posted about 13 hours ago on ars technica
Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, the Dealmaster is here with a host of tempting deals for you today. The top item is a bundle involving a Linksys WRT1900AC wireless router. You get the router plus a 128GB USB 3.0 drive plus a $100 Dell gift card. The regular price for all this would be $319.99, but today you can get the whole shebang for $229.99! Be sure to check out that and a host of other deals below. Linksys WRT1900AC Wireless Router + 128GB USB 3.0 Drive + $100 Dell Gift Card for $229.99 (Gift Card appears in cart - list price $319.99). Ubiquiti Networks UAP-AC-PRO UniFi Access Point Enterprise Wi-Fi System for $134.57 (list price $169.99). TP-Link AV600 Gigabit Powerline Ethernet Adapter Kit for $34.99 (list price $59.99). EC Technology USB Portable Battery (Charges iPhone 6 Plus 5-Times) for $18.99 (use code: 4J5D66OH - list price $34) Bosch Laser Distance Measure (50-Feet) for $29.97 (list price $49.99). ASUS F556 Intel Core i5 1080p 15.6" Laptop w/ 256GB SSD & USB-C for $529.99 (list price $669). Rachio 8-Zone Smart Sprinkler Controller (2nd Gen) + $50 Amazon Gift card for $199.99 (16-Zone for $249.o99). Laptop & Desktop Computers Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 14 hours ago on ars technica
(credit: Anis-Instituto de Bioética) With Brazil already swarming with Zika-loaded mosquitoes, hosting 500,000 foreign athletes and spectators for the 2016 Olympic games there in August poses unnecessary health risks and is downright “unethical,” according to an international group of 150 health experts. In an open letter to Margaret Chan, the Director-General of the World Health Organization, the group strongly urged that the games be moved or postponed. The health experts appealed to WHO, a specialized agency within the United Nations, because it has a well-established partnership with the International Olympic Committee. The partnership, which was affirmed most recently in 2010, is primarily aimed at coordinating the two groups’s efforts to promote healthy lifestyles, such as through physical activity campaigns and making Olympic games tobacco-free. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 15 hours ago on ars technica
(credit: Ekin Technology) Call it the next generation of light bars. Ekin Technology, a Turkish law enforcement technology company, was recently granted an American patent for what just might be the surveillance trifecta: a light bar with an integrated license plate reader (LPR), speedometer, and facial recognition capability. If the "Ekin Patrol" catches on in the United States, it will facilitate a notable acceleration in the advancement of spy tech. While speedometers are relatively old and LPRs are increasingly catching on, facial recognition technology is not yet widespread in America. Agencies ranging from the FBI to the California attorney general's office have expressed their interest in the technology. "The facial recognition equivalent of license plate reader scanning has always been a civil liberties nightmare," Jay Stanley, an analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union, told Ars. "We’ve definitely seen baby steps in that direction, but this technology, if widely deployed, would mean it’s arrived." Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 15 hours ago on ars technica
Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage right here—and let us know what you think. While the worldwide board-gaming community has plenty of awards ceremonies, arguably the most important remains the "Spiel des Jahres" (Game of the Year) award issued by Germany's game critics. Past winners have included everything from Catan to Qwirkle, and winning one of the coveted trophies ensures solid sales and (very occasionally) fame and fortune. This week, the Spiel des Jahres jury released its list of finalists (German) for the main "Spiel des Jahres" prize, which is always quite family friendly, and the newer "Kennerspiel" award for slightly more complex/advanced games. While the winners won't be picked until July, any of these titles would make a great gift for the board game lover in your life, and the list provides a good starting point for exploring the terrific titles from the past year. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 16 hours ago on ars technica
(credit: Flickr user marya) The oxygen minimum zone is the section of ocean that has the lowest oxygen saturation. While the thickness and depth of the OMZ varies, the Pacific Ocean's OMZ has been expanding in recent years. This has consequences for oceanic ecosystems, since animals struggle in this region, and its primary productivity is low. However, the cause of this oxygen decline is not fully understood. A paper published in Nature Geoscience uses climate modeling to indicate that aerosol particulate pollution may be contributing significantly to the acceleration of oxygen depletion. To determine the relationship among atmospheric pollution, ocean dynamics, and the OMZ, researchers performed computational simulations of atmospheric chemistry and its impact on marine biochemistry. This modeling included fluctuations of aerosols that contained soluble iron and fixed nitrogen, coupled with a dust-iron dissolution scheme. The model also included hindcast simulations that tracked anthropogenic pollution increases between the years of 1750 and 2002. The researchers’ model showed that the combination of climate variability and longterm increases in macro- and micronutrients going into the ocean alters the large-scale patterns of ocean productivity and dissolved oxygen. They also saw that variability in ocean circulation and pollution enhanced the deposition of soluble iron, whereas fixed nitrogen did not see the same effect. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 17 hours ago on ars technica
