posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood has been a persistent critic of Google, complaining that the company's search engine leads consumers quickly to everything from pirated movies to illegal pharmaceuticals. In late October, Hood sent a broad subpoena to Google, which was recently published by The New York Times. Now, Google has gone on the counter-attack, asking a federal judge to throw out (PDF) Hood's subpoena. The search giant is quick to point out that Hood's entire investigation was undertaken "following a sustained lobbying effort from the Motion Picture Association of America." Google says that Hood's efforts to force it to censor and rearrange its search results are barred by multiple laws. The first is Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which generally makes websites immune from lawsuits over what's published by third parties. The company further argues search results are protected by the First Amendment, since "the state can no more tell a search engine what results to publish than it can tell a newspaper what editorials to run." Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
When International Space Station Commander Barry Wilmore needed a wrench, NASA knew just what to do. They "e-mailed" him one. This is the first time an object has been designed on Earth and then transmitted to space for manufacture. Made In Space, the California company that designed the 3D printer aboard the ISS, overheard Wilmore mentioning the need for a ratcheting socket wrench and decided to create one. Previously, if an astronaut needed a specific tool it would have to be flown up on the next mission to the ISS, which could take months. This isn't the first 3D-printed object made in space, but it is the first created to meet the needs of an astronaut. In November astronauts aboard the ISS printed a replacement part for the recently installed 3D printer. A total of 21 objects have now been printed in space, all of which will be brought back to Earth for testing. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
T-Mobile will expand its LTE network with the same 5GHz spectrum used by Wi-Fi starting next year. The deployment would help the company boost data throughput but work only over short distances, similar to Wi-Fi hotspots. LTE over Wi-Fi airwaves is unusual in a couple of ways: T-Mobile will share unlicensed airwaves with other networks, rather than using spectrum to which it has an exclusive license, as wireless carriers typically do. And by using 5GHz for cellular, T-Mobile is going in a direction opposite of the coveted low-band frequencies below 1GHz that travel longer distances and more effectively penetrate building walls. T-Mobile has acknowledged that its network has trouble over long distances and indoors because it has less low-band spectrum than AT&T and Verizon Wireless, hence T-Mobile's reliance on Wi-Fi calling to cover the gaps. But deploying LTE over 5GHz doesn't preclude further purchases of low-band licenses, which T-Mobile will likely do in an auction of 600MHz airwaves expected to occur in early 2016. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
In a message sent to company executives, someone claiming to represent the hacker group calling itself the Guardians of Peace has given Sony Pictures Entertainment the go-ahead to release the film The Interview—with some minor caveats. First of all, they want any death scene for Kim Jong-un dropped from the film. "This is GOP. You have suffered through enough threats," the message, which was also posted to Pastebin, read. "The interview may release now. But be careful. September 11 may happen again if you don't comply with the rules: Rule #1: no death scene of Kim Jong Un being too happy;  Rule #2: do not test us again ; Rule #3: if you make anything else, we will be here ready to fight." Sony dropped plans for the release of the film following the cancellation of screenings by major theater chains. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
If you need yet another sign that the game industry is a serious business force and that game creators are the new entertainment moguls, look no further than the newest purchase by Minecraft creator Markus "Notch" Person. The Mojang cofounder, who cashed out of the company after a $2.5 billion Microsoft buyout in September, just set a record for a Beverly Hills real estate purchase by laying down $70 million on a mansion in the Trousdale Estates neighborhood. As reported by Curbed LA, the 23,000-square-foot residence features "a candy room, a car showroom, vodka and tequila bars, a 54-foot curved glass door that opens onto the pool, eight bedrooms, 15 bathrooms, apartment-sized closets, and a movie theater." Oh, and let's not forget the "three high-definition 90-inch television screens [that] bring panoramic views of Los Angeles from the roof into the down stairs lounge." the $5,600 toilets in each bathroom, and the cases of Dom Perignon that were reportedly part of the deal. There are tons of pictures and video of the ridiculous residence over at its official listing website. “[Person] fell in love with the house, its sleek contemporary design, and its spectacular panoramic views that sweep from downtown LA to the Pacific Ocean,” Aaroe Group agent Katia De Los Reyes, who helped represent Person in the sale, said in a statement. “The fact that the house also was completely furnished in such great style was another major selling point for him.” Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is back with a whole bag of holiday deals for you and everyone on your list. The top deal this week is a 15.6-inch Asus laptop for just $199—that's $49 off the list price. For your two Benjamins you get a 1366×768 display, a 2.16GHz Intel Celeron N2830 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 500GB hard drive. Featured No junkware! ASUS X551MAV UB01 Dual-Core Celeron 15.6" Laptop with 4GB RAM and 500GB Hard Drive for $199 (list price $249). Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
One of the most successful forms of genetically modified crops are the species that have been engineered to express bacterial proteins that are lethal to insects that ingest them. These crops have picked up the name "Bt," for Bacillus thuringiensis, the bacteria that originally made the toxins. There are Bt versions of food crops such as corn and soy beans, as well as the commercial crop cotton. The danger with these crops is that they'll do what every other insecticide has done throughout history: select for the evolution of resistance. In the US, government regulations require that Bt crops be planted along with some fields sown with their non-Bt versions, called refuges. This ensures that any rare resistant individuals will likely mate with non-resistant animals that fed on the insecticide free crops, diluting out the resistance genes. But China, which grows lots of Bt cotton, has no such regulations. Instead, it relies on the fact that insect pests aren't always picky about the crops they feed on. Neighboring fields of non-Bt corn, peanuts, etc. are expected to provide the equivalent of refuges. Until now, however, that idea has never been tested. But the results of tracking Bt resistance over several years are now in, and they are somewhat mixed. Refuges of other crops do work, but they've only delayed the spread of resistance. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
A German steel factory suffered significant damage after attackers gained unauthorized access to computerized systems that help control its blast furnace, according to a report published Friday by IDG News. The attackers took control of the factory's production network through a spear phishing campaign, IDG said, citing a report published Wednesday by the German government's Federal Office for Information Security. Once the attackers compromised the network, individual components or possibly entire systems failed. IDG reporter Loek Essers wrote: Due to these failures, one of the plant’s blast furnaces could not be shut down in a controlled manner, which resulted in “massive damage to plant,” the BSI said, describing the technical skills of the attacker as “very advanced.” The attack involved the compromise of a variety of different internal systems and industrial components, BSI said, noting that not only was there evidence of a strong knowledge of IT security but also extended know-how of the industrial control and production process. The incident is notable because it's one of the few computer intrusions to cause physical damage. The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's uranium enrichment program has been dubbed the world's first digital weapon, destroying an estimated 1,000 centrifuges. Last week, Bloomberg News reported that a fiery blast in 2008 that hit a Turkish oil pipeline was the result of hacking, although it's not clear if the attackers relied on physical access to computerized controllers to pull it off. The suspected sabotage of a Siberian pipeline in 1982 is believed to have used a logic bomb. Critics have long argued that much of the world's factories and critical infrastructure aren't properly protected against hackers. Read on Ars Technica | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
The traditional picture of Vikings is one of boatloads of hairy men pillaging their way along the coasts of Europe. Though true to some degree, this stereotype has more recently been tempered with the appreciation of Vikings as explorers and settlers, founding colonies from the Black Sea to Canada. Left out of this picture are Viking women, but with the results of state-of-the-art DNA sequencing techniques, geneticists from Norway and Sweden have provided a picture of the Viking world that reveals women traveled to settle in far-off places. This appears to be true of born-and-bred Norsewomen as well as those from the lands where vikings traveled. Handed down the maternal line The study, published by the Royal Society, sequenced DNA from 45 Viking-age skeletons. This was mitochondrial or mtDNA which, unlike most DNA, is passed down from mother to child with no input from the father. Unless there's a mutation, children have identical mtDNA to their mothers, their mother’s mothers, and so on. If you go back far enough, every person who has ever lived falls somewhere on a single, branching, maternal family tree. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
