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Enlarge (credit: Scott Gilbertson) The Linux world has long maintained a very specific rite of passage: wiping the default operating system from your laptop and plugging in a USB stick with your favorite distro's live CD. Some of us get a little, dare I say, giddy every time we wipe that other OS away and see that first flash of GRUB. Of course, rites of passage are supposed to be one-time events. Once you've wiped Windows or OS X a time or two, that giddiness vanishes—replaced by a feeling of annoyance, a kind of tax on being a Linux user. In recent years, the PC industry has finally spawned a few manufacturers offering up machines with Linux pre-installed to eliminate this issue. By this point, I've tested most of them around Ars: Dell's XPS and Precision lines both have Linux-friendly offerings, and dedicated Linux manufacturers like System76 have long offered decent hardware with Linux pre-installed. In all this testing, I've yet to encounter a driver problem, which is the real benefit of a machine with Linux pre-installed. (Though to be fair, I could say the same for the Lenovo x240 that serves as my daily driver.) Read 29 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Homeopathic remedies in a pharmacy. (credit: Getty | Peter Macdiarmid ) Unproven alternative treatments are clearly risky. Some carry the risk of direct harms, such as improperly diluted homeopathic tablets, blinding stem cell injections, contaminated supplements, or tainted placenta pills. And others, such as magic healing crystals and useless detoxes, may risk indirect harm by taking the place of evidence-based treatments. However obvious the risks, measuring them has been tricky. For one thing, patients aren’t always eager to provide data, let alone admit to their doctors that they’ve ditched conventional therapies. But, by digging into the National Cancer database, researchers at Yale have finally quantified one type of risk for cancer patients—the risk of death. And the results are grim. Those who skipped or delayed conventional treatment to use alternative ones had as much as a 5.7-fold increased risk of dying within five years than those who stuck with conventional medicine, the researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Though the study was small and had several gaps—including not knowing the types of alternative treatments patients had tried—the researchers hope that it spurs discussion and “greater scrutiny of the use of [alternative medicine] for the initial treatment of cancer.” Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Courthouse in San Francisco, California. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images) A federal appeals court ruled (PDF) yesterday that a lawsuit alleging that Spokeo's "people search engine" violates the Fair Credit Reporting Act can move forward. Spokeo operates a "people search" engine which gathers publicly available information from social networks, phone books, and real-estate and business websites. The engine then makes the information available via its online search portal. The company's search results tell users that it "does not verify or evaluate each piece of data," and it says the information it shows should not be used to determine "eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, or for any other purposes covered under the FCRA," referring to the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Thomas Robins, a Virginia resident, sued Spokeo in 2011. In a proposed class-action complaint, Robins said that Spokeo's search engine is producing "in-depth consumer reports" in violation of FCRA. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Aston Martin The build-up to this year's Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance continues apace. Yesterday was Infiniti's turn, with its gorgeous, retro-styled electric Prototype 9 concept car, while today the headlines go to Aston Martin. Once again, the British carmaker teamed up with Italian design house Zagato, this time on a pair of limited-edition versions of a rather old model: the Vanquish Zagato Speedster and Vanquish Zagato Shooting Brake. That now makes a total of four different Zagato-bodied versions of the venerable GT car, for the two companies have previously collaborated on a Vanquish Zagato Coupe and Vanquish Zagato Volante (which means "convertible" in Aston Martinese). Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) is likely to be NASA's next administrator. (credit: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call) NASA may finally be close to getting some clarity about its leadership during the Trump administration. On Tuesday, NASA Watch reported that the President will nominate US Representative Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.), as administrator and Aerojet Rocketdyne Vice President John Schumacher as deputy administrator. Both men have been rumored to be nominated for these posts in recent weeks, but there have been no official confirmations as yet. Two sources familiar with Washington, DC, space politics confirmed the choices to Ars, but one of them offered a caveat. "I have heard same from multiple sources, but this is Trump world," one DC-based source said. A formal announcement has been in the works for September, but a date and location have not yet been set. A NASA spokeswoman did not reply to a query from Ars on Tuesday evening. John Logsdon, a noted space historian and author of several books, including After Apollo? Richard Nixon and the American Space Program, said he has been hearing the same names. "Appointing Jim Bridenstine and John Schumacher as the top two NASA officials is an intriguing and potentially very productive move," Logsdon told Ars, via e-mail. "Bridenstine, for several years, has been conceptualizing what is needed for, as he suggests, an 'American Space Renaissance' and has been testing his ideas with multiple audiences. Schumacher is a Washington space community veteran, with years of both senior NASA and space industry executive experience. Together, they can bring both fresh ideas and a sense of political and policy realism to the space agency." Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Shaun Bridges was captured by CCTV security cameras, leaving a Secret Service field office in 2015 with a large bag. The government said the bag may have contained hard drives with keys needed to access his Bitstamp wallet. (credit: US Attorney’s Office San Francisco) SAN FRANCISCO—Former Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges pleaded guilty on Tuesday to new counts of money laundering and related forfeiture. In May 2015, Bridges was sentenced to 71 months after he stole money from Silk Road dealers while investigating Silk Road, a now-defunct Tor-hidden underground website. Over a year ago, federal authorities strongly suggested in court filings that, in 2015, after Bridges had left the Secret Service and after he had already signed his first guilty plea, he had illegally transferred to himself over 1,600 bitcoins. Those bitcoins had previously been seized by federal authorities from Bitstamp, a European Bitcoin exchange, which later challenged the seizure. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Money - Savings) A 32-year-old American man accused of using an eBay account for fake computer-printer transactions to raise funds for a US terror plot pleaded guilty to federal terrorism-related charges Tuesday. Mohamed Elshinawy, whom the government said pledged allegiance to ISIS, told the authorities that the up to $8,700 he received via PayPal was to be used for "operational purposes" (PDF) in the US, like conducting a terror attack. However, he also told the authorities, according to court documents, that he was just ripping off overseas ISIS operatives and had no intention of carrying out an attack in the US. Elshinawy The FBI said in court documents that the authorities began investigating the Maryland man in 2015 after he received a $1,000 Western Union money transfer from Egypt. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images) A US-based solar-panel components maker called Suniva filed a petition with the International Trade Commission (ITC) this spring, alleging unfair trade practices after the company declared bankruptcy. It was later joined in its petition by SolarWorld America, another US-based solar cell manufacturer. Today, the two companies pleaded their case (PDF) in front of the ITC and are asking for tariffs to be placed on solar-panel materials imported to the US. Specifically, “the petition seeks a 40-cent-per-watt duty on imported cells and a 78-cent-per-watt floor price for imported modules,” according to E&E News. Panels and their components have been plummeting in price, and Suniva and SolarWorld say this is mainly due to cheap imports from China and Southeast Asia. The tariffs they seek would apply to solar panel components imported to the US from anywhere in the world, however. “Quite simply, we need the commission’s help to save solar manufacturing in the United States,” Jürgen Stein, chief executive of SolarWorld Americas, said in testimony before the commission, according to The Washington Post. “Relief under Section 201 is our last hope.” Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Some of my tabs. If your browser is a catastrophe of tabs as mine is—I currently have six Chrome windows across three monitors with more than 100 tabs open, because tabs are the new bookmarks—then this thing I just discovered may be life-changing. (Though it's certainly not new.) We all know that you can tear a tab off the tab bar to drag it into a new window (or drag it into a different tab bar to move it from window to window). What if I told you that you can use the standard selection modifiers—ctrl-click for multiple non-contiguous tabs, shift-click for multiple contiguous tabs—to tear off entire groups of related tabs in a single action? Because believe it or not, you can. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A Kaby Lake desktop CPU, not that you can tell the difference in a press shot. This is built using Intel's 14nm+ process. (credit: Intel) Intel has given an unusual insight into the road ahead for its mainstream desktop and laptop processors, confirming the existence of a new processor family called Ice Lake. Once upon a time, the company planned to follow up Skylake, built on a 14nm process, with Cannon Lake, built on a 10nm process and shipping in late 2016. But that plan was derailed. The 14nm process took longer than expected to bed down and start working properly. Our understanding is that Intel moved engineers that were developing 10nm to help with fixing 14nm. This had a few knock-on effects. First, it required Intel to produce additional designs built on 14nm: last year's Kaby Lake uses the second-generation 14nm+ process, and this year's Coffee Lake will use a third-generation 14nm++ process. Second, it delayed 10nm. 10nm parts aren't now expected until 2018, when Cannon Lake finally materializes. The newly confirmed Ice Lake will use a second-generation 10nm process, 10nm+. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) The ongoing Waymo v. Uber lawsuit continues to yield more interesting information about the internal plans of the ride-hailing company and its self-driving car ambitions. Uber was recently compelled by the court to hand over copies of text messages sent between former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick and Anthony Levandowski. While there's no "smoking gun" in the redacted document that would settle the matter in Waymo's favor, the messages—sent between February and December 2016—do show a particular disregard for Elon Musk and Tesla's autonomous driving project. Waymo says that Levandowski stole more than 14,000 secret files while he worked at Google, then departed to create his own startup, which was purchased last year by Uber for $680 million. Now Uber stands accused of using Google trade secrets in building its self-driving car project—charges that Uber vehemently denies. Levandowski's texts have a particular relevance to the case since he hasn't answered many questions himself, instead pleading his Fifth Amendment rights to avoid testifying. Earlier this year, Uber fired Levandowski when he wouldn't cooperate with court-ordered document production. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Jeremy Brooks) For 17 days starting last month, an advanced backdoor that gave attackers complete control over networks lurked in digitally signed software used by hundreds of banks, energy companies, and pharmaceutical manufacturers, researchers warned Tuesday. The backdoor, dubbed ShadowPad, was added to five server- or network-management products sold by NetSarang, a software developer with offices in South Korea and the US. The malicious products were available from July 17 to August 4, when the backdoor was discovered and privately reported by researchers from antivirus provider Kaspersky Lab. Anyone who uses the five NetSarang titles Xmanager Enterprise 5.0, Xmanager 5.0, Xshell 5.0, Xftp 5.0, or Xlpd 5.0, should immediately review posts here and here from NetSarang and Kaspersky Lab respectively. Covert data collection The attack is the latest to manipulate the supply chain of a legitimate product in hopes of infecting the people who rely on it. The NotPetya worm that shut down computers around the world in June used the same tactic after attackers hijacked the update mechanism for tax software that was widely used in Ukraine. Supply-chain attacks that targeted online gamers included one used to spread the PlugX trojan in 2015 and the malware dubbed WinNTi in 2013. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC. (credit: Win McNamee / Getty Images News) A group of prominent tech companies and lawyers has come together in new friend-of-the-court filings submitted to the Supreme Court on Tuesday. The group is arguing in favor of stronger legal protections for data generated by apps and digital devices in an important privacy case pending before the court. The companies, which include Apple, Google, and Microsoft among many others, argue that the current state of the law, which distinguishes between "content" (which requires a warrant) and "non-content" (which does not) "make[s] little sense in the context of digital technologies." The amicus filing by dozens of law professors also concludes that the third-party doctrine "cannot support future application of the Fourth Amendment." The legal theory posits that individuals relinquish their privacy interest in data (like a call record or location data) to a third-party—so the government can access it with a court order rather than a warrant. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have new deals to share today. Amazon Prime members can get the popular new game Sonic Mania: Collector's Edition for just $55.99. That's 20 percent off its original price, which is great for such a new release. We also have a JACKYLED 45-in-1 screwdriver set for just $6.93 and a Dell XPS tower desktop with Core i7 for $599. Check out the rest of the deals below, too. Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on this post through affiliate programs. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner. (credit: Ken Yeung) A California federal court has handed a setback to LinkedIn in a case that could determine whether scraping a public website triggers anti-hacking law. The 25-page ruling, released on Monday, holds that federal anti-hacking law isn't triggered by scraping a website, even if the website owner—LinkedIn in this case—explicitly asks for the scraping to stop. The case pits a business analytics startup called hiQ against the Microsoft-owned behemoth LinkedIn. HiQ scrapes data from publicly available portions of the LinkedIn website, then sells reports to employers about which of their employees seem to be looking for new jobs. LinkedIn sent hiQ a cease-and-desist letter warning that continued scraping could subject hiQ to liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the anti-hacking legislation Congress enacted in 1986. But critics argued that the LinkedIn interpretation of the law could have sweeping and harmful consequences. After all, lots of people scrape publicly available websites, and they don't always do so with the approval of website owners. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Uber has reached a deal with the Federal Trade Commission to be subject to regular privacy audits, settling a complaint (PDF) in which the FTC accused Uber of violating its own privacy policy. The FTC investigation began following news reports in November 2014 about Uber employees using a mode called "God view" to track journalists. In December 2014, Uber created a system for monitoring employee access to consumer information—but stopped using it less than a year after it was put in place, according to the FTC. For more than nine months, Uber "rarely monitored internal access to personal information about users and drivers," today's FTC statement reads. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An archaeological sample with traces of bone-on-bone contact. (credit: Heli Maijanen) Painful, stiff, and grating knees may not just be a sign of aging—they may also be a sign of the times. Degenerative knee arthritis, or knee osteoarthritis (OA), seems to be on the rise. Since the early part of the 20th century, its prevalence has doubled in Americans, according to a new study in PNAS. Researchers estimate that at least 19 percent of all US adults over the age of 45 now suffer from the condition, and it’s a leading cause of chronic pain. But, it’s unclear why. The most obvious suspects—longer lifespans and heftier bodies—don’t fully explain the aching jump in joint problems, researchers report. But one thing that does seem clear is that our frames haven’t kept pace with our lifestyles. “From an evolutionary perspective, knee OA thus fits the criteria of a “mismatch disease” that is more prevalent or severe because our bodies are inadequately or imperfectly adapted to modern environments,” the researchers behind the study conclude. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / An artist's rendering of the EchoStar 24/ Jupiter 3 satellite, planned for launch in 2021. The satellite will provide 100 Mbps residential Internet service to the Western Hemisphere. (credit: EchoStar) In March, Hughes Network Systems launched an upgrade of its satellite-based Internet service, HughesNet, that transformed it into the first residential satellite-based Internet service to meet the Federal Communications Commission's definition of "broadband." Now, the company is planning for its next major leap in bandwidth—a 100 Mbps-capable network based on a new satellite to be launched in 2021. HughesNet Gen5, which by June was serving more than 100,000 Internet service customers, provides 25 megabit-per-second (Mbps) download speeds and 3 Mbps upload speeds via the EchoStar 18/Jupiter 1 and EchoStar 19/Jupiter 2 satellites. HughesNet has a 60-percent share of satellite-based residential Internet service in the US and targets the service at rural residential customers underserved by terrestrial cable and telecommunications providers. Hughes executives announced last week that the company had signed a contract with Space Systems Loral to build the next EchoStar/Jupiter satellite. Designated as EchoStar XXIV/JUPITER 3, the Ultra High Density Satellite (UHDS) will provide residential Internet as well as commercial data services, including in-flight Internet and cellular network "backhaul" for remote cellular towers. EchoStar 24, when added to the existing fleet of satellites, will more than double Hughes' available Ka-band satellite service across both North and South America. The satellite will have 500 gigabits per second of throughput. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Getty Images) If you're an Amazon Prime member, you get orders pretty quickly. Some areas offer one-hour delivery, and some Amazon Fresh customers can get groceries even quicker. Now Amazon wants to shorten your wait time even more with Amazon Instant Pickup locations, which are localized spaces where you can pick up "daily essentials" within minutes of ordering them on Amazon's website. In essence, Instant Pickup locations are convenience stores that don't have aisles—and barely have employees. Prime and Prime Student members can order items from Amazon Instant Pickup on their mobile devices, choosing from products including drinks, snacks, phone chargers, personal care items, and more. It wouldn't be an Amazon service without integration of Amazon's products, so members can also order Echo speakers, Fire TVs, and Fire and Kindle devices on Instant Pickup. Once the order is placed, employees at the nearest Instant Pickup location gather the items and place them in a self-service locker. Members can then go to that locker, open it with a personalized bar code, and retrieve their items within minutes of placing the order. While customers presumably won't interact with the Amazon employees at pickup locations, they still require people to gather and place orders into lockers. According to a report from Reuters, Amazon considered fully automating Instant Pickup locations but didn't go through with it for the launch. Currently there are five Instant Pickup spots in cities across the US: Los Angeles; Atlanta; Berkeley, Calif.; Columbus, Ohio; and College Park, Md. Amazon hopes to open more Instant Pickup locations in the future. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A new logo for an old brand name. (credit: Blizzard) Remember last year when Blizzard announced it would be "transitioning away" from the 20-year-old Battle.net moniker for its online service in favor of "Blizzard Tech." You'd be forgiven for forgetting, because both Blizzard and Activision were still using the Battle.net name heavily this May, when they announced Destiny 2's move to the service. This despite the fact that the rebranded "Blizzard Launcher" was months old at that point, even though no one was really calling it that... Apparently, Blizzard recognized the confusion, and is now reverting back to the Battle.net branding it never fully abandoned. In a blog post yesterday the company explains its online service will now be called "Blizzard Battle.net" going forward: When we announced that we’d be transitioning away from the Battle.net name for our online-gaming service, we suspected that the shift would be challenging. We understood that Battle.net stood for something special—it represents years of shared history and enjoyment, community and friendship, for all of us and our players. Battle.net is the central nervous system for Blizzard games and the connective tissue that has brought Blizzard players together since 1996. The technology was never going away, but after giving the branding change further consideration and also hearing your feedback, we’re in agreement that the name should stay as well. Take it from the developer formerly known as Silicon & Synapse, and Chaos Studios, names are important too. This might not seem like a big deal; as Blizzard says, the underlying technology powering these games hasn't changed at all. But as Blizzard also acknowledges, "names are important too," and abandoning one with the history and awareness of Battle.net without a focused and heavily promoted replacement didn't really work out. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Intel CEO Brian Krzanich. (credit: NYU Stern BHR) Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has quit President Donald Trump's American Manufacturing Council, he announced in a Monday statement. "I resigned to call attention to the serious harm our divided political climate is causing to critical issues, including the serious need to address the decline of American manufacturing," Krzanich wrote. Krzanich hinted that his resignation was connected to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville, VA. "I have already made clear my abhorrence at the recent hate-spawned violence in Charlottesville," he wrote. "Earlier today I called on all leaders to condemn the white supremacists and their ilk who marched and committed violence." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Police and demonstrators stand off in downtown Washington following the inauguration of President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. More than 200 people were indicted on rioting-related charges. An investigation continues. (credit: Stephen J. Boitano/Getty Images) The Justice Department is seeking the 1.3 million IP addresses that visited a Trump resistance site. The search warrant is part of an investigation into Inauguration Day rioting, which has already resulted in the indictment of 200 people in the District of Columbia. DreamHost, the Web host of the disruptj20.org site that helped organize the January 20 protests, is challenging the warrant it was served as being an "unfocused search" and declared that it was a "clear abuse of government authority." A hearing on the dispute is set for Friday in Superior Court of the District of Columbia. "The request from the DOJ demands that DreamHost hand over 1.3 million visitor IP addresses—in addition to contact information, e-mail content, and photos of thousands of people—in an effort to determine who simply visited the website," DreamHost said in a blog post. "That information could be used to identify any individuals who used this site to exercise and express political speech protected under the Constitution’s First Amendment. That should be enough to set alarm bells off in anyone’s mind." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Apple Watch Series 2. (credit: Valentina Palladino) Aetna's 50,000 employees already use Apple Watches as part of their corporate wellness program, but Aetna may soon extend that perk to its customers. According to a CNBC report, the health insurer has been in talks with Apple to provide free or discounted Apple Watches to its 23 million customers as a member perk. Aetna sees Apple Watches as a way to further encourage its customers to take more interest in leading healthier lives and tracking their diets better. Calling out diet tracking is peculiar since the Apple Watch doesn't offer diet tracking, but there are plenty of third-party apps that function as food diaries on your wrist. Either way, Aetna clearly sees the value in the ease of exercise and diet tracking that the Apple Watch could provide its customers. Aetna reportedly met with Apple executives and hospital chief medical information officers late last week in outhern California to discuss the plan. Apple's Myoung Cha, with the title "special projects, health," led the meeting. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge The reference books that line the shelves of developer Ultra Ultra's modest Copenhagen office offers insight into the aesthetic of its first game, Echo. There's a book of 19th Century Interior Design, and a book of Venetian photography. Prometheus: The Art of the Film and Star Wars provide sci-fi reference points, while Metal Gear Solid, Blame! and Neon Genesis Evangelion—all three of which are represented in some form on the shelf—provide the inspiration for character design. Echo is made up of many familiar parts, but parts that are remixed in a way that makes them feels new. This is fundamental to Echo not just aesthetically, but also mechanically. Unsurprisingly, given Ultra Ultra's staff of ex-IO Interactive Hitman developers, Echo is a stealth game. It learns from your actions to figure out how you play the game. This causes you to second guess your tactics regularly, almost like playing chess against yourself. The third-person camera, and helpfully placed walls and corners that act as cover are all familiar, then, but the overall atmosphere is different. This is much more of a reactionary stealth game than we're used to. As such, this is not a game that—even if you're familiar with the genre—you can simply sleepwalk through. Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Trevor Mahlmann On Monday, after standing down for a month, SpaceX returned to flight from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Mostly sunny, deep-blue skies provided a perfect opportunity to photograph the launch of the Falcon 9 rocket. And armed with four remote cameras, Trevor Mahlmann was there for Ars to capture the scene. The photo galleries in this post showcase the Falcon 9 rocket in flight from launch, into MaxQ, and through the first stage's return to Landing Zone 1 on the Florida coast. When he checked his remotes, Mahlmann found a few surprises—including a few birds other than the Falcon taking a flight of their own during the launch. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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