(credit: CBS SF Bay Area) The 28 shootings along a 10-mile stretch of San Francisco-area highway over the past six months have led mayors of the adjacent cities to declare that these "murderous activities" have reached "crisis proportions." Four people have been killed and dozens injured, including a pregnant mother of four children who was shot to death earlier this month. These five mayors want California Gov. Jerry Brown to fund surveillance cameras along all the on and off ramps of Interstate 80 and Highway 4 along the cities of El Cerrito, Hercules, Richmond, San Pablo, and Pinole. According to their letter (PDF) to the governor: Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 18 hours ago on ars technica
Nathan Mattise (using a 2014 Moto G, sorry) The sign says it all. "Welcome to the beginning of your dreams." 10 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } ABITA SPRINGS, Louisiana—To the uninitiated, folk art seems decidedly lo-fi. As opposed to the classical techniques and aesthetics shown off at a fine art or modern art museum, folk art runs a gamut of adjectives: utilitarian, decorative, junky, profound, recycled,, crafty, and more. But at the Abita Mystery House, artistic curators have increasingly embraced the idea of our vintage technology taking on second life as folk art. Enter the old gas station turned museum, and circuit boards from long deceased computers, televisions, and other gadgets line the ceilings. Art Deco style robots (or bots made from more unused circuit boards) stand at attention to take visitor tickets. Artist John Preble started putting together the museum in the 1990s; culture vultures as big as Mike and Frank from the History Channel's American Pickers have descended upon it since. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted about 19 hours ago on ars technica
Enlarge / Vive la Vive! (Or is it el Vive? Crap...) (credit: Lee Hutchinson) My name is Lee and I’m a hardware-a-holic. (Hi, Lee.) In walking the long path to VR on the PC, I’ve built a new gaming computer from scratch, bought peripherals out the wazoo, and, of course, pre-ordered both an Oculus Rift and an HTC Vive so I wouldn't have to choose between the two. If we’re including things like the peripherals I use when playing some VR games—like my Warthog HOTAS and Slaw Device pedals—then my grand total is hovering at $4,000 or so in VR-related expenses. Read 53 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Annette Hurst is an attorney at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe who represented Oracle in the recent Oracle v. Google trial. This op-ed represents her own views and is not intended to represent those of her client or Ars Technica. The Oracle v. Google trial concluded yesterday when a jury returned a verdict in Google's favor. The litigation began in 2010, when Oracle sued Google, saying that the use of Java APIs in Android violated copyright law. After a 2012 trial, a judge held that APIs can't be copyrighted at all, but that ruling was overturned on appeal. In the trial this month, Google successfully argued that its use of Java APIs, about 11,500 lines of code in all, was protected by "fair use." (credit: barraquito) The developer community may be celebrating today what it perceives as a victory in Oracle v. Google. Google won a verdict that an unauthorized, commercial, competitive, harmful use of software in billions of products is fair use. No copyright expert would have ever predicted such a use would be considered fair. Before celebrating, developers should take a closer look. Not only will creators everywhere suffer from this decision if it remains intact, but the free software movement itself now faces substantial jeopardy. While we don't know what ultimately swayed the jury, Google's narrative boiled down to this: because the Java APIs have been open, any use of them was justified and all licensing restrictions should be disregarded. In other words, if you offer your software on an open and free basis, any use is fair use. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: Gage Skidmore) Yesterday in a press conference and speech in North Dakota, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced what some are terming his energy policy. His announcement was extremely short on specifics, included factual inaccuracies, and in some cases contained obvious internal contradictions. As such, what he said might better be termed "energy aspirations." We'll have to wait for the details to see how these aspirations might eventually lead to policy. What were those aspirations? There were two related themes in the announcements: extraction is good, and regulations are bad because they tend to limit extraction. So Trump will get rid of a lot of the latter in order to boost the former. But, at the same time, he'll preserve our air, water, and natural resources. At one point, Trump estimated that "75 percent of our rules and regulations are bad for us." So he'd get rid of most of them: "Any regulation that's outdated, unnecessary, bad for workers, or contrary to the national interest will be scrapped, and scrapped completely." Lest there be any confusion about whose rules were problematic, he went on to accuse the Environmental Protection Agency of using "totalitarian tactics" and accused the Obama administration of blocking extraction. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Verizon workers rallying in July 2015, just before their contract expired. (credit: Communications Workers of America) Thirty-six thousand Verizon employees are close to going back to work because of an agreement struck by the company and union representatives. The workers went on strike on April 13 after working without a contract for 10 months. The union said Verizon was seeking to move jobs offshore, outsource work to low-wage contractors, close call centers, and force technicians to go on months-long assignments away from home. Union reps also accused Verizon of cutting staff instead of living up to promises to install more FiOS fiber lines. But there is now an agreement in principle to end the strike and sign a new four-year contract, US Labor Secretary Thomas Perez announced today. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
The Falcon 9 and its Thaicom satellite payload are ready to go. Will Mother Nature cooperate? (credit: SpaceX) Despite a two-hour window to get off the ground, SpaceX was unable to launch its Falcon 9 rocket this Thursday. According to the company's founder, Elon Musk, the company couldn't conduct the launch due to "a tiny glitch in the motion of an upper stage engine actuator." Better to scrub for 24 hours to investigate the problem and ensure the rocket's readiness, he said. Whereas the weather was nigh perfect on Thursday, it's a tad less so today. Forecasters anticipate a 60 percent chance of "go" conditions for launch when the two-hour window opens at 5:39pm ET (10:39pm BST). Fresh off two straight launches and unprecedented water landings of its Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX will try for its third sea-based landing this evening after it launches a 3,000kg Thaicom communications satellite to a supersynchronous transfer orbit. Like a similar launch three weeks ago, the Thaicom mission requires the first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket to reach a high velocity relative to the Earth's surface before separating from its payload. "As with other missions going to geostationary orbits, the first stage will be subject to extreme velocities and reentry heating, making a successful landing challenging," the company stated in its mission overview. Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: Judit Klein) Yesterday, Illinois senator Terry Link filed an amendment to the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) to relax rules on the collection of facial recognition data, and he attached that amendment to an unrelated bill pertaining to unclaimed property. But on Friday morning, the senator's spokesperson reached out to Ars saying that the bill "had been put on hold," although he would not comment on the reasons for the decision, nor would he speak to when or if the amendment might be revived. If it passes, the amendment would pull the rug out from under a number of lawsuits filed against Facebook, Google, and Snapchat for using facial recognition in photo tagging. At first, it seemed that the amendment would be quietly pushed through the legislative process. A law firm representing plaintiffs in the Facebook case suggested that Sen. Link proposed the amendment yesterday and added it to a bill that has been languishing since February so that state representatives would move to quickly pass the amendment before Memorial Day. But Link's amendment has drawn concern from privacy advocates. The Center for Democracy and Technology wrote that the piece of legislation was proposed "without time for sufficient public debate, less than a week before the end of a legislative session" in an "undemocratic maneuver that minimizes the potential for public engagement on a vital issue of policy and technology." The Electronic Privacy Information Center also wrote that the amendment "would undercut legal protections, exempting facial recognition software from the law." Chris Dore, a partner at the firm representing the Illinois plaintiffs, said that the Illinois Attorney General had also come out this morning against Link's amendment. The Attorney General's Office confirmed to Ars that it is opposed to the changes, although it gave no further statement. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: DailyDot) FBI agents armed with an assault weapon raided the home of a security professional who discovered sensitive data for 22,000 dental patients was available on the Internet, according to a report published Friday. Justin Shafer, who is described as a dental computer technician and software security researcher, reportedly said the raid happened on Tuesday at 6:30am as he, his wife, and three young children were sleeping. He said it started when his doorbell rang incessantly and someone banged hard on his door. According to Friday's report: “My first thought was that my dad had died,” Shafer told Daily Dot in a phone interview, “but then as I went to the door, I saw all the flashing blue and red lights.” With the baby crying in fear from the racket, Shafer opened the door to find what he estimated to be 12 to 15 FBI agents. One was “pointing a ‘big green’ assault weapon at me,” Shafer told Daily Dot, “and the baby’s crib was only feet from the door.” The agents allegedly ordered Shafer to put his hands behind his back. As they handcuffed him, his 9-year-old daughter cried in terror, Shafter