We recently recapped some of our time at the PlayStation Experience expo two weeks ago in Las Vegas, but that roundup only included the biggest first-party games coming to the PlayStation 4 in 2015. The showcase was also packed to the gills with some intriguing third-party titles, as well as ample evidence of Sony's commitment to putting some of the best indie games on its consoles. Welcome to our PSX Las Vegas gallery! This also includes blurbs about a few games that didn't quite make our indie roundup. 16 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true});In some cases, like From Software's Bloodborne and EA's Battlefield: Hardline, we saw playable demos with slightly new content but nothing largely different from what we'd seen at other expos. (A quick primer: we're stoked on Bloodborne as a next-gen followup to the brutally difficult Dark Souls, and we refuse to get jazzed about a snappy-looking Battlefield game until we see one without performance issues that take months to fix.) In other PSX cases, we were vastly underwhelmed. We had few kind words for Tearaway: Unfolded, the PS4-exclusive follow-up to the touch-and-twist 2013 Vita platformer; the original game's charm felt diluted by its clunky transition to the DualShock 4 controller. Worse was Fat Princess Adventure, a four-player co-op adventure whose playable demo recalled the slow pacing and boring combat of Fable: Legends in all of the worst ways. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Over a year after the shuttering of the original Silk Road website and over a month after the seizure of Silk Road 2 and other similar sites, the sketchiest of Dark Web sites still persist. According to a new report published Thursday from the Digital Citizens Alliance (DCA), an advocacy group, Evolution Marketplace has long passed Silk Road “as the largest illegal black market for drugs before the takedown." Others include Agora Marketplace, Nucleus Marketplace, and a number of smaller ones. As of this week, Evolution has over 26,000 listings for drugs, weapons, pornography, and more. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Specs at a glance: 2014 BMW i3 (Range Extender) Body type 5-door Layout Rear engine, rear wheel drive Powerplant AC synchronous electric motor, 2 cylinder inline internal combustion engine Transmission Single speed reduction gear Horsepower 170 bhp @ 4800 rpm Torque 184 lb-ft @ 0 - 11400 rpm Steering  rack & pinion (electronic) Suspension Macpherson strut (front), 5-link (rear) Tires Bridgestone Ecopia 155/70R19 front, 175/60R19 rear Top speed 93 mph (150 km/h), software limited Battery 22 kWh lithium ion Rated max range 150 miles (241 km) (battery: 71 miles) Combined fuel economy 117 mpg Combined energy consumption 27 kWh/100miles Internet connectivity Optional, not fitted to test car. Weight 3130 lb (1420 kg) Wheelbase 101.2 in (2570 mm) Dimensions 157.8 in (4008 mm) x 69.9 in (1775 mm) x 62.1 in (1578 mm) (LWH) Base price $45,200 Price as tested $47,050 Options added Heated front seats, Andesite silver paint. With the new i3 electric vehicle (EV) city car, BMW is making a pretty clear statement—the company is serious about designing and building cars properly adapted for the 21st century. It’s a radical departure from the Bavarian automaker’s mainstream offerings, looking like little else on the road. In fact, its looks alone are polarizing enough for some people to dismiss it instantly (looking at you, Senior Reviews Editor Lee Hutchinson). But keep an open mind about the i3's appearance, and you too may discover that it’s actually a very impressive little machine. The i3 is part of a two-car 'capsule collection' called Project i, the other half being the stunning i8 hybrid sports car (first seen as a concept car in Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol). The Project i cars use a range of alternative and sustainable materials in their construction along with electric or hybrid powertrains, but the automobiles retain BMW’s traditional emphasis on driving dynamics. What’s more, like the Tesla Model S, they aim to do so without the hair shirt that can be all too common with EVs. We plan to take a closer look at the i8 in the coming months, but BMW was kind enough to supply us with an i3 for a few days recently. Of the two, the i3 is undoubtedly the more relevant, particularly since it doesn’t come with a six-figure price tag. But with its unusual aesthetic and the still-in-progress adoption of EV infrastructure, is the i3 the car for an efficiency-minded city dweller? There’s no denying it, the i3’s exterior is radical and attracts some attention: not as much as a bright yellow Corvette perhaps, but over the course of a week several people approached us as we were parking or stopped in traffic wanting to know more about it. We got more