posted about 4 hours ago on ars technica
Right now the United States is entering a transition period when it comes to how we buy things. Magnetic stripe cards have become easy targets for massive fraud in the US, and major credit card issuers have agreed to begin issuing chip-and-PIN-based cards by October 2015. (Chip-and-signature transactions will also be widely available during the transition.) On top of that, people are also getting comfortable with paying for things through their phones. Cupertino shook things up earlier this fall with the launch of Apple Pay, which seems to have boosted Google Wallet use as well. So whether it’s by a financial necessity or by consumer preference, that all-American pastime—shopping—is being forced to re-think its plastic. It should come as little surprise that some smaller, third-party players are trying to find ways to take advantage of this perfect storm. Coin, Wocket, and Plastc are all companies that have found a tiny niche in the unyielding cliffs of financial technology, and that niche is all-in-one, digital credit cards. Attack of the clones When Coin was announced last fall, the company was a magnet for hype. Coin was promising a product the size and shape of a credit card, which would work just like a credit card, except that it would keep all your credit, debit, and loyalty cards digitally stored on this single device. Read 22 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 5 hours ago on ars technica
It appears that Mississippi AG Jim Hood is making a strategic retreat in the wake of publicity about his investigation of Google. On Friday morning, Google sued Hood, saying that a 79-page subpoena he had sent to the company was "punitive," and violated Google's First and Fourth Amendment rights. The company also pointed to recent press reports that showed Hollywood studios had lobbied heavily for the investigation. Later that day, Hood sent a statement to the New York Times saying that he's "calling a time out, so that cooler heads may prevail." Hood says he wants to negotiate a "peaceful resolution to the issues affecting consumers" that he and other state AGs have pointed out in a series of letters. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 7 hours ago on ars technica
CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true});We're always posting reviews that compare individual gadgets to other, similar gadgets, but sometimes it's nice to have something a little more comprehensive. For the last two years running, we've been rounding up all of the smartphones that are worth your time and weighing them against one another. With 2014 winding down, it's time to do it again. In past years, we've run down a list of flagships and declared "winners" in several categories—we'll be taking a slightly different approach this time, since there are just so many phones to talk about and their specs are more homogenized than ever. So we'll run through all of the phones we think you should be paying attention to, highlighting what each one does particularly well or particularly poorly. We'll bring a few interesting low-end and midrange phones into the fold. And we'll give a broad overview of the major operating systems and their ecosystems, and where things are going in 2015. Table of Contents Tl;dr: Just tell me what to buy! iOS Android Windows Phone And the rest The phones you should know about iPhone 6 iPhone 6 Plus Samsung Galaxy S5 Samsung Galaxy Note 4 HTC One M8 Motorola Moto X (2014) Motorola Moto G (2014) Motorola/Google Nexus 6 HTC One M8 for Windows Lumia Icon Lumia 830 Lumia 635 Honorable mentions iPhone 5S Sony Xperia Z3 and Z3 Compact Droid Turbo OnePlus One Nexus 5 2013 Moto G Lumia 1520 Lumia 930 Trends to watch for in 2015 64-bit goes mainstream (in Android, anyway) Specs (kind of) don’t matter China is getting more important The State of the Smartphone CN.dart.call("xrailTop", {sz:"300x250", kws:[], collapse: true});Tl;dr: Just tell me what to buy! Before we get started, here is the version of this article for people who just want purchasing recommendations. Read 87 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 9 hours ago on ars technica
Electric car manufacturer Tesla Motors made a splash last June with the announcement that it planned to offer 90-second battery pack swaps for Model S owners. The battery pack swaps were to be a fast alternative to actually charging the car’s battery; a quick 100-mile top off at a Tesla Supercharger station still takes between 15 and 20 minutes, while the automated battery swap demonstrated by Tesla took less time than it took to fill up an Audi A8 sedan with gas. Elon Musk demonstrates swapping out a Model S battery pack in less time than it takes to fill up an Audi with gas. However, the demonstration was just that—although Tesla continued to build out Supercharger stations around the US at a quick pace, none of them were equipped with the battery-swap technology. It’s taken about eighteen months, but this appears to finally be about to change. In a Friday afternoon blog post, Tesla announced that certain invite-only customers can have their cars’ batteries swapped out at a special facility across the street from the company’s the Harris Ranch, CA Supercharger location. The post notes that because of the addition titanium and aluminum "shields" to the bottom of Model S sedans, the swap will take somewhere in the neighborhood of three minutes to complete rather than the 90 seconds demonstrated on stage in 2013. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 10 hours ago on ars technica
