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ntr23 A Virginia-based law enforcement data sharing ring, which allows signatory police agencies to share and analyze seized "telephone intelligence information," was first proposed by federal prosecutors, according to new documents obtained by Ars. Federal involvement suggests that there could be more such databases in other parts of the country. "It’s unsurprising to see the feds encouraging local law enforcement agencies to create these localized databases," Hanni Fakhoury, a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told Ars. "In fact, there’s a whole division within the Department of Justice that focuses on educating and advancing local law enforcement interests, the National Institute of Justice. And so I would imagine there are others." As Ars reported last month, according to a memorandum of understanding (MOU) first published by the Center for Investigative Reporting, the police departments from Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Chesapeake, and Suffolk all participate in something called the "Hampton Roads Telephone Analysis Sharing Network," or HRTASN. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An electron micrograph of the wire that was used for testing the caged molecule. Laia Vila Nadal, Felix Iglesias Escudero, Leroy Cronin, Cronin Group, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow As features on chips get smaller, we're edging closer to where we bump up against basic physics, which dictates that the behavior of wiring will become unpredictable once the number of atoms involved gets small enough. As a result, there's been some preliminary work done on producing processor components out of single molecules, like carbon nanotubes. But it's not just processors we care about. As features of flash memory shrink, we'll eventually run up against a similar problem: the locations where electrons are stored will be too small to hold sufficient charge for the device to actually work. Fortunately, it looks like molecules may be able to help us out here, as well. Researchers are reporting that they've designed a combination of two molecules that can hold electrons for use as flash memory. This isn't the first advance in single-molecule flash memory. Last year, researchers reported building a flash device that included layers of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, both of which form molecular sheets a single atom thick. But these devices required several layers of these materials to work, so the charge ended up stored in several stacked sheets of graphene. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Retro Seattle police car. Curtis Cronn Police in Seattle are just weeks away from implementing pilot program in which 12 officers will test different types of body cameras. It's a first step in a plan to put body cameras on the department's more than 1,000 officers by the year 2016. Now that plan may get put on ice, due in part to an overly broad public records requests. The Seattle Times reported this morning that an anonymous man, known only by the email address policevideorequests@gmail.com, has made an official request for "details on every 911 dispatch on which officers are sent; all the written reports they produce; and details of each computer search generated by officers when they run a person’s name, or check a license plate or address." The requestor also wants all video from patrol car cameras currently in use, and plans to request video from body cams once they are implemented. He has requested the information "every day, in spreadsheet form." Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Megan Geuss LOS ANGELES—Throughout the press and trade days at the LA Auto Show, most of the big car makers in attendance hold 30-minute press conferences on the show floor to unveil their latest car or announce new company strategies. Given the gearhead audience, it’s no surprise that most of these announcements focus more on horsepower and design than phone compatibility and computing power. But a few car companies are looking toward the future and switching things up. ​Volvo was one of the few automakers to highlight its infotainment center and consoles in its announcement of the new XC90 seven-seat SUV. (Audi and Honda were the only other automakers of the ten-or-so announcements we attended that spent time extolling the virtues of its new cars’ interior tech.) That may be because Volvo is in a unique position to experience its “rebirth,” as one Volvo spokesman termed it. While many automakers are trying to reinvent themselves after a depressing decade, Volvo has new money from Chinese automaker Geely behind it after its former parent company Ford sold Volvo in 2010. That new money bought changes that are just starting to appear in Volvo’s 2015-and-beyond lineup. The company poured resources into building a small but powerful three turbo engine, which you can read about here, as well as equipping its cars with adaptive cruise control and collision avoidance mechanisms that turn on if the car is going below 30 miles per hour. Read 21 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! The Dealmaster is here again with a ton of deals courtesy of our partners at TechBargains. Today's featured deal is an HP