than a few double takes from people in other cars while on the road as well. What’s certain is that the i3 clearly signals to people that you’re driving something different, an effect the Toyota Prius benefited from in the beginning as well. Read 27 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Developers who use the official Git client and related software are being urged to install a security update that kills a bug that could allow attackers to hijack end-user computers. The critical vulnerability affects all Windows- and Mac-based versions of the official Git client and related software that interacts with Git repositories, according to an advisory published Thursday. The bug can be exploited to give remote code execution when the client software accesses booby-trapped Git repositories. "An attacker can craft a malicious Git tree that will cause Git to overwrite its own .git/config file when cloning or checking out a repository, leading to arbitrary command execution in the client machine," Thursday's advisory warned. "Git clients running on OS X (HFS+) or any version of Microsoft Windows (NTFS, FAT) are exploitable through this vulnerability. Linux clients are not affected if they run in a case-sensitive filesystem." Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
In the latest fight back against tech support scammers, Microsoft has sued firms in California and Florida complaining of trademark infringement, unfair competition, trademark dilution, cybersquatting, and deceptive trading practices. This comes after similar FTC action against scammers in Florida. In its complaint, Microsoft notes that tech support scamming is a big money-maker. It estimates that it costs Americans $1.5 billion a year, with $179 million from 390,000 victims being taken in California alone. Over a six month period this year, the company also received some 65,000 complaints relating to the scams. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
T-Mobile US has won a declaratory ruling that could force AT&T and Verizon Wireless to charge lower prices for data roaming. T-Mobile argued in a petition to the Federal Communications Commission that the biggest carriers charge their smaller competitors artificially high prices. The petition asked the commission to offer specific guidance and enforcement criteria for determining whether any given data roaming agreement is commercially reasonable. The FCC granted T-Mobile’s request today, rejecting arguments made by AT&T and Verizon. The ruling by itself doesn’t lower the rates that T-Mobile has to pay AT&T and Verizon. However, T-Mobile could now challenge the rates it pays those companies and have a better shot at winning because the commission largely accepted T-Mobile’s proposed guidance. The greater possibility of FCC intervention could also improve T-Mobile's leverage in negotiations. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
More than 12 million routers in homes and small offices are vulnerable to attacks that allow hackers anywhere in the world to monitor user traffic and take administrative control over the devices, researchers said. The vulnerability resides in "RomPager" software, embedded into the residential gateway devices, made by a company known as AllegroSoft. Versions of RomPager prior to 4.34 contain a critical bug that allows attackers to send simple HTTP cookie files that corrupt device memory and hand over administrative control. Attackers can use that control to read plaintext traffic traveling over the device and possibly take other actions, including changing sensitive DNS settings and monitoring or controling Web cams, computers, or other connected devices. Researchers from Check Point's malware and vulnerability group have dubbed the bug Misfortune Cookie, because it allows hackers to determine the "fortune" of an HTTP request by manipulating cookies. They wrote: If your gateway device is vulnerable, then any device connected to your network—including computers, phones, tablets, printers, security cameras, refrigerators, toasters or any other networked device in your home or office network—may have increased risk of compromise. An attacker exploiting the Misfortune Cookie vulnerability can easily monitor your Internet connection, steal your credentials and personal or business data, attempt to infect your machines with malware, and over-crisp your toast. Determining precisely what routers are vulnerable is a vexing undertaking. Devices frequently don't display identifying banners when unauthenticated users access them, and when such banners are presented, they often don't include information about the underlying software components. Beyond that, some device manufacturers manually patch the bug without upgrading the RomPager version, a practice that may generate false positives when automatically flagging all devices running versions prior to 4.34. To work around the challenges, Check Point researchers performed a comprehensive scan of Internet addresses that probed for vulnerable RomPager services. The results showed 12 million unique devices spanning 200 different models contained the bug. Manufacturers affected included Linksys, D-Link, Edimax, Huawei, TP-Link, ZTE, and ZyXEL. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
