posted less than an hour ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Steven Brewer / Flickr) Earlier this year, we covered an attempt by Arizona's superintendent of Public Instruction to alter the state's science education standards. Superintendent Diane Douglas seemingly directed her staff to edit a set of standards prepared by educators so that numerous mentions of the word "evolution" were eliminated. Climate change was later diminished in a similar manner. But since that time, the news has been almost uniformly good. Superintendent Douglas lost in a primary election to a fellow Republican, her edits to the school standards were rejected by the state school board, and a last-ditch effort to swap in educational guidelines from a religious college wasn't even given serious consideration. As we noted in our earlier coverage, Douglas has in the past suggested that schools teach intelligent design, which is the idea that life arose and diversified due to the intervention of an intelligent agent rather than evolution. It's an idea that was generated for religious purposes, and its teaching has been ruled an imposition of religion by the courts. She has also misunderstood the status of a scientific theory in suggesting that it reflected the idea that our knowledge of evolution is uncertain. These beliefs seem to have motivated her intervention into the science standards. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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HP HP's premium convertibles have consistently won over our hearts for the past couple of years. Now, the company is updating both the 13-inch and 15-inch Spectre x360 machines with more security features, more powerful CPU and GPU options, and an edgier design. Let's start with the Spectre x360 13: the fourth generation of the 13-inch two-in-one is slightly thinner and lighter than the previous model, now measuring 14.5mm thick and weighing 2.9 pounds. The now-faceted edges complement the jewelry-like gold finish, and the back corners near the hinge have a new angled design. HP made use of the angled corners by sticking an extra USB-C port on one of them. Whether open or closed, the Spectre x360 13 can connect to peripherals or charge via that extra USB-C port. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 3 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / An Oculus Rift photo montage from Oculus Connect. (credit: Kyle Orland) Oculus has reaffirmed it's working on a new version of its PC-based Rift hardware. That affirmation follows a report from TechCrunch suggesting the cancellation of the "Rift 2" was behind the sudden departure of Oculus co-founder and former CEO Brendan Iribe, announced just yesterday. Iribe, who stepped down as CEO to help lead Oculus' PC/Rift division in late 2016, announced his departure from the company on Facebook Monday. Iribe said he was "deeply proud and grateful for" the work he'd done with Oculus and that "although we're still far from delivering the magical smart glasses we all dream about, now they are nearly within our reach." That said, leaving the company "will be the first real break I've taken in over 20 years," he wrote. "It's time to recharge, reflect, and be creative." The TechCrunch report, though, cites an unnamed source "close to the matter" in saying Iribe had actually grown frustrated with "fundamentally different views on the future of Oculus that grew deeper over time" and was concerned about a "race to the bottom" in terms of performance. That suggests Iribe may not have been happy with the increased focus on the recently announced Oculus Quest, a $400 standalone headset powered by a mobile system-on-a-chip. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft is seen in this false-color infrared image as it launched with Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Nick Hague of NASA and Flight Engineer Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, on Thursday, October 11, 2018. (credit: NASA) Less than two weeks ago, a Soyuz rocket took off with a Russian cosmonaut and a NASA astronaut riding in a Soyuz capsule. The launch proceeded normally for about two minutes until the rocket experienced a problem, and one of the Soyuz's emergency escape systems fired automatically and pulled the crew vehicle away from the booster. After a few seconds of rapid acceleration, the crew capsule carrying Aleksey Ovchinin and Nick Hague made a relatively normal, safe return to Earth. In the wake of the accident, NASA officials expressed confidence in the ability of the Russian space agency to identify the problem with the Soyuz rocket and implement a fix. "It's my speculation that they will put a lot of resources into trying to understand exactly what happened," Kenny Todd, the International Space Station's mission operations integration manager, said at the time. "I would anticipate that they would try to do that sooner rather than later." Russian officials have said that they intend to complete their investigation of the Soyuz failure by the end of October, and their report will include recommendations on how to fix the problem. Anonymous sources quoted in Russian media say the problem occurred because one of the Soyuz rocket's side-mounted boosters was improperly attached to the rocket core. This booster struck the core when it was supposed to fall away during launch, triggering a launch abort. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A Charter Spectrum vehicle. (credit: Charter) Charter Communications is raising prices throughout its 41-state cable territory in November, the company confirmed. "For a customer with a full suite of [Charter] Spectrum services, [the price increases] could total an additional $7.61 a month," or $91.32 a year, the Asheville Citizen Times reported yesterday. Charter confirmed the price increases when contacted by Ars today, saying that the change "takes effect in November throughout our service area." Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: TechBargains) Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains, we have another round of deals to share with you today. Headlining the list today is an Audible deal for Amazon Prime members: select Prime members can now get three free months of Audible, the company's audiobook subscription service. That includes three credits for three audiobooks of your choosing that you can keep even if you decide to cancel after the trial. Another great deal saves you $200 on a gaming laptop. Now you can get an Acer Predator Helios 300 notebook, featuring a hexacore Core i7 CPU, a GTX 1060 GPU, 16GB of RAM, and 256GB SSD, for $1,099. We also have the lowest price we've seen on a SanDisk Ultra 128GB microSD card with adaptor: $23.25, down from its list price of $33.79. Check out those and a bunch of other deals on mesh router systems, robot vacuums, gaming consoles, printers, and more below. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 4 hours ago on ars technica
Firefox 63, out today, includes the first iteration of what Mozilla is calling Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP), a feature to improve privacy and stop your activity across the Web from being tracked. Tracking cookies store some kind of unique identifier that represents your browser. The cookie is tied to a third-party domain—the domain of the tracking company, rather than the site you're visiting. Each site you visit that embeds the tracking cookie will allow the tracking company to see the sites you visit and, using that unique identifier, cross-reference different visits to different sites to build a picture of your online behavior. The new option to block third-party tracking cookies but permit other third-party cookies. (credit: Mozilla) Firefox has long had the ability to block all third-party cookies, but this is a crude solution, and many sites will break if all third-party cookies are prohibited. The new EPT option works as a more selective block on tracking cookies; third-party cookies still work in general, but those that are known to belong to tracking companies are blocked. For the most part, sites will retain their full functionality, just without undermining privacy at the same time. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 5 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Chris Anderson (left) doing drone stuff. (credit: Chris Anderson & 3D Robotics / WikiMedia Commons) This week, we’re serializing another episode of the After On Podcast here on Ars. Our guest was the editor-in-chief of Wired magazine for twelve years—until he did something quite unusual for an editor and started a high-profile, venture-backed startup. Specifically, 3D Robotics—which played a genuinely historic role in the rise of consumer drones (if a phenomenon that young gets to have historic players). Chris Anderson doesn’t have the background you might expect from someone with his résumé. For one thing, he dropped or failed out of multiple schools when he was young. For another, he played bass for R.E.M. (and there’s something of a twist to this fact—but you’ll need to hear to our conversation to find out what it is). We’ll be running this interview in three installments this week. You can access today’s installment via our embedded audio player, or by reading the accompanying transcript (both of which are below). Today, Anderson and I open by talking about his path from being a bohemian layabout to studying computational Physics at Berkeley, and finally to the pinnacle of the magazine world. We then discuss how a weekend LEGO Mindstorm project with his kids led him cobble together a very early consumer-class drone. Doing this led him to discover the emerging realm of homebrew drone makers. Their online community fascinated him, and he soon became a leader within it. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Bethesda Softworks has a bit of a reputation for epic-scale worlds that are chock full of spectacular glitches—we noted that Fallout: New Vegas was "buggy as hell" way back in 2010, for instance. With the impending launch of the online-only Fallout 76, including a private beta test starting today, Bethesda seems to be leaning into this image a bit. In a Twitter post yesterday evening, Bethesda seemed to be explicitly lowering expectations with a warning that "all new spectacular issues" will surely pop up come opening day: Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Alex Jones in Cleveland in 2016. (credit: Brooks Kraft/ Getty Images) Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his company InfoWars may have had their accounts yanked from Twitter, but that has not erased their presence from the platform. According to a CNN report, Twitter took action on Monday and suspended 18 additional accounts associated with Jones and InfoWars. The decision came after the Daily Beast reported last week that numerous accounts were still sharing InfoWars' content. All of the newly suspended accounts were "under the InfoWars umbrella," according to a statement from a Twitter spokesperson provided to CNET. Some of those suspended include the InfoWars Store account and the InfoWars "Real News" with David Knight show account. Twitter claims that it banned the accounts in part because they were trying to circumvent the initial ban of Alex Jones' and InfoWars' primary accounts by sharing content from the conspiracy-theory outlet. The accounts reportedly received "numerous violations and warnings" before finally being suspended. This deluge of suspensions comes after Twitter reportedly already suspended five other accounts for disseminating InfoWars content. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 7 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Cyber airmen cybering in the cyberspace. (credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Karol) The US Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) is engaging in a campaign to deter further disinformation operations by Russian operatives—individuals like those employed through Russian companies as part of the "Project Lakhta" program described in last week's Justice Department indictment of Elena Alekseevna Khusyaynova—by letting them know that they are being watched. According to a report from the New York Times' Julian E. Barnes, USCYBERCOM has directed operations to identify, track, and directly message individuals involved in disinformation campaigns associated with the upcoming midterm elections. The Cyber Command operation, described by unnamed senior military officials, is limited in scope and does not involve directly threatening Russian operatives. The measured steps are meant to avoid an escalation of operations by Russia to more serious computer-based attacks on US information systems and infrastructure. The operation reflects a more aggressive stance outlined in President Trump's recent executive order on national cyber strategy, which called for building a stronger deterrent. The new policy was accompanied by a loosening of Obama administration limits on use of offensive "cyber weapons" and a more "offense-forward" posture in information and network operations. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 8 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The view of the Athenian Acropolis in Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey shows ancient Greece in all its colorful glory. (credit: Screengrab courtesy of Dr. Kira Jones) When Assassin's Creed: Odyssey debuted earlier this month, it received widespread praise for the quality of its world-building and narrative. Some historians say it also deserves high marks for its attention to historical detail in recreating ancient Greece. Notably, the game showcases colorfully painted statues, temples, and tombs dotted about the virtual city. Yes, it's true: contrary to all those pristine, gleaming white marble sculptures we see all the time in museums—the ones we long thought defined the Western aesthetic of the Classical era—Greco-Roman art was awash in color. Art historians have known this for awhile, of course, but the knowledge hasn't really moved beyond the confines of that rarefied world. That might change, now that it's a feature in a hugely popular game. The 11th major installment in the popular gaming franchise, Assassin's Creed: Odyssey takes place in in year 431 BCE, detailing a fictional history of the Peloponnesian War that pitted Athens against Sparta. Ubisoft's development team took their world-building so seriously, they brought on a historical advisor to help get the details just right. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Video shot by Sean Dacaney and edited by Evan Watkin. Click here for transcript. Welcome back to "War Stories," an ongoing video series where we sit down with game designers and ask them to tell us about game development challenges that almost sank their projects. In previous instances, we've been lucky enough to get some time with the likes of Lord British (of Ultima fame) and Paul Neurath (of Thief), among others. This time, we've scored big: we tracked down the creators of the Star Control series—none other than Fred Ford and Paul Reiche III. Star Control was a fun little Space Wars-alike, but it's the second game in the series that truly became famous. Star Control II is the last—and many would say best—entry in the sorely missed Starflight-style space exploration/RPG genre that flourished in the 1980s and '90s. That pedigree is strongly represented in the game's form—in fact, Ford and Reiche even had the assistance of Starflight alum Greg Johnson in fleshing out aspects of SC2's design and dialog. Control them stars For the few Ars readers who might not have played Star Control 2 (or its later open source re-release, The Ur-Quan Masters), it might be difficult to see why I'm so effusive in praising a game that turns 26 years old next month. And I admit to no small amount of personal bias here, as SC2 is one of my favorite games of all time. But the game is just so damn good—from the tight plotting, to the wonderfully written and varied alien dialog, and especially the beyond-addicting two player melee combat with hilariously unbalanced ships. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 9 hours ago on ars technica