It’s a great time to be a fan of space combat games. Last week, UK-based Frontier Developments formally released Elite: Dangerous to the world, and late Friday evening US-based Roberts Space Industries announced that Star Citizen’s single- and multiplayer "Arena Commander" dogfighting module has also reached its 1.0 milestone. Star Citizen is the sprawling brainchild of Chris Roberts, who is most famous for designing and producing the Wing Commander series of games in the 1990s. When we last checked in with the Star Citizen team in Austin back in August, the company had brought in about $48 million in crowdfunding contributions and pre-purchase money to finance the development of the giant space MMO; as of today, the company’s fundraising page shows that they’ve collected a staggering $67 million (and, with three ships in my Star Citizen hangar, I’ve definitely contributed my share). Currently, the only way to really "play" Star Citizen is by downloading the "Arena Commander" module. It’s an "in-fiction" combat simulator module that lets players fly a limited number of ships in a few different scenarios, including both cooperative and player-versus-player missions. Last night’s upgrade to 1.0 increases the number of ships players can fly in "Arena Commander," and also adds additional weapons, a greatly revamped cockpit interface, and a new lobby system to make flying with (and against) friends a lot easier to set up. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
While sequencing an entire genome is eminently doable, sequencing an exome is easier. The exome contains all of the DNA that dictates the amino acid sequences of all the proteins a cell needs to make, so any mutations that will change a protein's sequence can be found in it. It's easier simply because only about two percent of the entire genome encodes proteins. But not all disease-causing genetic mutations alter amino acid sequences. Evidence has been accumulating for some time that mutations in non-coding regions of DNA—which can dictate how much of a protein is produced, in which cells, and at which times—can also cause trouble. Computational models have been used to try to find different types of non-coding mutations. A new one has just been developed to try to find mutations that alter the processing of RNA and correlate these mutations to disease; results are reported in Science. To retain its fidelity, DNA stays in the nucleus, like we'd keep our valuables in a vault. The DNA has all the directions for how to make the proteins the cell needs, but the protein making machinery is outside of the nucleus. So the cell makes copies of the DNA—messenger RNA molecules—and these RNA copies leave the nucleus to get translated into protein. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 11 hours ago on ars technica
Rockstar’s Max Payne 3 is 70% off right now as part of the 2014 Steam Holiday Sale, but would-be neonoir crime story aficionados were denied entry into the cynical world of of the drug-dependent detective yesterday by a failure in the game’s third-party authentication and matchmaking system. Starting early on Friday, December 19, the Rockstar Social Club component of the game would respond only with "Error contacting activation server" when players tried to start up the game for the first time. Though Max Payne 3 players only use the Rockstar Social Club for multiplayer games, the Social Club is also a DRM system, functioning as an activation gate and validating new users’ product keys. PC users who buy the game through Steam must still log on to the Social Club before they can play multi- or single player. The problem popped up at a particularly bad time, since Max Payne 3 was being featured as a Steam sale item. It sparked a vitriolic Reddit post and numerous threads on the game’s Steam discussion subforum, with frustrated customers immediately jumping to the conclusion that Rockstar had disabled or shut down the Social Club service for the game. Max Payne 3 was released on PC in June 2012, and disabling activation services of a 2.5-year old title would indeed have been an extraordinarily customer-hostile move. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
rjzii asks: During a meeting regarding the rollback of a third-party SDK from the latest version, it was noted that the SDK developers already announced in the commit history that the latest version should not be used. Some developers argued that this was a bad practice and there should have been something either in the source file (i.e. '// Don't upgrade SDK Version x.y.z, see ticket 1234') or in a project level 'README' file. Others argued that since the commit history is part of the project documentation, it is an acceptable location for such information since we should all be reading it anyway. Read 26 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