It's the most wonderful time of the year for PC gamers looking for deals on cheap software. Well, probably the second most wonderful, after you take the annual Steam Summer Sale into account. Anyway, it's still a pretty wonderful time to get discounted games through Steam's annual Holiday Sale, running today through January 2. As in years past, this year's sale includes a handful of "featured" daily discounts, updated with new offers every 12 hours, as well as daily "community choice" votes on which of a few select games will go on sale next, and thousands of titles that have just had their prices slashed for the duration of the event. Among the more intriguing featured deals right now: Dark Souls II for a very reasonable $14.79, State of Decay for a cheap $4.99, and SpeedRunners for a bargain basement $2.49. SteamDB has a good roundup of everything that's come down in price during the sale so far, including some games discounted as much as 98 percent! Remember, if history is any guide, some games listed for sale today may actually come down further in price on the last day of the sale, so you may want to wait if the current deal doesn't seem too hot. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
When 2K Games let invited players try out Evolve as part of its "Big Alpha" event a few months ago, those players could put the game through its paces on the Xbox One, PS4, or PC. When the publisher opens up the game for a public beta test next month, only Xbox One players will be able to get in on the full extent of the action. 2K Games announced today that the Xbox One open beta will be open to anyone with an Xbox Live Gold account from January 15 through January 19. The beta will include new playable characters, monsters, and maps in the previously shown 4-hunters-vs-1-monster Hunt mode and, starting January 17, will also introduce a new "Evacuation" campaign mode that mixes up different gameplay types in a five-round series. Progress from the beta will carry over to the game's full release, which is now expected February 10, after being pushed back from an original October launch earlier this year. On the PC and PS4, access will be limited to "smaller closed technical tests" available to those who already participated in the Big Alpha, as well as players who own Left 4 Dead 2 or Bioshock Infinite on PC. These tests will be limited to Hunt mode and won't let players carry progress to the final release. These will start January 16 on the PC and January 17 on the PS4. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
We have become blasé about technology. The modern smartphone, for example, is in so many ways a remarkable feat of engineering: computing power that not so long ago would have cost millions of dollars and filled entire rooms is now available to fit in your hand for a few hundred bucks. But smartphones are so widespread and normal that they no longer have the power to astonish us. Of course they're tremendously powerful pocket computers. So what? This phenomenon is perhaps even more acute for those of us who work in the field in some capacity. A steady stream of new gadgets and gizmos passes across our desks, we get briefed and pitched all manner of new "cutting edge" pieces of hardware and software, and they all start to seem a little bit the same and a little bit boring. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
For its more-than-10-year existence, World of Warcraft has operated in two parallel economies: the in-game economy of gold exchanged for items, and the real-world economy of dollars (or others hard currencies) exchanged for monthly game time subscriptions. Now, Blizzard says it's considering bringing those two economies together through some sort of exchange in 2015. "We’re exploring the possibility of giving players a way to buy tradable game-time tokens for the purpose of exchanging them in-game with other players for gold," Blizzard writes in a preview of next year's World of Warcraft plans. "Our current thought on this is that it would give players a way to use their surplus gold to cover some of their subscription cost, while giving players who might have less play time an option for acquiring gold from other players through a legit and secure system." Blizzard goes on to say that many players have expressed interest in the feature and that the developers "agree it could be a good fit for the game." As Blizzard points out, some other MMOs have a similar option. EVE Online might be the prototypical example, where the relationship between in-game Aurum and game-time-granting Pilot License Extensions helps create a robust economy where virtual items have real world value. On the other end of the spectrum, many free-to-play games simply let players buy in-game perks and currency directly with real money, a phenomenon that has turned the term "pay-to-win" into an epithet in most game design circles. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
