posted about 6 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / An illustration picture shows vials with COVID-19 Vaccine stickers attached, with the logo of US pharmaceutical company Pfizer, on November 17, 2020. (credit: Getty | JUSTIN TALLIS) The US Food and Drug Administration has authorized the use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in adolescents between the ages of 12 to 15, the agency announced Monday evening. In the announcement, acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock called the authorization “a significant step in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic” that will bring the country “closer to returning to a sense of normalcy and to ending the pandemic.” Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, echoed that sentiment. He called the ability to vaccinate children and teens “a critical step” in the fight against COVID-19.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 7 hours ago on ars technica
Corning's glass products, close-up. [credit: Apple ] Apple has invested an additional $45 million in US-based Corning Incorporated, the maker of Gorilla Glass, the companies announced today. A news release from Apple says the investment will help "expand Corning's manufacturing capacity in the US" and "drive research and development into innovative new technologies that support durability and long-lasting product life." The investment will come out of Apple's $5 billion Advanced Manufacturing Fund, which was established in 2017 to invest in manufacturing jobs and infrastructure in the United States related to Apple's products like the iPhone.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 10 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Amazon trailers backed into bays at a distribution center in Miami, Florida, in August 2019. (credit: Getty Images | Lawrence Glass) Amazon "seized and destroyed" over 2 million counterfeit products that sellers sent to Amazon warehouses in 2020 and "blocked more than 10 billion suspected bad listings before they were published in our store," the company said in its first "Brand Protection Report." In 2020, "we seized and destroyed more than 2 million products sent to our fulfillment centers and that we detected as counterfeit before being sent to a customer," Amazon's report said. "In cases where counterfeit products are in our fulfillment centers, we separate the inventory and destroy those products so they are not resold elsewhere in the supply chain," the report also said. Third-party sellers can also ship products directly to consumers instead of using Amazon's shipping system. The 2 million fakes found in Amazon fulfillment centers would only account for counterfeit products from sellers using the "Fulfilled by Amazon" service.Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 10 hours ago on ars technica
Tom Hardy returns to the big screen as the lethal protector Venom, taking on Woody Harrelson's villainous Cletus Kasady/Carnage, in Sony's forthcoming film Venom: Let There Be Carnage. Tom Hardy (Mad Max: Fury Road) returns as intrepid reporter Eddie Brock, infected with a parasitic alien symbiote that gives him super powers, in Venom: There Will be Carnage. Directed by motion-capture icon Andy Serkis, it's the sequel to 2018's box-office smash, Venom. After being delayed for nearly a year due to the ongoing pandemic, Sony just dropped the official trailer, in which Brock/Venom must battle serial killer Cletus Kasady (Woody Harrelson, Zombieland), infected with another alien symbiote dubbed Carnage. (Some spoilers for first film below.) A Venom film was in development at New Line Cinema back in 1997, although the project didn't really get off the ground until Sony acquired the rights to the character, as well as Spider-Man. Sony initially planned for Venom and Spider-Man to inhabit a shared universe, given their history in the comics. (Spider-Man was Venom's first host, before moving on to Brock, and the character gradually evolved from villain to more of an antihero.) The disappointing box office performance of 2014's The Amazing Spider-Man 2 changed those plans, and Venom was re-conceived as a standalone film, with Tom Hardy signing on as the star and Zombieland director Ruben Fleischer agreeing to direct.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Italian Culture Ministry) Archaeologists in Italy recently unearthed the remains of at least nine Neanderthals in Guattari Cave, near the Tyrrhenian Sea about 100 km southeast of Rome. While excavating a previously unexplored section of the cave, archaeologists from the Archaeological Superintendency of Latina and the University of Tor Vergata recently unearthed broken skulls, jawbones, teeth, and pieces of several other bones, which they say represent at least nine Neanderthals. That brings the cave’s total to at least 10; anthropologist Alberto Carlo Blanc found a Neanderthal skull in another chamber in 1939. Italy was a very different place 60,000 years ago. Hyenas, along with other Pleistocene carnivores, stalked rhinoceroses, wild horses (an extinct wild bovine called aurochs), and people. “Neanderthals were prey for these animals. Hyenas hunted them, especially the most vulnerable, like sick or elderly individuals,” Tor Vergata University archaeologist Mario Rolfo told The Guardian. The archaeologists found the Neanderthal remains mingled with the bones of rhinos, giant deer, wild horses, and other hyenas. Predators and scavengers tend to leave behind different parts of the skeleton than, say, flowing water or simple burial—and tooth marks are usually a dead giveaway.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
