posted about 8 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / LONDON: A President Trump impersonator poses in a mock-up of the Oval Office to promote the global release of James Patterson and Bill Clinton's book, The President is Missing at Waterloo Station. (credit: Eamonn M. McCormack / Getty Images) If you hadn't heard, former President William Jefferson Clinton and well-established mass-production author James Patterson have collaborated on a novel titled The President is Missing. The book is a political cyber-thriller of sorts, the second such book from a member of the Clinton family—that is, if you count Hillary Clinton's What Happened as one. And just as with with Ms. Clinton's book, The President is Missing gives shout outs to Russian hacking groups, mentioning Fancy Bear by name. The President is Missing is, however, a work of fiction. At 513 pages in hardcover, it's slightly slimmer than the recently-released Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General report on the FBI's conduct during the Clinton email investigation, and certainly better paced—with Patterson's trademarked five-to-10 page chapters cutting it up for easy digestion. The prose is largely marked by Patterson's hand as well, but there are places where Clinton's voice pushes through (and not always for the better)—particularly in the passages of first-person narration from the protagonist, President Jon Duncan, which are laden with Democratic talking points and the moral weight of every presidential decision. The plot, in brief, is this: a Democratic president from a southern state is on the verge of facing an impeachment (sound familiar?) in the midst of a national security crisis. A terrorist mastermind has managed to plant "wiper" malware in every computer in the United States. Racing against time, the president disguises himself, exits the White House through a secret tunnel, and meets in person with the hacker who helped distribute the malware while a crack mercenary hit squad led by a pregnant Bosnian sniper attempts to take the hacker and President Duncan out. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Bethesda) LOS ANGELES—The first Rage didn't generate much buzz amongst fans of first-person shooters when it shipped in 2010, but one of id Software's later titles (the 2016 Doom reboot) made a big splash. With Rage 2, publisher Bethesda is hoping that some of the post-Doom goodwill can elevate this low-profile franchise to popularity. The publisher partnered id's FPS veterans with Avalanche Studios (Just Cause, Mad Max) to make this sequel open world. The first game had a veneer that made it look open-world, even though it was just as enclosed as Doom. I played Rage 2 at Bethesda's E3 booth this week, and unfortunately I can only judge the id Software side of that partnership. The demo I played was a linear, corridor-crawling action shooter experience with no open-world aspects. When I asked a Bethesda rep why that was, he told me that the company wanted Rage fans to be sure that the gunplay is still just as good even though the game is going open world. I think it's more likely that the open-world part of the full game (which is slated to launch in spring 2019) just isn't ready to be played yet. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
Tammy Perez / ATX TV Festival AUSTIN, Texas—If you ask Graham Yost—prolific TV producer with a resume including Band of Brothers, The Pacific, and Justified—accuracy in on-screen military portrayals is a relatively new phenomenon, similar to how tech ranging from the latest hacker tools to futuristic autonomous bots have recently become increasingly grounded in reality. Ground zero for this idea won't surprise any fans of this particular entertainment genre. "In some historical military films, there have been some training of actors, but I think a lot of this really starts with Dale Dye and [Saving] Private Ryan [1998]," Yost says during ATX TV Festival's panel on modern military television. "That set a template for people, and we wouldn't have done Band without it. In fact, when the cast of Band gets together every year, the day they pick for their reunion is the first day of bootcamp. That's when they felt they came together as a unit." Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Eric Bangeman CHICAGO—When you think of Land Rover, what comes to mind? For me, it’s two things: ancient off-roaders trekking about the African savannah in the nature documentaries of my youth, and modern, well-appointed luxury SUVs. Nearly 50 years later, Land Rover is trying to meld the two worlds with a large, two-door SUV that can drive through three feet of water. It’s the Range Rover SV Coupe, and it starts at $295,000. A limited edition—only 999 will be sold—the luxury SUV is intended to evoke the early days of Range Rover (think two-door Series I-III), but it comes with several ultra-luxurious twists. We got our first glimpse of the SV Coupe at the last Geneva Auto Show, but when I found out there was one on display at a Land Rover dealership not far from my house—even with a price tag one digit too large for my tastes—my curiosity was piqued. I spent about a half-hour there being introduced to a pre-production SV Coupe in a look-but-don’t-touch encounter. