posted about 9 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Health Service Journal) Researchers have found more digital fingerprints tying this month's WCry ransomware worm to the same prolific hacking group that attacked Sony Pictures in 2014 and the Bangladesh Central Bank last year. Last week, a researcher at Google identified identical code found in a WCry sample from February and an early 2015 version of Contopee, a malicious backdoor used by Lazarus Group, a hacking team that has been operating since at least 2011. Additional fingerprints linked Lazarus Group to hacks that wiped almost a terabyte's worth of data from Sony Pictures and siphoned a reported $81 million from the Bangladesh Central Bank last year. Researchers say Lazarus Group carries out hacks on behalf of North Korea. On Monday, researchers from security firm Symantec presented additional evidence that further builds the case that WCry, which is also known as WannaCry, is closely linked to Lazarus Group. The evidence includes: Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 13 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Not just any universe... a DARK one. (credit: Universal Studios) If you can't beat 'em, misunderstand 'em. That appears to be the logic coming from the programming wizards at Universal Studios. The film production company took the (mummy) wraps off its "Dark Universe" initiative on Monday, and its intent is clear: to "reboot" the company's old monster-movie franchises over the next few years with big-name actors, interconnecting plots, and a rising tide of evil—a tide, of course, that can only be stopped by good guys who don't always follow the rules. As if this didn't sound Marvel-y or Avengers-y enough, get a load of this official synopsis of what's to come: Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 14 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / From Daimler's press page: "Federal Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel in a conversation with Dieter Zetsche (Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars) and two employees of Accumotive accompanied by Minister President of Saxony Stanislaw Tillich as well as Markus Schäfer (Member of the Divisional Board of Mercedes-Benz Cars, Production and Supply Chain) and Frank Blome (Managing Director Deutsche Accumotive GmbH & Co. KG)." (credit: Daimler) On Monday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel visited the site of a future lithium-ion battery factory in the eastern German town of Kamenz. The factory is being developed by Mercedes-Benz manufacturer Daimler, which will devote approximately €500 million (or $562 million) to churning out batteries for electric vehicles and stationary storage. If the project seems similar to Tesla’s Nevada-based Gigafactory, you wouldn’t be alone in making that comparison. Tesla and Panasonic partnered to devote $5 billion to building a lithium-ion battery factory outside of Reno, Nevada, and the electric-car maker has said it hopes to produce 35 gigawatt-hours of auto and stationary batteries by 2018. Daimler didn’t give any projections for its factory’s potential capacity, but it did say that its investment would quadruple the size of an existing battery factory on the site, which is run by Accumotive, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Daimler. The German automaker is also pledging another €500 million to expand battery production worldwide. And if all goes well at the Kamenz site, Daimler says it will “go into operation in mid-2018.” Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 15 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / All those Lawbreakers characters had better be playing on the same platform... After years of online gaming being strictly segregated by platform, recent months have seen a resurgence in the idea of playing with friends and rivals on different hardware. That includes some hesitant attempts by game makers to cross the PC/console barrier with cross-play between players using a mouse/keyboard and those using handheld controllers, even in first-person shooters. At least one major developer is not a fan of the emerging trend, though. "We made the decision not to do cross-play, and there are a lot of people with this pipe dream of PC and console cross-play," Lawbreakers lead developer Cliff Bleszinski told PCGamesN while announcing a PS4 port of what was formerly a PC exclusive. "It's like, 'No, be the best console game you can be, or be the best PC game you can be.' Because then you get PC players getting angry that there's aim assist on console, or with balance issues." The announcement follows on a Eurogamer interview Bleszinski gave a year ago, in which he commented on a then-theoretical console version. "The thing about the controller is it's going to be tricky," he said at the time. "We've played around with the controller a little bit and, thing is, if we get around to doing console ports, I don't want to do cross-play. Some people think that's the holy grail for a lot of games, and I'm like, 'no.' If you have somebody with a keyboard and mouse versus somebody with a controller, I'm sorry, but the person with the keyboard and mouse is going to win nine times out of 10." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 15 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Little touches like these, before and after fights, really give the game personality. (credit: NetherRealm Studios) There’s a lot going on in Injustice 2—maybe more than the game itself can keep track of, at times. But thanks to developer NetherRealm’s ongoing commitment to making the most accessible fighting games this side of Divekick, Injustice 2 is only occasionally overwhelming. That permissiveness begins with Injustice 2’s single-player campaign, which just might set a new gold standard for such modes in fighting games. Granted, that’s a low bar to clear, and NetherRealm is mostly competing with itself. But the cinematic unfolding of alternate-universe comic-book antics in Injustice 2 is wildly fun in its own right. In the Injustice-verse, Superman is a villain. The first Injustice ended with the last son of Krypton locked up and awaiting trial for murdering both criminals and “potential” wrongdoers without hearings of their own. Just as Batman and his “no-kill club” allies are returning things to normal, a Superman-level threat invades Earth in the form of Brainiac. The alien machine-man wants the Kryptonian for his own personal collection, and perhaps the only one that can stop the invasion is Superman himself. Punching ensues. Read 21 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 16 hours ago on ars technica