said, and his wife tried to tell the agents that there were three young children in the house. Once handcuffed, Shafer was taken outside, still in his boxer shorts, still not knowing what was going on or why. Over the next few hours, the agents seized all of Shafer’s computers and devices—“and even my Dentrix magazines,” Shafer said. “The only thing they left was my wife’s phone.” The seized property list, a copy of which was provided to Daily Dot, shows that federal agents took 29 items. Enter Eaglesoft A FBI agent told Shafer the raid stemmed from an incident in February, when Shafer discovered a file transfer protocol server operated by Eaglesoft, a provider of dental practice management software. The FTP server reportedly stored patient data in a way that made it easily accessible to anyone. Shafer contacted DataBreaches.net and asked for help privately notifying the software maker, and once the patient data was secured, the breach notification site published this disclosure. In a blog post of his own, Shafer later discussed the FTP lapse and a separate Eaglesoft vulnerability involving hard-coded database credentials. Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
The DJI Phantom 4 tracks a person. (credit: Ron Amadeo) The owner of a drone store outside Nashville told Ars on Friday that two of his customers have had their unmanned aerial vehicles shot at in recent weeks. The incident is reminiscent of last year’s similar incident in California and another in Kentucky, which resulted in the shooter being cleared on local firearms charges. As drones become more pervasive, it seems that drones, perceived privacy violations, and firearms are increasingly becoming a dangerous combination. According to Byron Brock, the owner of Vivid Aerial in Whites Creek, a man named Gary Sammons was flying his new DJI Phantom 4 above his home in Rutherford County last Saturday. Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: Aurich Lawson) This just in: Android updates are still really slow. The latest numbers put the seven-month-old Android 6.0 Marshmallow at just 7.5 percent of devices. That's an average of just over one percent per month, so if this keeps up, by 2020 the majority of devices will be compatible with Marshmallow or higher. Great. Google's latest attempt at fixing Android's update problem reportedly involves "a list." On this list, OEMs are ranked by how fast they deliver updates, which the report says is used to "highlight proactive manufacturers and shame tardy vendors." Google has even thought about making this list public. Does anyone think this is going to work? Can "shame" really be the driving force behind getting companies to update? We'd imagine "making the list public" would mean posting it to a website—is that really going to compete with the millions of dollars these companies spend on advertising? Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
A grid full of stock cars at the hallowed Indianapolis Motor Speedway. This is familiar ground for NASCAR. 4 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } 2016 has been a bit of a bumper year for Turn 10. Forza Motorsport 6 has been ported to Windows 10, and the Xbox One version has had not one but two expansion packs—first the return of Porsche and more recently an official NASCAR license. Stock cars have appeared in previous installments of the franchise (last seen in Forza 4), but the $20 NASCAR expansion puts these 3,300lb (1.497kg) 700+hp monsters front and center. Turn 10 also pushed out a fairly significant update to Forza 6 alongside (but independently of) the NASCAR expansion, adding some tweaks to the game that players will benefit from even if they don't want to buy the stock cars. Drafting in the slipstream of another car has been tweaked. When you're racing in a pack, the HUD now has little proximity arrows that let you know someone is in a blindspot. You can configure games to include mandatory pit stops and also rolling starts (as opposed to taking off from a standstill). As for those NASCAR Cup cars, arguably this is a brave move. The new career campaign transplants these specialized oval racing machines onto race circuits from around the world, pitting them head-to-head against more conventional Forza fodder (sports cars like the Audi R8 LMS, Ferrari 458 GTE, and McLaren 12C GT3 which race at Le Mans and the like). The sport has a well-deserved reputation for extremely careful control of its image, hence my surprise at their willingness to enter into such a direct comparison with other flavors of racing. It's the automotive equivalent of firing up Madden and then facing off against Manchester United or the New Zealand All Blacks. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: Bill Dickinson) The Federal Communications Commission is making another $2.15 billion available for rural broadband projects, and it's trying to direct at least some of that money toward building services with gigabit download speeds and unlimited data. The FCC voted for the funding Wednesday and released the full details yesterday. The money, $215 million a year for 10 years, will be distributed to Internet providers through a reverse auction in which bidders will commit to providing specific performance levels. "We now adopt an auction design in which bidders committing to different performance levels will compete head to head in the auction, with weights to take into account our preference for higher speeds over lower speeds, higher usage over lower usage allowances, and low latency over high latency," the FCC said. Prices should be "reasonably comparable to similar offerings in urban areas," the FCC said. Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Printing butterflies is just one possibility for the new inkjet/laser system. (credit: Lewis Lab / Wyss Institute at Harvard University) Customizable, wearable electronics open the door to things like heart-monitoring t-shirts and health-tracking bracelets. But placing the needed wiring in a complex 3D architecture has been hard to do cheaply. Existing approaches are limited by material requirements and, in the case of 3D writing, slow printing speeds. Recently, a research team at Harvard University developed a new method to rapidly 3D print free-standing, highly conductive, ductile metallic wires. The new method combines 3D printing with focused infrared lasers that quickly anneal the printed nanoparticles into the desired architecture. The result is a wire with an electrical conductivity that approaches that of bulk silver. 3D printed conductive wires The new 3D printing approach starts like a standard inkjet: concentrated silver nanoparticle inks are printed through a glass nozzle. The ink is then rapidly annealed by a focused infrared beam trailing the print stream by 100µm. This laser annealing process increases the density of the nanoparticles, transforming them into a shiny silver wire. The researchers demonstrated its ability to print an array of silver wires with diameters ranging from the sub-micron up to 20µm through variation of a few key printing parameters. Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: Aurich Lawson) Ars can confirm that at least one major developer is currently planning to release a new virtual reality game on the Xbox One in 2017 and plans to show that game at E3. The news lends credence to multiple recent reports suggesting Microsoft is planning a more powerful, VR-compatible Xbox One for 2017. The information was provided to Ars directly by the developer as part of pre-E3 planning and was confirmed by a PR representative. Ars isn't at liberty to discuss the name of the game or the specific developer, but we can say that a well-known European studio is planning "a new VR game" set in the universe of an established, long-running franchise. The game is also being planned for release on the PC and PS4, and while it seems likely the E3 demonstration will be on one of those platforms, the PR representative was clear that an Xbox One version was also being planned. The game's working title contains the word "VR," strongly suggesting this isn't merely a VR-compatible game that happens to have a more traditional Xbox One version. Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
(credit: CSPAN) On Wednesday, the inspector general of the Department of State issued a scathing report on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of a private mail server during her tenure there, further securing the episode's legacy as perhaps the most historic case of "shadow IT" ever. Paying a State Department employee on the side to set up and administer her personal mail server, Clinton claims she just was doing what her predecessors did—but you'd be hard-pressed to find any government executive who ignored rules, regulations, and federal law so audaciously just to get mobile e-mail access. If you've worked in IT for any amount of time, you've run across the shadow IT syndrome—employees using outside services to fix a problem rather than using internally supported tools. Sometimes (but rarely), it's actually mission-essential—for example, at a previous employer, when half the company lost access to e-mail and the content management system because a network card was stolen in a smash-and-grab at the telco's co-location facility, I set up a password-secured Wiki on my personal Web server to handle workflow and communications for a day. (The CIO was not happy, particularly when my boss wanted me to write an article about it. The corporate counsel had the story spiked because it exposed a Sarbanes-Oxley breach—not by me, but by the company's failure to have a backup system.) Often, people use shadow IT at work because of a lack of official IT resources to support a need. But it's also often about personal convenience—especially the personal convenience of executives and managers who want what they want and will twist the arm of someone in IT to support it whether it's within policy or not (or find someone else to do it for them and then tell IT they have to support it). Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 1 day ago on ars technica
Normally Blue Origin's New Shepard spacecraft would require three parachutes to land. (credit: Blue Origin) Spaceflight entrepreneur Jeff Bezos has promised to test his New Shepard spacecraft to the limit, and perhaps it is time to take him at his word. On Thursday, the founder of Blue Origin said his company has nearly finished planning the next test flight for his space capsule, and this time the crew vehicle will attempt to land with one of its three parachutes intentionally failing. The goal, Bezos said, is to demonstrate New Shepard’s ability to safely handle such a scenario. “It promises to be an exciting demonstration,” he wrote, perhaps understatedly, in an e-mail. One of the maxims of spaceflight is that every launch is a test flight—rockets and spacecraft just don’t fly frequently enough, like airplanes, for spaceflight to become routine. So every time the space shuttle, or Saturn V or any other vehicle flew, engineers on the ground would learn more about the launch system, and how it operated. The same is true today, even for frequently flown rockets such as the Atlas V or Soyuz launch vehicle. But what if it didn’t have to be that way? With the New Shepard architecture, a capsule atop a propulsion module powered by a single BE-3 engine, Blue Origin has fashioned a suborbital launch system that is not only completely reusable but is one that also appears to be relatively inexpensive to fly, costing a few tens of thousands of dollars to turn around. Critically for testing purposes, it is also completely autonomous. This means Blue Origin can test New Shepard as much as it likes to ensure the vehicle is safe without taking any meaningful risk. It might even get to the point where, one day, each flight is not a test flight. Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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X-Men: Apocalypse Why am I wearing this weird greenish-blue outfit and prosthetics on my face? Maybe this is why I'm so angry all the time! 6 more images in gallery .related-stories { display: none !important; } The best way to approach X-Men: Apocalypse is to think of it as an actual series of comics—some of the individual books are incredible, and other ones are absolutely meh. Translated into movie terms, that means you'll flip from a scene of holy-shit awesomepants to a subplot where you know exactly what's about to happen because it's so grindingly obvious. Whether the movie as a whole works for you depends on your investment in these characters and how much filler you're willing to endure to reach those transcendent moments that genuinely shine with a sense of wonder and fascination. Apocalypse is the third in the latest X-Men trilogy, finishing off a timeline that took us back to the origins of the X-Men in the 1960s with First Class, went all timey-wimey in Days of Future Past, and has now landed solidly in the 1980s, complete with bad hair and new-wave music. Directed by Bryan Singer, who helmed two of the original X-Men movies as well as Days of Future Past, it's a perfectly competent action movie with a few dazzling effects. Singer has continued the trilogy's theme of history affecting the future by picking Apocalypse as his lead villain. Possibly the very first mutant on Earth, Apocalypse is virtually immortal and was last seen ruling over ancient Egypt, sucking the powers out of mutants using a weird slab of glowing rock. A series of superpowered shenanigans left him buried in rubble for thousands of years, only to be resurrected by cultists who want him to rule the world again with his extremely old-school values. Great characters, and missed opportunities As Apocalypse gathers his new gang of mutant buddies and plots to destroy everything in a way that is unbelievably predictable, we're treated to little pyrotechnic snippets of mutant life after the events of Days of Future Past. If you recall, that movie ended with Mystique revealing herself to the world in an intense "coming out" moment for all mutantkind. Now everyone knows about mutants, and the classes at Professor X's school are growing ever larger. Xavier has just recruited Jean Gray (a terrific Sophie Turner, taking a break from playing Sansa Stark), as well as Cyclops, who doesn't quite have control of his burning eyes yet. The relationships that bloom in the first trilogy are just getting started here. Be on the lookout for the first meeting between Jean and Wolverine, who have a very "it's complicated" relationship in the comics that's gracefully evoked here. Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
(credit: Garrett Ewald) The investigation into the attempted $1 billion electronic heist at the Bangladesh central bank has expanded to as many as 12 more banks that all use the SWIFT payment network. Security firm FireEye, investigating the hack, has been contacted by numerous other banks, including some in New Zealand and the Philippines. While most of the attempted transfers in the original heist were cancelled, some $81 million was sent to the Philippines and subsequently laundered through casinos. The SWIFT organization in a statement said that some of these reports may be false positives, and that banks should rigorously review their computing environments to look for hackers. Symantec, meanwhile, has corroborated earlier claims from BAE Systems that the hackers that stole from the Bangladesh central bank are linked to the hackers that have attacked targets in the US and South Korea since 2009, and that hacked Sony Pictures in 2014. The FBI claimed that those hackers were North Korean. Symantec's rationale is the same as that of BAE; malware found at the bank, Sony, and other victims, all appears to share common code for securely deleting files to cover its tracks. Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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posted 2 days ago on ars technica
(credit: NIAID) Over the next day or so, you may see headlines and reports about a “nightmare” “superbug” that has been detected for the first time in the US. So far, the Washington Post reports: “The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.” And the article starts with: “For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort.” CNN had a similarly alarming, but distinct headline: “'Nightmare' drug-resistant bacteria CRE found in U.S. woman” Read 18 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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