After permanently bricking two AirTags, stacksmashing succeeded in breaking into and reprogramming a third. [credit: stacksmashing ] This weekend, German security researcher stacksmashing declared success at breaking into, dumping, and reflashing the microcontroller of Apple's new AirTag object-location product. Breaking into the microcontroller essentially meant being able both to research how the devices function (by analyzing the dumped firmware) and to reprogram them to do unexpected things. Stacksmashing demonstrated this by reprogramming an AirTag to pass a non-Apple URL while in Lost Mode. Lost Mode gets a little more lost When an AirTag is set to Lost Mode, tapping any NFC-enabled smartphone to the tag brings up a notification with a link to found.apple.com. The link allows whoever found the lost object to contact its owner, hopefully resulting in the lost object finding its way home.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Google tells users where they can find YouTube TV now: inside the regular YouTube app. (credit: Google) Previously on Google versus Roku: Roku and Google needed to renew the contract for YouTube TV, Google's $65-per-month cable TV replacement, on Roku's TV platform. The two companies weren't able to come to an agreement on the new contract, resulting in YouTube TV being pulled from the Roku store. Oh no! While existing customers could still use the YouTube TV app they had already installed, new users couldn't sign up. Will the two companies ever be able to settle their differences, or is their friendship ruined forever? The next exciting episode in this saga aired on Friday, when Google announced in a blog post that it was just going to run an end-around on Roku and stick the YouTube TV app in the YouTube app. YouTube and YouTube TV exist as separate apps, and while the YouTube TV contract expired and the app was taken off the Roku store, the YouTube contract does not expire until December. Since the YouTube app is still running, Google was able to quickly shove YouTube TV functionality into it. On the side navigation menu, the last link in the list reads, "Go to YouTube TV." This is not unprecedented—it's actually the way YouTube Music works, too, with a sort of app-within-an-app interface.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 12 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Vials with COVID-19 Vaccine labels showing logos of pharmaceutical company Pfizer and German biotechnology company BioNTech. (credit: Getty | Photonews) The European Union has declined to renew orders for AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine, an EU official said Sunday. The decision comes after a series of production and safety troubles with AstraZeneca’s vaccine—and news on Saturday that the EU signed a deal to have Pfizer and BioNTech provide up to 1.8 billion doses of their vaccine between 2021 and 2023. Last month, the EU took legal action against AstraZeneca, alleging that the company had failed to live up to its contract to supply the bloc with doses. The contract ends in June. "We did not renew the order after June,” European Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton said in a Sunday French radio interview, which was reported by Reuters. “We’ll see what happens," he added, leaving open the possibility of future orders.Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 12 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Problems with Colonial Pipeline's distribution system tend to lead to gasoline runs and price increases across the US Southeast and Eastern seaboard. In this September 2016 photo, a man prepared to refuel his vehicle after a Colonial leak in Alabama. (credit: Luke Sharrett via Getty Images) On Friday, Colonial Pipeline took many of its systems offline in the wake of a ransomware attack. With systems offline to contain the threat, the company's pipeline system is inoperative. The system delivers approximately 45 percent of the East Coast's petroleum products, including gasoline, diesel fuel, and jet fuel. Colonial Pipeline issued a statement Sunday saying that the US Department of Energy is leading the US federal government response to the attack. "[L]eading, third-party cybersecurity experts" engaged by Colonial Pipeline itself are also on the case. The company's four main pipelines are still down, but it has begun restoring service to smaller lateral lines between terminals and delivery points as it determines how to safely restart its systems and restore full functionality. Colonial Pipeline has not publicly said what was demanded of it or how the demand was made.Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 12 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty) Few bitcoin projects illustrate the cryptocurrency’s enormous climate impact better than the Greenidge power plant in upstate New York. The once-abandoned power plant was bought by private equity firm Atlas Holdings and retasked. A significant portion of Greenidge's electricity no longer powers nearby homes or businesses; rather, the plant's smokestacks are increasingly pouring pollutants into the atmosphere in the service of mining bitcoin. Now, Greenidge is on the verge of ramping up its bitcoin ambitions. By the end of this year, it plans to have 18,000 specialized machines mining bitcoin, and with the recent approval of its data center expansion plans, it will add 10,500 more. When the project is complete, the miners will be using 79 percent of the power plant’s capacity, or 85 MW.  “No direct competitor currently owns and operates its own power plant for the purpose of bitcoin mining,” the company wrote in its recent S-4 filing with the SEC. “No other bitcoin-mining operation of this scale in the United States currently uses power generated from its own power plant.” The filings came as a result of Greenidge's recent merger with Support.com.