body cameras on its police officers has made peace with the police department. Today's Seattle Times reports that Seattle Police Department COO Mike Wagers has invited the man into police headquarters to meet with him and tech staff to discuss how he could receive video regularly. As a condition of the meeting, he has dropped the public records request. "I’m hoping he can help us with the larger systemic issue—how can we release as much video as possible and redact what we need to redact so we can be transparent?” Wagers told the newspaper. “What do we have to lose? We have nothing to hide. There are no secrets.” Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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