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Enlarge (credit: Nyttend) In a severe rebuke of one of the biggest suppliers of HTTPS credentials, Google Chrome developers announced plans to drastically restrict transport layer security certificates sold by Symantec-owned issuers following the discovery they have issued more than 30,000 certificates. Effective immediately, Chrome plans to stop recognizing the extended validation status of all certificates issued by Symantec-owned certificate authorities, Ryan Sleevi, a software engineer on the Google Chrome team, said Thursday in an online forum. Extended validation certificates are supposed to provide enhanced assurances of a site's authenticity by showing the name of the validated domain name holder in the address bar. Under the move announced by Sleevi, Chrome will immediately stop displaying that information for a period of at least a year. In effect, the certificates will be downgraded to less-secure domain-validated certificates. More gradually, Google plans to update Chrome to effectively nullify all currently valid certificates issued by Symantec-owned CAs. With Symantec certificate representing more than 30 percent of the Internet's valid certificates by volume in 2015, the move has the potential to prevent millions of Chrome users from being able to access large numbers of sites. What's more, Sleevi cited Firefox data that showed Symantec-issued certificates are responsible for 42 percent of all certificate validations. To minimize the chances of disruption, Chrome will stagger the mass nullification in a way that requires they be replaced over time. To do this, Chrome will gradually decrease the "maximum age" of Symantec-issued certificates over a series of releases. Chrome 59 will limit the expiration to no more than 33 months after they were issued. By Chrome 64, validity would be limited to nine months. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Lewis Mulatero/Getty Images) Brian Dutcher A Wisconsin man lost his bid before a federal appeals court to set aside his 3-year prison sentence for threatening to kill then-President Barack Obama. The threats first appeared on Facebook, and were then made verbally to anybody who would listen, including to Secret Service agents. Brian Dutcher, 56, posted on his Facebook page in June that he would attend an Obama speech in La Crosse, Wisconsin. "(sic) hopefully I will get clear shot at the pretend president. (sic) killing him is our CONSTITUTIONAL DUTY!" He also posted, "pray for me to succeed in my mission." The next day, he took the 45-mile drive from his Tomah residence to La Crosse. Once there, he told an acquaintance, "I'm here to kill the President, the usurper, tomorrow at his speech." The acquaintance called police, and the Secret Service shortly thereafter questioned Dutcher for two hours. The court later described what happened next: Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Elizabeth Holmes, Theranos CEO. (credit: Getty | CNBC) Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes is planning to give up some of her personal shares to investors who pledge not to sue the disgraced blood-testing company, the Wall Street Journal reports. The deals would only involve investors from the last round of funding, which ended in 2015 and brought in more than $600 million. These investors include the family of US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, the family behind Walmart stores, and John Elkann, who controls Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. Investors could get about two free shares of the company for every share they bought. The deals would also mean that Holmes could lose her majority stake in Theranos. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Young woman checking her running results at the smartphone (credit: Getty | AleksandarNakic) Makers of three popular health apps are changing their tune about the capabilities and privacy policies of their products following an investigation and settlement with the New York Attorney General’s office. The makers of Cardiio, Runtastic, and My Baby’s Beat apps all agreed to pay a combined total of $30,000 in fines while changing their advertising claims and privacy policy disclosures, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced Thursday. A year-long investigation by his office found that the three made health claims that were not backed up by data or FDA-approval. They also found that the app makers weren’t forthright about how identifying information from users could be shared with third parties. “Mobile health apps can benefit consumers if they function as advertised, do not make misleading claims, and protect sensitive user information,” Schneiderman said in a press release. “However, my office will not hesitate to take action against developers that disseminate unfounded information that is both deceptive and potentially harmful to everyday consumers.” Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Perovskite crystals in a photovoltaic cell. (credit: Los Alamos National Lab) Currently, silicon is the dominant technology for photovoltaic solar power. There are a handful of competing thin-film technologies, which are easier to manufacture but rely on more expensive raw materials and don't reach the same efficiencies. These sorts of trade offs have helped drive research into perovskite solar cells, which rely on cheap and abundant raw materials but have the potential for much higher efficiencies. Still, perovskites have two significant issues. One is that the ability to integrate them into mass production techniques hasn't been demonstrated. The second is that they tend to decay pretty rapidly in the real world. There's been some progress on issue two recently, and now a team at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL)* has figured out a way to make a perovskite "ink" that should allow mass-manufacturing of the material. Perovskites aren't actually a single material; instead, they're a class of materials that all share the same general crystal structure. Many of them involve a small organic chemical and metals like lead, along with some other simple chemicals. The best perovskites are closing in on silicon, with efficiencies well over 20 percent (meaning over 20 percent of the incoming sunlight is converted to electricity). Critically, crystals of perovskites are easy to form from a water-based solution, meaning that it should be possible to coat all sorts of materials with a photovoltaic material using manufacturing tech that's been in use for decades. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / One of these things is a CIA implant dropper. (credit: From an original image by Scott Ackerman) WikiLeaks today dumped a smaller subset of documents from its "Vault 7" collection of files from a CIA software developer server. Yet again, these documents are more important from the perspective of WikiLeaks having them than for showing any revelatory content. The exploits detailed in these new files are for vulnerabilities that have largely been independently discovered and patched in the past. The files also reveal that the CIA likely built one of these tools after seeing a presentation on the exploits of Apple's EFI boot firmware at Black Hat in 2012. The latest batch of files, dramatically named "DarkMatter" (after one of the tools described in the dump), consists of user manuals and other documentation for exploits targeting Apple MacBooks—including malware that leveraged a vulnerability in Apple's Thunderbolt interface uncovered by a researcher two years ago. Named "Sonic Screwdriver" after the ever-useful tool carried by the fictional Doctor of Dr. Who, the malware was stored on an ordinary Thunderbolt Ethernet adapter. It exploited the Thunderbolt interface to allow anyone with physical access to a MacBook to bypass password protection on firmware and install one of a series of Apple-specific CIA "implants." The first (and only documented) version of Sonic Screwdriver was released in 2012. It worked only on MacBooks built between late 2011 and mid-2012, and the tool used a vulnerability in the firmware of those computers that allowed commands to be sent via the Thunderbolt adapter to change the "boot path" (the location of the files used to boot the computer). The change would allow a local attacker to boot the targeted MacBook from an external device to install malware that eavesdropped on the computer during normal use. Those implants included "DarkMatter," the predecessor to "QuarkMatter." (QuarkMatter is malware that was revealed in the previous WikiLeaks dump, and it infected the EFI partition of a MacBook's storage device.) Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Cancer cells in culture from human connective tissue, illuminated by darkfield amplified contrast, at a magnification of 500x. (credit: NCI, Dr. Cecil Fox) What causes cancer? High-profile culprits obviously include bum genes inherited from parents and harmful environmental and lifestyle factors, such as smoking or not wearing sunscreen. But in a new study in Science, researchers yet again say a big factor is random mutations—those that naturally and unavoidably occur as our error-prone cells go about the normal process of replication. In fact, two-thirds of the mutations behind cancer are random—not inherited or induced by our environment—researchers at Johns Hopkins conclude from a fresh statistical analysis. But, they caution, the contribution of genetic bad luck doesn’t mean that many cancers aren’t preventable. It’s a point they emphasize carefully after their previous work set off fiery controversy on the matter. Back in early 2015, the lead researchers of the new study, Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein, published a straightforward hypothesis (also in Science) that the risk of cancers can, in part, be explained by simple stem cell replication. The idea being that the more stem cells a tissue type has and the faster those cells make copies of themselves, the more chances there are for mutations from sheer cellular sloppiness—thus, more chances for cancer. So, if a tissue type has a lot of fast-replicating stem cells, it would have a higher risk of developing cancer over a person's lifetime. This could help explain why different tissue types do have different risks of cancer. Lung and thyroid cancer are far more common than brain and pelvic bone cancer, for instance. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: ymgerman / Getty Images News) In new filings, prosecutors told a court in Washington, DC that within the coming weeks, they expect to extract all data from the seized cellphones of more than 100 allegedly violent protesters arrested during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Prosecutors also said that this search is validated by recently issued warrants. The court filing, which was first reported Wednesday by BuzzFeed News, states that approximately half of the protestors prosecuted with rioting or inciting a riot had their phones taken by authorities. Prosecutors hope to uncover any evidence relevant to the case. Under normal judicial procedures, the feds have vowed to share such data with defense attorneys and to delete all irrelevant data. "All of the Rioter Cell Phones were locked, which requires more time-sensitive efforts to try to obtain the data," Jennifer Kerkhoff, an assistant United States attorney, wrote. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Wanna try out SFV's latest fighter, Kolin, for free? Capcom's week-long online-update beta, starting next week, will let you do just that. Ars' review of Street Fighter V in February of last year began with this simple declaration: "Definitely good, definitely unfinished." Now 13 months later, Capcom is finally tiptoeing toward the fighting game's complete state as one of the game's most crucial elements will get a major unveil next weekend: a full netcode rehaul. "We understand that Street Fighter V’s server performance has been a less than optimal experience for many of our players," a Capcom staffer frankly admitted at the company's official blog on Thursday. That comment was followed by an announcement of the "Capcom Fighters Network" (basically, the game's underlying matchmaking and connectivity system) receiving a full overhaul—and a week-long freebie to put money where Capcom's mouth is. To prove the upgrades out, Capcom will unlock the game's online modes for everyone in the world as a separate, free download via Steam starting Tuesday, March 28. If you already own the game, the beta will carry over your current online stats; if you don't, you'll start fresh. Either way, it's free for all Windows Steam gamers until the beta closes on Monday, April 3, and all current characters from both SFV seasons will be unlocked for free as well. The beta will simultaneously test the latest balance tweaks set to reach the official game. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Jonathan Gitlin It's still surprising that Tesla has had the high-end electric car market to itself for all these years. The Model S has existed for nearly five years, and even today, potential rivals remain in the prototype stages. Porsche is going ahead with the Mission E. Faraday Future has the FF91 under development, and then there's Lucid. Formerly known as Atieva, it's backed by the same Chinese billionaire as Faraday Future, and this week the company brought a prototype of its first model to Washington, DC, for us to check out. Small on the outside, big on the inside With its concept car looks and a pearlescent coat of paint, the Lucid Air certainly drew people's attention as it sat parked outside of one of the US Senate buildings. The first thing that strikes you is the car's relative compactness. Lucid CTO (and former Model S chief engineer) Peter Rawlinson explained that the goal was to be a similar size to the Mercedes-Benz E Class on the outside but with S Class-beating space on the inside. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Christiaan Colen) In early 2015, architects of Google's Android mobile operating system introduced a new feature that was intended to curtail the real-time tracking of smartphones as their users traversed retail stores, city streets, and just about anywhere else. A recently published research paper found that the measure remains missing on the vast majority of Android phones and is easily defeated on the relatively small number of devices that do support it. Like all Wi-Fi-enabled devices, smartphones are constantly scanning their surroundings for available access points, and with each probe, they send a MAC—short for media access control—address associated with the handset. Throughout most of the history of Wi-Fi, the free exchange of MAC addresses didn't pose much threat to privacy. That all changed with the advent of mobile computing. Suddenly MAC addresses left a never-ending series of digital footprints that revealed a dizzying array of information about our comings and goings, including what time we left the bar last night, how many times we were there in the past month, the time we leave for work each day, and the route we take to get there. Eventually, engineers at Apple and Google realized the potential for abuse and took action. Their solution was to rotate through a sequence of regularly changing pseudo-random addresses when casually probing near-by access points. That way, Wi-Fi devices that logged MAC addresses wouldn't be able to correlate probes to a unique device. Only when a phone actually connected to a Wi-Fi network would it reveal the unique MAC address it was tied to. Apple introduced MAC address randomization in June 2014, with the release of iOS 8. A few months later, Google's Android operating system added experimental support for the measure. Full implementation went live in March 2015 and is currently available in version 5.0 through the current 7.1; those versions account for about two-thirds of the Android user base. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) The US Senate today voted to eliminate broadband privacy rules that would have required ISPs to get consumers' explicit consent before selling or sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other companies. The rules were approved in October 2016 by the Federal Communications Commission's then-Democratic leadership, but are opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority and Republicans in Congress. The Senate today used its power under the Congressional Review Act to ensure that the FCC rulemaking "shall have no force or effect" and to prevent the FCC from issuing similar regulations in the future. The House, also controlled by Republicans, would need to vote on the measure before the privacy rules are officially eliminated. President Trump could also preserve the privacy rules by issuing a veto. If the House and Trump agree with the Senate's action, ISPs won't have to seek customer approval before sharing their browsing histories and other private information with advertisers. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: imbd.com) A Senegalese man was sentenced to five years in prison and ordered Wednesday to pay the Motion Picture Association of America and the Recording Industry Association of America $71,000 in restitution for his role in an Atlanta-based DVD and CD pirating operation that unlawfully sold millions of copies of copyrighted works without authorization from rights holders. Mamadou Aliou Simakha had pleaded guilty in 2010 to one count of conspiracy to commit copyright infringement but then fled the country. He was arrested last year in Morocco and extradited to the US in December, the authorities said. The FBI investigated the case with a variety of government agencies in addition to the RIAA and MPAA. "Simakha admitted his part as a high-volume seller in a conspiracy to produce and traffic millions of pirated music CDs and DVDs which was a leading supplier for the southeastern US," John Horn, the US attorney, said in a statement. “His decision to flee the country garnered him the statutory maximum sentence he deserves for his many years as a disc counterfeiter and international fugitive." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Apple A8 die shot as mapped out by Chipworks. (credit: Chipworks) The semiconductor industry is beyond remarkable when it comes to the complexity and precision of the processes. A modern integrated circuit is not a single layer of circuitry, but many layers, all stacked on top of each other. This is all done through photolithography, where a pattern is imaged on a silicon wafer. Each layer requires a separate image, and all the images have to be aligned. If you take the 14nm number seriously (a nanometer is 1/1,000,000th of a millimeter), then wafers and masks, which are seriously hold-in-two-hands-big, have to be aligned with a precision that is better than the feature size. But, how do you know you've done it right? The obvious answer is whether or not the chip works. But it would be nice to image the circuit so that it can be compared to the design. Apart from detecting problems during manufacturing, being able to image the final product would also allow for the design to be improved, since it would let you identify areas of a chip that consistently cause problems. But, how do you image structures that might be as small as 14nm that are buried under other structures that you also want to image. The answer, it seems, is a form of X-ray tomography. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Location sharing is back in Google Maps. Google announced the addition of "real-time location sharing" to the Android and iOS apps, coming soon to an app store near you. The process seems pretty simple: Open the navigation drawer and press the new "Share Location" button. You'll be able to send a sharing permission to a Google contact or send a link over a messaging app, and you'll be able to pick how long you want to share your location for—permanently or for a set time. Anyone you share to will get a notification from Google Maps, and they'll be able to see your location on the smartphone and Web versions of Google Maps. There's also a "share trip" button you can activate while navigating somewhere, so rather than sending someone an ETA, they can just see you drive around on the map. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Out of my way... that unlockable content is MINE! Over the past week or so, Ubisoft's For Honor has faced criticism for the sheer amount of unlockable content it offers players, which one Reddit user calculated would cost over $700 or 5,200 gameplay hours to access. Ubisoft Montreal Game Director Damien Kieken addressed those concerns in a lengthy livestreamed video conversation. The main thrust of his argument? "We never had an intention for you to unlock everything in the game." To Kieken, the idea of unlocking absolutely everything available in For Honor "doesn't really make any sense. We applied RPG mechanics on top of the game... it's like in an RPG, let's say World of Warcraft, you would never try to unlock everything for all the characters of the whole game. It's the same thing in any MOBAs, you're not trying to unlock all the content for all the heroes in your game." It's interesting that Kieken compares the $60 For Honor to two genres that are usually free to play these days (or occasionally offered on a monthly subscription plan). Unlockable content in a fighting game like For Honor is also very different from that in an MMO, where finding and completing quests for new items and abilities is the overarching point. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: NASA) The evidence for liquid water on the surface of Mars in the distant past is strong, but a discovery a few years ago provided a glimmer of hope that the wet stuff might still be making occasional appearances on the Red Planet. Fresh, dark streaks show up on steep slopes during the “warm” season, almost as if something wet is trickling downhill. To some researchers, however, these “recurring slope lineae,” which are a few meters wide and a few hundred meters long, look more like downward slides of destabilized sediment. The question is, what could destabilize the sediment? The presence of briny water? (Water has been detected as a component of some of the minerals present, at least.) Could the thawing of carbon dioxide ice play a role? There is debate about which of these explanations can work and where water could possibly be coming from. A new study led by Frédéric Schmidt of the University of Paris-Sud throws out a possible alternative that doesn’t involve thawing anything. If you’re holding out for water, you might consider that bad news, but it is at least a satisfyingly weird process. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Rego Korosi) The controversy surrounding Google and YouTube advertising and extremist content has spread across the pond. According to a Bloomberg report, some of YouTube's biggest advertising customers, including Verizon and AT&T, have halted spending on display and other non-search advertising on the platform. The news comes days after a stream of UK companies pulled their ads from YouTube and Google's display ad network in response to a report from The Times that cited instances of UK government advertising running over extremist content. Bloomberg reports AT&T and Verizon Communications Inc. have stopped all non-search advertising spending with Google, while Johnson & Johnson stopped all its global advertising on YouTube. AT&T said in a statement that it is concerned that its advertising may have appeared over "YouTube content promoting terrorism and hate," and it will not resume advertising "until Google can ensure this won’t happen again." Verizon has launched an investigation, presumably to find out if any of its ads appeared over extremist content. The original report from The Times cited specific instances in which UK taxpayer-funded advertising ran over hateful, offensive videos, including those by American white nationalist David Duke. That revelation sparked many companies in the UK to remove their ads from Google platforms, forcing Google to examine its ad policies and implement new tools to give advertisers more control over where their ads go. However, there have been no other reports detailing instances in which ads from the companies named above ran over offensive content on YouTube or Google's Display Network. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Live #10, filmed by Chris Schodt and produced by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) UC-Berkeley environmental scientist Lynn Ingram joined us for the one-year anniversary episode of Ars Technica Live, and she gave us a broad historical perspective on climate change. Ingram's special focus is paleoclimatology, or the study of Earth's ancient ecosystems. She explained that she spends a lot of time in the lab dissolving rocks, bones, and shells in acid to get good carbon dates on them. Working with other researchers, she has found that California's climate has always been subject to dramatic fluctuations, but now those are being exacerbated by human activity. California history has always been one of drought and flood. Ingram told us about the southwestern region's great medieval warming period roughly 800 years ago, which may have caused drought for over a century. People living in the region abandoned their settlements and moved away, while plant life struggled to hold on. In the more recent past, California's central valley became an inland sea after 40 days of rain in 1862. This is the sort of megaflood that is due to happen again, Ingram told us, because they seem to occur roughly every two centuries. Even without humans contributing to rapid climate change, we should be preparing for another flood of this magnitude—but now, with atmospheric rivers becoming more common, they will probably happen more often. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A view of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the station. (credit: NASA) Launched to the International Space Station in 2011 on the penultimate flight of the Space Shuttle, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has quietly been collecting data during the last six years, observing more than 100 billion cosmic ray events. Although it has yet to produce any major scientific findings, physicists believe the steady accumulation of data will eventually yield insights about dark matter and other cosmic mysteries. But for that to happen, the instrument has to continue to take data. In recent months, scientists monitoring the $2 billion AMS instrument have noticed an increase in the "degradation" of one of several pumps that operate its thermal cooling system. The AMS has redundant systems, however, and could switch to a different pump if needed. Nevertheless, there appears to be an overall concern that if this degradation is not an isolated incident, it could begin to affect other cooling pumps within the AMS thermal system. (Despite several requests for information in recent weeks from Ars, NASA officials have remained cagey about the overall threat this problem presents to the instrument. The scope of repairs they're contemplating suggests that the problem could eventually become serious, however.) Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Android O is actually here! After diving into Google's blog post, we fired up our developer tools and got Android O loaded on a sacrificial device. There are a few new interesting features, lots of UI tweaks, and plenty of odd bugs and unfinished areas. Let's dive in! Notifications: Snooze, channels, and a terrible new ambient mode My favorite new feature in Android O is the ability to do system-wide notification snoozing. If you don't want to deal with a notification right now, just pull it to the side a bit, which will unveil a new "clock" icon. Tap it and the notification will be automatically snoozed for 15 minutes, and you can tap on the drop down menu to up it to 30 minutes or an hour. This is really handy, but I'd like to be able to customize the times here. I'm sure some people would like a few hours, or maybe a "tomorrow" option. A "type in your time" option would be fine, too. Read 33 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: Corsair One Lowest Middle Best (as reviewed) OS Windows 10 Home 64-bit CPU Intel Core i7-7700 (liquid cooled) Intel Core i7-7700K (liquid cooled) Intel Core i7-7700K (liquid cooled) RAM 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) GPU Nvidia GTX 1070 (air cooled) Nvidia GTX 1080 8GB (liquid cooled) Nvidia GTX 1080 8GB (liquid cooled) HDD 240GB SATA SSD, 1TB HDD 480GB SATA SSD, 2TB HDD 960GB SATA SSD PSU 400W SFX 400W SFX 400W SFX NETWORKING Gigabit Ethernet, AC Wi-Fi PORTS 3 x USB 3.1 Type-A, 1 x USB-3.1 Type-C, 2 x USB 2.0, 2 x DisplayPort, 2x HDMI, headphone jack, microphone jack SIZE Height: 380mm (18.6 inches), depth: 200mm (14.19 inches), width: 176mm (8.35 inches) WEIGHT 7.4kg WARRANTY Two years with 24/7 support and five day repair turnaround PRICE £1800/$1800 £2200/$2200 £2300/$2300 It's hard to believe that the Corsair One comes from the same company that designed the Bulldog, a small form factor PC so monstrously ugly that the mere thought of placing it in a living room was enough to set off a spousal gag reflex. Where the Bulldog was a confused mishmash of jaunty, l33t gamer angles, the One is sleek, sophisticated, and—dare I say it—even a little grown up. That Corsair continues to sell a slightly updated version of the Bulldog is something of mystery considering just how good the Corsair One is. Of all the small form factor (SFF) PCs I've tried—and there have been quite a few over the past year—it is by far the best. I'd even go as as to say it's one of the best pre-built PCs you can buy, full stop. At £2,300 for a fully loaded version, the Corsair One isn't cheap by any means—and as always, going the DIY route can lead to substantial savings—but few homebrew PCs have such a tiny footprint. Fewer still do so while being entirely liquid cooled, graphics card and all. It's a combo that results in a PC that doesn't just fit into the living room environment aesthetically, but acoustically too. Read 21 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Workflow app. (credit: Workflow) Late yesterday, Apple closed a deal to acquire Workflow, an app for iOS power users that lets you string a series of repetitive actions together to make them easier and quicker to accomplish. In many ways, the app accomplishes for iOS what the Automator app does for macOS. Late last year Apple laid off Sal Soghoian, the product manager in charge of automation-related products like Automator and AppleScript, and eliminated his position; the purchase of Workflow suggests that it could be the future of Apple's automation-related efforts. Workflow's developers—Ari Weinstein, Conrad Kramer, Ayaka Nonaka, and Nick Frey—are all being hired by Apple, and they'll continue to develop Workflow which will continue to exist in the App Store. It used to cost $2.99, but it's now available to all users free of charge. The amount Apple paid for Workflow hasn't been disclosed, but TechCrunch reports that it was a "solid payday" for both the developers of the app and its investors. Apple's statement about the acquisition highlighted that it had won an Apple Design Award in 2015 for its use of iOS' accessibility features, which suggests that the Workflow team could also help Apple develop and implement new accessibility features in future versions of iOS. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Jean-Etienne Minh-Duy Poirrier) Anna O. Szust is not a real person. She is, literally, a fraud: oszust means “fraud” in Polish. Nonetheless, Szust has been appointed as an editor at 40 bogus academic journals. After sending out her fake application for an editorial role, the researchers responsible for the world’s nerdiest sting operation began to receive responses almost immediately. “Four titles immediately appointed Szust editor-in-chief,” report Piotr Sorokowski and colleagues in Nature this week. At legitimate journals, editors play an important role in quality control. They decide whether a paper is worth sending out for peer review, and, if so, who is best qualified to review it. Then they decide whether to publish it, based on the advice of the reviewers. A high-quality journal has rigorous editors who work to ensure higher-quality science, which helps to stop bad science—ranging from the silly to the truly dangerous—from getting the approval stamp of publication and peer review. Predatory journals Bogus, predatory journals, on the other hand, are not concerned with quality; they’re concerned with making a buck or ten thousand. They take advantage of legitimate open access scientific journals, which often charge a fee for publication in order to cover their costs; papers are then made available without a subscription. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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McLaren Pity the humble hypercar. For a brief moment in time you're the hottest thing on four wheels, splashed across thousands of desktop wallpapers (and bedroom walls, if car posters are still a thing). But these days that kind of star power doesn't last long. Blame the companies that build them. You'd think it would be hard to top something like a McLaren P1, a hybrid with 903hp (673kW) and a $1.6 million price tag, but that's just what McLaren intends to do with the next car in its "Ultimate" series, the BP23. The BP23 is still two years off, and details are scarce on the ground. It will be a hybrid and have even more power than the P1, and more advanced aerodynamics. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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