Stream 7 Windows 8.1 tablet with one year of Office 365 personal for just $99. The 7-inch tablet has a 1280×800 screen, a 1.33GHz Intel Atom Z3735G quad-core processor, and 1GB of RAM. Best of all, it's the "Signature Edition" of the tablet, which means it isn't full of crapware. This and tons more deals are below for your holiday and/or personal shopping. Enjoy! Featured Deal Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It looks a little bit like an overgrown MacBook Air. But the Librem is free of corporate oppression. Purism What price can you put on freedom? If you’re talking about software freedom, a new San Francisco-based computer company prices it at $1,949 and up. Purism has turned to the crowdfunding site Crowd Supply to fund and launch its first-ever product—a laptop that's as open source friendly as it is technically feasible. Advertised as a "Free and Open Source laptop that respects your essential freedoms," Purism’s Librem 15 laptop, now in prototype and ready for manufacture, is designed to run entirely with open source software, requiring no proprietary drivers. The only proprietary code on the laptop resides in its Intel firmware. Based on the Intel i7-4712MQ processor, the 15.6-inch Librem 15’s base configuration will come with an Nvidia GT840M, 4GB of RAM, a 500 gigabyte hard drive, and an actual CD/DVD drive. The Librem will have three USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, an SDXC card slot, and a “pop-down” RJ-45 Ethernet port, in addition to an Atheros-based 802.11n Wi-Fi adapter, a 720p built-in camera, HD audio, and a backlit keyboard. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Twenty months after it started, Valve's experiment in letting developers sell unfinished games through its Steam Early Access program continues to evolve. Giant Bomb reports that the distribution service has sent a new set of rules and guidelines to Early Access developers about how they should market and position their games. The most important new rule might be the requirement that developers clearly communicate a game's unfinished status wherever Steam keys are sold outside of Valve's storefront. As Valve notes, "We've seen that many of these titles are sold as keys on other websites where there is no explanation of what Early Access is or what the current state of your product is now versus what you hope to achieve." This extends to setting proper expectations for the project "everywhere you talk about your game," Valve says. Early Access developers must also avoid "specific promises about future events," such as when a game will be finished or what features are planned for future updates. "Customers should be buying your game based on its current state, not on promises of a future that may or may not be realized," Valve writes. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Trevor Paglen An unnamed top National Security Agency (NSA) official had a stark internal disagreement with then-director Keith Alexander in 2009 over the bulk metadata program, according to a new report by the Associated Press (AP) on Thursday. The official warned that the program put the agency into new and unlawful territory, saying that if it was made public, it would cause an enormous backlash. That person, who has retired and spoke to the AP under condition of anonymity, said "he knows of no evidence the program was used for anything other than hunting for terrorism plots in the US. But he said he and others made the case that the collection of American records in bulk crossed a line that had been sacrosanct." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Game of Thrones, the adventure game Excitement for the latest Game of Thrones video game has been building for nearly a year, ever since its December 2013 reveal as a point-and-click adventure game being made by Telltale Games, known for its acclaimed virtual take on The Walking Dead. On Thursday, the episodic game received its first gameplay reveal in the form of a 60-second teaser trailer, complete with virtual approximations of series stars Peter Dinklage (Tyrion Lannister), Lena Headey (Cersei Lannister), Natalie Dormer (Margaery Tyrell), and Iwan Rheon (Ramsay Snow). They'll all appear in the game's first episode, with other stars from the TV series to come in future episodes. However, HBO and Telltale took a curious path to unveiling other parts of the game in a Thursday media blitz. Namely, the companies reached out to various gaming and nerd-culture sites and whispered into each of their individual ears, "we have an exclusive for you." The result: At least twelve sites posted stories about the game's trailer, and each outlet added their own trumpeted "exclusive" reveal of a specific in-game character. So far, the following outlets have succumbed to HBO's tease: Entertainment Weekly, Gamespot, IGN, The Nerdist, GamesRadar, Polygon, USA Today, The Verge, Mashable, Game Informer, The Escapist, Yahoo, and Wired. Each site lists an individual character's backstory, all the while unable to confirm whether their site's character will be one of the game's five playable characters. Either way, the combined pool of the game's revealed characters draws heavily from House Forrester, a family that has yet to appear in the televised HBO series despite having an impact in the series' original books. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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This video screencap comes after a Gorilla Glass 4 device fell for a full meter and landed directly onto a sandpaper-coated surface. Look: no breakage, no shattering. Corning On Thursday, Corning Incorporated, the creators of Gorilla Glass, unveiled the fourth generation of its thin, durable glass technology for use in smartphones, tablets, and other mobile electronics. Gorilla Glass 4 is already being advertised as "up to two times stronger" than any "competitive" mobile screen, with a specific focus on surviving everyday drops in the real world. Corning confirmed to Ars Technica that the upgraded glass will reach consumer devices "this quarter." Global marketing director David Velasquez was unwilling to reveal "what we did to the glass to make it better," but he talked at length about one major change to the company's lab testing: a single sheet of sandpaper. After analyzing "thousands upon thousands" of screens broken in the real world, Corning confirmed that a major contributor to common breakage was dropping a phone on "rough surfaces like asphalt and concrete." That might seem like a head-smackingly obvious issue, but Velasquez insists that the smartphone glass-making industry, which hasn't even existed for a full decade, has "no standard" for such testing. Most drop tests employ surfaces like stainless steel or granite, which replicate surfaces in a home. "The best way to approximate what asphalt does [to a phone screen] is 180-grit sandpaper," Velasquez said. That can more consistently reproduce the microscopic breakage of a rough surface than even a giant sheet of asphalt (which, Corning learned after a few tests, actually smooths out at a point of contact after a few drops). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The high-profile patent lawsuit between Google and the "Rockstar Consortium" is drawing to a close. Google has signed a "term sheet" with Rockstar which will be finalized as a settlement in the coming weeks. None of the terms of the Google-Rockstar settlement have been made public so far. The news comes days after it became public that Cisco expects to take a $188 million charge to settle its own patent dispute with Rockstar, which sought royalties from at least a dozen Cisco customers. The lawsuit against Google was filed in October 2013. Although the litigation did not advance past jockeying over venue, it was closely watched. Rockstar is owned by five of Google's chief rivals in the smartphone industry: Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, Ericsson, and Sony. The Rockstar group was created in 2011, and it bid $4.5 billion for the large patent portfolio of Canada-based Nortel, which went bankrupt in 2009. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Brian Gaid A bill is moving forward in the Utah State Legislature that aims to eventually shut down water to the National Security Agency’s (NSA) new massive data storage facility at Bluffdale, just south of Salt Lake City. On Wednesday, the Public Utilities and Technology Interim Committee discussed the bill that "prohibits cooperation between a federal agency that collects electronic data and any political subdivisions of the state." Rep. Marc Roberts, the bill’s author, did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment. As currently drafted, the bill would let the Bluffdale contract with the NSA continue until it runs out. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Aurich Lawson On November 10, a 12-year-old girl left her home in the Baltimore suburb of Nottingham at 7:30am, heading to her middle school. She never returned home. When her mother called the school later, she discovered that her daughter had not even arrived. Suddenly, Baltimore County Police were calling in the FBI to assist in their search for a missing person. According to police reports, “an unfamiliar blue pick-up truck with North Carolina license plates” was spotted by neighbors near Jane Doe’s home that morning. (While the girl’s name was previously published in Baltimore local media, we’ll refer to her by the name used in recent court documents—Jane Doe—because of her age and because of the nature of the crime allegedly committed against her.) Over the next four days, the investigation of Jane Doe’s disappearance led to a ranch house on a cul-de-sac 340 miles away in Raleigh, North Carolina. That’s where North Carolina Alcohol Law Enforcement agents working under the direction of the FBI eventually found the kidnapped girl—along with a 32-year-old probationer named Victor Yanez Arroyo. The girl is now back with her family, but according to arrest documents, Jane Doe told authorities that “at the residence, Arroyo had non-consensual sex with her two times.” Arroyo was arrested and now faces a wave of state and federal charges. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In Thursday blog post titled "Your time is valuable; we don't want to waste it," Comcast customer service chief Charlie Herrin detailed a new service that will give customers alerts 30 minutes before a technician shows up. Comcast reduced its four-hour technician arrival windows to two hours a few years ago, and it promises $20 credits or a free premium channel for three months if they arrive late. Comcast also promises to call customers before they arrive at their home. To make the alert process more efficient, Comcast developed a feature "that enables our customers to track our technicians' arrival in real time," Herrin wrote. "This new feature, which will be available for free through our MyAccount app, begins trialing outside Boston this week." "This is how it works," he continued. "Customers with scheduled appointments will be alerted through our App when our technician is about 30 minutes away from arriving at their house, and will be able to track this technician’s progress on a map. We’re hoping this will prevent our customers from just needing to sit at home and wait. They can check the app from the office, or wherever they are, and head home when they see we’re on our way. If we are running late, which can happen if our tech gets tied up at someone else’s house, we will let folks know that too, and provide real-time status updates so they can plan accordingly." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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acidpolly A Swedish appellate court has denied WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s bid to have his arrest warrant set aside. On Thursday, the Svea Court of Appeal upheld a city court’s decision, saying in an online statement that "Julian Assange is suspected on probable cause of crimes including rape (less serious crime) and that there is a great risk that he will evade legal proceedings or punishment." The Australian remains wanted in Sweden for questioning relating to alleged sex offenses dating back to 2010—however, Assange has not yet been formally charged with a crime. According to Assange’s own September 2013 affidavit, he stated that the women he slept with specifically said they were not accusing him of rape and that police "made up the charges." Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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A substantial part of Microsoft's Azure cloud platform went down earlier this week, leaving customers with deployments in the US, Europe, and Asia unable to use Azure for about 11 hours. Microsoft has explained the problem. An update was made to Azure Storage that caused the storage front-end servers to get stuck in an infinite loop, leaving them unable to service any requests. Everything else that depended on storage subsequently keeled over. Although the bad update was reverted, it took a while for the subsequent reboots to ripple through the system and get things working again. The update had been tested before the broad rollout, but the testing had only been performed on Azure's table-based storage. The infinite loop error was discovered in Azure's blob-based storage. This was compounded by a rollout that was more rapid than normal; updates such as this should be deployed in limited batches to avoid taking out multiple Azure data centers simultaneously. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Five seconds after this photo was taken, projectile vomit was everywhere. True story. Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock For all the excitement in many portions of the gaming community over virtual reality technologies like the Oculus Rift and Sony's Project Morpheus, major third-party gaming publishers have been slow to throw their weight behind the idea. In fact, at least two of those publishers are now publicly expressing worries about motion sickness and nausea getting in the way of the consumer adoption that virtual reality headsets are going to need to become a market force. In an interview with Bloomberg this week, Take-Two President and CEO Strauss Zelnick said the industry is "not yet" ready for virtual reality. He said that's partly because developers need to work out issues such as "how are you going to see your controller, how does the controller interact with this immersive space," but it's also because of comfort and motion sickness issues with current prototypes. "We are concerned that you'll play our games for a long period of time—we don't want people getting nauseated," Zelnick said. "And also, having had the experience, I'm not sure how long you want an immersive headset on your head. We'll find out." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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SugarString's last stand. Verizon's attempt at technology journalism has seemingly been halted, as its widely mocked news site hasn't published anything new in more than three weeks. "SugarString" is bankrolled by Verizon Wireless and got off to a rocky start when its editor, Cole Stryker, was seeking out reporters and told prospective candidates that the site would not write about spying and net neutrality. The Daily Dot broke this news on October 28, and SugarString has gone silent since then. This story by Stryker about scientist Neil DeGrasse Tyson from 23 days ago seems to be the most recent one the site has published. Stryker, who didn't respond to Ars when we initially wrote about SugarString, has stayed mostly quiet on Twitter. We asked Verizon Wireless yesterday if SugarString is being shut down or if there are any plans for new stories. "As you know, this is a pilot/trial project, and pilot projects undergo a lot of changes/evaluation (and this one is no exception)," a Verizon Wireless spokesperson replied, adding nothing further. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