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 13 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / If you thought Ford would find it hard to resist reviving the Lightning brand for its electric F-150 pickup, you'd be right. (credit: Ford Motor Company) As many have predicted, Ford will revive the "Lightning" nameplate for the battery-electric version of its F-150 pickup truck. The formal reveal of the electric F-150 is scheduled to take place in Michigan on May 19, at which point we hope to get more information about this hotly anticipated electric vehicle. For now, Ford is keeping details like the vehicle's range and battery capacity to itself. Like the Rivian that we just wrote about or the hybrid F-150s that are already on sale, it sounds like the F-150 Lightning will come with on-board AC power outlets. "America's favorite vehicle for nearly half a century is going digital and fully electric. F-150 Lightning can power your home during an outage," said Ford President and CEO Jim Farley in a statement sent to Ars. The original F-150 Lightning was a product of Ford's Special Vehicle Team. It debuted in 1993 as a high-performance variant of the F-150 pickup, which was offered until 1995. Then in 1999, a second F-150 Lightning arrived, this time based on the 10th-generation F-150.Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 13 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / This Sony engineer can get a PS5, but millions of others can't, thanks to short supplies that are likely to continue. Sony thinks demand could continue to outstrip supply of the PlayStation 5 into 2022. That's according to a Bloomberg report citing a number of unnamed analysts who listened in on an explanatory call following Sony's recent earnings report. "I don’t think demand is calming down this year, and even if we secure a lot more devices and produce many more units of the PlayStation 5 next year, our supply wouldn’t be able to catch up with demand," Sony CFO Hiroki Totoki reportedly said. Sony has been warning for months that worldwide shortages of semiconductors and other components have made it hard to increase production for the PS5. But this is the most direct sign that those shortages will extend past this year and into the next.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 14 hours ago on ars technica
Porsche is preparing an all-electric Macan SUV for 2023. Here's an early prototype, seen testing at Weissach in Germany. [credit: Porsche ] This morning, in an email extolling the flexibility of in silico development, Porsche sent Ars the first official images of its next Macan crossover. And this Macan, which is still a couple of years from being ready, is entirely electric. Unfortunately, the photos don't give too much away about this electric vehicle replacement to one of Porsche's biggest sellers; the prototypes are camouflaged, and that Safari-spec LED roof bar is presumably just there to help Porsche's engineers test around the clock. The four-element LED headlights are probably the real deal, though. Porsche first revealed that the Macan would go all-electric in early 2019. The car will use a new electric vehicle architecture called PPE (Premium Platform Electric), which Porsche is developing together with corporate sibling Audi. Audi recently briefed us on one of its first PPE-derived EVs, the 2023 Audi A6 e-tron, which uses an 800 V, 100 kWh battery pack and a motor for each axle, with a combined output of 350 kW (469 hp) and 800 Nm (590 lb-ft). Although Porsche isn't ready to share its own specs yet, the A6 e-tron offers a ballpark within which we can guesstimate. In its email, Porsche says that it has built 20 digital prototypes, with different departments conducting their own simulations. "We regularly collate the data from the various departments and use it to build up a complete, virtual vehicle that is as detailed as possible," said Porsche's Dr. Andreas Huber, who manages the digital prototypes. The aerodynamicists were among the first to start modeling the EV Macan beginning in 2017.Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 16 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The B1051 booster launches for the 10th time early on Sunday morning from Florida. (credit: SpaceX) SpaceX crossed a significant milestone on Sunday morning with yet another launch of 60 Starlink Internet satellites. These Starlink launches have become routine—and dare we say it, a little boring?—as SpaceX builds out its constellation to deliver broadband Internet around the world from low Earth orbit. However, the rate at which SpaceX has begun to reuse its Falcon 9 first stages is decidedly not monotonous. For Sunday morning's launch, SpaceX used a first stage that had flown into space nine previous times. After this launch, the B1051 booster landed safely on a drone ship, completing its tenth flight to space. This is a notable milestone because, in 2018, SpaceX founder Elon Musk said the goal for its Falcon 9 rocket would be to fly each first stage booster 10 times before requiring significant maintenance.Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 18 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Please don't actually drive while wearing a giant Android mask. (credit: Aurich Lawson / Polestar) Can Google do to car infotainment what it did to smartphones? Every car manufacturer nowadays needs to include an infotainment system with its car, and that means developing an operating system, making a UI that isn't terrible, building an SDK and app ecosystem, and doing a million other things car manufacturers have not typically needed to do. In the face of all that, Google is pulling out the Android smartphone playbook and tempting car manufacturers with a car-specific version of Android, called the "Android Automotive OS." "Let us build your operating system!" Google essentially tells the car manufacturers. "We've got great hardware and touch support, third-party apps, and a well-known developer SDK! We'll provide Google Maps, Google Assistant voice commands, and the Play Store! We even update the codebase with monthly security updates! Best of all, for you, it's free! Just sign this contract ensuring you'll include all of our apps and services."Read 106 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Jason Schreier's latest deep dive on the game industry is out on May 11 at all major booksellers. (credit: Grand Central Publishing) Games industry journalist Jason Schreier has left his mark over the years by digging up behind-the-scenes dirt at sites like Kotaku and Bloomberg, but he may be best known for Blood, Sweat, and Pixels. This 2017 book broke down like a Schreier's "greatest hits" collection: Every chapter followed a particular game and its lead studio through a wild "triple-A" period in the late '00s and early '10s. If you've read BSP or any of Schreier's other investigative stories, you'll likely notice common threads at modern game studios, no matter which genre or specific company is involved. The first brilliant stroke of his newest book, Press Reset: Ruin and Recovery in the Game Industry, is to take that concept a step further. Individual games and studios get an occasional spotlight, but this time, Schreier often follows individual developer résumés to answer a few huge industry questions. Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) (credit: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images) To promote her new book, Antitrust: Taking on Monopoly Power from the Gilded Age to the Digital Age, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota gave a series of interviews this week, one of which was with me. She told me outright that our session was not her favorite of the tour—that honor went to her comedic exchange with Stephen Colbert a few days earlier, which she recounted to me line by line. Nonetheless, I welcomed the chance to speak with her. Klobuchar has enjoyed a heightened profile since her presidential run and quick pivot to the eventual winner, Joe Biden, so she had her choice of book subjects to focus on. Ultimately, she produced 600 pages on the relatively arcane topic of antitrust law, a telling choice. Her goal is to make the subject less arcane, in hopes that a grassroots movement will support her effort to fortify and enforce the laws more vigorously. In the book, Klobuchar attempts to inspire readers with a history of the field, which in her rendering sprang from a spirited populist movement that included her own coal-mining ancestors. That’s why her book is stuffed with vintage political cartoons, typically portraying Gilded Age barons as bloated giants, hovering over workers like top-hatted Macy’s balloons. (Obviously those were the days before billionaires had Peloton.) Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Three friends trying to create their own RPG game about getting away with murder get more than they bargained for in the new black comedy, Murder Bury Win. Three friends get more than they bargained for when they think they are about to hit the gaming big-time in Murder Bury Win, a charming black comedy that proved to be a fan favorite at last year's Austin Film Festival. It certainly won't dislodge 1985's cult classic, Clue, as the best movie yet made about a board game ("Flames... on the side of my face!"), but it's very solid indie fare, and a lot of fun. (Some spoilers below, but no major reveals.) Per the official synopsis:Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Unless we're mistaken, the Rivian R1T will be the first battery electric truck in the US market. [credit: Rivian ] Electric vehicle startup Rivian is moving closer to production of its innovative-looking trucks and SUVs. The first launch edition R1T pickup trucks are expected in June, with series production models arriving at the start of 2022. And even though I'm not really a truck person, I remain as fascinated now by this new entrant into the most quintessentially American part of the vehicle market as I was after first seeing one in 2019. Ahead of those initial deliveries, the company reached out to share some of info about the R1T, which looks like it will offer Swiss Army knife-levels of versatility to its owners. It's about the size you'd expect of a full-size pickup truck: 217.1 inches (5.51 m) long, 81.8 inches (2.08 m) wide, and between 72.1-78.3 inches (1.83-1.99 m) tall depending on whether it's in kneel mode (ground clearance: 8.7 inches/0.22 m) or off-road mode (ground clearance: 14.9 inches/0.38 m). The big lockable cargo area under the hood (also known as a frunk) can stash 11 cubic feet (311 L) of stuff. And at the rear, you'll find a tow hook capable of pulling up to 11,000 lbs (4,989 kg). It lives beneath an aerodynamic cover when not in use.Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) In September 2015, Apple managers had a dilemma on their hands: should, or should they not, notify 128 million iPhone users of what remains the worst mass iOS compromise on record? Ultimately, all evidence shows, they chose to keep quiet. The mass hack first came to light when researchers uncovered 40 malicious App Store apps, a number that mushroomed to 4,000 as more researchers poked around. The apps contained code that made iPhones and iPads part of a botnet that stole potentially sensitive user information. 128 million infected. An email entered into court this week in Epic Games’ lawsuit against Apple shows that, on the afternoon of September 21, 2015, Apple managers had uncovered 2,500 malicious apps that had been downloaded a total of 203 million times by 128 million users, 18 million of whom were in the US.Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: AI Dungeon) In December 2019, Utah startup Latitude launched a pioneering online game called AI Dungeon that demonstrated a new form of human-machine collaboration. The company used text-generation technology from artificial intelligence company OpenAI to create a choose-your-own adventure game inspired by Dungeons & Dragons. When a player typed out the action or dialog they wanted their character to perform, algorithms would craft the next phase of their personalized, unpredictable adventure. Last summer, OpenAI gave Latitude early access to a more powerful, commercial version of its technology. In marketing materials, OpenAI touted AI Dungeon as an example of the commercial and creative potential of writing algorithms. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
