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Enlarge / Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Bresch testifies on Capitol Hill in a hearing on "Reviewing the Rising Price of EpiPens." (credit: Getty | Alex Wong) When Mylan dramatically increased the price of its life-saving EpiPen devices, it drew sharp rebuke all around for what seemed like a purely greedy—and heartless—move. But according to a lawsuit filed by French drug maker Sanofi, the move wasn’t just out of simple greed. Instead, it was part of an underhanded scheme to “squash” competition from Sanofi’s rival device, the Auvi-Q. With the lofty prices and near-monopoly over the market, Mylan could dangle deep discounts to drug suppliers—with the condition that they turn their backs on Sanofi’s Auvi-Q—the lawsuit alleges. Suppliers wouldn’t dare ditch the most popular auto-injector. And with the high prices, the rebates wouldn’t put a dent in Mylan’s hefty profits, Sanofi speculates. Coupled with a smear campaign and other underhanded practices, Mylan effectively pushed Sanofi out of the US epinephrine auto-injector market, Sanofi alleges. The lawsuit, filed Monday in a federal court in New Jersey, seeks damages under US Antitrust laws. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The announcement of the Creators Update in October 2016. Two weeks into its phased rollout, the Creators Update (version 1703) is on about ten percent of Windows 10 machines. That number comes from AdDuplex, which collects statistics from Windows 10 machines running apps built with its advertising SDK. 9.8 percent of Windows 10 machines are on 1703, 82.1 percent are on the Anniversary Update, 6 percent are on version 1511, and just 1.8 percent are on the original RTM release. That original release (sometimes known as 1507, following the year-year-month-month naming pattern used for subsequent releases) moves out of support on May 9. Although Windows 10 itself has a minimum of ten years of support, maintaining that support will still require periodic upgrades. This is not an entirely new policy; in the days of Windows Service Packs, the release of a new Service Pack would start a two-year countdown for support of the previous Service Pack. After those two years, only the new Service Pack would be supported. The timetable is a little condensed, however; Windows 10 1507 is not yet two years old, and it won't be two years old when it falls out of support. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Following the Megaupload bust, the feds took more than 1,000 servers belonging to Carpathia Hosting. The servers, now offline in a climate-controlled facility, held more than 25 petabytes of data. (credit: Getty Images) It's been more than five years since the government accused Megaupload and its founder Kim Dotcom of criminal copyright infringement. While Dotcom himself was arrested in New Zealand, US government agents executed search warrants and grabbed a group of more than 1,000 servers owned by Carpathia Hosting. That meant that a lot of users with gigabytes of perfectly legal content lost access to it. Two months after the Dotcom raid and arrest, the Electronic Frontier Foundation filed a motion in court asking to get back data belonging to one of those users, Kyle Goodwin, whom the EFF took on as a client. Goodwin ran OhioSportsNet, and he used Megaupload to store the digital video he recorded of high school sports games. He paid €79.99 ($87.49) for a two-year premium subscription. Years have passed. The US criminal prosecution of Dotcom and other Megaupload executives is on hold while New Zealand continues with years of extradition hearings. Meanwhile, Carpathia's servers were powered down and are kept in storage by QTS Realty Trust, which acquired Carpathia in 2015. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Countercept) After Microsoft officials dismissed evidence that more than 10,000 Windows machines on the Internet were infected by a highly advanced National Security Agency backdoor, private researchers are stepping in to fill the void. The latest example of this open source self-help came on Tuesday with the release of a tool that can remotely uninstall the DoublePulsar implant. On late Friday afternoon, Microsoft officials issued a one-sentence statement saying that they doubted the accuracy of multiple Internet-wide scans that found anywhere from 30,000 to slightly more than 100,000 infected machines. The statement didn't provide any factual basis for the doubt, and officials have yet to respond on the record to requests on Tuesday for an update. Over the weekend, Below0day released the results of a scan that detected 56,586 infected Windows boxes, an 85-percent jump in the 30,626 infections the security firm found three days earlier. Both numbers are in the conservative end of widely ranging results from scans independently carried out by other researchers over the past week. On Monday, Rendition Infosec published a blog post saying DoublePulsar infections were on the rise and that company researchers are confident the scan results accurately reflect real-world conditions. Rendition founder Jake Williams told Ars that the number of infected machines is "well over 120k, but that number is a floor." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock) AT&T's deployment of fiber-to-the-home in California has been heavily concentrated in higher-income neighborhoods, giving affluent people access to gigabit speeds while others are stuck with Internet service that doesn't even meet state and federal broadband standards, according to a new analysis. "Because there is no regulatory oversight of AT&T’s fiber-to-the-home deployment, AT&T is free to choose the communities in which it builds its all-fiber GigaPower network," UC Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society wrote in a report released today. "Our analysis finds that AT&T has built its all-fiber network disproportionately in higher income communities. If this pattern continues, it has troubling consequences for low- and moderate-income Californians, leaving many without access to AT&T’s gold standard all-fiber network and exacerbating the digital divide." California households with access to AT&T's fiber service have a median income of $94,208, according to "AT&T's Digital Divide in California," in which the Haas Institute analyzed Federal Communications Commission data from June 2016. The study was funded by the Communications Workers of America, an AT&T workers' union that's been involved in contentious negotiations with the company. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge With Windows 10, Microsoft shook up the long-standing Windows patching model. Instead of producing individual hotfixes for each security flaw and infrequent updates to address non-security issues, Windows 10 has two monthly packages. There's a Security Update—a single update that contains all of a given month's security fixes—and a Cumulative Update that contains all of the security and non-security fixes for a given version of Windows 10. Microsoft has also retroactively applied this updating approach to Windows 7 and 8.1; those operating systems also have a third package containing only the Internet Explorer security fixes. With the Creators Update, Microsoft is now adding another monthly package. Starting with Windows 10 1703 only, the company will also offer a cumulative non-security update. This will contain all the non-security fixes released for a given version. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Aviation authorities late Monday released police reports about the Kentucky doctor who was violently removed from a United flight earlier this month. The officers involved painted a picture that differs from the viral videos of the incident taken by other passengers. The videos of the April 9 incident, which were posted on social media and broadcast on news sites across the world, have sparked global outrage at United, which at first defended the incident but later apologized. The police reports, released from Chicago's Department of Aviation in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by The Los Angeles Times and other news outlets, say 69-year-old passenger David Dao was flailing his arms and being verbally abusive. The officers involved suggested that it was Dao's fault that he struck his face on an armrest, which broke his nose, knocked out his two front teeth, and gave him a concussion before a flight from Chicago to Louisville. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Leon Neal) Amazon is constantly thinking of new ways it can cut costs and revolutionize the shipping and delivery industry. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal, Amazon formed a team about a year ago of a dozen employees to focus on driverless-vehicle technology and develop the company's plans to use self-driving cars to better its business. Amazon doesn't plan on building its own self-driving cars for now. Instead, this newly formed team is tasked with figuring out how the company can use autonomous vehicle technology to deliver packages more quickly. Not only could self-driving cars be used to deliver packages to customers during the final leg of the shipping process, but Amazon could use autonomous cars, trucks, forklifts, and drones to move goods in and around warehouses and elsewhere. Shipping and delivery costs continue to rise for Amazon as it delivers more categories of products. Autonomous vehicles could cut those costs, especially considering that they don't have the same time restrictions that humans do. Humans, specifically truck drivers, have a 10-hour limit before they need to stop for rest. A shipment that originally took a few days to move across the country in a human-driven vehicle could take half the time with a self-driving car. According to the report, Amazon is particularly interested in autonomous trucking. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Oh, there's that cure I was looking for. (credit: Getty | Harold M. Lambert) Tried, true, and FDA-approved drugs for cancer and depression—already in medicine cabinets—may also be long-sought treatments for devastating brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other forms of dementia, according to a new study in Brain, a Journal of Neurology. The research is still in early stages; it only involved mouse and cell experiments, which are frequently not predictive of how things will go in humans. Nevertheless, the preliminary findings are strong, and scientists are optimistic that the drugs could one day help patients with progressive brain disease. Researchers are moving toward human trials. And this process would be streamlined because the drugs have already cleared safety tests. But even if the early findings hold up, it would still take years to reach patients. In the preliminary tests, the two drugs—trazodone hydrochloride, used to treat depression and anxiety, and dibenzoylmethane (DBM), effective against prostate and breast tumors—could shut down a devastating stress response in brain cells, known to be critical for the progression of brain diseases. The drugs both protected brain cells and restored memory in mice suffering from brain diseases. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A truck from Idaho arrived at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant at night. (credit: WIPP) The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, began accepting shipments of transuranic waste (PDF) this month for the first time since February 2014 when an explosion of a drum of plutonium and americium waste halted all deliveries. WIPP is the only facility that accepts waste from the nation’s Cold War-era nuclear weapons production sites. The waste has been kept at those production sites for decades and includes “contaminated items such as clothing, tools, rags, residues, debris, soil.” The New Mexico facility, carved into a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed in the 1980s, is intended to be a long-term storage solution (a very long-term solution) for all the waste that's distributed at facilities across the country. The 2014 accident at WIPP occurred when a worker packed a shipment of waste in the wrong kind of kitty litter, which started a “complex chemical reaction” causing “white, radioactive foam” to explode from the drum, according to the Los Angeles Times. No one was in the WIPP shafts at the time of the explosion, so no one was hurt, and workers on the surface were only exposed to minimal radiation. But the facility’s state-of-the-art ventilation system was damaged, meaning shipments to the facility couldn’t continue. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Finding out the price for Internet service shouldn't be this difficult. Verizon's rollout yesterday of a $70-per-month gigabit Internet plan was pretty confusing. The Verizon announcement said the gigabit service would be immediately available to more than 8 million homes and did not say that the $70 price would only be available to certain customers. But it turned out that the $70 price was only for customers who don't have Verizon FiOS service today. Existing customers who tried to upgrade yesterday were told that the standard price was as much as $200 a month. After exchanging many e-mails throughout the day yesterday with a Verizon spokesperson, we now have a better understanding of what went wrong and what should happen next. Verizon promised a "revolutionary speed and a revolutionary price." But there's more than one price. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Behold: It's No Game, written by an AI and starring the great David Hasselhoff. (video link) Last year, director Oscar Sharp and AI researcher Ross Goodwin released the stunningly weird short film Sunspring. It was a sci-fi tale written entirely by an algorithm that eventually named itself Benjamin. Now the two humans have teamed up with Benjamin again to create a follow-up movie, It's No Game, about what happens when AI gets mixed up in an impending Hollywood writers' strike. Ars is excited to debut the movie here, so go ahead and watch. We also talked to the film cast and creators about what it's like to work with an AI. The scenario in It's No Game is sort of like Robocop, with about 20 hits of acid layered on top. Two screenwriters (Tim Guinee and Walking Dead's Thomas Payne) are meeting with a producer (Flesh and Bone's Sarah Hay), who informs them that it doesn't matter if they go on strike because the future is AI writing movies for other AI. As evidence, she shows them Sunspring, gushing about how it "got a million hits." The fact that Sunspring did in fact get a million hits in real life, and that there really is a writer's strike threatening Hollywood, make this movie even more of a reality distortion field. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / AMD's new Radeon Pro Duo GPU. (credit: AMD) A little over a year after launching the last Radeon Pro Duo graphics card, AMD is back with an all-new version that has the same name but makes a whole bunch of changes. The new Radeon Pro Duo mashes two separate 14nm Polaris GPUs with 2,304 stream processors, 128 texture units, 32 ROPs, and 16GB of graphics RAM apiece (for a total of 32GB) into a single card. As the name implies, the card is being aimed primarily at professional users rather than gamers. It's based on the Radeon Pro WX 7100 workstation GPU, which uses one GPU with most of the same specs as the Radeon Pro Duo but with 8GB of RAM instead of 16GB. You can find the full spec list for the card here, which will launch at "the end of May" for $999. The card is quite different from last year's Radeon Pro Duo—that card launched at $1,499 and featured a pair of 28nm Fiji GPUs with 4,096 stream processors and 4GB of RAM each; it was also a power-hungry monster, requiring its own closed-loop liquid cooler, three external PCIe power plugs, and as much as 350W of power. The new card only needs two power plugs, uses an air blower typical of most GPUs, and has a rated TBP (typical board power) of 250W. