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Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: Max Morse for TechCrunch) Amid the looming possibility of federal sanctions and criminal charges, Theranos is now facing two lawsuits by patients who say they were duped into using the company’s blood testing services. Apparently, Walgreens also feels hoodwinked. The pharmacy chain, which signed a blood testing deal with Theranos back in 2013, failed to vet claims about the company’s proprietary testing devices prior to getting into bed with the unproven startup, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. Walgreens made moves to try to get out of the deal after quality and accuracy problems at Theranos came to light last October. But, fearing breach-of-contract litigation that could open the door to Theranos getting billions in damages, Walgreens has yet to nix the partnership. They have, however, shelved plans to expand Theranos testing in Walgreens pharmacies. Currently, Theranos runs 45 “wellness centers” in Arizona and California, including 40 in Walgreens stores. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge As Microsoft pats itself on the back for its crackdown on easily cracked passwords, keep this in mind: a quick check shows users still have plenty of leeway to make poor choices. Like "Pa$$w0rd" (excluding the quotation marks). As a Microsoft program manager announced earlier this week, the Microsoft Account Service used to log in to properties such as Xbox Live and OneDrive Azure has been dynamically banning commonly used passwords during the account-creation or password-change processes. Try choosing "12345678," "password," or "letmein"—as millions of people regularly do—and you'll get a prompt telling you to try again. Microsoft is in the process of adding this feature to the Azure Active Directory so enterprise customers using the service can easily stop employees from taking security shortcuts, as well. But a quick check finds it's not hard to get around the ban. To wit: "Pa$$w0rd1" worked just fine. And in fairness to Microsoft, Google permitted the same hopelessly weak choice. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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SAN FRANCISCO—Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google's Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations. "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, listen to your verdict as it will stand recorded," said the court clerk, before polling each of the ten men and women on the jury. There was only one question on the special verdict form, asking if Google's use of the Java APIs was a "fair use" under copyright law. The jury unanimously answered "yes," in Google's favor. The verdict ends the trial, which began earlier this month. If Oracle had won, the same jury would have gone into a "damages phase" to determine how much Google should pay. Because Google won, the trial is over. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Falcon 9 rocket with its Thaicom payload on the launch pad in Florida. (credit: SpaceX) Fresh off two straight launches and unprecedented water landings of its Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX will try for a third sea-based landing this evening after it launches a 3,000kg Thaicom communications satellite to a supersynchronous transfer orbit. The two-hour launch window opens at 5:40pm ET (10:40pm BST). Weather is 90 percent "go" for a launch today. Like a similar launch three weeks ago, the Thaicom mission will require the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket to reach a high velocity relative to the Earth's surface before separating from its payload. "As with other missions going to geostationary orbits, the first-stage will be subject to extreme velocities and re-entry heating, making a successful landing challenging," the company stated in its mission overview. SpaceX has now shown it can land in relatively benign reentry conditions, as it did in April after delivering a payload to the International Space Station and in "hot and fast" conditions as it did earlier this month. A successful landing tonight would prove that the company has taken a big step toward making sea-based rocket landings—if not routine—at least something that can be attempted with a reasonable expectation of success. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Apple's popular iMessages as used on an iPad. (credit: Robert S. Donovan) Patent troll VirnetX, fresh on the heels of a $626 million FaceTime and iMessages patent victory over Apple, now wants a federal judge to permanently turn off those popular features. VirnetX on Wednesday also asked the judge presiding over the litigation to increase the damages the East Texas jury awarded in February by another $190 million or more. Apple wants a retrial, claiming that VirnetX's lawyers misrepresented evidence to the jury and that the evidence presented at trial didn't support infringement. The gadget maker said it also should not have to pay royalties, according to Law360 (subscription required), which attended Wednesday's hearing (PDF). Apple "argued that VirnetX is improperly trying to secure an overly broad injunction so that it can be used to extract a massive licensing fee," Law360 reported. Apple's documents connected to the issue are lodged under seal. However, VirnetX's post-trial demands (PDF) are in the public record. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An annual customer experience survey of 10,000 US consumers has rated broadband service and pay-TV as the least-liked industries, with Comcast being the lowest-rated company among the Internet and TV providers. "Of the 20 industries covered in the 2016 Temkin Experience Ratings, TV service and Internet service providers tied with healthcare providers for the lowest average ratings," the Temkin Group said yesterday. "These industries have been at the bottom of the ratings for the past four years, and their scores hit an all-time low this year. The poster child for poor customer experience in these industries—Comcast—was not only the lowest-scoring TV service and Internet service provider, but was also one of the lowest-scoring companies in the entire Ratings. It ranked 289th overall out of 294 companies for its TV service and ranked 284th overall for its Internet service." The free report can be downloaded here. The ISP and pay-TV industries ranked just below auto dealers, airlines, major appliance vendors, and rental car agencies. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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An animation of the black hole in action. Back in February, researchers at LIGO made the historic discovery of gravitational waves, predicted a century earlier. The waves were generated by a pair of black holes in their final in-spiral before an inevitable collision and merger. Now, a group of researchers is investigating the possibility that the discovery may have been even more historic than we thought. Last week, Physical Review Letters published a paper titled “Did LIGO detect Dark Matter?” It explores the possibility that dark matter could really be black holes, such as the pair seen by LIGO, provided enough are distributed throughout the halos of galaxies. If so, in addition to finally observing the long-sought gravitational waves, we may have simultaneously discovered dark matter. But we shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet. Black holes aren’t among the leading candidates for dark matter, and there are good reasons for that. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Artist's conception of Valve's Gabe Newell finally putting us out of our misery. Well what do you know? We were so busy playing and talking about Overwatch this week that we failed to note an important vaporware milestone on Tuesday. Just over ten years ago, on May 24, 2006, Valve first announced it was working on Half-Life 2: Episode 3, the final part "in a trilogy... that will conclude by Christmas 2007." Back then, Valve even hinted at a standalone Episode 4, developed outside of Valve, which could be ready six to eight months after Episode 3. Pretty ambitious, eh? Ten years... where does the time go? If you're Valve, it goes into a litany of broken timeline promises and continual stonewalling, as noted in this memorable video of quotes from Valve cofounder and Managing Director Gabe Newell regarding Episode 3 and the mythical Half-Life 3 (which was sort of first announced in 2007 but might as well be considered equally nonexistent at this point). Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Ron Amadeo) A report from Bloomberg claims that Google is going to take yet another swing at making manufacturers care about Android updates. This time the plan is apparently to "shame" OEMs into updating their devices. Google has "drawn up lists that rank top phone makers by how up-to-date their handsets are, based on security patches and operating system versions" according to the report. Google has apparently shared this list with OEMs already and has "discussed making it public" in the hopes that OEMs will do better at updating their devices as a result. This isn't the first time Google has tried to entice OEMs to update their devices. At Google I/O 2011, Google triumphantly announced the "Android Update Alliance," an agreement where Google and OEMs would work to ensure devices got 18 months of updates. A year later everyone promptly forgot about it, and it hasn't been mentioned since. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Peter Thiel takes Gawker Media down to the mat. (credit: JD Lasica) Wednesday was not a good day for Gawker Media: first, a Florida judge refused to reduce the $140 million in damages awarded by a jury in the invasion-of-privacy suit brought by professional wrestler Hulk Hogan against Gawker for posting a sex tape. The judge then refused to order a new trial. Ars had described the March verdict as a "life threatening" event for the New York-based network of news and gossip sites. Now it has been revealed that Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel, who a decade ago was outed as being "totally gay" by Gawker's now-defunct Valleywag site, has bankrolled Hulk Hogan's litigation. "It’s less about revenge and more about specific deterrence," Thiel told The New York Times. "I saw Gawker pioneer a unique and incredibly damaging way of getting attention by bullying people even when there was no connection with the public interest." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars was invited to the end-of-year sumo competition, where the victor was “Taetay.” Shot/Edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) NEW YORK—For the past ten years, professor Brian Cusack has been teaching robot design and construction to science and engineering students at Cooper Union. The mechatronics class is an intense, 14-week immersion in robot design, programming, building, testing process, and competition. This week, the class kicked off Cooper Union's End of Year Show with a robot "sumo" competition. The goal of the competition involves two autonomous robots (no remote controls) which can sense the edge of a square “ring” using infrared sensors and use programmed motors to push the other robot out of the ring. The lighting is important for the sensors to pick up the white outline of a black ring. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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When air was added to the Bigelow module on Thursday morning it didn't inflate properly. (credit: NASA TV) After working for several hours unsuccessfully Thursday morning to inflate an expandable module attached to the International Space Station, NASA astronaut Jeff Williams and a team of engineers in Houston decided to delay operations for a day. Williams summed up the efforts by saying, "That's the space business." The initial steps of the process to expand Bigelow Aeropace's habitat from a length of 5.7 feet to 13 feet went well. But when Williams opened a valve to add air into the module, pressure inside it began to increase at a greater rate than expected, and the habitat expanded only very slowly. When Williams stopped and then repeated the valve-opening process four more times, the same anomalous pressure rises occurred. After engineers on the ground conferred, they decided to delay the expansion efforts until Friday morning at the earliest. Teams from NASA, which has paid Bigelow $17.8 million to test the concept, and Bigelow are expected to meet today to study data from the expansion attempts, determine what went wrong, and then make a decision on whether to proceed Friday. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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How Reddit's native image/gif upload tool appears when you want to post (credit: Reddit) A big change is rolling out on Reddit that will affect the way you post and view images on the site. Through a thread created by a Reddit product team member named Andy (u/amg137), the site announced it's launching an image-upload tool for single photos and gifs on select subreddits. This means the site is shifting away from its informal partner Imgur, which currently hosts the majority of Reddit's uploaded images. With the tool, users will be able to upload images up to 20MB and gifs up to 100MB in size directly to Reddit. When viewing a thread that started with an image or a gif, users will click on the thread and be taken to the thread page with the media at the top and the comments below. With Imgur-hosted images, clicking on the Reddit link takes you directly to that image on Imgur's site. To see thread discussion, you had to click on the "comments" link directly below it. Andy explains in the post that the company is hoping the native image tool will make the Reddit experience more seamless. "For a long time, other image hosting services have been an integral part of how content is shared on Reddit—we’re grateful to those teams, but are looking forward to bringing you a more seamless experience with this new feature," he writes. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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My actual drive from Washington, DC, to Columbus, Ohio, and back took about 12 hours in total, but thanks to the magic that is time-lapse, you can come with me in a mere 90 seconds. Video edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) On Sunday, my colleague Lee Hutchinson regaled you all with a tale of his semi-autonomous driving adventure in one of Tesla's high-speed electric chariots. But that's not the only semi-autonomous (Level 2 self-driving, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) road trip we've conducted here at Ars. You can read all about how we got on with Volvo's latest and greatest XC90 SUVs in a week or so. Plus, there's the new Audi A4, which in Dynamic mode really puts the mantra of "trust the machine" to the test as it late-brakes for exits at up to 0.5G. And finally, I was also fortunate enough to have put many miles on an Audi A7 TDI, driving from DC to Columbus, Ohio, and back when I went to visit the Venturi Buckeye Bullet 3. Much of the technology that underpins these systems is shared among the industry. A handful of companies like Bosch, Delphi, and Mobileye provide sensors, control units, and even algorithms to car makers, who then integrate and refine those systems. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Technica Live #2: Surveillance, with guest Elizabeth Joh. Filmed by Chris Schodt/Edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Last week, we filmed our second episode of Ars Technica Live in Oakland, California, and we had a tremendously interesting conversation with UC Davis law professor Elizabeth Joh, who researches surveillance technology and policing. Right out of the gate, Joh made it clear that the problem isn't surveillance per se—governments "need surveillance," she said, to figure out what its citizens require in terms of benefits, help, and security. The problem is when this surveillance becomes invasive, and the government inhibits freedom of expression and punishes unconventional behavior. How do we balance the need for surveillance and the need for free expression and privacy in a democratic society? Joh talked a lot about the future legal landscape we're creating with cutting-edge technologies like self-driving cars, facial recognition, and body cams. When you're talking about law and policy, the issue is always that adoption of devices like body cams tends to precede careful thought about what rules will govern them. After the Ferguson protests, for example, police departments started using body cams as an accountability measure. But there are no federal guidelines for how cops will use these cams. Will they be able to turn them off whenever they want? Who has access to the data they collect? Can they use facial recognition in body cams? All of these questions remain unanswered, yet body cams are in widespread use across the US. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Hanno Böck) Dozens of HTTPS-protected websites belonging to financial services giant Visa are vulnerable to attacks that allow hackers to inject malicious code and forged content into the browsers of visitors, an international team of researchers has found. In all, 184 servers—some belonging to German stock exchange Deutsche Börse and Polish banking association Zwizek Banków Polskich—were also found to be vulnerable to a decade-old exploit technique cryptographers have dubbed the "forbidden attack." An additional 70,000 webservers were found to be at risk, although the work required to successfully carry out the attack might prove to be prohibitively difficult. The data came from an Internet-wide scan performed in January. Since then, Deutsche Börse has remedied the problem, but, as of Wednesday, both Visa and Zwizek Banków Polskich have allowed the vulnerability to remain and have yet to respond to any of the researchers' private disclosures. The vulnerability stems from implementations of the transport layer security protocol that incorrectly reuse the same cryptographic nonce when data is encrypted. TLS specifications are clear that these arbitrary pieces of data should be used only once. When the same one is used more than once, it provides an opportunity to carry out the forbidden attack, which allows hackers to generate the key material used to authenticate site content. The exploit was first described in comments submitted to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. It gets its name because nonce uniqueness is a ground rule for proper crypto. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ah, there you are. That didn't take too long, surely? Just a click or a tap and, if you’ve some 21st century connectivity, you landed on this page in a trice. But how does it work? Have you ever thought about how that cat picture actually gets from a server in Oregon to your PC in London? We’re not simply talking about the wonders of TCP/IP, or pervasive Wi-Fi hotspots, though those are vitally important as well. No, we’re talking about the big infrastructure: the huge submarine cables, the vast landing sites and data centres with their massively redundant power systems, and the elephantine, labyrinthine last-mile networks that actually hook billions of us to the Internet. And perhaps even more importantly, as our reliance on omnipresent connectivity continues to blossom, the number of our connected devices swells, and our thirst for bandwidth knows no bounds, how do we keep the Internet running? How do Verizon or Virgin reliably get 100 million bytes of data to your house every second, all day every day? Read 100 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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For those of you who don't remember, this is what an 8-inch floppy disk looks like. (credit: Government Accountability Office) Some of the most critical business systems run by US government agencies are older than many of the IT people who support them, written in mainframe assembler code or COBOL. That might not shock or surprise anyone who works in mainframe-centric industries like insurance and finance, where the time-tested reliability of some systems has granted them lives that reach back to the Johnson administration. But a new GAO report has called out some of these systems as being so archaic that they're consuming increasingly larger portions of agencies' IT budgets just for operation and maintenance. As the breach at the Office of Personnel Management demonstrated, old systems are also a security risk—particularly when they've been "updated" with now-unsupported versions of Windows Server and Internet and database components that were end-of-life'd by their creators years ago. To drive those points home, the report—written by David A. Powner, GAO's Director for Information Technology Management Issues—called out specific legacy systems from multiple agencies that are particularly obsolete, reliant on older programming languages and older computing technology that are no longer supported. To help members of Congress too young to remember them, the report also included an infographic (as show above) to explain what an 8-inch floppy disk was. Of the top ten oldest systems cited by GAO, six are over 50 years old—and five of the ten oldest systems, all dating from before the 1980s, are not slated to be replaced anytime soon. And it should come as no surprise that the two oldest systems in government are at the Internal Revenue Service, and both will remain in place for some time. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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17.3" HP Omen laptop (credit: HP) Much of the time at Ars we look at laptops that tend towards the thinner and lighter end of the spectrum. These are great for portability, but they all tend to give up a little, and sometimes a lot, when it comes to raw performance. HP's new Omen gaming laptops tilt things much further in the performance direction, and they manage to do so while still offering decent portability, competitive pricing, and, refreshingly, looks that aren't too gamery: turn off the red backlit keyboards, and they'll not look too out of place as capable workhorses too. Shipping on July 10, $899.99 will get you the 15.6 inch 1920×1080 IPS screened 4.6lb laptop with a quad core Skylake Core i7-6700HQ, 8GB RAM, Nvidia GTX 950M GPU with 2GB dedicated memory, and a 1TB 7200rpm hard disk. Spend a bit more and you can go up to a GTX 960M with 4GB dedicated memory, 16GB RAM, and add a 128GB SSD alongside the spinning disk. All the systems have 2×2 802.11ac Wi-Fi, 2 USB 3 ports, wired gigabit Ethernet, and a full-size HDMI output. The keyboards make full use of the 15 inch form factor, sporting a full number pad alongside the keys—something that we know many of you look for in these larger laptops. For $1029.99 you can get a 17.3 inch 1920×1080 IPS screen in a 6.3lb package. This has the same processor and 8GB RAM as the 15 inch system, but a faster Nvidia GTX 960M GPU with 4GB dedicated memory, and a 128GB SSD alongside its 1TB hard disk. Pay for options and you can get a 512GB PCIe SSD, 16GB RAM, a GTX 965M GPU, and a 4K screen. The larger laptop has all the same connectivity and networking options as its smaller sibling, and even adds an integrated DVD burner. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Melimama) With sleepless nights and puzzling crying spells, caring for a newborn may seem like a mind numbing endeavor. But the mental abilities needed to keep a helpless, fussy infant alive may actually be the source of our smarts. Humans’ extraordinary intellectual abilities may have arisen, in part, in an evolutionary feedback loop involving the care of helpless infants, researchers hypothesize in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In the loop, big-headed babies are born relatively early in their development to ensure that they fit through the human vaginal canal. The underdeveloped newborns then rely heavily on the savviness of their parents for survival. Through generations, this selects for brainy parents, which pushes kids to have ever fatter noggins and, thus, earlier births. “Human infants are born far more immature than the infants of other species,” study author Celeste Kidd, a brain and cognitive science researcher at the University of Rochester, said. “For example, giraffe calves are able to stand-up, walk around, and even flee from predators within hours of their births. By comparison, human infants cannot even support their own heads.” Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Tristan Schnurr) On Wednesday, a federal judge in Washington state tossed all the evidence in a child pornography case that was obtained via an FBI-deployed Tor exploit. Absent a successful government appeal, it seems extremely difficult for prosecutors going forward in United States v. Michaud, suggesting that judges are continuing to push back on the FBI’s deployment of hacking tools. "It's hard to see how the government can secure a conviction without this key evidence," Ahmed Ghappour, a law professor at the University of California, Hastings, told Ars. Judges in at least two related cases in other states have also ruled in favor of defendants, on the grounds that the Virginia-issued warrant to deploy the NIT (network investigative technique) malware was invalid from the start. Those judges found that the warrant to search their computers in other parts of the country couldn’t have had force of law in other states as issued by the Virginia magistrate judge. Other judges, meanwhile, have said that the warrants were also invalid, but they did not go so far as to suppress evidence. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Aurich Lawson) Oracle's lawyers have made their final pitch to paint Google as a copyright outlaw, and the decision is now up to a 10-person jury. The jurors are deliberating in a room on the 19th floor of the US Federal Courthouse in San Francisco. Deliberations have gone on for two days now, and the jury will return to court Thursday to continue its debate. During a 90-minute closing argument on Monday, Oracle attorney Peter Bicks said every fair use factor weighed in Oracle's favor and that Google's behavior showed "bad faith." Here are some of the slides Bicks showed jurors during his closing argument. We also asked Google for some of the visuals it showed to the jury, but Google declined to provide them. (These in-court visuals aren't evidence, according to the rules of the court, so it's up to the parties as to whether or not to show them outside court.) Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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In the later Universe, supermassive black holes are easy to spot. (credit: NASA/Chandra) It seems that nearly every galaxy has a supermassive black hole at its core. Based on the presence of extremely bright objects early in the Universe's history, it seems that this relationship goes back to the galaxy's very start—galaxies seem to have been built around these monstrous black holes. But this presents a bit of a problem. There's a limit to how fast black holes can grow, and they shouldn't have gotten to the supermassive stage anywhere near this quickly. There have been a few models to suggest how they might grow fast enough, but its hard to get any data on what's going on that early in the Universe's history. Now, however, a team is announcing some of the first observational support for one model: the direct collapse of gas into a black hole without bothering to form a star first. Most black holes form through the collapse of a star with dozens of times the Sun's mass. The resulting black holes end up being a few times more massive than our local star. But supermassive black holes are a different breed entirely, with masses ranging anywhere from 100,0000 times to a billion times that of the Sun. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The European Extremely Large Telescope is, indeed, extremely large at 39 meters across. (credit: ESO) An astronomy organization consisting of 15 European countries, as well as Chile and Brazil, has signed a €400 million ($450 million) contract to move forward with the construction of a large dome and structure to support a massive optical telescope that will have a 39-meter wide main mirror. The European Southern Observatory said the contract keeps it on track to begin observing the night sky with its European Extremely Large Telescope (EELT) as early as 2024. The telescope will operate from a 3,000-meter mountaintop site in northern Chile. The agency said that this is the most expensive contract ever awarded by ESO and the largest contract ever in ground-based astronomy. However, it represents only a fraction of the telescope's overall multi-billion dollar cost. The largest optical telescopes in the world today are only about 10 meters in diameter. The European instrument is part of a new generation of much larger telescopes being built to extend the ability of astronomers to peer back further into the history of the universe, when the first stars and galaxies formed. The newly possible observations may also elucidate the nature of dark matter and dark energy and could potentially sniff out the signatures of life in the atmospheres of exoplanets. As such, there is a tremendous race to reach first light and begin using these large instruments. Nobel Prizes await. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we have a preview of some of the best Memorial Day sales you can get this year. Featured is a great price on a big TV: now you can get a Vizio 4K LED smart TV plus a $200 Dell gift card for $549. That's nearly $200 off the original price, and you'll have a gift card to spend however you like on top of it. Check out the rest of the holiday weekend deals below. Featured Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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