According to Engadget, Nintendo is releasing Duck Hunt to the Wii U's Virtual Console on Christmas Day. Though Nintendo is notorious for reissuing (and reissuing, and reissuing) its old games for new consoles, this is actually the first time Duck Hunt has appeared on any console aside from the NES. Let's call it a Super Smash Bros. tie-in—it wouldn't be the first time Nintendo dusted off a long-dormant franchise after including one of its characters in Smash. I was first exposed to Duck Hunt when my parents bought the NES Action Set. I never knew it by that name, since I was playing games while I could barely read, but I know it now because the Action Set came with an NES, two gamepads, the obligatory Super Mario Bros., and a copy of Duck Hunt with an NES Zapper light gun. I still have that NES, and I've kept it in reasonably good working order, but in recent years when I've pulled it out, Duck Hunt is one of the few games that doesn't actually work. You can fire it up and connect the Zapper, but your "shots" never actually hit anything. This isn't because your Zapper is broken, but because of your shiny new HDTV. The Zapper is a simple piece of hardware, but to work it relied on some technical trickery exclusive to older CRT TVs. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
The US Patent and Trademark Office handed out patents on human genes for about 30 years, but genomic patents were blocked after a landmark Supreme Court ruling last year. The patent holder in that case, Myriad Genetics, had patented a test on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The test shows mutations that reveal which women are more susceptible to breast and ovarian cancer. The BRCA test is substantially cheaper in countries where it wasn't patented, such as Canada. After losing its case, Myriad didn't give up. Instead, it quickly filed a new round of lawsuits, trying to keep competitors like Ambry Genetics out of the business of BRCA testing. The new suits named different patents, which instead of simply claiming the gene itself, included "method" claims and also discussed the use of DNA "primers"—an entirely lab-made substance which Myriad lawyers said were still open to being patented. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Time Warner Cable has "crie[d] foul" over a proposed franchise agreement between the city of Lincoln, Nebraska and Windstream that would force TWC to face competition for TV customers, the Lincoln Journal Star reported Wednesday. "The city isn’t playing fair with the proposed cable franchise agreement with Windstream, according to its sole cable provider Time Warner," the paper reported. TWC lawyer Bill Austin said during a public hearing on Monday that the Windstream franchise violates a requirement in Time Warner's franchise agreement that new franchises may not be "more favorable or less burdensome when taken as a whole” the report said. "Austin listed several specific areas where Windstream is getting a better deal, including public access capital needs, the public access studio requirements, the government education grant, and service area requirements," the Journal Star wrote. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
According to New Zealand’s Otago Daily Times, a series of unfortunate events led to Alexandra, New Zealand, residents Mollieanne and Brian Smith suffering through a 13-hour-long ordeal in the front seats of their Mazda3 hatchback last month. The couple apparently got into their car without the car’s wireless key fob and somehow managed to lock the doors—and then couldn’t figure out how to get out. The Times explains that the couple’s inability to unlock the doors stemmed from "a combination of stress, night-time, and what they called a lack of information from a car salesperson." Although the pair tried to summon aid by sounding the car’s horn and tried to break the car’s windows with the spare tire jack, they ended up stuck in the Mazda from about 7:00 in the evening of November 5 through about 7:45am the next morning. Neighbors found the couple in dire straits, with Mollieanne Smith unconscious and her husband Brian having difficulty breathing. Mrs. Smith required a three-day hospital stay to recover. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...
posted 3 days ago on ars technica
A Boston Uber driver has been formally charged by Massachusetts prosecutors with rape, assault to rape, kidnapping, assault, and two counts of battery. "We allege that this defendant picked up a young woman, presenting himself as the driver for a ride-sharing service, and then drove her to a secluded location where he beat and sexually assaulted her," Marian Ryan, the Middlesex County district attorney, said in a Wednesday statement. "This alleged predator took advantage of a young woman who trusted that he was who he portrayed himself to be and exploited her vulnerability once he had her in his car." The company did not immediately respond to Ars' request for comment. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read More...