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On Saturday, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department released dash and body cam footage of an officer killing a black man on Tuesday. The release of the footage by Chief Kerr Putney comes amid widespread calls for the footage to become public, and two days after the chief said he would not divulge it because he never said the investigation of Keith Lamont Scott's death would involve "full transparency." The new footage confirms what the chief said Thursday, that it does not show "absolute, definitive visual evidence that could confirm that a person is pointing a gun." Tuesday's shooting has sparked violent protests, requiring the North Carolina governor to declare a state of emergency, and to call in the national guard. Police shot the 43-year-old Smith outside an apartment complex while serving a warrant on somebody else. The authorities said the 194th black man killed by US police this year had a handgun and refused to drop it. In a two-minute video the dead man's wife took with a mobile phone in the moments leading up to the shooting, an officer is overheard yelling, "Drop the gun." Chief Putney told a news conference on Saturday that police saw marijuana, and a weapon in Scott's car, and said, "uh oh, this is a safety issue for us and the public." Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / There are a few hidden areas in The Plaguelands, but not many. You’d think a game wouldn’t still be able to disappoint me so much, two years after its initial release. After so long, I’ve either given up on a game or still find it immensely satisfying. But after a week with Destiny: Rise of Iron, the fourth expansion to Bungie’s endlessly injured shooter, I’m mostly befuddled. That’s not just because the expansion is lighter on content than I could have imagined, but because it seems light on care. Nearly everything in Rise of Iron smacks of recycled content. The gear, the strikes, the enemies, and even the writing all feel like things we've seen before, many times over. It’s as though whatever Bungie employees not working on Destiny 2 were forced to cobble together one last dollop of content for the original game so 2016 wouldn't pass without something they could sell. Almost nothing is actually new, and what is new rarely feels that way. The Plaguelands That recycled feeling is ever-present in The Plaguelands, the new in-game region for Rise of Iron. This marks the second time Bungie has bolted a new zone onto the main game’s original four. While The Taken King's Dreadnought was substantially different from anything else in Destiny—all bones, breathing walls, and slimy indoor cathedrals—The Plaguelands are just an extension of an existing locale. They look nearly identical to what Destiny fans already know as The Cosmodrome—all snow, rusted-out icebreakers, and jagged metal strewn across post-apocalyptic Russia. Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Peter Opaskar) Cursing is cool. It just is. Ask anyone. In his new book What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves, Benjamin Bergen—a linguist in the Cognitive Science Department at UC San Diego—tries to explain exactly why cussing is so amazing. His self-described “book-length love letter to profanity” defines what makes a swearword and why using one feels so great. Although What the F has its share of silliness, it’s full of cute tidbits you can drop at cocktail parties, like how all Samoan babies’ first words are “eat s#!t” and how Japanese completely lacks curse words. Japanese people with Tourette’s syndrome blurt out insults and childlike words for genitalia that are generally considered impolite and inappropriate, but not profane. Across unrelated languages—Bergen mentions Cantonese, Russian, Finnish, American and British Sign Languages, Hebrew, Arabic, Italian, German, and Quebecois French in addition to English—curses largely fall into four categories. There are words that deal with prayer, the divine, and the supernatural (the word “profane,” after all, is the counterpoint to the word “sacred”). There are also words that deal with sex, various sex acts, the people who perform them, and the body parts involved. Other words cover the act of excreting, as well as the excretions themselves. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our regular look at tabletop games. Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com. PS4 unplugged. Perhaps surprisingly, tabletop games based on video game franchises are not always terrible. Most, in fact, have a history of being fairly respectable. But not every video game needs a tabletop version, and video game fans should be wary of snapping up a board game just because it features their favorite digital world. When I first heard that publisher Cool Mini Or Not was releasing a card game based on From Software’s beloved PS4 exclusive Bloodborne, I rolled my eyes. “Card game” isn’t the first place my mind would go if I were designing a tabletop game based on the white-knuckled, crushingly difficult third-person action of Bloodborne. Then again, I’m not award-winning designer Eric Lang. Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: NRDC) TV manufacturers Samsung, LG, and Vizio build their TVs to pass federal energy-use tests while allowing the TVs to consume much more energy when they operate outside of the narrow test parameters, a report from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) claims. This week, the environmental group published the results of a study it did with third-party efficiency consulting firm Ecos Research (PDF). The study found that many of the TVs they tested used more than double the amount of energy listed on the yellow EnergyGuide label every time the TV was used under conditions not tested by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) energy-use test. EnergyGuide labels also help determine whether a TV qualifies for an EnergyStar label, which indicates whether the TV is among the more energy-efficient in its group. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Luckey (right) speaks at an event promoting VR games (and not Donald Trump). (credit: Sam Machkovech) Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is apologizing for "the impact my actions are having on the [VR] community," even as he seeks to minimize his support for a pro-Trump political group and push back against reports that he was behind some of the group's controversial online posts. In a public Facebook post late last night, Luckey confirmed earlier reports that he donated $10,000 to Nimble America, the self-described "shitposting," meme-making group behind controversial The_Donald subreddit (though he says he has "no plans" to donate more). Luckey said he thought the group had "fresh ideas on how to communicate with young voters through the use of several billboards." That includes one such billboard in the Pittsburgh area that called Hillary Clinton "too big to jail," according to reports. In the wake of controversy surrounding that revelation, Luckey said he was "deeply sorry that my actions are negatively impacting the perception of Oculus and its partners," and that "my actions were my own and do not represent Oculus." Luckey also says that previous reports on that donation do not accurately reflect his political views. He described himself as a libertarian (lowercase L) and Gary Johnson supporter who is "committed to the principles of fair play and equal treatment." Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge An overseas hacker from the group Kosovo Hacker's Security was handed a 20-year term Friday. This is the nation's first prosecution of a hacker trying to carry out an act of terrorism. Kosovo citizen Ardit Ferizi, a 20-year-old with the online handle Th3Dir3ctorY, was arrested in Malaysia in 2015. In a Virginia federal court earlier this year, he pleaded guilty to stealing data on US military personnel by hacking undisclosed US corporate computers and then providing that data to the Islamic State (ISIS) terror group. "This case represents the first time we have seen the very real and dangerous national security cyber threat that results from the combination of terrorism and hacking," said US Assistant Attorney General John Carlin. "This was a wake-up call not only to those of us in law enforcement but also to those in private industry." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: A Maze) "I'm not a game designer. I’m a programmer," says Cukia Kimani, one half of the South African dev team on Semblance, a game that demonstrates what might happen if Super Meat Boy were let loose in a world made of Play-Doh. In Semblance you move from side to side. Your avatar is a squishy pound of flesh with tears flowing down its face. You can flatten the protagonist from either side—making it thinner or smaller—and you can hammer it against the walls of its environment, creating jump spaces and holes. You collect orbs, smash your way through barriers, and sneak under spike awnings that send you back to the start screen if you touch them. Semblance feels like a game you should be paying for, but it's not finished. It's on display at "A Maze. / Johannesburg," a South African festival for indie developers and digital artists. Read 36 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Snapchat's new "Spectacles" glasses, which have been copy-and-pasted from Friday's WSJ report onto the company's official logo. (credit: Sam Machkovech) The Snapchat empire will soon see an expansion into physical products. On Friday, company founder Evan Spiegel unveiled the company's first for-sale product on Friday: Spectacles, a $129 pair of sunglasses with a camera lens mounted to their front. Spectacles were not announced via Spiegel's wildly popular social-media app, however, but instead through an exclusive report published by the Wall Street Journal. The report confirms some of the glasses' technical details, including a 115-degree camera lens, a fisheye rendering effect on any videos taken, and three color options at launch (black, teal, and coral). Tap a button near the hinge, the WSJ reports, and Spectacles will record exactly 10 seconds of video. (A leaked promotional reel for Spectacles turned up at Business Insider before the WSJ's report went live showing what the glasses' video footage will probably look like.) The glasses, as shown on Spiegel's face, contain pronounced bulges on both halves of the glasses' frame and an apparently dime-sized circle on each lens' upper, outer corner. We only have two official photos and a brief, leaked promo video to go on—and no further technical details from the report—so we'll have to wait to learn how much on-board memory is filling either of those bulges, what resolution the video will be captured in, and whether the glasses' processing unit communicates with a nearby smartphone to upload those video captures to Snapchat. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: David Brandt) For the better part of a day, KrebsOnSecurity, arguably the world's most intrepid source of security news, has been silenced, presumably by a handful of individuals who didn't like a recent series of exposés reporter Brian Krebs wrote. The incident, and the record-breaking data assault that brought it on, open a troubling new chapter in the short history of the Internet. The crippling distributed denial-of-service attacks started shortly after Krebs published stories stemming from the hack of a DDoS-for-hire service known as vDOS. The first article analyzed leaked data that identified some of the previously anonymous people closely tied to vDOS. It documented how they took in more than $600,000 by knocking other sites offline. A few days later, Krebs ran a follow-up piece detailing the arrests of two men who allegedly ran the service. On Thursday morning, exactly two weeks after Krebs published his first post, he reported that a sustained attack was bombarding his site with as much as 620 gigabytes per second of junk data. That staggering amount of data is among the biggest ever recorded. Krebs was able to stay on line thanks to the generosity of Akamai, a network provider that provided a DDoS mitigation service to him for free. The attack showed no signs of waning as the day wore on. Some indications suggest it may have grown stronger. At 4 p.m., Akamai gave Krebs two hours' notice it would no longer assume the considerable cost of defending KrebsOnSecurity. Krebs opted to shut down the site to prevent collateral damage hitting his service provider and its customers. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A demo of Audi's e-tron dashboard, simulating the Personal Intelligent Assistant, or PIA. It uses three HD OLED displays and ditches the rotary dial input for a touchscreen with haptic feedback. Audi says we can expect some of this technology to show up in road cars in the next 12-18 months. (credit: Audi) Although we usually cover our own travel costs, in this case that was not an option; flights and accommodation on this trip to Munich were paid for by Audi. MUNICH—The recent tech extravaganza put on by Audi didn't just involve virtual reality. The Ingolstadt-based OEM also had plenty of automotive UX bits to show us, from infotainment systems found in its latest vehicles to ideas for a future in which your car plays a central role in organizing your life. Obviously these future developments are built off the hope that the cars will be connected. Yes, we know many of you hate the idea of connected cars. But in addition to relatively obvious benefits for the end user—things like preventative maintenance alerts—connecting cars also means Audi will be able to benefit from the same approach that Tesla has been using to better understand the needs of its customers. And, in this case, we're relatively confident in saying the automaker is taking issues like privacy and security seriously. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / To understand goats, you have to walk like them. Or something. I'm the Ars correspondent responsible for the Nobel Prize coverage. And each autumn, the fact that they're coming up tends to slip my mind until a very specific moment: the announcement of the Ig Nobel Prizes, organized by the Annals of Improbable Research. Each year, honorees are cited for doing scientific work that, at first glance, seems devoid of sane motivation. But sometimes (not always) a more careful look at their work shows that it's getting at a serious scientific issue, if perhaps in a baroque or roundabout way. This year's awards, handed out at a ceremony that traditionally includes everything from a mini-opera to a Nobel Laureate acting as an official Sweeper of Paper Airplanes, was no exception. I'm partial to the science behind figuring out the brand personality of rocks, since it adds rigor to a field that was apparently lacking it. But I'm getting ahead of myself. Here, in no particular order, are the honorees. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Warning, graphic content. The New York Times released cel lphone footage on Friday showing the confusion leading up to the Tuesday shooting death of a black man by Charlotte police. The two-minute footage, which does not show the shooting itself, was taken by the wife of the victim, Keith Lamont Scott. The development comes a day after Charlotte's police chief said the department would not publicly release video footage of Smith's shooting that was captured by police body and dash cams. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Chief Kerr Putney, however, did allow the family to view the police footage on Thursday. The family said the video could not conclusively demonstrate whether the victim had a handgun, as police have said. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Rep. Mike Honda (pictured here) sued his challenger, Ro Khanna, "Ro for Congress," and Brian Parvizshahi, Khanna's former campaign manager, on Thursday. (credit: Bill Clark / Getty Images News) Mike Honda, the congressman who represents a large portion of Silicon Valley, has sued his political opponent, Ro Khanna, under a federal anti-hacking law known as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Khanna, a former Department of Commerce official, is trying to unseat Honda in the upcoming November 2016 election. Honda, who has been a member of the House of Representatives for 15 years, previously defeated Khanna in a tight race in 2014. The lawsuit claims that Brian Parvizshahi, who was Khanna’s campaign manager until Thursday evening, worked as an intern for a Honda campaign fundraising firm, Arum Group, for just a few weeks in the summer of 2012. However, when Parvizshahi left Arum Group, his access to a Dropbox account that included data on thousands of donors was not revoked. Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Google OnHub, Google's now old router? (credit: Ron Amadeo) As part of Google's multi-device release extravaganza on October 4, Android Police claims Google is going to launch a Wi-Fi router. Another Wi-Fi router. Google's current Wi-Fi router is the Google OnHub, a $200, single-port router that was released over a year ago. Google promised that the OnHub would receive regular updates, and while minor bugfixes and security updates were provided, much of the hardware is still left unactivated: the USB port still doesn't work, and the included smart home antennas are still dormant. Popular user-requested features like IPv6 support and NAT loopback never arrived, either. Now Google is apparently poised to release a new Wi-Fi router, simply called "Google Wi-Fi." Android Police says the new router looks like a "white Amazon Echo Dot"—so a hockey puck with a light on top—and it costs $129. The site also says the router will have mesh Wi-Fi capabilities, meaning you can buy more than one and link them together for better coverage. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge Apple released iOS 10.0.2 to the general public today, the first update for iOS 10 since it was released last week (10.0.1, not 10.0, was the version number of the first public build). The update's main fix is for the Lightning-to-3.5mm dongle that ships with the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. Headsets plugged into the dongle could become unresponsive if plugged into an idle phone for more than five or so minutes. Getting the headset and any volume or playback controls to work again required unplugging the dongle and plugging it back in. With today's update, that should no longer be a problem. The update also solves a problem that caused the Photos app to crash when enabling iCloud Photo Library and a problem that prevented app extensions from being enabled. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Jeff Pachoud/Getty Images) The federal judge who presided over the Google-Oracle API copyright infringement trial excoriated one of Oracle's lawyers Thursday for disclosing confidential information in open court earlier this year. The confidential information included financial figures stating that Google generated $31 billion in revenue and $22 billion in profits from the Android operating system in the wake of its 2008 debut. The Oracle attorney, Annette Hurst, also revealed another trade secret: Google paid Apple $1 billion in 2014 to include Google search on iPhones. Judge William Alsup of San Francisco has been presiding over the copyright infringement trial since 2010, when Oracle lodged a lawsuit claiming that Google's Android operating system infringed Oracle's Java APIs. After two trials and various trips to the appellate courts, a San Francisco federal jury concluded in May that Google's use of the APIs amounted to fair use. Oracle's motion before Alsup for a third trial is pending. Oracle argues that Google tainted the verdict by concealing a plan to extend Android on desktop and laptop computers. As this legal saga was playing out, Hurst blurted out the confidential figures during a January 14 pre-trial hearing, despite those numbers being protected by a court order. The transcript of that proceeding has been erased from the public record. But the genie is out of the bottle. Google lodged a motion (PDF) for sanctions and a contempt finding against Hurst for unveiling a closely guarded secret of the mobile phone wars. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / A photo of First Lady Michelle Obama's passport from a dump of the e-mail of White House contractor Ian Mellul. Mellul's password may have been in a 2013 Adobe user data breach. On September 21, a dump of an e-mail account belonging to a White House contractor was posted to the "hacktivist" website DCleaks.com. This is the same site that already revealed e-mails from former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a Navy captain leading a weapons procurement program, and a public relations person who has done advance work for Hillary Clinton. The latest victim did advance work for travel by First Lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. Attributing the leak will be difficult because, as with previous "dumps" published on DCleaks, the compromised account's password information was widely available on the Internet from a previous data breach. An unnamed US intelligence official was quoted by NBC News as calling the leak of contractor Ian Mellul's e-mails "the most damaging compromise of the security of the president of the United States that I've seen in decades"—one caused by the use of an outside personal e-mail account for government business. The e-mails included full scans Mellul had forwarded to himself from a White House e-mail account of passports, including Michelle Obama's. Mellul likely forwarded the e-mails to his Gmail account because he couldn't access White House mail offsite without a secure device. Government sources have described DCleaks.com as being connected to Russian intelligence organizations. But just about anyone could have gotten into Ian Mellul's e-mail if he was using the same password for his Gmail account that was exposed in a 2013 breach of Adobe user data—just as was Navy Captain Carl Pistole's. The accounts of Powell and of Sarah Hamilton were both leaked as part of a 2012 breach of Dropbox's user data, according to data from HaveIBeenPwned. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / Screen grab of SpaceX static fire anomaly from YouTube video. (credit: USLaunchReport.com) On Friday, SpaceX released an update on its investigation into the recent loss of its Falcon 9 rocket (the rocket was lost in a fast fire on September 1 at its Florida-based launch pad and took its Israeli satellite payload with it). After a preliminary review, the company has tentatively found that a "large breach in the cryogenic helium system of the second stage liquid oxygen tank took place." The breach occurred during propellant loading in advance of a static fire test, in which the vehicle's engines are fired before launch to ensure their readiness. While this represents a step forward, SpaceX still has not identified the root cause of the accident. The company has, however, concluded that the problem is not related to the June 2015 loss of another Falcon 9 rocket in flight, which also failed because of an upper-stage incident. "All plausible causes are being tracked in an extensive fault tree and carefully investigated," the company stated in its update. "Through the fault tree and data review process, we have exonerated any connection with last year's CRS-7 mishap." According to SpaceX, the biggest challenge with investigating the September 1 accident is that the failure happened during a very short period of time. Just 93 milliseconds passed between the initial sign of an anomaly to a loss of data. An accident investigation team, including officials from SpaceX, the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, the US Air Force, and the industry continues to look at 3,000 channels of data from this short time period, as well as debris and photographs that have been collected. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / No, not really, Capcom. (credit: Aurich Lawson) On Thursday, Street Fighter V's first "season" concluded with a downloadable update that included the game's 22nd fighting character. (If you're curious: the new guy is Urien, a tall fellow who first appeared in Street Fighter III wearing only a thong.) But the download updated more than just the game's roster. It also brought apparent sweeping changes to the PC version—which now demands kernel access from players before every single boot of the game. Windows' User Account Control (UAC) system warns computer users when an application wants to write or delete sensitive files, and, in the case of PC games, you typically only see these warnings during installations. SFV's Thursday patch, however, apparently includes "an updated anti-crack solution" that Capcom insists is "not DRM" but rather an anti-cheating protocol. The anti-crack solution is causing a UAC prompt to pop up for the PC version's users. (Our own Aurich Lawson confirmed the news by booting the latest patched version; his Windows prompt appears above.) Unfortunately, Capcom's public-facing messages about PC version "hacks" have not been about cheats but about players finding workarounds to unlocking in-game content. In July, Capcom issued a stern warning to any PC player who found alternate ways to unlock Street Fighter's alternate costumes, which normally require grinding through the game's lengthy "survival" modes. Capcom producers also condemned PC players who used characters hidden in that game's version before they were officially released. Thursday's patch notes mentioned that the new anti-crack solution is particularly targeted at "illicitly obtaining in-game currency and other entitlements" (so it's, you know, DRM). Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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(credit: Marco Paköeningrat Follow) On Friday, Facebook took to its official blog to confirm and respond to a Wall Street Journal report that had spread far and wide: one of Facebook's most crucial metrics for measuring video-view performance had been wildly inflated. The blog post, from Facebook VP of marketing David Fischer, spells out exactly what the company did wrong. Its advertising-dashboard measure of "average duration of video viewed" was apparently based on questionable math. To get that count, the "total time spent watching a video" was only divided by the number of people who have seen at least three seconds of the video rather than everyone who watched the video. Fischer writes: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / It's exactly like this. Exactly. Last night brought revelations that Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey is funding an odd political group that produces anti-Clinton memes to spread online. Today, a handful of smaller developers have publicly announced that they're dropping Oculus support from their current and upcoming games. "Hey Oculus, Palmer Luckey's actions are unacceptable," writes Tomorrow Today Labs, a company working on VR physics middleware and an unannounced VR game. "NewtonVR will not be supporting the Oculus Touch as long as he is employed there." Newcomer indie developer Scruta Games, which is currently working on a number of VR titles, echoed the same sentiment. "Until Palmer Luckey steps down from his position at Oculus, we will be cancelling Oculus support for our games," the company tweeted. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Getty | Barcroft) The greedy, price-hiking ways of Turing, Mylan, Valent, and countless others are breaking out like blemishes across the face of the pharmaceutical industry. So it may come as no surprise that a simple acne cream, called Aloquin, saw its price hit a whopping $9,561 last week. The 60g tube of zit-zapping topical previously cost just $241.50—but that was months ago, before Chicago-based Novum Pharma bought the medication from Primus Pharmaceuticals in May of 2015 and made no changes to the product at all. Since then, Novum hiked the price three times, reaching an increase of 3,900 percent. Like many other drugs that have seen huge and sudden price hikes, Aloquin is old and cheap to make. It consists of two main ingredients: iodoquinol, a generic, longstanding antibiotic; and extracts from the aloe vera plant. As the Financial Times points out, a similar cream containing the iodoquinol costs less than $30, and aloe vera extracts are just a few dollars. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Jawbone) It has been nearly a year since Jawbone's most advanced tracker, the Up4, hit shelves, and the company doesn't seem to be doing well. According to a Business Insider report, Jawbone didn't pay its customer service partner NexRep, and Jawbone cut ties with the company shortly after. The report cites an e-mail from a NexRep executive that says Jawbone is "struggling financially" and couldn't pay for the company's services. The abrupt termination affected 93 NexRep jobs, leading to some layoffs and others being reassigned to other clients. Jawbone cites "restructuring" of its customer service for the partnership change. In addition to its financial issues, Jawbone's website is curiously out of most of its inventory. All of its fitness trackers, including the Up4, are listed as "sold out" and are unavailable for purchase. Another source familiar with the NexRep-Jawbone relationship claims in the report that Jawbone shipments have slowed in the past few weeks and have nearly come to a halt. Because of this, NexRep employees assigned to Jawbone couldn't fill replacement orders that came in from complaining customers. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge (credit: Google Fiber) AT&T has sued Nashville to stop a new ordinance designed to accelerate the deployment of Google Fiber. The lawsuit (PDF) was filed in US District Court in Nashville yesterday, only two days after the Nashville Metro Council passed a “One Touch Make Ready” rule that gives new ISPs faster access to utility poles. The ordinance lets a single company make all of the necessary wire adjustments on utility poles itself, instead of having to wait for incumbent providers like AT&T and Comcast to send work crews to move their own wires. Google Fiber says it is waiting on AT&T and Comcast to move wires on nearly 8,000 poles. AT&T’s lawsuit claims that the ordinance is preempted by Federal Communications Commission pole attachment regulations and violates AT&T’s 58-year-old pole attachment contract with Nashville. The company seeks a declaration that the ordinance is unlawful and a permanent injunction preventing the local government from enforcing it. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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