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A LEGO app using Apple's new ARKit features. (credit: Apple) Augmented reality (AR) has played prominently in nearly all of Apple's events since iOS 11 was introduced, Tim Cook has said he believes it will be as revolutionary as the smartphone itself, and AR was Apple’s biggest focus in sessions with developers at WWDC this year. But why? Most users don’t think the killer app for AR has arrived yet—unless you count Pokémon Go. The use cases so far are cool, but they’re not necessary and they’re arguably a lot less cool on an iPhone or iPad screen than they would be if you had glasses or contacts that did the same things. From this year's WWDC keynote to Apple’s various developer sessions hosted at the San Jose Convention Center and posted online for everyone to view, though, it's clear that Apple is investing heavily in augmented reality for the future. Read 56 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Facebook logo is displayed at the 2018 CeBIT technology trade fair on June 12, 2018 in Hanover, Germany. (credit: Alexander Koerner/Getty Images) Earlier this week, Facebook submitted nearly 500 pages worth of written responses to dozens of US senators’ questions stemming from CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s April 2018 testimony before two committees. In the documents, the company attempted to provide clarity to the lingering concerns many lawmakers had. While seemingly trying to be forthright overall, Facebook was also evasive when responding to certain critical questions. Notably, Facebook declined to promise to share the results of its post-Cambridge Analytica investigation with the public or even Congress. The social media giant also wouldn’t say if it had ever turned off a feature for privacy reasons. Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Bethesda) LOS ANGELES—A true The Elder Scrolls game on mobile? Not exactly. Recently-announced The Elder Scrolls Blades from Bethesda Game Studios is not a massive, free-roaming, systems-based super RPG. Instead, it's a casual dungeon crawler with a gorgeous presentation—and more bells and whistles than your typical mobile RPG. I'm a passionate fan of the franchise, and I played the new mobile game for about a half an hour at Bethesda's E3 booth this week. In a similar way to spinoffs The Elder Scrolls Online and The Elder Scrolls Legends, I recognized the franchise's DNA but I also recognized that the growing game studio is trying something different here. That's not necessarily a bad thing. The streamlined game has top-notch visuals, the combat draws influences from the right places, and it feels entirely native to the device on which it runs. The game I played intrigued me, but I didn't get a sense of what might keep someone coming back for days or weeks after the initial download. Judging from the modes described in the initial announcement, that could be because the most interesting mode—the one in which you play through a story to build a town with non-player characters (NPCs) in it—wasn't on display at the show. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Founder & CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes. (credit: Getty | Gilbert Carrasquillo) Federal prosecutors have indicted Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes and the company’s former president Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani with nine counts of wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Prosecutors claim that the pair defrauded investors, doctors, and patients while promoting and running their now disgraced blood-testing startup. In the new court filing—submitted Thursday, June 14 in the US District Court located in the Northern District of California and unsealed on Friday—prosecutors allege that Holmes and Balwani engaged in a scheme to mislead investors about the state and capabilities of the company’s blood-testing technology and defrauded them out of more than $100 million. The prosecutors also allege that the pair defrauded doctors and patients by knowingly misleading them with false advertising and marketing that stated that their company could provide accurate and reliable health tests on just drops of blood from a finger-prick with their proprietary technology. Later investigations, sparked by reporting by the Wall Street Journal, revealed that Theranos' blood testing tech was flawed and faulty. The findings led to a dizzying downward spiral of lawsuits, regulatory sanctions, and tens of thousands of blood tests results being corrected or voided. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Michael Cohen leaving the United States District Court Southern District of New York on May 30, 2018 in New York City. A letter today revealed that the FBI had recovered over 700 pages of messages and call logs from encrypted messaging apps on one of two BlackBerry phones belonging to Cohen. (credit: Getty Images) In a letter to the presiding judge in the case against Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's long-time personal attorney, the US Attorney's Office for the District of Southern New York revealed today that it had obtained additional evidence for review—including a trove of messages and call logs from WhatsApp and Signal on one of two BlackBerry phones belonging to Cohen. The messages and call logs together constitute 731 pages of potential evidence. The FBI also recovered 16 pages of documents that had been shredded, but it has not yet been able to complete the extraction of data from the second phone. The letter to Judge Kimba Wood stated that "the Government was advised that the FBI’s original electronic extraction of data from telephones did not capture content related to encrypted messaging applications, such as WhatsApp and Signal... The FBI has now obtained this material." This change is likely because of the way the messages are stored by the applications, not because the FBI had to break any sort of encryption on them. WhatsApp and Signal store their messages in encrypted databases on the device, so an initial dump of the phone would have only provided a cryptographic blob. The key is required to decrypt the contents of such a database, and there are tools readily available to access the WhatsApp database on a PC. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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You don't have to go home, but you can't stay at the NIH. (credit: Maya83) The National Institutes of Health has terminated a controversial $100-million study on the health effects of daily drinking that was largely funded by the alcohol industry. The announcement comes after internal NIH investigations found evidence of scientific bias, policy violations, and inappropriate engagement with industry representatives. The findings—announced by the NIH on Friday, June 15—largely support recent investigations by the press that suggested NIH officials and the study’s lead researchers had inappropriately wooed industry and pitched the study as “necessary if alcohol is to be recommended as part of a healthy diet.” Five of the world’s largest alcoholic beverage companies, namely Anheuser-Busch InBev, Diageo, Pernod Ricard, Heineken, and Carlsberg, subsequently agreed to pitch in $67.7 million for the study. Those funds would be provided indirectly through a nongovernmental foundation that raises funds for the NIH. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Disney) Apple announced today that it signed a multi-year content partnership with actress, philanthropist, and talk-show host Oprah Winfrey. The partnership is the latest in a series of moves Apple has made to bolster its original programming efforts. Winfrey's content will be released as part of Apple's lineup, but it's still unclear when and where Apple will debut the bulk of its planned original content. Monetary details of the deal have not be disclosed. According to a report by The Hollywood Reporter, the partnership is non-exclusive, as Winfrey will remain chairman and CEO of OWN, her cable network backed by Discovery. Apple's statement says that Winfrey will create content that embraces "her incomparable ability to connect with audiences around the world." Reports suggest that Winfrey may not only make a certain type of content for Apple—the deal supposedly covers movies, TV shows, books, applications, and more. Snagging a partnership with Winfrey is one of Apple's biggest gets yet in terms of talent, especially considering Netflix and Amazon were reportedly also in talks with the star. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Aurich Lawson) The Department of Justice announced Friday that Ross Ulbricht’s alleged right-hand man—Roger Thomas Clark, also known as "Variety Jones"—has been extradited to the United States after being in custody in Thailand for more than 2.5 years. Federal prosecutors allege that the 54-year-old Canadian was paid "at least hundreds of thousands of dollars" to work for Ulbricht. Over two years ago, Ulbricht was sentenced to life in prison for owning and operating the notorious Silk Road, a website and online marketplace for drugs or other illicit materials. The operation is now defunct. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: PA Images via Getty Images) Several members of the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity at the University of Central Florida, along with that chapter at large, have been sued by a woman who says her former romantic partner published nude photos of her on Facebook without permission. In the lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Orlando on Wednesday, Kathryn Novak said that she had dated lead defendant Brandon Simpson between October 2017 and February 2018. The two were in a long-distance relationship. Periodically, when Novak would visit Simpson, he would film their "private sexual activities." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Brad Parscale, Donald Trump's campaign digital director, arrives at Trump Tower, December 6, 2016. (credit: y Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Data Propria, a brand-new "data and behavioral science company" run by former staff at Cambridge Analytica, has been "quietly working" for the president’s 2020 re-election campaign, according to the Associated Press. Two reporters from the news organization overheard Matt Oczkowski, the company’s president, tell someone in a public place that he and Brad Parscale, who is Donald Trump’s re-election campaign manager, were "doing the president’s work for 2020." Neither Oczkowski nor Parscale immediately responded to Ars’ request for comment on Twitter. Oczkowski "denied a link to the Trump campaign, but acknowledged that his new firm has agreed to do 2018 campaign work for the Republican National Committee," according to the AP. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) Things aren't looking great for the family sedan here in the US. The car-buying public has turned against the traditional three-box silhouette, preferring the crew-cab truck, SUV, and crossover instead. Sedan sales are down for most automakers, and Ford has even taken the drastic step of abandoning it altogether in the very near future. So the 2018 Honda Accord might have a tough road ahead of it when it comes to finding buyers. That's a real shame, as Honda's engineers have done a great job. In fact, I'm not sure any new car has surprised me quite as much this year. Mindful of my reaction to the fully loaded Toyota Camry XSE I failed to gel with earlier this year, I asked Honda to send me whichever Accord had the lowest sticker price. (I was actually most interested in trying the Accord Hybrid, but that one hasn't made it to the press fleet yet.) So I booked a week with the 2018 Accord Sport. This was the 1.5L version, yours for $25,780, not including the delivery charge. And unlike your average press fleet ride, this one didn't fall out of the options tree and hit every branch on the way down. Every feature from the infotainment system to the adaptive cruise control was standard equipment. Jonathan Gitlin Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / More than 200 medications list depression as a potential adverse effect. (credit: Getty | ullstein bild) More than a third of