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Ore Huiying/Bloomberg via Getty Images) A former Lyft driver sued Uber on Monday in a proposed class-action lawsuit over its recently evealed "Hell" software, which allowed Uber to spoof fake Lyft drivers through a flaw in Lyft’s own design. In turn, those faux accounts gave Uber confidential location information about the eight nearest Lyft drivers. Not only did this program provide secret information about Lyft, its largest rival, but it also allowed Uber to target its own drivers who also drive for Lyft. Uber could then present them with enticing offers to make sure that they would stay loyal to Uber. The "spyware," according to the lawsuit, which reportedly ran from 2014 to 2016, "enabled Defendants to remotely and surreptitiously access, monitor, intercept, and/or transmit personal information as well as electronic communications and whereabouts." The ex-driver, Michael Gonzales, who never drove for Uber, claims violations of federal and California state privacy laws, and unfair business practices. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / One of the earliest self-driving trial families poses with Waymo's minivan. (credit: Waymo) Waymo—Alphabet's self-driving car division—is launching a "trial" of a self-driving taxi service in the Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area. The Google spinoff's fleet of self-driving cars is descending on Phoenix and offering free rides to anyone in its "early rider program," which is currently accepting new members. The taxi service is not totally "self-driving." Waymo notes that "as part of this early trial, there will be a test driver in each vehicle monitoring the rides at all times." While the car will handle most of the driving duties, a driver will ensure nothing goes wrong if the car runs into a situation it can't handle. While the trial will offer free rides to Phoenix residents, it will also serve as a research program for Waymo. The company's blog post say it wants to "learn things like where people want to go in a self-driving car, how they communicate with our vehicles, and what information and controls they want to see inside." To handle the load of a city-wide taxi service, Waymo is building 500 more of its self-driving Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans, bringing the total minivan fleet to 600. The minivans represent the latest in Waymo's technology. In a recent talk at the North American International Auto Show, Waymo CEO John Krafcik said the vehicles would be the launch platform for Waymo's "full-stack approach," which combines Waymo's software with a "fully integrated hardware suite" that is "all designed and built, from the ground up, by Waymo." Most self-driving car programs stick to developing software using Velodyne's LiDAR hardware. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Boeing Last October, during a White House Frontiers Conference in Pittsburgh, President Obama sat down in a simulator of Boeing's Starliner spacecraft, which will begin transporting astronauts to the International Space Station within a couple of years. The commander-in-chief wanted to try his hand at a task astronauts would eventually have to perform. After taking the controls and cleanly docking to the station, Obama gleefully exulted, “Your ride is here, baby." So when I sat down in the same simulator on a recent Friday morning, at the FIRST Robotics Competition in Houston, I felt a little pressure to match the president's success. Even though this simulator has been "dumbed" down for the general public from the real thing, it still wasn't trivial to guide the Starliner, nose first, into a docking port on the station's Node 2 module. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Soylent) Those swigging Soylent are in for another hiccup—but, it seems, no belly aches this time. The high-profile meal-replacement company issued a voluntary recall Monday after finding that a small amount of milk product may have slipped into some batches of its Soylent 1.8 powder, which is supposed to be free of lactose and milk products. Soylent fans with an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk face serious or even life-threatening allergic reactions if they chug any of the contaminated product. In an announcement of the voluntary recall on the Food and Drug Administration’s website, the company noted that it has not received any reports of illnesses related to the offending dairy. The company also said it has figured out what went wrong and identified the batches contaminated, and the problem won’t affect future products or interrupt supply. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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YouTube, Samsung Italia You may know someone who sends messages with more emojis than words, but chances are they don't need those symbols to communicate. For some with language disorders such as aphasia, which can make it difficult to read, talk, or write, emojis can be an ideal way to communicate with others around them. Samsung Electronics Italia, the company's Italian subsidiary, just came out with a new app called Wemogee that helps those with language disorders talk to others by using emoji-based messages. Wemogee focuses on "bringing all users together again" regardless of their language abilities. Samsung worked with Italian speech therapist Francesca Polini to translate over 140 sentence units from text into emoji strings, sequences of emojis that accurately convey the meaning of sentences. For example, "How are you?" turns into a smiley face, an "ok" hand gesture, and a question mark on a single line. The app has two modes, visual and textual, and users can choose which mode they prefer. In visual mode, users send an emoji-based message and the receiver will get it either as an emoji sequence if they're in visual mode as well, or as a text message if they're in textual mode. On the flip side, those in textual mode can send text messages that show up as emojis for those in visual mode. The app can also be used to assist face-to-face interactions for quicker and more accurate communication. Wemogee's promotional video shows a screen in the app with a message written in words and emojis, allowing both users to understand the conversation regardless of language capacity. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Wikipedia cofounder Jimmy Wales. (credit: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Getty Images) Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales wants to bring together unpaid volunteers and journalists to create a rival news publication—dubbed Wikitribune—that he hopes will battle "fake news" more effectively than long-established newspapers. Volunteers are encouraged to contribute funds to the project via a crowdfunding campaign. They will then shape the topics that Wikitribune will cover as well as offer up fact checking duties—again, the work of a typical newsroom. "If we have a community guiding the work and we have people who are paying to be monthly supporters we can do the numbers and say, well for this many monthly supporters we can hire another journalist," Wales told Wired. "Which means if a group wants us to hire a journalist on a particular topic, whatever that might be, then we can do that." Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Not quite an RPG, not quite an RTS, MOBAs are fierce, fast games that combine swift fingers, strategic thinking, and uproarious bursts of skill. Two teams of five players duke it out to destroy each other's base with the assistance of computer-controlled units that march forward along set paths, or lanes, as the terminology has it. It's a simple concept that allows for a huge amount of depth, and when two teams are in full flow, firing on every cylinder, it's a joy to watch and play. But there's a precipitous learning curve at every level of skill, and it can just as easily become an exercise in frustration and self-flagellation, especially if your teammates aren't up to snuff—or if you're the rube but you don't know it. I've played Heroes of the Storm for two years, starting just after it left beta. In that time I've played 2,490 games. Each game takes an average of 20 minutes, though they can last anything from about 12 minutes during an outright stomp to upwards of half an hour, if both sides consist of woeful morons. By my calculations, that's exactly 830 hours of furious mouse-clicks and grimaces of anguish, or just over 34 and a half full days of gaming. That's a lot. [Pfft, I had over 700 days of World of Warcraft play time! -Ed.] Since mid-2015, I've obsessively devoured patch notes, posted several despairing notes on Reddit wondering why I always seem to find myself partnered with imbeciles (surprise: the team imbecile is often me), and even found myself watching tournaments played by men and boys 10 years my junior with frightening dedication to the game, and faster fingers than I'll ever have—e-sports being something I'd never expected to find pleasure in. These things, if you let them, have a way of taking over your life. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge According to Warhammer: 40,000 lore, the Power Fist (also known as the Power Glove) is a late-41st millennium weapon wielded by honoured Space Marine Captains and Chapter Masters. While slow to use, its powerful hydraulics mean the fist can hammer straight through the side of tanks, and end conflicts with a single, powerful blow. And yet, despite the fist's theoretical technological prowess, no one has seen fit to turn it from fiction into fact. That is until Sega, clearly with a marketing budget surplus to burn through by the end of the fiscal year, decided the best way to promote its latest real-time strategy game Warhammer 40K: Dawn of War 3 was to build a replica 3000psi Power Fist, and then have journalists and influencers smash things with it. Yes, it's a classic PR stunt the likes of which gaming hasn't seen since that time THQ asked people to literally break into parked cars with a hammer and steal copies of Red Faction: Guerrilla(!), or when Activision renamed Edinburgh Zoo's wolverine "Logan" to launch X-Men Origins. And it's just as brilliantly pointless. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Here at Ars, we like to celebrate the classics—especially classic video games—and we've long been fans of the folks over at GOG (formerly known as "Good Old Games"). They sell modern games, sure, but the site is a treasure trove of DRM-free hits from days gone by. Want to grab a copy of Tie Fighter that works on modern computers? Boom, ten bucks. Want to replay Wing Commander IV with upgraded DVD-quality cutscenes? Here ya go, $5.99. Never got a chance to try your hand at managing global thermonuclear war? DEFCON, six bucks. And there are more—so many more. As it turns out, GOG likes Ars, too! We've been in talks with the GOG crew for the past couple of weeks and as of this morning, I am happy to announce that Ars and GOG are entering into a partnership—which means there are some cool things that are about to happen. First thing: You get a free game! And you get a free game! The first of those cool things is that we're giving away a few hundred thousand copies of The Witcher: Enhanced Edition—all you have to do is click in the sidebar over there to claim a code. You'll be redirected to GOG.com to redeem the code and download the game. It'll work on Windows or MacOS (sorry, penguin fans—there's no Linux version of this particular game, though there's a buttload of Linux-friendly titles on GOG). Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Ron Howard speaks to Ars Technica at March's South By Southwest festival. (credit: Sam Machkovech) AUSTIN, Texas—Writer, director, and actor Ron Howard is very careful when considering his place in the geek-media universe. Over 20 years ago, his film Apollo 13 kicked off a trajectory of major science-and-heart storytelling, which recently crystallized as an ongoing series-development deal with National Geographic's TV channel. This Tuesday's premiere of TV mini-series Genius, which sees Geoffrey Rush playing the role of Albert Einstein, won't be the last of that deal, either—and Howard laughs at how that fact might look to people in his past. "My tenth grade science teacher, Mr. Dowd, would be, you know, rolling over in his grave!" Howard says with a laugh during an interview at last month's South By Southwest festival. "No, no, he'd enjoy it. He had a great sense of humor. The fact that I'm telling stories about science"—and saying this makes Howard laugh uncontrollably—"well, he thought I was a nice guy. He knew I didn't get it." Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Let it burn: the cover of Cory Doctorow's Walkaway, a novel of building a new world from the ashes of the old post climate-apocylapse. Science fiction has long served as a platform for the hashing out of big social, political and economic issues, either metaphorically or literally. Cory Doctorow has never been shy of speaking their names directly, whether examining the implications of the surveillance state or the shifting of social and economic forces caused by technology. In his first novel for an adult audience in eight years, Doctorow revisits many of the themes he's written about in the past, and he refines them into a compelling, cerebral "hard" science fiction narrative of a not-too distant future that ranks with some of the best of the genre. Walkaway (from Tor Books, which releases on April 25 in hardcover) is a very Doctorow-y book. Intensely smart and tech-heavy, it still manages maintains the focus on its human (or in some cases, post-human) protagonists. Walkaway is also full of big ideas about both the future and our current condition, and it has enough philosophical, social, and political commentary lurking just below the surface to fuel multiple graduate theses. At its heart, Walkaway is an optimistic disaster novel—"in as much as it's a book about people who, in the face of disaster, don't disintegrate into CHUDs but instead jump right into the fray to figure out how they can help each other," Doctorow explained to Ars. "That, to me, is the uplifting part—it's not a question of whether bad things will happen or won't happen, but what we'll do when disaster strikes." Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Brad Jones' DJI Inspire 2, before its final flight. (credit: Brad Jones) It was around sunset on Easter Sunday, April 16, when Brad Jones took his DJI Inspire 2 out for a flight in front of his home. Jones hoped, as he does on most nights, to capture some of the forested and hilly scenery in the environs of his hometown, Oliver Springs, Tennessee—about 30 miles west of Knoxville. “I flew down over my aunt’s house, and I heard a gunshot within the first three to four minutes of flight,” Jones told Ars. “So I sped up and flew back towards my house.” After a few more minutes, he flew back westward. He had just switched the drone’s camera mode from video to taking still photos in RAW format. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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