Dell Today, Dell announced availability of new models in its Latitude Rugged and Latitude Rugged Extreme laptop lines: the 5420, 5424, and 7424. These follow up on the previous 4414 and 7414 models. The line is aimed at professional users working in factories, on offshore oil-rigs, in the military, in disaster-relief situations, and the like. Dell says it chose the Latitude brand, which is usually targeted at the enterprise space, in part because it aims to align the configurations of its Rugged and Extreme Rugged lines with those of the standard Latitude line in such a way that administrators can use the same image to deploy and manage systems across product lines. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 21 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Last week, Twitter released data from accounts that had been identified as part of Russian and Iranian influence campaigns, including efforts by Russia to influence the political climate in the United States before, during, and after the 2016 presidential campaign. Hours later, the US Department of Justice announced the indictment of a 44-year-old Russian woman accused of directing ongoing influence campaigns on social media platforms targeting the US midterm congressional elections. Both Twitter's data and the indictment are data points in the history of "Project Lakhta," a wide-ranging campaign to shape the political and cultural discussions in Russia, Ukraine, Western Europe, and the United States. The campaign started began in earnest in 2014, though the Internet Research Agency's efforts date back even further in Russia. The Internet Research Agency, also known as the IRA, was but one of several organizations enlisted in these efforts; the operation also enlisted a number of media organizations, including the Federal News Agency (FAN). FAN operates the "USA Really" propaganda site, which was launched earlier this year, as well as associated social media accounts that have been leveraged as part of the campaign. According to the FBI affidavit that led to the indictment of Elena Alekseevna Khusyaynova last week, Khusyanova managed the financing of the organizations under the Project Lakhta umbrella and funneled $35 million to various entities to fund social media and propaganda operations. These activities in the US included covering the expenditures of "activists," purchasing advertisements on social media platforms with faked US identities, operating proxy servers in the US, and "promoting news postings on social networks." Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 23 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Hubble Space Telescope above Earth, photographed during STS-125, Servicing Mission 4, May 2009. (credit: NASA) After NASA's Hubble Space Telescope entered "safe" mode about two weeks ago, its operations team has been scrambling to bring a balky gyroscope back online. Now, the space agency says it believes it has fixed the problem. "The Hubble operations team plans to execute a series of tests to evaluate the performance of the gyro under conditions similar to those encountered during routine science observations, including moving to targets, locking on to a target, and performing precision pointing," NASA said in a news release. "After these engineering tests have been completed, Hubble is expected to soon return to normal science operations." Ground operators put the telescope into a stable configuration earlier this month after one of the three active gyros that help point the telescope failed. According to NASA, the gyro that failed last week had been exhibiting end-of-life behavior for about a year, and its failure was not unexpected. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 24 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / PANAMA CITY, Fla. - OCTOBER 19: Mark Mauldin hangs a sign near the front of his property expressing his dissatisfaction with his Verizon cell phone service following Hurricane Michael, which slammed into the Florida Panhandle on October 10. (credit: Getty Images | Scott Olson ) Verizon Wireless service is back up and running "essentially everywhere" throughout the area hit by Hurricane Michael, the company said today. "Verizon engineers and fiber crews have been working around the clock after unprecedented damage to our fiber infrastructure caused by the most intense storm in history to make landfall in the Panhandle," Verizon's announcement said. "Services for our customers and first responders are back up and running today, providing wireless coverage essentially everywhere it was before Hurricane Michael hit." Verizon had faced repeated criticism from Florida Governor Rick Scott, who said Verizon lagged behind AT&T and other carriers in restoring service after the Category 4 hurricane made landfall on October 10. Scott last week suggested that Verizon misled the public about its post-hurricane recovery, saying that Verizon's claim of covering "98 percent of Florida" was only accurate because it included customers "hundreds of miles away from impacted areas." Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 24 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Never fear, the... Justice Syndicate is here? (credit: Traveller's Tales) Traveller’s Tales has been developing licensed Lego games for more than a decade now, and though the series has made some leaps and bounds, the core formula remains the same: jump into a familiar pop-culture universe, embody Lego-fied versions of your favorite characters, and play through a story that involves action-adventure gameplay and lots of scenery smashing. Lego DC Super-Villains is comforting in its familiarity, like a favorite meal that always makes you feel better. The character creator adds a new mechanic while fitting neatly into the story, and there’s enough content to keep players occupied for dozens of hours. It’s not particularly challenging, and gameplay remains largely the same. But there’s enough heart and humor to make Lego DC Super-Villains an enjoyable adventure. No more heroes Unlike the previous Lego games in the DC universe, Lego DC Super-Villains puts you squarely on the side of chaos, working alongside baddies like the Joker, Scarecrow, and Harley Quinn. When a mysterious group from an alternate Earth pops up and banishes the Justice League, it’s open season for the villains of Metropolis and Gotham—at least until the so-called “Justice Syndicate” starts showing its true colors. Evil colors. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Media reports published today that Intel is ending work on the 10nm process are untrue. We are making good progress on 10nm. Yields are improving consistent with the timeline we shared during our last earnings report. — Intel News (@intelnews) October 22, 2018 Earlier today, it was reported that Intel is cancelling its troublesome 10nm manufacturing process. In an unusual response, the company has tweeted an official denial of the claims. Development of Intel's 10nm process has been difficult. Intel was very ambitious with its 10nm process—planning to increase the transistor density by something like 2.7 times—and wanted to use a number of exotic technologies to get there. It turned out that the company had bitten off more than it could chew: yields were very low, which is to say, most of the chips being manufactured were defective. In a bid to recover, Intel is now striving for a less ambitious scaling (though still more than double the transistor density of its 14nm process). It has one oddball processor on the market: the Cannon Lake core i3-8121U. Unusually for this kind of processor, the integrated GPU has been disabled. That's because they're not working; the GPUs use different designs for their logic than the CPUs, and these designs are proving particularly troublesome. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Transdev) The Trump administration has taken a hands-off approach to regulating self-driving cars, but on Friday federal regulators decided that one self-driving car project had gone too far. In a sharply-worded statement, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it has ordered the French transportation company Transdev to stop transporting schoolchildren in a self-driving vehicle in Florida. Transdev's pilot project in Babcock Ranch, a planned community, was quite modest. On Fridays, Transdev's electric shuttle would take a group of elementary-aged children to school, then take them home later in the day. The vehicle had a safety driver on board. The route was short enough that kids walked or rode their bikes to school the other four days of the week, according to a spokeswoman for Babcock Ranch. "The shuttle travels at a top speed of 8mph, with the potential to reach speeds of 30mph once the necessary infrastructure is complete," an August press release stated. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Hackers could briefly create a scene like this at will even in targets' single-player games of Grand Theft Auto V. Over the years, we've written a lot about the apparently easy-to-hack Grand Theft Auto Online and Rockstar's many, many, many attempts to prevent cheaters from ruining the online experience for legitimate players. Last week, though, players reported that trolls were briefly able to mess with the single-player portion of Grand Theft Auto V through an exploit targeting players' Rockstar Social Club accounts. You can see an example of the single-player hacking in action in this Twitch clip, where a troll follows user SnowieLive after kicking him from an online session and continually kills his avatar in the single-player mode. "You're not safe in single player," the hacker says in a somewhat on-the-nose message in the clip. Similar clips from GTA speedrunner FriendlyBaron show hackers loading jets into his path and simply killing his character in mid-drive during a run. Players that track the state of cheating tools in the Grand Theft Auto universe noted last week that one popular "mod menu" was advertising the newfound ability to discover an online player's Rockstar ID, a hidden string of numbers associated with their Rockstar Social Club account. With that number, hackers using that tool could take control of an online user's single-player games, with new abilities including "Rockstar admin kick, Network kick, Ragdoll, Fake money correction, Kill, Spawn vehicle, and send crew message." Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Literature's most famous haunted house is back for the best adaptation yet. (credit: Steve Dietl/Netflix) The quintessential ghost story is back to haunt your dreams with the recent debut of The Haunting of Hill House, Netflix's new miniseries adaptation of Shirley Jackson's classic 1959 gothic horror novel. Frankly, it's less an adaptation than a bold reimagining that still remains true to the rich metaphorical depths of the titular source material. No less an authority than Stephen King cited the original Haunting of Hill House as one of the finest horror novels of the late 20th century in his nonfiction overview of the genre, Danse Macabre. His 2002 miniseries Rose Red was an homage of sorts. Jackson's novel has already been adapted twice for the big screen: once in 1963 and again in 1999. The former film is considered a classic. The less said about the overwrought 1999 adaptation, the better, despite a stellar cast that included Liam Neeson, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Owen Wilson, and Lili Taylor. This latest version is the best by far. Even though it veers sharply from the original storyline, there are sufficient nods to the novel throughout to keep the staunchest fan happy. The Haunting of Hill House offers up plenty of bone-chilling horror, but like all the best ghost stories, that horror is rooted in the complexities of the human psyche. At its heart, this is a story of family trauma and dysfunction, turning Jackson's psychological subtext into text. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Crowded conditions at the Andersonville POW camp. (credit: US National Archives) "It is hard on our men held in Southern prisons not to exchange them, but it is humanity to those left in the ranks to fight our battles." – General Ulysses S. Grant, August 18, 1864. General Grant did not halt the exchange of Union and Confederate soldiers between the summers of 1863 and 1864, although this quotation—chiseled into a monument on the site of Camp Sumter military prison in Andersonville, Georgia—is often cited as evidence that he did. The exchange halted as a consequence of the Emancipation Proclamation. Black Union soldiers started enlisting in increasing numbers, and the Confederates refused to trade them along with their white officers. Once the exchange stopped, prisons got more and more crowded and more and more squalid. Malnutrition and disease were rampant. And, according to a new study, the consequences lasted for generations. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Can this 3D printer really make rocket parts? (credit: Relativity Space) No one could argue that a company like SpaceX has one of the most cutting-edge rocket factories in the world, as the company builds some of the most advanced boosters launching today. And yet much of the manufacturing is still done by hand, at various work stations. Humans remain integral to building rockets. However, a new company called Relativity Space is among those trying to radically automate the process. The California-based company is perhaps best known for its goal to print the entirety of its boosters, from payload fairings to the engines, with additive manufacturing. Equally revolutionary is the company's goal to automate the production of rockets. To that end, Relativity recently announced the hiring of Tobias Duschl, who has worked for the last six years as senior director of global business operations for Tesla, the electric vehicle company. He will run operations for Relativity as it transitions from development to commercial spaceflight operations over the next three to four years. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Enlarge / An image of the Hawthorne test tunnel under construction. (credit: The Boring Company) On Sunday night, Tesla, SpaceX, and Boring Company CEO Elon Musk tweeted "The first tunnel is almost done," adding that the tunnel will open December 10. "The first tunnel" refers to the initial tunnel that The Boring Company has been digging under the streets of Hawthorne. Work began on that project around the start of 2017, when Musk moved excavation equipment into what was then SpaceX's tiny employee parking lot and began digging. Since then, Musk has purchased a boring machine to tunnel under the Los Angeles neighborhood with the hope of making modifications to the machinery that will allow tunnels to be dug more quickly. According to The Boring Company website, the Hawthorne tunnel "leaves SpaceX property (parking lot east of Crenshaw Boulevard and south of 120th Street), turns west under 120th Street, and remains under 120th Street for up to 2-miles." Musk tweeted last night that pods in the tunnel will achieve a top speed of 155mph (250km/h). The CEO added that there will be an opening event on the evening of December 10 and free rides for the public on the following day. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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