Americans are estimated to be taking at least one prescription medication that carries the risk of depression, including suicidal symptoms, as a possible adverse effect—and they may have no idea—according to a study published this week in JAMA. The study is an observational one, meaning it can only identify associations and not whether common drugs are causing depression or suicide in people. Still, the researchers found some worrying links between the use of common medications and the potential for depression. Most notably, the researchers found that those taking three or more medications with depression risks had a greater chance of self-reporting depressive symptoms on a nine-question survey. Their rate of self-reported depressive symptoms was 15.3 percent, about double the rate reported by those taking just one drug with a risk of depression and about triple the rate of those taking no medications with risk of depression. This is particularly concerning, the researchers suggest, because patients may not make a connection between their depressive symptoms and the drugs they’re taking. Drugs with risks of depression are very common, they may not have clear warning labels, and some can even be purchased as over-the-counter medications. The most common of them are drugs such as hormonal birth control, beta-blockers (used for conditions such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, and migraines), and proton-pump inhibitors (used for acid reflux). Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) Those who attempted to use Apple Maps this morning during their commutes were met with a frustrating situation—Apple's navigation app hasn't been working properly for much of the day. Problems appeared around 7am PT/10am ET, resulting in errors when users searched for route directions and for specific locations. The message "Directions not available—route information is not available at this moment" appears when searching for directions, and searching for specific places like "Penn Station" or "JFK Airport" yields a "No results found" message. The outages affect all forms of Apple Maps, including those on Apple Watches and in vehicles with CarPlay, for users across the US, Canada, and other countries. Those using an iPhone or iPad can choose to use another navigation app like Google Maps or Waze, but those who rely on CarPlay and other systems that don't offer an alternative mapping service will be out of luck. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / "Did you feel that?" (credit: OIST) There are enough seismometers around these days to detect and locate nearly all earthquakes on land, except the most minuscule ones. The seafloor is another story. It’s expensive and difficult to maintain seismometers at the bottom of the ocean, so our coverage is pretty sparse. Earthquakes smaller than a magnitude four won’t register in many places—and “many places” in the ocean means a large portion of the planet. A group of researchers led by Giuseppe Marra of the UK’s National Physical Laboratory accidentally stumbled on an inexpensive way to fill in many of the gaps. They were working on advanced fiber optic links capable of connecting things like next-gen atomic clocks around Europe. At this level of sensitivity, any vibrations near the cable introduce noise in the signal, which is generally a nuisance to be overcome. But while running an experiment on a UK cable in August 2016, they realized the noise in the line was coming from a magnitude 6.0 earthquake in Italy. As the seismic waves pass through the fiber, the resulting distortion slightly delays the signal, causing a measurable shift in the peaks and troughs of the oscillating light wave. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson) AT&T yesterday completed its acquisition of Time Warner Inc., two days after a federal judge ruled against a Department of Justice (DOJ) attempt to block the deal. The DOJ could still appeal the ruling, but it agreed not to seek a stay pending appeal, allowing the merger to be completed. You can expect more personalized advertisements as AT&T combines a major programmer with its DirecTV, home broadband, and mobile services. By adding Warner Bros., HBO, and Turner to AT&T's TV and broadband services, the combined company will "bring a fresh approach to how the media and entertainment industry works for consumers, content creators, distributors and advertisers," AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said in the merger completion announcement. AT&T will "offer customers a differentiated, high-quality, mobile-first entertainment experience," he said. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Friday morning was going pretty well, all things considered. I was at my desk, editing some photos and having breakfast. Then Lee Hutchinson pinged me on Slack and ruined it all. "It’s even worse than we could have possibly imagined," said my boss. "And, as Han Solo said, I can imagine a lot." Accompanying this missive was news about George Lucas' plans for Star Wars episodes 7-9, and my god would they have sucked. Forget the First Order or Porgs, forget BB-8 and Poe Dameron. Imagine, if you can, our heroes shrinking down like the Fantastic Voyage to go meet some midichlorians. There, now your breakfast is ruined, too. The info comes from an interview between Lucas and another billionaire filmmaker, James Cameron. The latter made a series about science fiction, and the transcript of their interview was recently published in the companion book. The bombshell drops after a brief insight into Lucas' view of the environmental damage we're causing the Earth. "We're not going to save the planet," Lucas regularly tells people, and follows up by saying we'll end up like Mars. But Mars is fine, he thinks, and is sure we'll find life there. And in the rest of the solar system too. This thought of microscopic alien life spurs a memory. "Everybody hated it in Phantom Menace [when] we started talking about midicholorians," Lucas says. Uh-huh, we sure did. Because it was a really dumb idea. What follows should make every Star Wars fan send a note of gratitude to whomever at Disney decided to buy the franchise and take it away and out from under Lucas' control. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Voyage operates low-speed self-driving taxis in two retirement communities. (credit: Voyage) There's near-universal agreement that Google spinoff Waymo is the leading company in the driverless-vehicle business. And Waymo's strategy for developing fully driverless cars is very expensive. Before launching a commercial driverless car service, Waymo needs to convince itself—and the world—that its cars will be at least as safe as human drivers. That has meant racking up millions of test miles on public roads, a process that has taken several years and cost Waymo well over $1 billion. Waymo's more established competitors—including Uber, GM's Cruise, and the Ford-aligned Argo.ai—are pursuing a similar strategy. But a number of startups is also trying to build fully autonomous cars. And many of these companies simply don't have the money it takes to follow Waymo's lead. They need a different strategy—one that allows them to bring a product to market more quickly and at lower cost. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Square-Enix) LOS ANGELES—French game development studio Dontnod Entertainment didn't make waves with its first big triple-A release, Remember Me. It took scaling down the scope of its projects to achieve real success. That success came with critically acclaimed adventure game Life is Strange, which we at Ars liked quite a bit. Dontnod and publisher Square-Enix announced The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit this week at E3. It's a two-hour-long, free-to-download game for PS4, Xbox One, and PC that takes place in the same universe as Life is Strange. It's not the first Life is Strange spinoff. Last year, a multi-part prequel series called Before the Storm was released. But while that tied directly into the events of the first batch of Life is Strange episodes, Captain Spirit is more tangentially related. Still, Dontnod Executive Producer Luc Baghadoust said that there will be hints in Captain Spirit's conclusion about what to expect from Life is Strange 2. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The galaxy merger, with an artist's representation of a star being drawn into a black hole. (credit: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI) The supermassive black holes at the center of mature galaxies tend to be quiet. Their activity will have blasted away most of the nearby gas and dust, and any stars that were in unstable orbits were likely to have been torn to shreds long in the past. But on occasion, the chaotic nature of complex orbital interactions should bring a star close enough to experience what's called a tidal disruption event—the star is ripped apart by the black hole's gravity. We've done modeling of what a tidal disruption should look like, and it's clear that it ought to produce copious numbers of energetic photons. The problem is that we've not seen many events like this. Now, taking advantage of a decade of observations, researchers who recently published in Science have spotted what seems to be a black hole tearing apart a star and converting some of it into a jet of material traveling at a quarter of the speed of light. The reason we haven't seen it before? Rather than showing up at the wavelengths we expected, the event was visible in the infrared. Merger The story starts all the way back in 2005, when researchers identified a transient light source, meaning something that was plainly detectable hadn't been there in earlier images. The source of the signal was traced to an unusual object: Arp 299, which contains two galaxies in the process of merging. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Time to save the day. Again. (credit: Disney / Pixar) The superhero film industry would be wise to look at exactly what Disney-Pixar’s Incredibles 2 has accomplished. Comic book hero sequels typically hinge on the boring formula of a hero, after riding the highs of success, succumbing to a predictable “even more powerful than me” downfall. But this film has a particularly impressive director: Brad Bird, the animation-storytelling wunderkind behind the emotional likes of The Iron Giant, Ratatouille, and the original Incredibles. Default tropes won’t cut it. Thus, Incredibles 2 wins by playing its established characters against each other in delightful ways, all while focusing Pixar’s special-effects portfolio on new and exciting cartoon antics. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / We need your help to produce a new newsletter to chronicle the dynamic launch industry. (credit: Aurich Lawson/background image United Launch Alliance) Welcome to Edition 1.04 of the Rocket Report! This collaborative effort with readers of Ars Technica seeks to diversify our coverage of the blossoming launch industry. The Rocket Report publishes as a newsletter on Thursday and on this website every Friday morning. We welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe in the box below. Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar. Did a rocket launch from Washington state? Early on the morning of Sunday, June 10, a photographer in northern Washington captured a 20-second exposure of what looked just like a rocket or missile launch. But there are no known launchpads nearby. Inquiries to a nearby naval station on Whidbey Island were responded to with a simple, "It wasn't us." Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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