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Launching a new app in the mobile age is hard. If you want to reach a wide audience, you usually have to make your client three times at minimum: once for Android, once for iOS, and once more for the Web. Building an app on three different platforms means three times the work, with three times as many bugs to squish. To make matters more complicated, these clients all use different programming languages: Objective-C and/or Swift for iOS, Java for Android, and JavaScript/CSS/HTML5 for the Web. It's a problem Google decided to tackle when it was developing the recently launched reimagining of Gmail, called Google Inbox. With Inbox, Google adopted a set of tools that allowed it to tame the three-headed platform hydra. The app shares roughly two-thirds of its code across Android, iOS, and the Web. These three platforms share most of the back-end logic that powers the app, while the unique parts are mostly the user interfaces for each app. That gives Inbox a native feel and OS integration on each platform. Google has built itself a good enough arsenal of cross compilers that it can write an app's logic once for Android—in Java—and can then cross-compile to Objective-C for iOS and JavaScript for browsers. Java-to-JavaScript is handled by the Google Web Toolkit SDK, which has been around for some time. The real enabler for Inbox is called J2ObjC, which, as the name implies, converts Java code meant for Android into iOS-ready Objective-C code. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Just a few months ago, the future wasn't looking so bright for World of Warcraft, with subscriptions dipping down to just under 7 million and Blizzard employees stating publicly that they didn't expect the subscriber base to grow going forward. What a difference an expansion makes, as Blizzard announced this week that the recent release of Lords of Draenor has pushed the game back over 10 million subscribers for the first time since 2012. That's up from 7.4 million subscribers reported in October and a low of 6.8 million reported in July, Blizzard said. More than 3.3 million people have purchased a copy of Draenor even prior to the expansion's launch in South Korea, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau today. World of Warcraft's popularity peaked at 12 million subscribers in late 2010, around the release of the Cataclysm expansion and the game's first launch in China. Subscriber numbers have been on a slow but consistent downward slope since then, though. That wasn't materially changed by the 2012 release of the Mists of Pandaria expansion, which sold 2.7 million copies in under a week. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Nintendo's sprawling fighting game franchise is back for more. Andrew Cunningham CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true});True story: I had to win a fight for the right to review this game. The fight took place at our annual staff meetup last month, and it was fought not with fists or swords but with copies of Super Smash Bros. For Nintendo 3DS. I beat both Senior Gaming Editor Kyle Orland and Technology Reporter Sam Machkovech, and they were the only ones who were surprised. Super Smash Bros. Wii U is unique among Smash games in that we've already had a pretty good version of it for almost two months—the recent 3DS release. The portable version doesn't have quite the same feel, being squeezed onto a small screen and all, but all the characters and most of the new gameplay elements and modes are known quantities at this point. Read 41 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Netflix We’ve written a lot about how Netflix takes up a gigantic share of Internet traffic. During peak viewing hours, Netflix accounts for about a third of all bits sent to Internet users in North America on “fixed” connections—that is, cable, DSL, fiber, or satellite, but not cellular. But Netflix users also send a ton of data upstream, so much so that Sandvine’s latest Internet Phenomena Report puts Netflix at 9.48 percent of all peak upstream traffic on North American fixed Internet services, second only to BitTorrent's 25.49 percent. Sandvine, a maker of equipment that helps consumer broadband providers manage network congestion, defines “peak” hours as those when network usage is within 95 percent of its daily maximum, typically from 7 to 11 p.m. It isn’t new that Netflix is both an upload and download monster. But for some reason, its share of uploads went up substantially in the latest measurement while downloads remained level. The twice-annual report had Netflix accounting for 6.44 of peak upstream traffic and 34.21 percent of downstream traffic in the first half of this year, while the newest report has Netflix at 9.48 percent of upstream and 34.89 percent of downstream: Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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It took a lot of work to find the promised performance and stability improvements in iOS 8.1.1 for Apple A5 devices like the iPhone 4S, the iPad 