On Friday, the Chicago Tribune released the results of a study it commissioned on injury crashes and red light cameras, revealing that while right angle crash incidents have been reduced, rear-end crashes that resulted in injuries went up 22 percent. The results of the study throw cold water on the booster efforts of Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration and raise questions about the use of red light cameras as a whole. Chicago is the home of the nation's largest red light camera program and encompasses 350 cameras at a variety of the city's intersections. The red light camera program has been accused of mismanagement and embroiled the mayor's office in a $2 million bribery scandal. But recently, administrators trotted out a seemingly redeeming statistic: that the introduction of the cameras had created a 47 percent reduction in the rate of right angle, or “T-bone,” injury crashes. The Chicago Tribune in response commissioned a scientific study by two well-regarded transportation researchers, who found that the statistics promoted by the mayor's office were misleading. According to the Tribune, the authors of the study found a statistically significant, but still smaller, reduction in angle and turning injury crashes by 15 percent, as well as “a statistically significant increase of 22 percent in rear-end injury collisions.” Overall, there was “a non-significant increase of 5 percent in the total number of injury crashes” that happened at intersections with red light cameras when comparing the injury crashes that occurred there before and after the cameras were present. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
A federal judge in New Jersey has signed off on the practice of law enforcement using a fake Instagram account in order to become "friends" with a suspect—thus obtaining photos and other information that a person posts to their account. "No search warrant is required for the consensual sharing of this type of information," United States District Judge William Martini wrote in an opinion published last Tuesday. "[Defendant Daniel] Gatson’s motion to suppress the evidence obtained through the undercover account will be denied." Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
BT, Sky, and Virgin Media are hijacking people's web connections to force customers to make a decision about family-friendly web filters. The move comes as the December deadline imposed by prime minister David Cameron looms, with ISPs struggling to get customers to say yes or no to the controversial adult content blocks. The messages, which vary by ISP, appear during browser sessions when a user tries to access any website. BT, Sky,TalkTalk and Virgin Media are required to ask all their customers if they want web filters turned on or off, with the government saying it wants to create a "family friendly" Internet free from pornography, gambling, extreme violence and other content inappropriate for children. But the measures being taken by ISPs have been described as "completely unnecessary" and "heavy handed" by Internet rights groups. The hijacking works by intercepting requests for unencrypted websites and rerouting a user to a different page. ISPs are using the technique to communicate with all undecided customers. Attempting to visit WIRED.co.uk, for example, could result in a user being redirected to a page asking them about web filtering. ISPs cannot intercept requests for encrypted websites in the same way. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Depending on the context, volcanic eruptions are either terrifying or transfixing—sometimes both, but rarely neither. The opportunity to safely view the otherworldly spectacle of lava rarely fails to ignite a child-like, giddy wonder. The damage currently being done by a lava flows in the Cape Verde Islands, on the other hand, is heart-breaking. We study these things because they are both lovely and terrible. We want to see a lava flow spill across a snowfield out of curiosity, and we want to better understand the hazards surrounding snow-capped volcanoes out of caution. Benjamin Edwards of Dickinson College and Alexander Belousov and Marina Belousova of Russia’s Institute of Volcanology and Seismology got the opportunity to witness one of these events last year in Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. For nine months, Tolbachik spewed basaltic lava flows that ultimately covered 40 square kilometers, reaching as far as 17 kilometers from their source. The lava flows came in two flavors, known to geologists by Hawaiian names. (While frozen Kamchatka doesn’t exactly evoke coconuts and grass skirts, these lavas are similar to those of the Hawaiian volcanoes.) First there’s ‘a’a (pronounced as a staccato “AH-ah”), which ends up a chunky, blocky crumble of basalt. The other is pahoehoe (roughly “puh-HOY-hoy”, which is how volcanologists answer the phone), which flows more like thick batter and can solidify into a surface resembling a pile of ropes. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Several critical vulnerabilities in the protocol used to synchronize clock settings over the Internet are putting countless servers at risk of remote hijacks until they install a security patch, an advisory issued by the federal government warned. The remote-code execution bugs reside in versions of the network time protocol prior to 4.2.8, according to an advisory issued Friday by the Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team. In many cases, the vulnerabilities can be exploited remotely by hackers with only a low level of skill. "Exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the [network time protocol daemon] process," the advisory warned. Exploit code that targets the vulnerabilities is publicly available. It's not clear exactly what privileges NTP processes get on the typical server, but a handful of knowledgeable people said they believed it usually involved unfettered root access. Even if the rights are limited, it's not uncommon for hackers to combine exploits with privilege elevation attacks, which increase the system resources a targeted app has the ability to control. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Tensions between Google and Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood exploded into public view this week, as Google filed court papers seeking to halt a broad subpoena Hood sent to the company. The Hood subpoena, delivered in late October, didn't come out of nowhere. Hood's investigation got revved up after at least a year of intense lobbying by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). E-mails that hackers acquired from Sony Pictures executives and then dumped publicly now show the inner workings of how that lobbying advanced—and just how extensive it was. Attorneys at Sony were on a short list of top Hollywood lawyers frequently updated about the MPAA's "Attorney General Project," along with those at Disney, Warner Brothers, 21st Century Fox, NBC Universal, and Paramount. The e-mails show a staggering level of access to, and influence over, elected officials. The MPAA's single-minded obsession: altering search results and other products (such as "autocompleted" search queries) from Google, a company the movie studios began referring to as "Goliath" in around February 2014. The studios' goal was to quickly get pirated content off the Web; unhappy about the state of Google's voluntary compliance with their demands and frustrated in their efforts at passing new federal law such as SOPA and PIPA, the MPAA has turned instead to state law enforcement. Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
OAKLAND, Calif.—A federal judge spent over four hours on Friday questioning lawyers from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and from the Department of Justice in an ongoing digital surveillance-related lawsuit that has dragged on for more than six years. During the hearing, US District Judge Jeffrey White heard arguments from both sides in his attempt to wrestle with the plaintiffs’ July 2014 motion for partial summary judgment. He went back and forth between the two sides, hearing answers to his list of 12 questions that were published earlier this week in a court filing. That July 2014 motion asks the court to find that the government is "violating the Fourth Amendment by their ongoing seizures and searches of plaintiffs’ Internet communications." The motion specifically doesn’t deal with allegations of past government wrongdoing, nor other issues in the broader case. Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
The highly destructive malware believed to have hit the networks of Sony Pictures Entertainment contained a cocktail of malicious components designed to wreak havoc on infected networks, according to new technical details released by federal officials who work with private sector security professionals. An advisory published Friday by the US Computer Emergency Readiness Team said the central malware component was a worm that propagated through the Server Message Block protocol running on Microsoft Windows networks. The worm contained brute-force cracking capabilities designed to infect password-protected storage systems. It acted as a "dropper" that then unleashed five components. The advisory, which also provided "indicators of compromise" that can help other companies detect similar attacks, didn't mention Sony by name. Instead, it said only that the potent malware cocktail had targeted a "major entertainment company." The FBI and White House have pinned the attack directly on North Korea, but so far have provided little proof. "This worm uses a brute force authentication attack to propagate via Windows SMB shares," Friday's advisory stated. "It connects home every five minutes to send log data back to command and control (C2) infrastructure if it has successfully spread to other Windows hosts via SMB port 445. The tool also accepts new scan tasking when it connects to C2." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Birds perform incredible feats of migration, crossing entire continents on their journeys between favorable nesting and feeding grounds. For most species, this behavior appears to be hard-wired in, driven by instinctual urges. But a recent study suggests that at least some birds aren't purely creatures of instinct—they can perform migratory feats in order to get away from dangerous weather, as well. The study came as a bit of an accident. A team of researchers had tagged golden-winged warblers, which migrate between South America and the eastern US. After having completed a 5,000-mile journey from Columbia, five males settled down into breeding areas in eastern Tennessee, one for just a single day. Then, they rapidly left, heading back to the Gulf Coast along routes that mimic their fall migration. The researchers term this trip an evacuation. The cause? A massive storm system that produced over 80 tornadoes and killed 35 people, which swept through the region shortly thereafter. (The storm was so severer that the authors write, "We did not conduct surveys on any of the study sites on April 29, 2014 because we performed our own evacuation migration and waited out the storm in Caryville, Tennessee, USA.") This happened in late April; all five birds returned to the region and returned to breeding activities by early May. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Legendary file-sharing site The Pirate Bay may have finally been forced offline, but that doesn’t mean that the less-than-legal file-sharing scene has slowed down—the shady BitTorrent hydra has many more heads to take The Pirate Bay’s place. In fact, if the folks at torrent site Isohunt have their way, there will very soon be many, many more heads: the site has released an open sourced "copy" of The Pirate Bay called "Open Bay" that anyone with access to a Web server can install and run. The Open Bay project maintainers have set up a GitHub repository for the Open Bay application and written instructions covering how to get your very own Open Bay site up and running—complete with example configuration files. To make it work, you need at minimum a Web server running Apache or Nginx and PHP (either with mod_php or PHP-FPM or whatever other PHP method you prefer); since we’ve got one of those in our closet, we decided to take a crack at installing the application to see how it works. What Open Bay is not I was hoping that Open Bay would be a full-featured Bittorrent site wherein I could both search for and also add torrents; I’d planned on setting everything up and then offering out a complete set of Linux ISO torrent links to prove that it worked. However, it’s important to be clear at the outset that Open Bay’s primary purpose is to be a copy of The Pirate Bay. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Sources at Reuters claim that the next major version of Android, which it calls "Android M," will support being used as an in-car infotainment OS. The outlet says the OS would be built right into the car's hardware and would have the full suite of standard infotainment features. The project sounds a lot like the Android-based infotainment system Harman was building along with Google's help. Harman is one of the world's largest infotainment system suppliers and was building the system for General Motors. The Reuters report never mentioned the Harman product, so it's unclear if the two projects are related. Harman's CEO indicated that GM would have exclusive rights to the newest version of their OS, so it may be a separate project or something based on this Google-developed OS. The move also sounds similar to Android Auto, Google's currently announced car interface, but Android Auto isn't an operating system. Like Apple's CarPlay, it requires a smartphone plugged into a compatible vehicle, and then it takes over the car infotainment screen. Both projects require an underlying OS to function and can't access car functions like the radio, cameras, or air conditioning. So for your in-car Android options you have Android Auto, this new Android M-based OS, and the Harman project, which may or may not be based on Google's official Android M infotainment system. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
The Sony hacking scandal has, inadvertently, claimed another victim. After Sony's The Interview was pulled from released amid bomb threats aimed at cinemas planning to air the North Korea-mocking comedy, film studio New Regency has cancelled its planned movie adaptation of acclaimed graphic novel Pyongyang, by cartoonist Guy Delisle. The film was set to be directed by Pirates of the Caribbean'sGore Verbinski, with a script by Steve Conrad. Steve Carell was set to headline, coming off a particularly strong reception to his dramatic turn in Foxcatcher. Delisle's comic was a gripping memoir of his time working in the communist state, where he was sent to oversee animation work. At times a whimsical look at a culture alien to westerners, at others a chilling insight into daily life in the oppressive nation, its original publication came about only through a loophole in the confidentiality contract the artist had to sign to even enter the country. The film version was to skew darker, set to be "a paranoid thriller", with production due to start in March 2015. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