The launch of a Pukguksong-2 solid-fuel missile from a mobile launcher on May 21 may signal a new level of worries for the US, Japan, and South Korea. (credit: KCNA (North Korean state media)) On Sunday, the North Korean military conducted a second, successful test of the Pukguksong-2, a solid-fuel intermediate range ballistic missile based on a design derived from the country's submarine-launched ballistic missile. While this might seem like just more saber-rattling from Pyongyang's leadership given the relatively continuous chain of test launches since President Donald Trump's inauguration (a total of 10 so far this year), this launch and the launch on May 13 carry a bit more weight. According to North Korea's government media, Sunday's test shows that the Pukguksong-2 is now ready to be "mass-produced." If true, that development would substantially increase the threat posed by North Korea's missile force—the Pukguksong-2 can be deployed on tracked mobile launchers, and it uses a "cold-launch" system that requires much less preparation time, which provides much less of an opportunity for the US and allies to detect an impending attack. The tracked launchers also increase the potential number of locations from which the missile could be launched. And the range of the missile appears to be greater than originally estimated. Sunday's missile test was tracked by US Pacific Command. The test missile flew in a high-lofting path from North Korea's west coast across the country and toward Japan, landing in the Sea of Japan. The missile flew approximately 500 kilometers (310 miles) and reached an altitude of about 560 kilometers (about 350 miles). It has an estimated range of 3,000 kilometers (1,900 miles) or more. If launched from within North Korea, the missile could potentially strike all of Japan, South Korea, and even US forces in Guam. By comparison, the Pukguksong-1 submarine-launched missile is believed to have a 1,000 kilometer (620 mile) range. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 16 hours ago on ars technica
Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Marshall, Texas. (credit: Joe Mullin) The US Supreme Court ruled (PDF) today on how to interpret the patent venue laws, and the controversial business of "patent trolling" may never be the same. In a unanimous decision, the justices held that the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which handles all patent appeals, has been using the wrong standard to decide where a patent lawsuit can be brought. Today's Supreme Court ruling in TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods enforces a more strict standard for where cases can be filed. It overturns a looser rule that the Federal Circuit has used since 1990. The ruling may well signal the demise of the Eastern District of Texas as a favorite venue for patent lawsuits, especially those brought by "patent trolls," which have no business outside of licensing and litigating patents. Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 17 hours ago on ars technica
Audi There's a danger with SUVs, but not the kind you might suspect. Should any lingering doubts exist that SUVs have inherited the automotive Earth, chew on this: Audi, the most recent luxury brand to the SUV playpen in the US, now counts 24 percent of all its USA sales from the Q5 column. But that's not dangerous. One other luxury car brand offers a staggering five different SUV models. But even that's not dangerous. The danger is that, through better suspension (including sophisticated electronics that change to your whim or situational input) and better tires, SUVs are getting closer and closer in performance level to sports sedans. The danger is that even though the SUV already killed the American station wagon market, it's not satisfied. The SUV is coming after the hot sports sedan. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 17 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: BenGrantham) For years, Yahoo Mail has exposed a wealth of private user data because it failed to update widely used image-processing software that contained critical vulnerabilities. That's according to a security researcher who warned that other popular services are also likely to be leaking sensitive subscriber secrets. Chris Evans, the researcher who discovered the vulnerabilities and reported them privately to Yahoo engineers, has dubbed them "Yahoobleed" because the vulnerabilities caused the site to bleed contents stored in server memory. The easy-to-exploit flaws resided in ImageMagick, an image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other programming languages. One version of Yahoobleed was the result of Yahoo failing to install a critical patch released in January 2015. A second Yahoobleed vulnerability was the result of a bug that ImageMagick developers fixed only recently after receiving a private report from Evans. The vulnerability discovered by Evans could be exploited by e-mailing a maliciously manipulated image file to a Yahoo Mail address. After opening the 18-byte file, chunks of Yahoo server memory began leaking to the end user. Evans called this version of the attack "Yahoobleed1." "Yahoobleed2" worked by using a hacking tool known as "Strings" to exploit the vulnerability fixed in January 2015. Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 17 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Agent Dale Cooper is very much back. (credit: Suzanne Tenner / Showtime) Warning: This post contains some spoilers for Twin Peaks: The Return alongside references to details from the original series. “Is it future, or is it past?” -Mike (a benign spirit inhabiting a shoe salesman sitting in an extra-dimensional waiting room) It almost goes without saying that Twin Peaks felt like nothing else on TV back when it debuted on ABC in the early 1990s. Excitingly, the same applies to last night’s premiere of Twin Peaks: The Return on Showtime. A beloved cult-classic has surfaced 25 years later, and it immediately throws both old and new viewers into the deep-end without the slightest hint of a flotation device. Don't expect any “here’s what happened a quarter-century ago” catch-up sequences. Laura Palmer gets no explanation. Margaret the Log Lady gets no explanation. And the dual Dale Coopers/Red Room/extra-dimensional lodges/otherworldly spirits sure as hell get no explanations. Ostensibly, Twin Peaks: The Return aims to please fans by making such choices, but going into the series blind in 2017 probably doesn’t leave you that far behind, even if it’ll make those Dale Cooper-Red Room sequences extra surreal and obtuse. Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 17 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge The shortlist for board game's biggest international award, the Spiel des Jahres (Game of the Year), has just been announced by the German critics' association that awards the prize. The main Spiel des Jahres award is currently reserved for lighter, family-style games, while the more complex Kennerspiel des Jahres honors deeper or more strategic games. The final decision will be made this summer, but for now, if you're looking for something new to play with friends or family, this list provides a nice starting point. Ars Cardboard's own recommendations from the list are, in order of complexity, Kingdomino (light), Exit—The Game (light-medium, very puzzle-y), and Terraforming Mars (medium-heavy, thinky). Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 18 hours ago on ars technica
Trailer for tonight's episode of Year Million. (video link) If you're interested in where science and technology might take humanity over the next million years, you might want to check out a new series from National Geographic called Year Million. Part science fiction, part speculative commentary, the show explores what could happen to humanity if we actually achieve some of today's scientific moonshots, like extreme longevity, human-equivalent AI, fully immersive VR, and space colonization. The series' advisers included futurists like George Dvorsky and Michio Kaku, as well as science fiction writers like N.K. Jemisin. Their commentary is interspersed with the story of a family whose members go through all the changes created by technology. Thanks to life extension, they get to live for a million years and see the Earth and humanity utterly transformed. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 18 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Atypeek) Two Democratic senators have asked Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai to explain why "FCC security personnel reportedly manhandled, threatened, and ejected" a journalist who was trying to ask questions after last week's net neutrality vote. Senators Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.) sent a letter to Pai Friday, one day after CQ Roll Call reporter John Donnelly accused FCC guards of forcing him out of the building when he was trying to talk to Pai and Commissioner Michael O'Rielly. Udall and Hassan wrote: Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 18 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Yuriko Nakao/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Tesla CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter on Sunday night to let the world know that a revised version of the company's semi-autonomous Autopilot software would arrive on compatible cars next month. Excited about the Tesla Autopilot software release rolling out next month. New control algorithm feels as smooth as silk. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) May 22, 2017 The release will be for the most recent versions of the Model S sedan and Model X SUV, built from October 2016 onward. Earlier Teslas—known as HW1 or "hardware 1" vehicles—used sensors and algorithms from Mobileye (like many other semi-autonomous cars). However, following a fatal crash in May 2016 that garnered a lot of media attention, the relationship between Tesla and Mobileye broke down, and the former decided to develop its own sensor suite and software. (An NHTSA investigation into the crash revealed that the car's software was not to blame for the accident and that virtually every automatic emergency braking system would also have failed to activate given the specific circumstances of the crash.) Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 19 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Intropin) Amid a national shortage of a critical medicine, US hospitals are hoarding vials, delaying surgeries, and turning away patients, The New York Times reports. The medicine in short supply: solutions of sodium bicarbonate—aka, baking soda. The simple drug is used in all sorts of treatments, from chemotherapies to those for organ failure. It can help correct the pH of blood and ease the pain of stitches. It is used in open-heart surgery, can help reverse poisonings, and is kept on emergency crash carts. But, however basic and life-saving, the drug has been in short supply since around February. The country’s two suppliers, Pfizer and Amphastar, ran low following an issue with one of Pfizer’s suppliers—the issue was undisclosed due to confidentiality agreements. Amphastar’s supplies took a hit with a spike in demand from desperate Pfizer customers. Both companies told the NYT that they don’t know when exactly supplies will be restored. They speculate that it will be no earlier than June or August. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 20 hours ago on ars technica