In this image, courtesy of Windows Latest, we see new icons from a Sun Valley preview build on the left versus production icons on the right. [credit: Windows Latest ] Back in January, we reported on Sun Valley—a coming "sweeping visual rejuvenation" of Windows 10's user interface. This week, Windows Latest leaked new detail about the upcoming makeover: There's a new set of icons in C:\Windows\System32\Shell32.dllreplacing classic Windows icons that date back to the Windows 95 era. The changes are surprisingly subtle. Most of the new icons are extremely similar to the nearly 30-year old versions they're replacing. Elderly symbols such as floppy disks and floppy disk drives persist in the new icon set—the visual style is updated on these venerable references, but that's about it. The floppy-derived icons in Windows now (right) look like 1990s-era hardware—the Sun Valley refresh replacements (left) look more like late 1970s/early 1980s equipment. [credit: Jim Salter ] Ironically, in the case of the floppy disk related icons, the equipment looks older. The drives in the older icons took styling cues from then-current 1990s-era equipment, but the replacement icons look more like equipment from the late 1970s or very early 1980s.Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A gift card like this goes less far because of Sony's monopolistic control of the PlayStation downloads market, according to a new lawsuit. In Apple's opening statements in the Epic Games v. Apple trial on Monday, the company argued that "the law protects Apple's choice to have a closed system just as it protects Sony and Nintendo." A new proposed class-action lawsuit against Sony's alleged monopoly control over the market for downloadable PlayStation games seems set to test that argument in the near future. The lawsuit, filed in Northern California federal court (first reported by Bloomberg News and obtained by Polygon), alleges that Sony's monopoly control over the PlayStation Store leads to "supracompetitive prices for digital PlayStation games, which are... [priced] significantly higher than they would be in a competitive retail market for digital games." No more retail code competition Microsoft and Nintendo also maintain digital storefronts that provide the only legitimate way to download software on the Xbox and Switch platforms, of course. But the lawsuit says the PlayStation Store differs from its console competition for a couple of reasons.Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge / The Facebook iPhone app asks for permission to track the user in this early mock-up of the prompt made by Apple. (credit: Apple) It seems that in the United States, at least, app developers and advertisers who rely on targeted mobile advertising for revenue are seeing their worst fears realized: Analytics data published this week suggests that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time in the wake of iOS 14.5. When Apple released iOS 14.5 late last month, it began enforcing a policy called App Tracking Transparency. iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV apps are now required to request users' permission to use techniques like IDFA (ID for Advertisers) to track those users' activity across multiple apps for data collection and ad targeting purposes. The change met fierce resistance from companies like Facebook, whose market advantages and revenue streams are built on leveraging users' data to target the most effective ads at those users. Facebook went so far as to take out full-page newspaper ads claiming that the change would not just hurt Facebook but would destroy small businesses around the world. Shortly after, Apple CEO Tim Cook attended a data privacy conference and delivered a speech that harshly criticized Facebook's business model.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 3 days ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | MirageC) The average US home-Internet bill increased 19 percent during the first three years of the Trump administration, disproving former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai's claim that deregulation lowered prices, according to a new report by advocacy group Free Press. For tens of millions of families that aren't wealthy, "these increases are felt deeply, forcing difficult decisions about which services to forgo so they can maintain critical Internet access services," Free Press wrote. The 19 percent Trump-era increase is adjusted for inflation to match the value of 2020 dollars, with the monthly cost rising from $39.35 in 2016 to $47.01 in 2019. Without the inflation adjustment, the average household Internet price rose from $36.48 in 2016 to $46.38 in 2019, an increase of 27 percent. The nominal increase in each of the three years was between 7.27 percent and 9.94 percent, while inflation each year ranged from 1.81 percent to 2.44 percent.Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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