A cyber espionage campaign targeting activist groups in Syria is likely the work of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), according to a report published on Thursday by CitizenLab, a research group at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. The attacks have targeted a group of Syrian activists, Raqqah Is Being Slaughtered Silently (RSS), that focuses on documenting human rights abuses in the northern Syrian city of Ar-Raqqah, which is currently occupied by ISIS, according to the analysis. The attacks used a tailored e-mail message to direct targeted users to an infected slide show, purportedly showing locations of ISIS forces and US airstrikes, but in reality, compromising the victim’s computer. The attack does not result in remote access to a victim’s computer, but does result in a malicious program sending out occasional e-mail messages with data about the victim’s system and location, including the Internet protocol (IP) address, CitizenLab said in its analysis. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
At the president's end-of-year speech on Friday afternoon, Barak Obama acknowledged the FBI's report claiming that North Korea was behind the November hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment and confirmed that the US would lay blame on the isolated nation for Sony's hack. The president promised a “proportional response,” but he did not give more details as to what that response would look like. “They caused a lot of damage, and we will respond,” Obama told the press. “It will be proportional, and it will be at the time and place that we choose; it's not something I'm going to announce at a press conference.” The president continued, calling for the US government to help private interests shore up their security practices, although he was vague on details for that plan as well. “Part of the problem is you've got weak states that can engage in this kind of attack, you've got non-state actors, that's part of the reason we need to work with congress and get an actual bill passed to prevent these attacks from taking place.” When asked whether he thought Sony did the right thing in pulling the movie The Interview from theaters, the president spoke remarkably candidly. “Sony is a corporation, it suffered significant damage... I am sympathetic to the concerns that they faced. Having said all that ,yes, I think they made a mistake.” Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
Congressional Republicans are drafting an "industry-backed proposal" to enforce net neutrality rules while preventing the Federal Communications Commission from reclassifying Internet service as a utility, The Washington Post reported today. The Republicans "appear likely to introduce legislation next month," the report said. If true, Internet providers and Republicans would be resigning themselves to some form of network neutrality rules being imposed on broadband service. But they would avoid the imposition of utility rules under Title II of the Communications Act, a scenario the industry fears even more. The FCC is on track to issue network neutrality rules that prevent or limit the ability of Internet providers to block or discriminate against applications and websites. The rules would include restrictions on "fast lanes" in which online content providers could pay ISPs for preferred access. The FCC may need to use Title II to impose these rules because of a Verizon lawsuit that led to a court decision saying the FCC could not impose per se common carrier obligations without reclassifying broadband providers as common carriers. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation's Washington press office has issued an update on the investigation into the cyber attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, including the conclusion that North Korea was behind it. “As a result of our investigation, and in close collaboration with other US government departments and agencies, the FBI now has enough information to conclude that the North Korean government is responsible for these actions,” the office said in a statement. However, the information cited by the FBI’s update may not be as conclusive as many would like. Other hints at the attribution were provided to news organizations off-the-record, but the FBI’s public statements are far from definitive. Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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T-Mobile US has given up its fight against a lawsuit filed by the US government, agreeing today to refund $90 million or more to customers who were charged premium text message fees without their consent. The Federal Trade Commission alleged that T-Mobile made hundreds of millions of dollars off the practice of passing along third-party charges to customers without their authorization and taking a commission on each charge. T-Mobile could end up paying much more than $90 million. "The settlement requires that they provide full refunds to consumers, with a total of 'at least' $90 million," an FTC spokesperson explained. "The $90 million is a floor. If they receive refund requests of more than that, they have to provide them." In addition to everything it pays back customers, T-Mobile will pay $18 million in fines and penalties to state attorneys general and $4.5 million to the Federal Communications Commission. If T-Mobile receives less than $90 million worth of refund requests, the extra fines can be counted toward the minimum payment of $90 million. If the payment is still under $90 million, "the balance must be remitted to the FTC for additional consumer redress, consumer education, or other uses," the FTC said. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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