An Oregon man who stripped naked at an airport security screening checkpoint must pay a $500 fine after a federal appeals court ruled that the First Amendment does not protect this method of protest. The nude protest at Portland International Airport (PDX) by a traveler named John Brennan prompted legal action by both the federal government and the state of Oregon. Portland prosecutors charged him with indecent exposure. A local judge acquitted him, saying that Oregon cannot "punish" him for his nudity, which amounted to protest speech protected by the First Amendment. Federal authorities also imposed a civil fine for violating a US law that prohibits "interference with screening personnel." The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, siding with the government, ruled last week that the First Amendment is no defense to getting naked in a TSA security line. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 21 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The Samsung Chromebook Pro is finally going to be a real device. Lost in the hubbub of Google I/O Friday, Samsung quietly dropped a press release pegging the device for a May 28 release date. With the Chromebook Pixel off the market, the all-aluminum, touch-and-pen enabled, Android app-packing Samsung "Chromebook" models were immediately looked to as the flagships of the Chromebook universe. Samsung announced the ARM-powered Chromebook Plus and Intel-powered Chromebook Pro at CES in January, and the Plus saw a reasonable release date the next month. Review units for the faster, Intel-powered Chromebook Pro went out in February, too, but the actual release date remained a mystery. Now it's May, and almost five months after the announcement, the Chromebook Pro will finally hit the streets. The reason for the delay is the Android apps on Chrome OS feature. It has been around as a "beta" for some time, but wrapping things up apparently took much longer than Google expected. According to a report from The Verge, the Android on Chrome OS beta will continue into the summer. And while the Chromebook Pro's Android container will be running Android 7.0, it still won't support window resizing at launch. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 21 hours ago on ars technica
Careful, friend... while you were sleeping, the real-world value of that gold pile just went down a bit. Activision's decision to sell Destiny 2 through Blizzard's Battle.net (or the Blizzard app, if you insist on calling it that) is already having ripple effects throughout the platform. Look no further than World of Warcraft, where the real-world value of in-game gold has sunk quickly in the wake of the announcement, according to the tracker at WoWToken.info. The in-game auction price of a WoW Token—which can be exchanged for $15 in credit on other Battle.net games—settled at around 120,000 gold pieces on North American servers this morning. That's up from a price of about 110,000 gold pieces just before the Destiny 2 announcement threw the market into turmoil, causing the Token price to briefly spike to over 140,000 gold on Thursday evening. The result looks to be about a 7 percent decline in the real-world buying power of a piece of WoW gold in less than a week. Put another way, the functional price of a $60 copy of Destiny 2 in WoW gold jumped from just under 450,000 gold pieces to just over 480,000 in a matter of days. An incredibly focused, min-maxing gold farmer could still earn that gold in a month or two of dedicated WoW play, though. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 21 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge (credit: University of Tasmania) Plastic is durable—very, very durable—which is why we like it. Since it started being mass-produced in the 1950s, annual production has increased 300-fold. Because plastic is so durable, when our kids grow up and we purge our toy chests, or even just when we finish a bottle of laundry detergent or shampoo, it doesn’t actually go away. While we're recycling increasing amounts of plastic, a lot of it still ends up in the oceans. Floating garbage patches have brought some attention to the issue of our contamination of the seas. But it's not just the waters themselves that have ended up cluttered with plastic. A recent survey shows that a staggering amount of our stuff is coming ashore on the extremely remote Henderson Island. Henderson Island is a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Pitcairn Group of Islands in the South Pacific, roughly half way between New Zealand and Peru. According to UNESCO, Henderson is one of the best examples we have of an elevated coral atoll ecosystem. It was colonized by Polynesians between the 12th and 15th centuries but has been uninhabited by humans since then. It is of interest to evolutionary biologists because it has 10 plant species and four bird species that are only found there. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 22 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Gearah Goldstein speaks with her plastic surgeon, Dr. Loren Schechter, about her gender confirmation surgery. (credit: ASPS) Gender confirmation procedures are on the rise in the US, doctors reported Monday. Surgeons performed more than 3,200 transfeminine and transmasculine procedures in 2016, according to new data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). That’s nearly a 20 percent increase from numbers in 2015, when the ASPS began tracking the procedures, the society says. Gender confirmation surgeries encompass a variety of procedures, including those that contour or transform the face, chest, or genitals. “There is no one-size-fits-all approach to gender confirmation," Loren Schechter, a board-certified plastic surgeon based in Chicago, said in a statement. "There's a wide spectrum of surgeries that someone may choose to treat gender dysphoria, which is a disconnect between how an individual feels and what that person's anatomic characteristics are." Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 22 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / John L. Steele, photographed in Chicago in 2010. (credit: Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images) John Steele, one of the masterminds behind the Prenda Law "copyright trolling" scheme, has been disbarred. Court papers indicate that Steele agreed to the disbarment, which was announced by the Illinois Supreme Court on Friday. Steele pled guilty in March to federal fraud and money laundering charges. Over the course of several years, Steele said he and a co-defendant, Paul Hansmeier, made more than $6 million with "sham entities" that threatened Internet users with copyright lawsuits. Along with Hansmeier and a now-deceased attorney named Paul Duffy, Steele "conspired to extort settlement funds from thousands of Internet users in a multi-jurisdictional copyright litigation scheme," Illinois attorney regulators said in a statement of charges. "Specifically, they attempted to exact settlements from users who allegedly infringed on the copyrights of certain pornographic movies, including movies that Mr. Steele himself produced and distributed." Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 23 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A photo from the China Geological Survey. The researchers extracted methane hydrate from the bottom of the South China Sea. (credit: China Geological Survey) This month, teams from Japan and China have successfully extracted methane hydrate, a hydrocarbon gas trapped in a structure of water molecules, off the seafloor. The substance looks like ice but can be set on fire, and it’s energy-dense—one cubic meter of methane hydrate can contain 160 cubic meters of gas. This makes searching for methane hydrate an attractive research project for several countries. According to the Department of Energy, methane hydrates are abundant on the seafloor and under permafrost, and they contain “perhaps more organic carbon that all the world’s oil, gas, and coal combined.” Such vast reserves of fossil fuels are untapped because of how difficult it is to extract them. As a 2012 post from the Energy Information Agency (EIA) stated, until recently, methane hydrates “provided more problems than solutions.” Preventing their formation around deepwater oil and gas drilling operations has been a crucial part of planning ocean wells. The “ice” substance that contains the gas generally can’t just be picked up off the seafloor because it disintegrates outside of its high-pressure environment. The South China Morning Post wrote that current extraction efforts involve machinery “to depressurize or melt [the methane hydrate] on the sea bed and channel the gas to the surface.” Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 23 hours ago on ars technica
Nissan With the public charging infrastructure for electric cars expanding apace and Tesla Superchargers popping up like mushrooms, the concept of driving a few hundred miles in an EV is no longer as absurd a suggestion as it was just a couple of years ago. But ten thousand miles across Europe and central Asia? Come on now. That’s exactly what Chris Ramsey of Plug In Adventures plans to do, entering an all-electric Nissan Leaf in the 2017 Mongol Rally charity run. It’s the first time an electric vehicle has entered the event. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 24 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Like my father always said, it's always easier to climb a tower while riding a fire-breathing beast. (credit: WB Interactive / Monolith) LOS ANGELES—Having played a fair amount of Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor, I thought I knew what I was in for with its upcoming sequel, Shadow of War. The badass, "slay orcs all around" hero of the first game, Talion, returns with some supernatural twists. You'll use his new slate of dark superpowers against an even tougher crowd of Tolkien-inspired monsters. At recent Shadow of War preview events, the series' developers at Monolith have loudly hinted at one of the game's major new concepts: leadership. Now that your ranger hero is infused with former rival Celebrimbor's dark-elf powers, he can dominate orcs and conscript them to his own army. You'll need the monsters' help to invade and overthrow evil war chiefs at various fortresses and camps. These battlegrounds are packed full of powerful orc foes who remember you, and this idea builds upon SoM's "nemesis" system of persistent enemies. But only last week did Monolith let a particular cat (or orc?) out of the bag: how bleedin' hard this Lord of the Rings adventure game's sequel will be. Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 24 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / A wall of user photos form a Facebook logo at the company's data center in Lulea, Sweden. (credit: JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images) Just as the Tories—in their bid to form the next UK government—push for greater policing of free content ad networks, a trove of documents revealing the secret guidelines used by Facebook's moderators to deal with posts from child abuse to suicide to terrorist propaganda has been leaked online. The Guardian published the Facebook files on Sunday night. It reported some disturbing findings about what can and can't be moderated on Facebook, after the newspaper was passed more than 100 internal training manuals that included spreadsheets and flowcharts on how the Mark Zuckerberg-run company deals with hate speech, violence, self-harm, and a whole range of other issues. So, it's absolutely fine—under Facebook rules—to leave up a violent, deeply misogynistic post that reads: "To snap a bitch's neck, make sure to apply all your pressure to the middle of the throat." Likewise for comments such as "kick a person with red hair," or "let's beat up fat kids." But one that carries a message such as "Someone shoot Trump" is banned from the site, with moderators being advised to remove such a post. Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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