2, the iPad Mini, and the iPod Touch. Andrew Cunningham It would be a stretch to say that iOS 7.1 made the iPhone 4 feel fast, but the update improved the phone's performance as much as could reasonably be expected for then-three-and-a-half-year-old hardware. It took what had been a disappointing update and made it usable. Jump ahead to iOS 8, an update which did pretty much the same thing to the iPhone 4S, the iPad 2, and other hardware based on Apple's aging A5 chip. App launch times slowed. Animations got choppy. Performance became inconsistent. It was the update that made them stop feeling "fast enough," which makes Apple's decision to keep selling the first-gen iPad Mini all the more confusing. iOS 8.1.1 came out on Monday, promising an iOS 7.1-style update for older devices like the iPhone 4S, iPad 2, iPad Mini, and first-generation iPod Touch. We're here to dispel those notions. iOS 8.1.1 improves performance in a few specific places, ones that may well be important to heavy users. However, it doesn't improve responsiveness or consistency, two of the problems you'll notice the most if you upgrade from iOS 7. Let's look at the short list of things you can expect to improve if you're using an older iDevice and the longer list of things that won't. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Look familiar? Except for that iceberg, it probably should. Ubisoft doesn't want anyone to know about Assassin's Creed: Rogue. That's all I can gather from the game’s total lack of marketing—especially relative to its new-console cousin, the problematic Assassin’s Creed: Unity, which launched the very same day—and the fact that review copies didn’t go out to critics until the game was already on store shelves. What little information spilled out ahead of release focused on the ship combat, returning from last year's Black Flag, and on the fact that players would be controlling one of the traditionally villainous Templars, in the form of the very Irish protagonist Shay Patrick McCormack. Right from the start, a player loading up Rogue would be forgiven for thinking they had mistakenly started up a copy of Black Flag by accident. A great many assets from that game (and Assassin's Creed 3, to a lesser extent) were clearly lifted to be reused in Rogue. Animations, sound effects, combat, locations, and even the exact same recordings of those wonderful sea shanties are not just familiar, but identical. It got to the point where I couldn't figure out why "Lowlands Away" wasn't playable on my sailor-powered radio, before I realized that I hadn't collected it in this game yet. The one and only major wrinkle to the sailing gameplay is colder waters, which introduce icebergs and freezing to death as a going concern (but not much of one). An Assassin’s story… with a twist Even Shay starts the game relatively indistinguishable from previous Assassin’s Creed protagonists. At the start of the game he's still an assassin, in the American colonies around the time of the Seven Years War. The “present-day” storyline, meanwhile, is another direct follow-up to Black Flag. Your in-game "true self" is still a programmer at a Templar-run research facility, fronting as a game developer. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Either this is the Knightscope K5 posed next to a man of average height, or this is a leaked image from new Marvel comic series "Cyborg Cid and the Invisible CEO." Knightscope Over 25 years ago, sardonic filmmaker Paul Verhoeven imagined a future in which justice was served by the cold steel of humanoid robots. Thankfully, in the real world, we've yet to see fleets of Robocop-like robots telling pedestrians that they "have 20 seconds to comply," but even the tongue-in-cheek Verhoeven couldn't have imagined that his guesses about futuristic security would emerge in the form of the Knightscope K5. After being teased in a profile in last week's MIT Technology Review, Knightscope's patrolling robot product received a public video unveiling on San Francisco CBS affiliate KPIX on Tuesday. The squat K5 model, shown wheeling around the company's Mountain View, CA parking lot, looked more like a Dalek or a Star Wars droid than Robocop's Peter Weller. The five-foot-tall K5 comes equipped with four cameras spread at 90 degree angles from each other, along with a weather sensor, a microphone array, a separate "license plate camera," a GPS sensor, and a Wi-Fi-enabled system to transmit live video and keep track of other nearby K5s. In the KPIX video, the 300-pound behemoth appeared to move at a rate of no more than five miles per hour, and it was even shown noticing and side-stepping any nearby humans in its patrol path. Knightscope co-founder Stacy Stephens confirmed that the K5 is not equipped with weapons or any other means of dispatching crooks; instead, he described this robot as a crime deterrent (while simultaneously suggesting that people think it looks "cute" and want to hug it). We struggle to agree with its usefulness as a deterrent; having played our fair share of stealthy video games, we can't help but feel like we've trained for years to dodge and avoid exactly this kind of slow, awkward-looking artificial intelligence. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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